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George Graham Stewart and Grace Evelyn Mackenzie - marriage - April 1, 1910

Photo courtesy of Dianne Wegener.

Stewart, George Graham (1875–1967) and Grace Evelyn (Mackenzie) (1888–1988)

By Shirley Tarburton

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Shirley Tarburton, M.Litt. (Distinction) (University of New England, Armidale, New South Wales, Australia) retired in 2008 after 40 years teaching church-school (mainly high school but including eight years at university). An Australian, she has taught in four mission fields, Australia, and New Zealand. She has authored five books and co-authored one on church history, biography and family history, as well as several magazine articles. She is married to Dr. Michael Tarburton with two adult children and four grandchildren.

 

First Published: July 23, 2020

George Graham Stewart was a Seventh-day Adventist pastor, evangelist, missionary and administrator who gave more than fifty years of service to the Seventh-day Adventist Church in the Australasian (now South Pacific) Division.

Birth and Family

George was born August 18, 1875, in Ballarat, VIC,1 the third of seven children of Alexander Stewart (1848–1940)2 and his wife, Mary, née Graham (1848–1912).3 The other children in the family were Alexander John Dalgleish (1870–1942),4 Hellen Hardie (1872–1899),5 Robert Carmichael (1880–1962),6 Andrew Graham (1882–1975),7 Isabella Carmichael (Heaton, then Brady, 1883–1960),8 and Mary Graham (Wallace, 1886–1978).9

Joining the SDA Church

George’s parents, both children of Scottish immigrants, married in Ballarat, VIC,10 and took up farming at Wychitella, a small community further north. In 1887 George’s uncle Andrew Graham (his mother’s brother) came to help on the farm. He had become an SDA a few months previously, and left tracts where he hoped his sister would see them.11 She did and shared them with her husband, with the result that she asked her brother to show them these new teachings from the Bible.12 Others joined the study group and Uncle Andrew had to call for help, so they wrote to the publisher of the tracts for someone to come and study with them.13 Meanwhile, when the next Sabbath dawned, George’s father told the boys there would be no work that day, and suggested they spend the day reading in the straw stack.14

Mendel Crocker Israel, a pioneer SDA missionary from the United States of America (U.S.A.), responded to their request late in September, and by the end of October George’s parents, together with four others who had met with them, were baptized and joined the SDA Church.15 They are not named in the report, but probably George (aged 12) and his older brother and sister were part of that group.16

Working on the Family Farm

After leaving school, George worked on the family farm, having as his special interest training the horses in the various tasks for which they were so essential.17 In 1888 his father became one of the church’s early colporteurs and several times a year would be away from home for extended periods selling books and spreading other truth-filled literature.18 During these absences the main burden of running the farm fell on George and Alec.

On one of these trips in 1894 Alexander visited Mrs. Ellen G. White in Granville, Sydney, NSW.19 She and the other SDA Church leaders were discussing the proposed purchase of the Brettville Estate in Cooranbong for the establishment of a training school. She had been shown in a dream that it was the right place, but A. G. Daniells and W. C. White were conflicted because of direction from the Foreign Missions Board in the U.S.A. to look elsewhere as, according to expert advice, the land on the estate was too poor.20 Knowing Alexander was a practical farmer, she asked him to inspect the land himself and bring her a report. This he did and was able to state that among the patches of admittedly poor soil were areas of soil good for growing fruit and vegetables.21 His positive report, together with a change of instruction from the board, made the committee in Sydney happy about following through with the purchase of the land.22

When the Brettville Estate was purchased in the latter part of 1894, George’s older brother, Alec, left home and took an active part in the clearing of land and erection of buildings there, becoming a member of the first group of students at Avondale.23 This left George and his younger brothers, Robert and Andrew, to run the farm.

Working for the Church

By 1900 George’s two younger brothers, 21 and 18 years of age, were able to carry on the farmwork without his help, so he was free to follow his desire to spread the gospel. His first step along this pathway was to become a literature evangelist.24 Leaving the district where he grew up, he sold SDA books, mainly The Coming King, by James Edson White, from town to town in country Victoria.25

He continued this work until 1903, when he joined the team running the Helping Hand Mission in Melbourne.26 This mission was a unit of the Australasian Medical Missionary and Benevolent Association, which had been established early in 1898 as an umbrella organization over all the facets of the medical, health food, and welfare work in the AUC.27 The mission, situated on Latrobe Street, Melbourne,28 ministered to poor and needy individuals in surrounding districts by providing accommodation and meals for a minimal amount, some earning opportunities and medical help.29 George worked for the mission for two years.30

At the Victorian Conference session held in November 1904, George was given a missionary license31 and teamed up with Edward Hilliard to run a series of evangelistic meetings in Gippsland commencing the following month.32 They ran meetings in Warragul, then moved on to Drouin.33 Before their series finished in Drouin, Hillard was sent to Western Australia, and George was left to follow through by himself.34 He evidently did a good job, because instead of being put on someone else’s team for his next appointment, he was given a teammate and sent to run meetings in Moe for several months early in 1906.35 Over the next couple of years he worked in Kooweerup,36 Yallock, and other small rural localities.37

At the September 1908 conference session he was appointed to work in Tasmania.38 He must have gone immediately, as he was present at the annual session of the Tasmanian Conference that was held near Hobart, Tasmania, from November 26 to December 6. At this meeting he was given a ministerial license, and he served on two of the committees.39 He worked in the north of the island, giving Bible studies in and around Launceston.40

Marriage

In April 1910 George sailed back to Melbourne to marry Grace Evelyn Mackenzie.41 Grace was the only daughter of George Secundus Mackenzie and his wife, Grace Scott Mackenzie (née Fraser), and had been born July 6, 1888, in Ascot Vale, Melbourne.42 Grace had trained as a teacher43 and after their marriage worked alongside her husband.

To their marriage were born eight children. George Graham Mackenzie (1911–unknown),44 Grace Merle (later Thrift, 1914–2010),45 Donald Mackenzie (1916–2009),46 Mervyn Mackenzie (1919–1922),47 Melvin Mackenzie (1924–2008),48 Evelyn Marie,49 Jean (1931–1931),50 and Milton Sandeman.51

Pastoral Ministry

George took his bride back to Tasmania, and they set up home in Wynyard, ministering to the surrounding area.52 This was a very difficult area because of strong prejudice against the Adventist Church, but after supplying a Methodist minister with some Adventist literature, he asked George to help him out by preaching in some of the outlying areas of his circuit. This unexpected request enabled George to present Bible truth to people he otherwise would not be able to access.53 This was followed by an evangelistic effort at Longford, which he began, but other events called him away before its completion.54

Ordination

In October 1910 George was a delegate to the AUC session held in Warburton, Victoria,55 afterward hurrying back to Tasmania to attend the Tasmanian camp meeting two weeks later in Hobart.56 Two months later saw him once again sailing for Victoria to attend the Victoria-Tasmanian Conference session and camp meeting in an inner east suburb of Melbourne.57 Here, on February 12, 1911, George was ordained to the gospel ministry.58

Continued Ministry

Two weeks after George’s ordination, their first son, Graham, was born.59 After the camp meeting George and Grace took up their ministry in their new posting in Melbourne. George pitched the mission tent near the site of the camp meeting at first, but after a while moved it into South Melbourne, where he continued his outreach campaign with the help of two lady Bible workers.60 The meetings were going well, and Bible studies were progressing. It showed promise of a large baptism61 when once again George was called to move on. It was about June that they moved to Wedderburn, where there were requests for studies, and after four were baptized, they relocated to Bendigo about September.62

Mission Service

At the union conference council in September 1911 George was asked if he and Grace would go to Tonga.63 They sailed for this group of islands on December 5. George’s younger brother, Andrew, was a missionary in Fiji, so they arranged to spend a month there with him and his wife on their way to Nukualofa, where they were to be based.64 Sadly, while they were there, George’s and Andrew’s mother died in Cooranbong, where she and her husband had gone to live when all the children left home.65

The Stewarts arrived in Nukualofa mid-February 191266 and worked there until mid-1915.67 Also in Nukualofa were William and Alice Palmer, former island traders who were working as self-supporting SDA missionaries after having sent their children to New Zealand to be educated.68 Their local knowledge and contacts greatly assisted George and Grace to settle in.69 George’s ministry necessitated much sea travel70 because the kingdom of Tonga consists of more than 160 islands, although no more than 40 were inhabited. Sometimes Grace and Graham traveled with him, although the travel was often dangerous.71 They found evangelistic progress slow, as the Tongans did not accept change readily.72 At the AUC session in Australia in September 1914 (which the Stewart family, now numbering four, attended)73 George reported that the Tongan Mission had one church with 21 members and that four had been baptized during the reporting period.74 Among the difficulties with which they had to contend were two cyclones a little more than a year apart, which destroyed crops and buildings, bringing hardship to the inhabitants of the islands, and discouragement to the church members.75

Going the Second Mile

After their return to Tonga in November 1914, a Tongan Free Church (the state church) preacher asked the Stewarts to educate his ten-year-old76 son, John Kamea.77 They agreed and took the boy into their home. In June 1915 George was transferred to New Zealand,78 and John went with them to Auckland,79 living as a member of their family and attending school. He lived with them until the end of 1923, when he sailed to Fiji to work in the office of the Fiji Mission.80 He later attended Avondale College, taught in SDA secondary schools, was ordained as a minister and spent his life working for the Lord.81 The Stewarts did not balk at anything the Lord asked them to do, no matter how challenging or inconvenient.

New Zealand

When George joined the New Zealand Conference, he was the only ordained pastor apart from the conference president and vice president.82 He was kept busy supporting the SDA churches in Auckland, and at the end of January 1916 he baptized 16 people.83 In November he and C. K. Meyers commenced a city mission (evangelistic series) in Auckland,84 which continued into 1917.85 At the end of January thirty candidates were baptized.86

In January also, at the annual conference session, George was appointed to be the vice president of the North New Zealand Conference (NNZ) and was asked to move to the country’s capital, Wellington.87 Before he left, he organized a Dorcas Society at the Ponsonby church on February 10, to provide a special ministry for the women.88

In June 1916 their third child had been born. In order to help out, the attendees at the January camp meeting donated funds to allow John (from Tonga) to attend the SDA boarding school to further his education.89

After a year in Wellington, the Stewarts moved to Stratford, in the far west of the North Island,90 to run a tent mission in the Taranaki region.91 The war was at its height, causing many shortages, and restrictions were operating because of the worldwide flu pandemic. Arriving in Taranaki, they found it difficult to find appropriate housing in the small town.92 At the conference meetings held during the camp meeting in January, they were appointed back to Wellington.93 Also during camp meeting, their fourth child, Mervyn, was born.94

Through George’s evangelistic work in Wellington during 1919 he baptized ten people.95 At the annual NNZ Conference meetings in December he was assigned to evangelism in New Plymouth. At the same meetings the position of conference vice president was abolished; however, George remained on the executive council of the conference.96 He held weekly meetings in New Plymouth97 until he was asked to move to Wanganui in the second week of September, to fill a vacancy there.98 This town was about fifty miles (eighty kilometers) from the SDA boarding school at Longburn, the Oroua Missionary School, and George was asked to speak there on December 6 at the inaugural closing exercises at the school. He also conducted a baptism of seven students that graduation weekend.99 His foster son, John, was probably still a student there.

Four weeks later, during the 1921 camp meeting at Hawera, his daughter Grace, who was nearly seven years old, fell ill. She was hospitalized and underwent an operation, but the Stewarts were told her condition was terminal. An appeal was made for everyone at camp to pray for Grace, and she made a miraculous recovery, being raised to health and strength.100

Evangelism in Australia

In September 1921 the Stewarts left New Zealand for George’s new appointment in the South New South Wales Conference.101 He was assigned the Liverpool district and was soon conducting weekly evangelistic meetings.102 Sadly, little Mervyn contracted diptheria and died on March 21.103 In January 1924 George was asked to transfer to Albury,104 the southernmost church in the conference, on the border with Victoria, George’s and Grace’s home state. This was thought to be a good time for John Kamea to return to the islands in preparation for a career there, so he traveled east and north to Fiji105 while the Stewarts went west and south. John had lived with the Stewarts for nine years and was now 19.

Just before the Stewarts moved, baby Melvin was born.106 Their three other children were attending school, so Grace had only the baby home with her. George was very busy right from the start because a tent mission had been commenced in Albury by the previous pastor and was drawing such good attendance that he didn’t want there to be a break in the meetings.107 He was delighted to be able to teach a baptismal class of 25.108 On April 20, 1924, about half of these were baptized, with more expected to be baptized later.109 Another highlight of 1924 was the opening and dedication of the Albury SDA Church on September 14.110

About October 1925 George was again transferred, and the Stewart family moved to Wagga Wagga, where he and his team commenced a series of evangelistic meetings on November 22,111 which continued into the following year.112 It was difficult territory, but they were thankful that there was some positive response, with several baptisms.113

Administration

At the AUC session held in September 1926 George was appointed to be the president of the South New South Wales Conference.114 This meant a move for the family back to Sydney. He spent a very busy two years in this position, then was asked to take the presidency of the Victorian Conference.115 He and his family left for Melbourne on October 31, 1928.116 He served two terms as president in Victoria, then at the AUC session held early in September 1936, after presenting his report on the very successful results achieved in the Victorian Conference over the previous six years,117 he was appointed to pastoral work in Sydney.118 As he served out his final few months as president, he was busy ministering in various churches around the conference as usual.119 On leaving Victoria, they left behind the grave of their baby, Jean, who only lived five weeks in 1931, but had their spirits lifted by little Milton, whose arrival completed their family in January 1933, 22 years after the birth of his eldest sibling!

Ministry in Sydney

By January 1937120 the Stewarts had moved to Wahroonga, and George embarked on an active five years of pastoral ministry in the city of Sydney.121 He also served as one of the seven members of the SNSW Conference executive committee.122 In September 1941 George was again asked to take the presidency of the SNSW Conference.123 He had just had his sixty-sixth birthday. Commencing in November 1941 he exchanged places with the incumbent president, Albert Henry Piper.124 This could have been because in August, Piper’s son, Athol, who was a ministerial intern, sustained a serious spinal injury that was expected to leave him bedridden for up to 12 months.125

George slipped into his previous role easily and was soon representing the conference at events126 and visiting isolated members.127 In September he was requested by the AUC to join the faculty of the Australasian Missionary College (AMC) at Avondale, “with a view to still further strengthening the work of our leading educational training institution”128 as college chaplain and a member of the board of management.129 He tendered his resignation as president in October 1942, in order to take up this new appointment.130

An added bonus to the Stewarts’ time at Avondale was more time with their children who were studying there. Melvin was enrolled in the ministerial course,131 and Evelyn in teaching.132 He greatly enjoyed studying with and baptizing the students—his final baptism at Avondale was of 17 young people.133 After three years George and Grace were on the move again back to Victoria,134 where, at the end of 1945,135 he was appointed to pastor the Warburton SDA Church.136 He was now seventy, but had no thought of retiring.137

Retirement

Retirement finally came in 1949, and the Stewarts returned to the New South Wales central coast to live at Green Point.138 To George, retirement meant looking after two churches, and he became the pastor of Gosford and Woy Woy churches and the surrounding district.139 He continued this service until he was 84 years old, at which time he and Grace moved to Normanhurst, next to Wahroonga, for their remaining years.140

Final Years and Death

They attended the headquarters church, where “he was known as a faithful, loyal member, upright of character and fervent in spirit.”141 In 1960 their family, including 14 of their 18 grandchildren, honored George and Grace with a celebration to mark their golden wedding anniversary—fifty years of marriage.142 During that time they had moved 53 times. They never owned their own house, but unquestioningly accepted every appointment they were given even if it seemed like a demotion. George took it all as God’s will, and that was enough for him to be content. He was a very humble man.143

Even into his nineties he often walked when he wanted to go somewhere. On July 5, 1967, George didn’t return home from a trip to the nearby shopping center. Family members searched unsuccessfully for him, then were joined by friends; then the police were called in. After three days he was discovered on a little-used track through the bushland between his home and Hornsby, deceased from a heart seizure. On July 11 he was farewelled in a service at the Wahroonga SDA Church and interred in the SDA cemetery at Avondale.144

His death caused widespread sadness, and many offered tributes, one of which said, “Pastor Stewart adorned the ministry by his humility and quiet dignity. His life of firm conviction, straightforward dealing, and loyal fervent faith will be remembered with gratitude by many ministers and friends.”145

Grace Stewart

Grace outlived her husband by more than twenty years. She died, aged one hundred years, on October 12, 1988, in the Sydney Adventist Hospital, New South Wales.146

Sources

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———. “Tasmania.” Australasian Record, August 9, 1909.

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Beaty, Bud. “Kamea.” Australasian Record, July 25, 1992.

Best, G. C. “Life Sketch of Pastor G. G. Stewart.” Australasian Record, August 14, 1967.

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Burke, R. E. “Melbourne.” Australasian Record, May 22, 1911.

Butz, Edwin S. “Tasmania, Some Notes From My Diary.” Australasian Record, August 29, 1910.

Cole, J. M., and E. Rosendahl. “North New Zealand Conference.” Australasian Record, March 13, 1916.

Comins, L. L. “The Oroua Missionary School, Longburn, New Zealand.” Australasian Record, January 24, 1921.

Coombe, L. C. “Stewart.” Australasian Record, April 7, 1975.

Cormack, A. W. “Notes From North New Zealand.” Australasian Record, May 31, 1920.

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Craddock, Thomas H. “Stewart.” Australasian Record, March 30, 1931.

Craddock, Thos. H., and A. H. Rogers. “Longford, Tasmania.” Australasian Record, May 29, 1911.

“Dedication of the Church at Albury, N.S.W.” Australasian Record, October 6, 1924.

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Donaldson, P. A. “South New South Wales Conference Session.” Australasian Record, November 17, 1941.

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“Forty-three students . . .” Australasian Record, January 5, 1942.

“Fourth Sabbath School in Victoria.” Australasian Record, July 29, 1935.

Fraser, A. M. “A Much Appreciated Service.” Australasian Record, November 2, 1926.

“From the North New South Wales . . .” Australasian Record, June 26, 1950.

George Graham Stewart, Worker’s Biographical Record. South Pacific Division of the General Conference Archives. Folder: “Stewart, George Graham.” Document: “Worker’s Biographical Record.”

Hare, R. “Camp-Meeting in North New Zealand.” Australasian Record, February 21, 1921.

———. “North New Zealand Camp-Meeting.” Australasian Record, February 12, 1917.

Hare, Reuben E. “Stewart.” Australasian Record, April 10, 1922.

Head, Charles. “Wanganui, New Zealand.” Australasian Record, November 1, 1920.

Hilliard, E. “Warragul and Drouin, Victoria.” Australasian Record, March 1, 1905.

———. “West Australia.” Australasian Record, June 11, 1906.

Hollingsworth, C. F., and L. R. Thrift. “Wallace.” Australasian Record, June 26, 1978.

Hopkin, Walter H. “South New South Wales.” Australasian Record, February 18, 1924.

———. “South New South Wales.” Australasian Record, May 19, 1924.

Israel, M. C. “Opening of the Seventh-day Adventist Mission in the Australian Field.” Australasian Record, October 11, 1909.

———. “Wychitella.” Bible Echo and Signs of the Times, December 1887.

Kent, J. W. “Brady.” Australasian Record, September 5, 1960.

Litster, W. R. “Distribution of Labour in Victoria.” Australasian Record, June 3, 1946.

Mitchell, T. A. “The Week of Prayer—Warburton.” Australasian Record, May 13, 1946.

“Monthly Summary of Australasian Canvassing Work.” Australasian Record, October 1, 1901.

New Zealand Births, Stewart, 1919/No. 2975.

“Nominations, Appointments, and Transfers.” Australasian Record, October 6, 1941.

“On November 9 . . .” Australasian Record, November 16, 1914.

Palmer, W. W. “Nukualofa, Tonga.” Australasian Record, August 16, 1915.

———. “Tonga.” Australasian Record, November 13, 1916.

Parker, C. H. “Victoria-Tasmanian Camp-Meeting.” Australasian Record, March 6, 1911.

Parker, M. C. J. “Golden Jubilee Services at Ballarat.” Australasian Record, October 19, 1936.

Pascoe, W. H. “North New Zealand Conference and Camp-meeting.” Australasian Record, March 17, 1919.

———. “North New Zealand.” Australasian Record, December 25, 1916.

Pascoe, W. H., and E. Rosendahl. “The North New Zealand Conference.” Australasian Record, March 19, 1917.

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“Pastor Baker spent . . .” Australasian Record, July 1, 1907.

“Pastor G. G. Stewart . . .” Australasian Record, January 11, 1937.

“Pastor G. G. Stewart . . .” Australasian Record, July 10, 1922.

“Pastor G. G. Stewart . . .” Australasian Record, March 11, 1918.

“Pastor G. G. Stewart . . .” Australasian Record, October 17, 1921.

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“Pastor George Stewart . . .” Australasian Record, December 11, 1911.

“Pastor Hilliard and Brother . . .” Australasian Record, January 1, 1905.

Piper, A. H. “South New South Wales.” Australasian Record, July 5, 1926.

———. “The Union Conference Council.” Australasian Record, September 17, 1928.

Piper, H. E. “North New Zealand.” Australasian Record, November 8, 1915.

Robinson, A. T. “Australasian Medical Missionary and Benevolent Association.” Bible Echo and Signs of the Times, May 2, 1898.

“Roll Call.” Australasian Record, January 21, 1946.

Rollo, G. W., and G. C. Best. “Stewart.” Australasian Record, August 14, 1967.

Rose, Leo S. “Stewart.” Australasian Record, November 12, 1962.

“S. C.” “Laying the Foundation Stones.” Australasian Record, October 8, 1951.

“Send one shilling . . .” Australasian Record, July 15, 1898.

“Session Appointments.” Australasian Record, November 19, 1945.

“Session Appointments.” Australasian Record, October 15, 1945.

“Sister E. M. Cooper . . .” Australasian Record, January 21, 1924.

“Spectator.” “Preston Church Dedication.” Australasian Record, January 25, 1937.

“Stewart.” Cairns Post, June 13, 2008.

Stewart, Andrew G. In Letters of Gold. Mountain View, California: Pacific Press Publishing Association, 1973.

Stewart, G., and E. Stewart. “A Retrospect.” Australasian Record, January 5, 1912.

Stewart, G. and E. “Wynyard, Tasmania.” Australasian Record, September 5, 1910.

Stewart, G. G. “Albury.” Australasian Record, April 14, 1924.

———. “Faleloa, Tonga.” Australasian Record, December 23, 1912.

———. “Stewart.” Australasian Record, July 20, 1942.

———. “Stewart.” Australasian Record, June 3, 1940.

———. “Tonga Mission Field.” Australasia Record, September 28, 1914.

———. “Tonga, Friendly Islands.” Australasian Record, January 12, 1914.

———. “Tonga.” Australasian Record, April 1, 1912.

———. “Tonga.” Australasian Record, August 26, 1912.

Stewart, G. G., and G. E Stewart. “Tonga.” Australasian Record, May 19, 1913.

Stewart, G. G., C. J. Griffin, T. R. Kent, and Lily Pascoe. “Wagga Mission.” Australasian Record, March 15, 1926.

Stewart, Melvin. “Be Ye Therefore Ready.” Australasian Record, August 12, 1940.

Stewart family tree. Accessed January 22, 2020. https://www.familysearch.org/tree/pedigree/landscape/LWMC-YZT.

“Tasmanian Camp-Meeting.” Australasian Record, January 2, 1911.

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“The New Zealand Conference.” Australasian Record, March 1, 1915.

“The Secretary.” “The Melbourne Helping Hand Mission.” Australasian Record, October 15, 1898.

“The Victorian Conference.” Australasian Record, December 1, 1904.

“The Work in Australasia.” Australasian Record, April 5, 1912.

“Their First Eighty Years.” Australasian Record, September 18, 1967.

Thorpe, Elva E. “Festival of the Jacaranda—50th Annual Closing Exercises of the Australasian Missionary College.” Australasian Record, January 21, 1946.

Thorpe, Lily M. “From Tonga to Vavau.” Australasian Record, July 1, 1912.

Thrift, L. R. “Grace Evelyn Stewart.” Australasian Record, December 3, 1988.

Thrift, R. “Visiting the Far West of New South Wales.” Australasian Record, April 20, 1942.

Totenhofer, Edwin. “Stewart, Donald.” Australasian Record, March 7, 2009.

“Two Colporteurs.” “Moe, Victoria.” Australasian Record, March 13, 1916.

“Union Conference Proceedings.” Australasian Record, September 28, 1936.

“Victoria-Tasmanian Conference.” Australasian Record, March 13, 1911.

Victorian Birth Index, 1888, Mackenzie, No. 17136.

Victorian Marriage Index, 1869, Stewart, No. 3821.

“We deeply regret . . .” Australasian Record, September 8, 1941.

White, Arthur L. Ellen G. White: The Australian Years, 1891–1900. Washington D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1981.

Notes

  1. G. W. Rollo and G. C. Best, “Stewart,” Australasian Record, August 14, 1967, 15.

  2. Stewart family tree, accessed January 22, 2020, https://www.familysearch.org/tree/pedigree/landscape/LWMC-YZT.

  3. Ibid.

  4. G. G. Stewart, “Stewart,” Australasian Record, July 20, 1942, 7.

  5. Stewart family tree.

  6. Leo S. Rose, “Stewart,” Australasian Record, November 12, 1962, 15.

  7. L. C. Coombe, “Stewart,” Australasian Record, April 7, 1975, 15.

  8. J. W. Kent, “Brady,” Australasian Record, September 5, 1960, 6.

  9. C. F. Hollingsworth and L. R. Thrift, “Wallace,” Australasian Record, June 26, 1978, 15.

  10. Victorian Marriage Index, 1869, Stewart, No. 3821.

  11. M. C. Israel, “Opening of the Seventh-day Adventist Mission in the Australian Field,” Australasian Record, October 11, 1909, 1–3.

  12. Andrew G. Stewart, In Letters of Gold (Mountain View, California: Pacific Press Publishing Association, 1973), 9.

  13. Ibid.

  14. “Fourth Sabbath School in Victoria,” Australasian Record, July 29, 1935, 20.

  15. M. C. Israel, “Wychitella,” Bible Echo and Signs of the Times, December 1887, 186.

  16. George Graham Stewart, Worker’s Biographical Record, South Pacific Division of the General Conference Archives (Folder: “Stewart, George Graham”; Document: “Worker’s Biographical Record”).

  17. Ibid.

  18. G. G. Stewart, “Stewart,” Australasian Record, June 3, 1940, 7; Andrew G. Stewart, 11.

  19. “S. C.,” “Laying the Foundation Stones,” Australasian Record, October 8, 1951, 4–6.

  20. Arthur L. White, Ellen G. White: The Australian Years, 1891–1900 (Washington D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1981), 4:159–161.

  21. Andrew G. Stewart, 12.

  22. Ibid.

  23. “Their First Eighty Years,” Australasian Record, September 18, 1967, 3.

  24. George Graham Stewart, Worker’s Biographical Record.

  25. “Monthly Summary of Australasian Canvassing Work,” Australasian Record, October 1, 1901, 14.

  26. George Graham Stewart, Worker’s Biographical Record.

  27. A. T. Robinson, “Australasian Medical Missionary and Benevolent Association,” Bible Echo and Signs of the Times, May 2, 1898, 139.

  28. “Send one shilling . . . ,” Australasian Record, July 15, 1898, 84.

  29. “The Secretary,” “The Melbourne Helping Hand Mission,” Australasian Record, October 15, 1898, 106.

  30. George Graham Stewart, Worker’s Biographical Record.

  31. “The Victorian Conference,” Australasian Record, December 1, 1904, 5.

  32. “Pastor Hilliard and Brother . . . ,” Australasian Record, January 1, 1905, 2.

  33. E. Hilliard, “Warragul and Drouin, Victoria,” Australasian Record, March 1, 1905, 2.

  34. E. Hilliard, “West Australia,” Australasian Record, June 11, 1906, 4.

  35. “After several years . . . ,” Australasian Record, February 1. 1906, 7; “Two Colporteurs,” “Moe, Victoria,” Australasian Record, March 13, 1916, 3.

  36. “Pastor Baker spent . . . ,” Australasian Record, July 1, 1907, 8.

  37. W.H.L. Baker, “Gippsland, Victoria,” Australasian Record, July 8, 1907, 8.

  38. “Distribution of Labour,” Australasian Record, September 21, 1908, 42.

  39. “Tasmanian Conference,” Australasian Record, January 4, 1909, 6.

  40. W. L. H. Baker, “Tasmania,” Australasian Record, August 9, 1909, 5.

  41. “Fifty Golden Years of Happiness,” Australasian Record, May 9, 1960, 5, 6.

  42. Victorian Birth Index, 1888, Mackenzie, No. 17136; L. R. Thrift, “Grace Evelyn Stewart,” Australasian Record, December 3, 1988, 12.

  43. L. R. Thrift, 12.

  44. From Stewart family tree.

  45. Avondale Cemetery Records, L2-B, 164.

  46. Edwin Totenhofer, “Stewart, Donald,” Australasian Record, March 7, 2009, 14.

  47. Reuben E. Hare, “Stewart,” Australasian Record, April 10, 1922, 6.

  48. “Stewart,” Cairns Post, June 13, 2008.

  49. George Graham Stewart, Worker’s Biographical Record.

  50. Thomas H. Craddock, “Stewart,” Australasian Record, March 30, 1931, 6.

  51. George Graham Stewart, Worker’s Biographical Record.

  52. Edwin S. Butz, “Tasmania, Some Notes From My Diary,” Australasian Record, August 29, 1910, 4.

  53. G. and E. Stewart, “Wynyard, Tasmania,” Australasian Record, September 5, 1910, 3, 4.

  54. Thos. H. Craddock and A. H. Rogers, “Longford, Tasmania,” Australasian Record, May 29, 1911, 6.

  55. “Australasian Union Conference,” Australasian Record, November 7, 1910, 38–60.

  56. “Tasmanian Camp-Meeting,” Australasian Record, January 2, 1911, 4.

  57. “Victoria-Tasmanian Conference,” Australasian Record, March 13, 1911, 4, 5.

  58. C. H. Parker, “Victoria-Tasmanian Camp-Meeting,” Australasian Record, March 6, 1911, 5.

  59. George Graham Stewart, Worker’s Biographical Record.

  60. R. E. Burke, “Melbourne,” Australasian Record, May 22, 1911, 10, 11.

  61. Ibid.

  62. G. Stewart and E. Stewart, “A Retrospect,” Australasian Record, January 5, 1912, 6.

  63. “At our union conference . . . ,” Australasian Record, October 9, 1911, 8.

  64. “Pastor George Stewart . . . ,” Australasian Record, December 11, 1911, 8; “The Work in Australasia,” Australasian Record, April 5, 1912, 13–15.

  65. Avondale Cemetery Records, M1-B, 142.

  66. G. G. Stewart, “Tonga,” Australasian Record, April 1, 1912, 4, 5.

  67. W. W. Palmer, “Nukualofa, Tonga,” Australasian Record, August 16, 1915, 3.

  68. “The Work in Australasia,” Australasian Record, April 5, 1912, 13–15.

  69. G. G. Stewart, “Tonga,” Australasian Record, April 1, 1912, 4, 5.

  70. G. G. Stewart, “Tonga,” Australasian Record, August 26, 1912, 4; G. G. Stewart, “Tonga, Friendly Islands,” Australasian Record, January 12, 1914, 5.

  71. Lily M. Thorpe, “From Tonga to Vavau,” Australasian Record, July 1, 1912, 2.

  72. G. G. Stewart, “Faleloa, Tonga.” Australasian Record, December 23, 1912, 2, 3.

  73. “On November 9 . . . ,” Australasian Record, November 16, 1914, 8.

  74. G. G. Stewart, “Tonga Mission Field,” Australasia Record, September 28, 1914, 43, 44.

  75. G. G. and G. E. Stewart, “Tonga,” Australasian Record, May 19, 1913, 2; G. G. Stewart, “Tonga,” Australasian Record, August 26, 1912, 4.

  76. Bud Beaty, “Kamea,” Australasian Record, July 25, 1992, 14.

  77. W. W. Palmer, “Tonga,” Australasian Record, November 13, 1916, 2, 3.

  78. Palmer, “Nukualofa, Tonga”; George Graham Stewart, Worker’s Biographical Record.

  79. H. E. Piper, “North New Zealand,” Australasian Record, November 8, 1915, 8.

  80. “Sister E. M. Cooper . . . ,” Australasian Record, January 21, 1924, 8.

  81. Beaty, 14; “Brother John Kamea Writes From Tonga,” Australasian Record, November 7, 1949, 5, 6.

  82. “The New Zealand Conference,” Australasian Record, March 1, 1915, 3.

  83. J. M. Cole, E. Rosendahl, “North New Zealand Conference,” Australasian Record, March 13, 1916, 4.

  84. W. H. Pascoe, “North New Zealand,” Australasian Record, December 25, 1916, 6.

  85. “A tent effort . . . ,” Australasian Record, February 12, 1917, 8.

  86. W. H. Pascoe and E. Rosendahl, “The North New Zealand Conference,” Australasian Record, March 19, 1917, 6, 7.

  87. Ibid.

  88. “Echoes From Ponsonby, Auckland,” Australasian Record, August 12, 1918, 4.

  89. R. Hare, “North New Zealand Camp-Meeting,” Australasian Record, February 12, 1917, 5.

  90. “Pastor G. G. Stewart . . . ,” Australasian Record, March 11, 1918, 8.

  91. Ibid.

  92. Ibid.

  93. W. H. Pascoe, “North New Zealand Conference and Camp-meeting,” Australasian Record, March 17, 1919, 4, 5.

  94. George Graham Stewart, Worker’s Biographical Record; New Zealand Births, Stewart, 1919/No. 2975.

  95. “As a result of faithful work . . . ,” Australasian Record, September 29, 1919, 8.

  96. A. W. Cormack and E. Rosendahl, “The North New Zealand Conference,” Australasian Record, March 22, 1920, 4.

  97. A. W. Cormack, “Notes From North New Zealand,” Australasian Record, May 31, 1920, 3, 4.

  98. Charles Head, “Wanganui, New Zealand,” Australasian Record, November 1, 1920, 3.

  99. L. L. Comins, “The Oroua Missionary School, Longburn, New Zealand,” Australasian Record, January 24, 1921, 5.

  100. R. Hare, “Camp-Meeting in North New Zealand,” Australasian Record, February 21, 1921, 10.

  101. “Pastor G. G. Stewart . . . ,” Australasian Record, October 17, 1921, 8.

  102. “Pastor G. G. Stewart . . . ,” Australasian Record, July 10, 1922, 8.

  103. Reuben E. Hare, 8.

  104. Walter H. Hopkin, “South New South Wales,” Australasian Record, February 18, 1924, 7.

  105. “Sister E. M. Cooper. . . .”

  106. George Graham Stewart, Worker’s Biographical Record.

  107. G. G. Stewart, “Albury,” Australasian Record, April 14, 1924, 5.

  108. Ibid.

  109. Walter H. Hopkin, “South New South Wales,” Australasian Record, May 19, 1924, 5.

  110. “Dedication of the Church at Albury, N.S.W.,” Australasian Record, October 6, 1924, 7.

  111. G. G. Stewart, C. J. Griffin, T. R. Kent, Lily Pascoe, “Wagga Mission,” Australasian Record, March 15, 1926, 6.

  112. A. H. Piper, “South New South Wales,” Australasian Record, July 5, 1926, 5.

  113. Ibid.

  114. “Distribution of Labour,” Australasian Record, October 4, 1926, 32.

  115. A. H. Piper, “The Union Conference Council,” Australasian Record, September 17, 1928, 8.

  116. “Pastor G. G. Stewart left . . . ,” Australasian Record, November 12, 1928, 8.

  117. “Union Conference Proceedings,” Australasian Record, September 28, 1936, 5.

  118. “Distribution of Labour,” Australasian Record, September 28, 1936, 5.

  119. M.C.J. Parker, “Golden Jubilee Services at Ballarat,” Australasian Record, October 19, 1936, 5; A. M. Fraser, “A Much Appreciated Service,” Australasian Record, November 2, 1926, 5; F. Allsopp, “A Novel Investment,” Australasian Record, November 2, 1936, 5; “Baptismal Service,” Australasian Record, January 18, 1937, 5, 6; “Spectator,” “Preston Church Dedication,” Australasian Record, January 25, 1937, 5.

  120. “Pastor G. G. Stewart . . . ,” Australasian Record, January 11, 1937, 8.

  121. “Distribution of Labour,” Australasian Record, November 1, 1937, 6.

  122. “Annual Conference, South New South Wales,” Australasian Record, December 6, 1937, 4, 5.

  123. “Nominations, Appointments, and Transfers,” Australasian Record, October 6, 1941, 8.

  124. P. A. Donaldson, “South New South Wales Conference Session,” Australasian Record, November 17, 1941, 5.

  125. “We deeply regret . . . ,” Australasian Record, September 8, 1941, 8.

  126. “Forty-three students . . . ,” Australasian Record, January 5, 1942, 8.

  127. R. Thrift, “Visiting the Far West of New South Wales,” Australasian Record, April 20, 1942, 3.

  128. “Australasian Union Conference Annual Meeting,” Australasian Record, October 5, 1942, 4.

  129. Ibid.

  130. A. W. Anderson, “South N.S.W. Conference,” Australasian Record, November 2, 1942, 3.

  131. Melvin Stewart, “Be Ye Therefore Ready,” Australasian Record, August 12, 1940, 6, 7; “Session Appointments,” Australasian Record, November 19, 1945, 8.

  132. “Roll Call,” Australasian Record, January 21, 1946, 3.

  133. Elva E. Thorpe, “Festival of the Jacaranda—50th Annual Closing Exercises of the Australasian Missionary College,” Australasian Record, January 21, 1946, 2, 3.

  134. Ibid.

  135. “Session Appointments,” Australasian Record, October 15, 1945, 5.

  136. W. R. Litster, “Distribution of Labour in Victoria,” Australasian Record, June 3, 1946, 5.

  137. T. A. Mitchell, “The Week of Prayer—Warburton,” Australasian Record, May 13, 1946, 5.

  138. “From the North New South Wales . . . ,” Australasian Record, June 26, 1950, 8.

  139. Ibid.

  140. G. C. Best, “Life Sketch of Pastor G. G. Stewart,” Australasian Record, August 14, 1967, 14.

  141. Ibid.

  142. “Fifty Golden Years of Happiness.”

  143. Best, 14.

  144. Rollo and Best, 15.

  145. Best, 14.

  146. L. R. Thrift, 12.

×

Tarburton, Shirley. "Stewart, George Graham (1875–1967) and Grace Evelyn (Mackenzie) (1888–1988)." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. July 23, 2020. Accessed December 01, 2022. https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=385Q.

Tarburton, Shirley. "Stewart, George Graham (1875–1967) and Grace Evelyn (Mackenzie) (1888–1988)." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. July 23, 2020. Date of access December 01, 2022, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=385Q.

Tarburton, Shirley (2020, July 23). Stewart, George Graham (1875–1967) and Grace Evelyn (Mackenzie) (1888–1988). Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. Retrieved December 01, 2022, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=385Q.