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Superbom - Brazil Food Factory facade.

Photo courtesy of Superbom Archives, accessed on June 26, 2019, https://bit.ly/2m2IGz0.

Superbom - Brazil Food Factory

By Fábio Augusto Darius

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Fábio Augusto Darius

Superbom is a vegetarian food industry of the Seventh-day Adventist Church. It is headquartered at Rua Domingos Peixoto da Silva, no. 245, ZIP code 05868-680, Capão Redondo district, in São Paulo, SP, Southeast Region of Brazil.

Developments That Led to the Establishment of the Institution

Superbom emerged in a very challenging moment for the development of Adventism in South America. Greenleaf, in its work Terra de Esperança (A Land of Hope), pointed out the adversities and tensions faced by the Brazilian Adventists at the time. According to the author, “the slow recovery of the conditions caused by the time of war sank the country in a prolonged breakdown, which brought concern to politicians, the military, and bankers.” In addition, “another panic wave emerged in 1924, when the army units in São Paulo rebelled, in a three-week battle that involved the region where the conference headquarters was located.” At the time, fourteen grenades exploded in different locations near São Paulo Conference but with no human nor structural loss.1

Due to the narrated situation, some workers around the world donated a week worth of their salaries to help Brazil, as well as to assist other South American countries. Thus, it’s noticeable that God guided the leaders and workers of the country, granting success despite the inconveniences. Although it would need to deal with a challenging scenario, the church continued developing and creating work methods to reduce people’s suffering and aiming, if possible, to educate them in all fields of life.

Currently, it is possible to perceive, through historical research, how opposed the Brazilian and Adventist diets were and the real spiritual importance of Superbom in this context. The products often placed on Brazilian tables were objectionable by the church's guidance. Ellen G. White2 had already given instructions, a long time ago, about the importance of avoiding substances such as coffee, herbs, spices, alcoholic drinks, and pork. Since there were no feasible options for the newly converted in Brazil, the church noticed the need to open a health-food factory.3

The Institution's Founding

Superbom followed closely the transformation of the then Brazil College (CAB), current Brazil Adventist University (UNASP), located at Estrada de Itapecerica, no. 5859, Capão Redondo district, in the city of (at the time) Santo Amaro, currently São Paulo. The factory emerged in the old college’s farm in order to meet the local demand for grape juice–which, even today, after more than 90 years, is known for its quality, and for being 100percent natural and without chemical additives. Superbom activities, at the time called Excelsior, started in mid 1925, in a house on the surroundings of Brazil College. As a result, the creation of the industry was linked to the college, being even managed by the board of the educational institution at the time. However, the effective insertion of Superbom in the external consumer market, in addition to the school, only happened about ten years later.4

Led by Brothers Ernesto Bergold and Evaldo Belz, who managed the Brazil College farm, the production of grape juice was motivated and aimed at meeting the demand of Brazil College.5 Therefore, the partnership between Superbom and Brazil College benefited both institutions. While Superbom was supplying grape juice with increasingly higher quality, providing the cost of some in-house students, Brazil College offered its vast area of cultivation and workforce for production.6

Superbom benefited not only the college, but also the students, by subsidizing the studies of those who worked in the juice production. In fact, the factory had the intention of “giving work to the students that were getting prepared to be workers of the gospel.”7 In addition, Superbom maintained approximately 45 scholarships per year–at least until the first half of the 1970s, and part of its profits went to special projects run by the school, generating benefits for the surrounding community.8

In 1935 Bergold and Belz decided to produce the juice in larger scale, in addition to what Brazil College required. They were supported by the South American Division leaders, who realized the need to provide new converts with new food options. Soon the production of juices was accelerated, and the manufacture of other products was designed.9 All of this was done in the basement of an old house located at the back of Brazil College's kitchen, where Superbom's first facilities were established.10 In the following year the factory started to operate with the help of 30 employees and produced up to 300 bottles of juice per day.11 Thus, due to the company's growth and new product line, it was necessary to change the factory's operating location to the old school mill.12

The creation of a healthy food factory in the South American Division's territory evidenced the consolidation of yet another important branch of the Adventist work in this region of the world. In fact, the expansion of institutions and branches of activities of the church already showed the financial emancipation of the South American brothers and the desires of the denomination in its solid evangelistic growth. Knowing that the concern with economic stability existed, there was no room for errors in the advances of the new company.

At first it would be necessary, in addition to good products, to have a name that would perpetuate. There are two possibilities about the creation of the name of the factory as it is known today. The first version says that the name Superbom was conceived from a very interesting anecdote. It is told that Getúlio Vargas, then president of the Brazilian republic, was responsible for the current name of the company. This would’ve happened in 1936, when visiting the former Brazil College, Vargas tasted the grape juice. When asked by Domingos Peixoto, then director of the institution, about the taste and what he thought of it, he replied: “É super bom!” (It’s very good!) Since then this version has been the most commonly accepted for the brand's name.13

The other hypothesis alleges that the name choice happened when Brazil College held a contest among the students so that they could suggest a brand name for the factory. After dozens of suggestions, the one that best represented the quality of the product manufactured by the institution was chosen. Hence the name Superbom. In other words, a student, still unknown, would have been the creator of the name, which was approved after an evaluation made by the educational institution.14 However, the first version is the best known by Brazilians and the most widespread to explain the origin of the factory's name.

History of the Institution

In 1940 the factory had 12 employees, nine salespeople, a truck, and only three types of products–grape juice, grape jam, and guava juice. That year sales also showed growth, as they reached US $25,133.00.15 Still in 1940, in addition to the products mentioned above, they started including other natural products in Superbom’s menu–royal jelly, whole wheat flour, peanut butter, and honey. And in 1941 the factory started providing popcorn. The quality of these products were attested in 1943, when Superbom won a gold medal in an expo in São Paulo and a silver medal in the World Fair of Brussels, Belgium.16

As time went by, the factory grew and multiplied. Between 1941 and 1945 a new building was built on the original factory hill. On January 11, 1944, still under the leadership of Bergold, the factory was officially and legally incorporated to IAE, now as an industrial department. This greatly accelerated the diffusion of the brand, especially at the denominational level. In 1944 Superbom still counted on the productive efforts of 12 employees, who were managed by the college itself.17

The first factory leaders were of paramount importance for the initial thrust of the institution, since it was from that solid beginning that Superbom obtained sufficient structure for the subsequent achievements. From 1940 to 1953 the three managers of utmost importance for the success of the enterprise were: Ernesto Bergold, Arno Schwantes, and Germano Ritter. However, it’s only fair to say that these three didn’t exclude the efforts made by the managers that succeeded them.

In 1953, when Dermival Stocker assumed the factory management, Superbom had almost two hundred employees. The novelty in the production process was strongly noticed in Stocker’s management, mainly because of the new products such as passion fruit juice, apple and strawberry jam, Sojinha (Little soy), and Cremel (peanut butter with honey). At that time Superbom took advantage of all possible events to promote its products. A good example of that was, in 1958, when the factory products were displayed at the 48th General Conference Session of the Seventh-day Adventists.18

In 1959 Superbom established a branch in the city of Videira, in the state of Santa Catarina, aiming to expand the brand's reach. During the city’s anniversary, the 2.5 acres factory (c. 101,171 m²)19 received more than seventy regional authorities.20 This new establishment became another evangelistic extension of Superbom.

During that period many Superbom products were used in airplanes on international air travels. However, beyond the economic aspect, Superbom remained engaged in the church mission. And therefore many people got to know the Adventist message, sought Bible studies, and eventually got baptized due to contact with the brand's products. On October 16, 1961, for example, five people were baptized in Videira–a city located in the countryside of Santa Catarina, where there was no Adventist presence before the factory branch was set up.21

A decisive year for the future of the company was 1962. Still under the leadership of Stocker, Superbom had its production section modernized. This generated production records, as the confection of 1,540,000 grape juice bottles, adding up the factory productions of São Paulo and Santa Catarina.22 In that year the factory operated with 120 employees, 60 salespeople, 11 trucks, and 20 different types of products.23 It is noteworthy that, even with great increase in production, Superbom continued to dignify the name of IASD with the purity of its products.

In the following year Pastor Germano Boel took over the management of Superbom, after Stockler had managed the factory for ten years. Boel continued with the company development and expansion project. In 1967, for example, Superbom bought machines, trucks, and tools to produce its products with more efficiency and frequency.

Due to the growth of the factory, Superbom made new investments. The leadership's idea was that there was no reason to restrict the company's operations to the factory alone, since the food industry had the capacity to go further. Thinking of spreading even more the food principles in which they believed, the leadership of the company took two important steps. First, it set out in search of the international market by exporting its products. Countries like Germany, Portugal, Angola, Spain, Holland, and even Egypt received and were able to taste certain Superbom products. The main export products were vegetable proteins, fruit jellies and pineapple, passion fruit and grape juices.24

The second decision of the administrators was to open restaurants. They believed that, through these establishments, people would have an easier access not only to the brand but also to health messages in their daily routine. These establishments were different from other restaurants as they offered vegetarian options, with products originally from the factory, and because they had a missionary focus.

The first restaurant established by Superbom was opened on August 29, 1972. On the inauguration day, the director of the General Conference Food Department at the time, Eric Howse, and the director of the South American Division Food Department, Aleixo Pizarro, were present. Apart from them, some of the South American Division and Superbom leaders were also present, such as: Ardoval Schevani, the director of Superbom. Representatives of some supermarket chains were also present, which granted relevance to the moment. The restaurant was on the third floor of a building located in Praça da Sé, São Paulo center. An interesting detail is that, in this establishment, there was a counter where a few of Superbom’s products were displayed.25

In the first week of operation, the restaurant served around one hundred fifty people a day. This number increased over time.26 In fact, by the end of 1975, three years after the establishment’s opening, about four hundred meals were registered. The growth in the number of customers occurred due to the high standard of the vegetarian meal offered by the restaurant.27 It showed that the good services of the restaurant weren’t limited only in its physical space.

Also in 1975, on the weekend of August 15, a congress about health foods, in the church of Capão Redondo, in São Paulo, was held. With Superbom’s sponsoring and under the leadership of the administrator of the restaurant, R. S. Ferreira, the congress had about six hundred people in its opening.28 This event emphasized the importance of having an establishment that shares its teachings with as many people as possible, being inside or outside of its premises.

After the opening of the first restaurant, Superbom administrators realized the importance of this service. Hence, from 1976 this work front experienced rapid growth. And, at the end of that year, Superbom opened another restaurant, also in the state of São Paulo. In the following year, 1977, another restaurant was opened. This time, in Belo Horizonte, capital of the state of Minas Gerais. Later, in October 1979, the company was already opening its fourth vegetarian food establishment. There was also a restaurant in the city of Rio de Janeiro, that in a certain occasion, received hundreds of people who wanted to listen to Arautos do Rei (King’s Heralds) quartet.29

At the time, the administrators believed that these restaurants were Superbom’s “most profitable activity.” The meals and services offered in these establishments were a novelty to the Brazilian population. In this context, in order to bring people to Christ, Superbom joined East Sao Paulo Conference (APL) to hold an evangelistic experiment. The publication service was added to the practice of healthy eating (which was already happening). Together, the two institutions began to intervene more intentionally in the lives of customers. As they were more willing to know the gospel, new methods were put in place to reach them.30 Thus, it was possible to observe that these restaurants worked to offer well-being, but also to lead people to the kingdom of God.

When Superbom opened its fourth restaurant, two people had already been baptized due to the company's evangelistic effort. In addition, two people were healed from ulcers due to the influence of the diet offered by Superbom.31 Every day the company’s commitment to the health and salvation of its customers was evident. Its restaurants were visited by many kinds of people. Notwithstanding, most of the customers complimented the work and service provided by the establishments. But that was not all. For the company to continue moving forward, more changes needed to happen. In mid-1983, a planning meeting took place to discuss the separation between the food factory and IAE. This operation was seen as necessary so that Superbom could achieve greater flexibility when carrying out commercial transactions and for business growth.

According to South Brazil Union Conference (USB) bulletin of July 6, 1983, among the reasons for Superbom’s separation from IAE, the food industry growth stands out, which gradually transformed the college into a factory annex.32 On the other hand, there was a concern about the relationship between Superbom and the Seventh-day Adventist church, since the church was known by people through the identification of the factory with the educational institution.33 Thus, the factory would be responsible for continuing such a strategy through the relationship between its products and the Adventist message.

The complete disassociation between Brazil College and Superbom occurred more precisely in January 1984.34 Due to the dismemberment and expropriation that Brazil College farm had suffered on the part of the government, “Superbom was left with approximately 56,000 m², in addition to 5,448 m² for the sales post and the current office.”35 This change consolidated its emancipation once and for all. Therefore, legally, Superbom only appeared in 1984, when a register was made at the Chamber of Commerce upon its contract registration.

After these considerable changes in its administration, Superbom progressed with commitment and courage, achieving greater national projection. After SAD Food Company was approved, Superbom bought New Life Health Food Products (in operation since 1958). This industry was specialized in products categorized as “morning” foods, like royal jelly. Superbom decided to continue in the same line of production as New Life Health Food Products was, just expanding its clientele.36

Although it showed significant growth, Superbom went through some difficulties at the end of the 1980s. With a new currency in Brazil (derived from the Cruzado plan) from 1986, the factory faced difficulties to acquire raw material. This happened because the suppliers refused to sell products at a low price, the effect of the high inflation that ravaged the economy. As the demand for industrial products was high, between 1986 and 1987 the factory's stock began to decrease significantly.37

As a result, restaurants were seriously affected. And, due to the high financial imbalance, Superbom's management decided to close six of them, keeping only what was close to the factory, on Estrada de Itapecerica. In addition, Superbom closed its bakery and sold the equipment to IAE.38 During this period Superbom also left the management of the newly acquired factory New Health Foods Products.39 Such measures were taken in an attempt to stabilize the company's financial situation, which only happened at the end of 1989.

On April 2, 1987, even amid a time of crisis, Superbom managed to open its administrative building with 2,070 m² of built area in a record time–little more than a year. At the opening ceremony, Pastor João Wolff, then president of South American Division, was given a symbolic key to the building, thus representing “the inclusion (of Superbom) in the division's heritage.” With the inaugural ribbon cut by leader Eric Fehlberg and Pastors Wolff and Rui Nagel, the building, which cost about US$ 1.5 million, was ready to receive the company's entire administrative body.40

Later, in 1989, Superbom implemented a cold room for the storage of seasonal products and started to supply grape, passion fruit, and tomato juices to an international hypermarket chain. And in 1990 the company had 400 employees, 30 of whom were workers. The following year it introduced corn flakes to the market. In those days the production of grape juice41 reached the historical mark of 4,200,000 bottles. In addition, the entire wide range of products such as strawberry, pineapple, grape, and guava jellies, tomato juice, pineapple and passion fruit, soy-based protein,42 honey,43 breakfast cereals, and barley managed to achieve a large amount of production.44

At the same time, Superbom created more products. In 1990 there was a large Brazilian audience that liked coffee. This public, when opting to stop consuming this product, did not find valid alternatives in the market. For these people Superbom included barley and decaffeinated cappuccinos in its morning product line. In addition, the company started offering popular party products, such as 100 percent healthy alcohol-free champagne.45 From then on consumers who wanted to celebrate something without using alcohol would have access to a reliable product in its composition. It is important to note that in making these products, Superbom sought to bring more people to Christ and encourage a healthy lifestyle.

Throughout its history Superbom has impacted the lives of many Brazilians. One of these people was Maria Auxiliadora Garcia de Oliveira who at the end of the 1970s arrived in the city of Cuiabá to work at the Federal University of Mato Grosso (UFMT). There, Maria Auxiliadora started to teach classes in the nutrition course, teaching the discipline of Bromatology (science that studies the composition of food). One of the practices developed in this discipline was the analysis of food sold in supermarkets.46

In one of the establishments visited by Auxiliadora, a product caught her attention. It was a grape juice that was said to be without preservatives. After taking the bottle to analyze in class, she found that the product description was reliable, as its content was really 100 percent natural. She was surprised and even inadvertently promoted the brand responsible for making the juice- Superbom-among her students, telling them to try to make use of the company's products, since they were in fact natural.47

Some time later one of her friends, who was receiving Bible studies, invited Auxiliadora to join her. When Maria arrived at the Bible instructor’s home, she noticed a bottle of Superbom juice on the table. Upon confirming that the Bible instructor's church was the same as that brand, Maria recalled what was written on the juice bottle which had surprised her when she was in class, “An Adventist industry at your health’s service.” Since then she has admired the message preached by the SDA Church.48

During her Bible studies, Auxiliadora had access to some books by Ellen G. White. In addition, she learned about the Adventist lifestyle and went to a temple of this religious denomination for the first time. After being baptized, she declared: “It was through Superbom that I got to know the Seventh-day Adventist Church. And my lifestyle has been radically transformed through this knowledge.” It is stories like this that drive employees at the Superbom factory to continue seeking excellence in their services and products with the main objective of reaching people for the kingdom of Christ.49

Historic Role of the Institution

The South American Division started administering directly to the company after realizing the evangelistic perspective of Superbom. As seen, in 1969, the factory no longer belonged to IAE. On this occasion the Health Food Company of the South American Division was created. This department operated under the leadership of an executive committee that represented the division, the unions, and other Adventist food factories in South America.50

Aleixo Pizzaro, then director of the food company, highlighted the responsibility that rested on the shoulders of the managers designated to manage Superbom, whose alternation occurred from time to time, following the institution's normal administrative cycle.51 According to Pizarro, the company outlined three distinctive philosophies: the preaching of the gospel via the health message, the collaboration between institutions and the obtaining of profits to be able to subsidize the preaching of the gospel.52 Consequently, Superbom's works followed the same purposes.

Until 1973 there were 27 food factories and 64 points of sale belonging to the Seventh-day Adventist Church around the world. Of these factories, three were in South America, while a fourth (in Chile) was in the final stage of construction. During this period, among the almost 30 factories, Superbom reached “the third place in the world in terms of sales volume,”53 then revealing what the Brazilian factory power was becoming. Namely, the Chilean factory, an affiliate of the Brazilian factory, only started operating at the end of 1976.54

When installing a branch in Chile, Superbom aimed to create a place responsible for the production of dehydrated and preserved fruits. The idea was that these products could be distributed in Chile, but could be exported to Brazil and even to other countries.55 This goal lasted until mid-2017, when the company started selling all its line of production in Chile.56

In mid-1978, the Chilean factory won a contract with the local government and started to supply school meals. Since then this industry has started to take its first steps toward self-sufficiency. Pastor Geraldo Bökenkamp, when reporting this experience, said: “At the request of the students' families, the products are also being sold in Chilean supermarkets and grocery stores, as the children want to eat at home the same food they receive at school.” Such recognition was great for the SDAs in Chile, as Superbom-Chile was also submitted to South American Division leadership, through Companhia de Alimentos.57

At one point, Superbom intensified its concern about the low accessibility that the lower classes had to the brand's products. Since the beginning of Adventist work, both on Brazilian and South American soil, the population was mostly composed of a contingent with low purchasing power. Thus, in order to meet these classes, in 1976, Superbom launched more accessible products, among which the Textured Vegetable Protein stands out (PVT).58 The product, which promised to be a “production miracle,” didn’t categorically meet the expectations, even though the production manager of the South American Division, Dr. John Cole and factory director Joel Zukowski highlighted the product's effectiveness for the purpose of serving the lower classes.59

Despite being a product with regular output, the PVT did not take the leading position of the brand, which belonged to grape juice, this being the product of greatest output to date. Still, in 1978, Companhia de Alimentos announced a turnover of more than US$ 13 million, adding the results of all the companies that participated in the Adventist food ministry in the division.60 The two main factories were Superbom and Granix, in Buenos Aires. Together, they “formed the second largest Adventist food industry in the world,” making noticeable the capacity and commitment that Superbom showed in the face of a more competitive scenario.61

The financial issue was just one of the evidence of Superbom's success. On June 18, 1979, in Rio de Janeiro, the company was awarded the International Food/America Trophy.62 At the time the award represented yet another brand recognition in the competitive market. Still, in the same period, the missionary character of the company became more evident, which opened several courses to the public, in which participants were invited to get to know the Adventist message. In addition, there were vegetarian restaurants that witnessed throughout the country; the most famous one was located in Praça da Sé, in São Paulo.

Even with the challenges faced over the years, Superbom continued to be among the ascending companies. The factory continued to focus on investing its results in supporting IASD's evangelistic ministry at regional and South American levels. In 1984, while still comprised of 550 employees, 20 of whom were students at the Brazil College, the industry sent 20 percent of its net profit to the DSA evangelism department. On another occasion, in the same year, in support of local evangelism, the company donated one million pieces of literature to South Brazil Union Conference.63 From a humble beginning, Superbom became an industry with great evangelistic potential and continued to fight important battles for the Adventist message.

Overview

In 2012 the “Brazilian Academy in Honor of Merit (Abrahm) gave Superbom the golden seal of Prêmio Top Qualidade Brasil – Gastronomia (High Quality Brazil Award–Gastronomy). In the same year Superbom was considered to be the prominence in distribution of concentrated juice by the Brazilian Association of Wholesalers and Distributors (Abad). It is also possible to highlight the finding made by the Laboratory of Oenology Reference (Laren) in Caxias do Sul (RS), which showed that the Superbom grape juice has a 21.7 percent higher concentration than that of competitors.”64

And in 2015 Superbom started making franchises available for the service of snack bars in schools, called Superveg, “the first franchise of sustainable canteens in Brazil.”65 In addition to offering healthy food, Superveg has another differential, because the kids’ parents can monitor their children’s diet on the Internet. The first school to get the template was Milton Afonso Adventist Academy, located in the city of Brasilia, Federal District.66

In order to continue serving its customers in a satisfactory manner, the company continues to make financial investments every year, with the aim of developing tasty new products and, above all, of great benefit to consumer health.67 In addition, Superbom strives to grow in the export market. Until 2008 the company exported products to countries like Japan and China. However, in 2014 it started exporting sugarcane molasses to Germany; and since 2016 it exports to Paraguay, as well. Thus, its products continue to reach several countries around the globe.68

Superbom also maintains good relations with other Adventist institutions. Among its partnerships, the relationship with the Adventist Media Center-Brazil stands out. In 2016 both institutions created a reality show entitled Melhor da Vida (The Best in Life)–aired during the Vida e Saúde (Life and Health) program, which was already part of the fixed schedule of Hope Channel Brazil. The program aimed to make participants overcome physical, psychological, and emotional challenges. At the end some professionals evaluated the participants, suggesting necessary changes they should make to have a better life.69

Also in 2016, in order to follow the development of digital culture, Superbom launched an application with vegetarian recipes. With this new tool, tablet and smart-phone users can access more than fifty recipes, as well as “consult nutritional information on all products in Superbom's extensive portfolio.”70

The most recent partnership of great relevance made by Superbom was with the fast-food chain Giraffas, this being the industry's first partnership with an international restaurant chain. This chain invested around R$1,000,000.00 (approximately US$ 250,000.00) to create a new menu, which contains, for example, a steak made from peas.71

Such innovations show that Superbom has matured and reaches the beginning of the third millennium as a solid and remarkable growth company. However, good products, skilled servers, financial balance, and broad commercial outreach are only means to achieve the greater end of bringing people to Christ. Thinking about it, the almost centenary Superbom consolidated itself as an important branch of Adventist work in Brazil. Its leaders and servers remain committed to the mission of evangelizing and supporting the dissemination of the Bible message, recognizing God's direction throughout the institutional journey and the challenge of continuing the evangelical mission in which the institution has been working since 1925.72

Today Superbom is among the largest companies consolidated in the production of vegetarian products throughout Brazil, with goods sold at more than 25 thousand points of sale.73 The factory has 160 employees and a range of products covering 15 categories with diverse options.

Names List

Excelsior (1925-1936); Superbom Food Products (1936-current time).

List of Managers/Directors

Adopho Bergold (1940-1943); Ernesto Bergold (1944); Arno Schwantes (1945-1951); Germano Ritter (1951, 1952); Dermival S. de Lima (1953-1960); Pirajás Dias (1961, 1962); Dermival S. de Lima (1963-1967); Siegfried Genske (1968-1970); Ardoval Schevani (1970-1974); Alejo Pizarro (1974, 1975); Japhet Leme (1975, 1976); Joel Zukowski (1976-1980); Mario Fehlberg (1981-1984); Lourival Cruz (1984-1987); Paulo Stabenow (1987, 1988); Lauro Grellmann (1988-1996); Itamar de Paula Marques (1998-2002); David Deana (2003-2007); Alexandre Lopes (2007-2011); Adamir Alberto (2012-2019); Flávio André Nunes dos Santos (2019-current time).74

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“Restaurantes Adventistas: Para Orientar o Povo e Ganhar Almas” [Adventist Restaurants: To Guide the People and Win Souls]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 8, August 1979.

Rodrigues, Melchi, dir. 2003. Superbom: Uma indústria adventista a serviço de sua saúde [Superbom: An Adventist factory serving your health]. Superbom. 7 millimeters film. White Center Library, video CD.

Serafino, Hélio Ítalo. “Novas da Colina Iaense” [Brazil College Hill Tidings]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], July 1962.

Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook. https://www.adventistyearbook.org/.

Silva, Adilson. “Restaurantes vegetarianos superbom e o vegetarianismo” [Superbom vegatarian restaurants and vegetarianism]. Monograph, Brazil College, May 1972.

“South American Division health food Company.” In Seventh-day Adventist Encyclopedia, ed. Don F. Neufeld, 638-639. United States: Review and Herald, 1996.

Souza, Cleyton Ribeiro de. “A filosofia por trás da Superbom: uma história do Adventismo” [Superbom foundational philosophy: a story of the Adventism]. Master’s Thesis, Catholic Pontifical University – PUC, 2018.

Souza, Cleyton Ribeiro de, and Fabio Augusto Darius. “Diferenças entre a reforma de saúde proposta por Ellen White e o diet vegetariano comum” [Differences between Ellen White's proposed health reform and the common vegetarian diet]. Article presented in the VIII International Congress of Religion Science, Catholic Pontifical University – PUC, 2016.

Suárez, Adolfo Semo. “Superbom: História e desenvolvimento” [Superbom: History and Development]. Monograph, Brazil College, May 1990.

“Superbom chega às cantinas escolares” [Superbom arrives in school canteens]. Notícias Adventistas [Adventist News] (Online), March 30, 2015.

“Superbom Compra a New Life” [Superbom Buys New Life]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], March 1985.

“Superbom inaugura seu primeiro restaurante vegetariano” [Superbom opens its first vegetarian restaurant]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], December 1973.

“Superbom lança APP com receitas veganas e vegetarianas” [Superbom releases apps with vegan and vegetarian recipes]. Notícias Adventistas [Adventist News] (Online), June 7, 2016.

Notes

  1. Floyd Greenleaf, Terra de Esperança [A Land of Hope] (Tatuí, SP: Brazil Publishing House, 2011), 176-177.

  2. “Ellen G. White was a person of remarkable spiritual talents who lived most of her life during the 19th century (1827-1915). [...] Seventh-day Adventists believe that Ellen White was much more than just a talented writer - they believe she was appointed by God to be a special messenger, in order to draw everyone's attention to the Holy Scriptures, and help them prepare for Christ's second coming.” Accessed on October 25, 2018, https://goo.gl/imCr1P.

  3. Cleyton Ribeiro de Souza and Fabio Augusto Darius, “Diferenças entre a reforma de saúde proposta por Ellen White e o diet vegetariano comum” [Differences between Ellen White suggested health diet and the common vegetarian diet] (Article presented in the VIII International Congress of Religion Science, Catholic Pontifical University – PUC, 2016), accessed on June 20, 2019, https://bit.ly/2Y79vR0; Floyd Greenleaf, Terra de Esperança [A Land of Hope] (Tatuí, SP: Brazil Publishing House, 2011), 602.

  4. Cláudio Augusto Adão, “Superbom” (Monograph, Brazil College, 1985), 6.

  5. It’s important to say that the development, or creation, of an Adventist food factory almost always took place near church educational institutions. As an example, we can mention the Sanitarium and the Avondale College of Higher Education.

  6. Regarding the subsidy assumed by the company, this calling for the assisstance of students is expressed in the report for the X Ordinary General Assembly of Brazil College, on December 8, 1976, where it says, “Superbom Factory Department also keeps providing opportunities for students that don’t have finantial resources to carry out their dreams of a scholastic preparation.”

  7. “Relatório quadriênio 76/79” [Quadrennial report 76/79], in Report of the XXII Quadrennial Assembly of the South Brazil Union Conference, 114.

  8. Gerda Oliveira Coelho, “Superbom” (Monograph, Brazil College, May 1990), 4.

  9. Cleyton Ribeiro de Souza, “A filosofia por trás da Superbom: uma história do Adventismo” [Superbom foundational philosophy: a story of the Adventism] (Master’s Thesis, Catholic Pontifical University – PUC, 2018), 84.

  10. Reones Alves Nunes, “Superbom - História e Comércio” [Superbom - History and Commerce] (Monograph, Brazil College, May 1990), 2.

  11. Cláudio Augusto Adão, “Superbom” (Monograph, Brazil College, 1985), 6.

  12. Gerda Oliveira Coelho, “Superbom” (Monograph, Brazil College, May 1990), 2-3.

  13. Adventist Memory Enciclopedia in Brasil, “Produtos Alimentícios Superbom Indústria e Comércio LTDA” [Superbom - Brazil Food Factory and Commerce LTD], accessed on October 25, 2018, https://bit.ly/2XBxt9K.

  14. Adolfo Semo Suárez, “Superbom: História e desenvolvimento” [Superbom: History and Development] (Monograph, Brazil College, May 1990), 4; Cláudio Augusto Adão, “Superbom” (Monograph, Brazil College, 1985), 03.

  15. Cláudio Augusto Adão, “Superbom” (Monograph, Brazil College, 1985), 6; Ederson Costa Jacinto, “História e Planos da Superbom” [Superbom History and Plans] (Monograph, Brazil College, May 1990), 5.

  16. Adolfo Semo Suárez, “Superbom: História e desenvolvimento” [Superbom: History and Development] (Monograph, Brazil College, May 1990), 6.

  17. Cleyton Ribeiro de Souza, “A filosofia por trás da Superbom: uma história do Adventismo” [Superbom foundational philosophy: a story of the Adventism] (Master’s Thesis, Catholic Pontifical University – PUC, 2018), 85.

  18. Ibid., 88.

  19. Reones Alves Nunes, “Superbom - História e Comércio” [Superbom - History and Commerce] (Monograph, Brazil College, May 1990), 9.

  20. Cleyton Ribeiro de Souza, “A filosofia por trás da Superbom: uma história do Adventismo” [Superbom foundational philosophy: a story of the Adventism] (Master’s Thesis, Catholic Pontifical University – PUC, 2018), 85.

  21. Siegfried Hoffmann, “Uvas e almas” [Grapes and souls], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], February 1962, 24.

  22. Hélio Ítalo Serafino, “Novas da Colina Iaense” [Brazil College Hill Tidings], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], July 1962, 31.

  23. Ederson Costa Jacinto, “História e Planos da Superbom” [Superbom History and Plans] (Monograph, Brazil College, May 1990), 5.

  24. Jonas C. M. Júnior, “Superbom” (Monograph, Brazil College, May 1986), 10; Gerda Oliveira Coelho, “Superbom” (Monograph, Brazil College, May 1990), 11.

  25. “Superbom inaugura seu primeiro restaurante vegetariano” [Superbom opens its first vegetarian restaurant], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 12, December 1973, 24.

  26. E. W. Howse, “Vegetarian Foods Served at Sao Paulo Restaurant,” ARH, December 1973, 19.

  27. E. W. Howse, “SDA Restaurant Serves Dual Role,” ARH, December 1975, 17.

  28. Ibid.

  29. Floyd Greenleaf, Terra de Esperança [A Land of Hope] (Tatuí, SP: Brazil Publishing House, 2011), 702.

  30. “Relatório quadriênio 76/79” [Quadrennial report 76/79], Relatório da XXII Assembleia quadrienal da União Sul Brasileira [Report of the XXII Quadrennial Assembly of South Brazil Union Conference], 114.

  31. “Restaurantes Adventistas: Para Orientar o Povo e Ganhar Almas” [Adventist Restaurants: To Guide the People and Win Souls]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], August 1979, 34-35.

  32. Adolfo Semo Suárez, “Superbom: História e desenvolvimento” [Superbom: History and Development] (Monograph, Brazil College, May 1990), 11-12.

  33. Ibid; Cleyton Ribeiro de Souza, “A filosofia por trás da Superbom: uma história do Adventismo” [Superbom foundational philosophy: a story of the Adventism] (Master’s Thesis, Catholic Pontifical University – PUC, 2018), 85.

  34. Alessandro Neves Fuza, “Superbom e seu histórico” [Superbom and its history] (Monograph, Brazil College, June 1985), 5.

  35. “O Último Decreto” [“The Last Decree”], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], September 1983, 21.

  36. “Superbom Compra a New Life” [Superbom Buys New Life], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], March 1985, 32-33.

  37. Ederson Costa Jacinto, “História e Planos da Superbom” [Superbom History and Plans] (Monograph, Brazil College, May 1990), 07-08.

  38. Ibid.

  39. “New Life desvincula-se da Superbom” [New Life optout from Superbom]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], December 1987, 21.

  40. “Escritório Superbom” [Superbom Office]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], May 1987, 20-21.

  41. “Natural grape juice is an important part of Superbom's history. Produced in the cities of Videira and Lebon Régis, in the state of Santa Catarina, it helped to mark the beginning of the company and since its launch it has supported the unwavering leadership of the market as the grape juice most remembered by the consumer.” Melchi Rodrigues, dir. 2003. Superbom: Uma indústria adventista a serviço de sua saúde [Superbom: An Adventist factory serving your health]. Superbom. 7 millimeters film. White Center Library, video CD.

  42. “Produced from soybeans, it presents an intelligent option of alternative food to animal meat.” In the form of “steak, sausage and vegetable meat, in cans. In the frozen version, it has meatballs, kibbeh, hamburgers, hot-dogs and nuggets.” Melchi Rodrigues, dir. 2003. Superbom: Uma indústria adventista a serviço de sua saúde. [Superbom: An Adventist factory serving your health]. Superbom. 7 millimeters film White Center Library, video CD.

  43. “With Superbom, the mastery of the honey technique arrived in Brazil, which meant for millions of Brazilians access to a product rich in energy and effective in preventing infections.” Melchi Rodrigues, dir. 2003. Superbom: An Adventist industry serving your health. Superbom. 7 millimeters film White Center Library, video CD.

  44. Reones Alves Nunes, “Superbom - História e Comércio” [Superbom - History and Commerce] (Monograph, Brazil College, May 1990), 13.

  45. The product named as “Allegra, is a carbonate non-alcoholic unpreserved Champagne. It’s flavors are peach, grape, pineapple, and apple.” Melchi Rodrigues, dir. 2003. Superbom: Uma indústria adventista a serviço de sua saúde [Superbom: An Adventist factory serving your health]. Superbom. 7 millimeters film. White Center Library, video CD.

  46. Adventistas Brasil [Brazil Adventists], “O Suco que transforma vidas - Superbom | Igreja Adventista” [The juice that changes lives | Adventist Church] (Youtube video with Maria Auxiliadora’s testimony, November 14, 2013), accessed on June 25, 2019, https://bit.ly/2S0zKrY.

  47. Ibid.

  48. Ibid.

  49. Ibid.

  50. Gerda Oliveira Coelho, “Superbom” (Monograph, Brazil College, May 1990), 2.

  51. Cleyton Ribeiro de Souza, “A filosofia por trás da Superbom: uma história do Adventismo” [Superbom foundational philosophy: a story of the Adventism] (Master’s Thesis, Catholic Pontifical University – PUC, 2018), 93-94.

  52. “Grandes Coisas Fará no Brasil o Departamento de Alimentação” [The Food Department Will Do Great Things in Brazil]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 10, October 1973, 21.

  53. “Declarações do Pastor Eric Howse” [Pastor Eric Howse’s declarations], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], December 1973, 20.

  54. “Companhia de Produção de Alimentos da Divisão Sul-Americana” [Food Factory of the South American Division], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], November 1978, 31.

  55. Alejo Pizarro, “South American Food Plants Follow Ellen White Counsel,” ARH, April 1976, 18.

  56. Maria Cristina Frias. “Pacífico” [Pacific]. Folha de São Paulo [São Paulo Newspaper], August 8, 2017.

  57. “Filosofia Alimentar Adventista: Evangelismo através de Relações Públicas” [Adventist Food Philosophy: Evangelism through Public Relations], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], March 1981, 24-26.

  58. Textured Vegetable Protein is an industrially obtained food product that is widely consumed by vegans and vegetarians in substitution for foods of animal origin. It has a protein content greater than 50%, in addition to not containing saturated fats or cholesterol. Accessed on August 22, 2019, https://bit.ly/2P9CSlE.

  59. Ivo Cardosoo. “Superbom lança novo e barato produto” [Superbom releases new and affordable product], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 5, year 71 (May 1976): 9.

  60. Cleyton Ribeiro de Souza, “A filosofia por trás da Superbom: uma história do Adventismo” [Superbom foundational philosophy: a story of the Adventism] (Master’s Thesis, Catholic Pontifical University – PUC, 2018), 103.

  61. Floyd Greenleaf, Terra de Esperança [A Land of Hope] (Tatuí, SP: Brazil Publishing House, 2011), 701.

  62. “No Rio, Superbom Ganha Troféu Internacional” [In Rio, Superbom Wins Internaitonal Trophy]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], August 1979, 17.

  63. “Avaliação por setores” [Assessment by sections]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], December 1984, 23.

  64. Superbom, “Conheça a empresa” [Know the company], accessed on June 26, 2019, https://bit.ly/2S4FdxM.

  65. For more information access: https://bit.ly/2PqTbIC.

  66. “Superbom chega às cantinas escolares” [Superbom arrives in school canteens], Notícias Adventistas [Adventist News], March 30, 2015, accessed on June 25, 2019, https://bit.ly/2KJKqbR.

  67. Maria Cristina Frias. “Sem carne” [No meat]. Folha de São Paulo [São Paulo Newspaper], February 20, 2017.

  68. Maria Cristina Frias. “Campo de Provas” [Test Field]. Folha de São Paulo [São Paulo Newspaper], May 1st, 2016.

  69. “Programa da Novo Tempo vai acompanhar pessoas em busca de qualidade de vida” [Hope Channel Brazil Program will accompany people in search of quality of life], Notícias Adventistas [Adventist News], February 4, 2016, accessed on June 27, 2019, https://bit.ly/2Xdd8IA.

  70. “Superbom lança APP com receitas veganas e vegetarianas” [Superbom releases APPS with vegan and vegetarian recipes], Notícias Adventistas [Adventist News], June 7, 2016, accessed on June 25, 2019, https://bit.ly/2Fvt5z2.

  71. Mariana Desidério, “Giraffas lança pratos vegetarianos em parceria com Superbom” [Giraffes releases vegetarian dishes in partnership with Superbom], Exam Magazine, June 13, 2019, accessed on June 27, 2019, https://bit.ly/2xiPk6B.

  72. Melchi Rodrigues, dir. 2003. Superbom: Uma indústria adventista a serviço de sua saúde [Superbom: An Adventist factory serving your health]. Superbom. 7 millimeters film. White Center Library, video CD, 6: 25.

  73. Superbom. “A Superbom” [Superbom], accessed on June 26, 2019, https://bit.ly/34tu8ZK.

  74. “South American Division health food Company,” in Seventh-day Adventist Encyclopedia, ed. Don F. Neufeld, (United States: Review and Herald, 1996), 639; Wendel Lima, “O evangelho vai à mesa” [The Gospel is on the table], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], November 2010, 22; Seventh-day Adventist Online Yearbook, “Brazil Food Factory,” accessed on June 21, 2019, https://bit.ly/2RWvyti. For more information about the food factory, access the website: superbom.com.br, or the social media – Facebook, Instagram and Twitter: @SuperbomBR.

×

Darius, Fábio Augusto. "Superbom - Brazil Food Factory." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. June 01, 2020. Accessed September 25, 2020. https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=2GQ1.

Darius, Fábio Augusto. "Superbom - Brazil Food Factory." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. June 01, 2020. Date of access September 25, 2020, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=2GQ1.

Darius, Fábio Augusto (2020, June 01). Superbom - Brazil Food Factory. Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. Retrieved September 25, 2020, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=2GQ1.