Bangloy, Juan Antonio (1906–1986)

By Naretta Bangloy-Cabanos, and Marvin Bangloy-Campit

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Naretta Bangloy-Cabanos

Marvin Bangloy-Campit

First Published: January 6, 2021

Juan Bangloy was a pioneer Adventist educator, minister, and leader from the Philippines.

Early Life, Education and Marriage

Juan Antonio Bangloy was born on December 27, 1906, to Santiago and Saturnina Bangloy in Jones, Isabela, Philippines. His parents were from Laog, Ilocos Norte, Philippines. He was baptized when he was around 16 years old in 1922.1

Bangloy received his high school diploma from the Philippine Union College (PUC) and later moved to Flint, Michigan, United States, where he also received a high school diploma. In 1924, at the young age of 18, he traveled to the United States where he lived for seven years, until the age of 25. He returned to the Philippines in 1931 to pursue a Bachelor of Arts and Sciences in religion and history. In 1934, he graduated from PUC. Later, during his tenure at PUC, he completed his Master’s degree in education from the University of the Philippines (UP).

In 1935, Bangloy married Adelina P. who also acquired a Bachelor of Science in nursing from the Manila Sanitarium and Hospital. One year later, their only daughter, Naretta, was born. She achieved the terminal degree of Doctor of Medicine in 1961. As a father and husband, Juan Bangloy enjoyed cooking for his family and friends, and loved to make them laugh. He had a wonderful sense of humor.

Ministry

Bangloy started his denominational career as the dean of men and educator in the fields of economics and history2 at Northern Luzon Academy, Sison, Pangasian, from 1936 to 1947.3 There, he began his formal career in the field of religious education. Over his years of teaching, his goal was to bridge the gap between religious and formal education. Later, he was elected educational and Young People’s Missionary Volunteer secretary of the Northeast Luzon Mission4 when it was established on January 1, 1948.5 Bangloy founded and served as the first principal of Northeast Luzon Junior Academy, in Isabela, Philippines, between 1948 and 1951 following World War II, which immensely affected the Philippines due to the occupation of the Japanese from 1941 to 1945.6

From 1951 to 1956, Bangloy returned to Philippine Union College where he taught philosophy and religion.7 He was ordained as a gospel minister during this time.8 From 1956 to 1965, he served as president of the Northern Luzon Mission.9 While president, he traveled to many provinces supporting the work of his colleague in spreading the gospel message and recruiting students to pursue higher education. Important developments in the NLM territories during his administration included the dedication of the Dagupan City church on May 14, 1961,10 the Baguio Joint Summit of NLM and Mountain Province Mission (MPM) on February 8-11, 1961,11 and the graduation of twenty-eight home nursing students at Northern Luzon Academy on March 28, 1961, under the supervision of his wife, Adelina P. Bangloy.12

Another joint summit of the NLM and MPM was held on September 4-6, 1962,13 provided training for denominational workers taught by Pastor L. E. Tucker and Professor O. C. Edwards. The latter taught journalism, promoting professional public relations and communication of the Advent message through media publications. As a mission leader, Bangloy also supported the various activities of the union, such as the publishing council of the North Philippine Union Mission in January 24-27, 1961, at the publishing house in Caloocan City, Manila.14 After his services in NLM, he was called again to teach religion and history at PUC until his retirement in 1969.15 He served the denomination for thirty-three years.

Later Life

At the age of 63, Bangloy, along with his wife, followed his daughter, Naretta, to the United States where he enjoyed his retirement years from 1969 to 1986. Juan and Adelina Bangloy enjoyed watching their four grandchildren, and later their three great-grandchildren, grow up. Juan Bangloy died on March 12, 1986, in Seattle, Washington.16

Contribution

Juan Bangloy was a respected speaker as his audible voice carried and exuded strength, power, and persistence. His love for education was reflected in his aspiration to build a training school for young people in the northern Philippines. He also influenced many young people’s lives while mentoring them morally and spiritually at PUC.

Sources

Abara, P. A. “Northeast Luzon Adventist School of Technology.” Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. Accessed, May 20, 2021, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=CARC&highlight=Northeast|Luzon|Academy.

Alsaybar, B. B. “Two Missions Hold Summit Meeting.” Far Eastern Division Outlook, July 1961.

Alsaybar, B. B. “Red Cross Courses Completed.” Far Eastern Division Outlook, June 1962.

Alsaybar, B. B. “Come Ye Yourselves Apart.” Far Eastern Division Outlook, October 1962.

Alsaybar, B. B. “Publishing Council.” Far Eastern Division Outlook, April 1961.

Alsaybar, B. B. “Biennial Session Actions Affecting Faculty.” Far Eastern Division Outlook, April 1966.

“Juan Bangloy obituary.” North Pacific Union Gleaner, May 5, 1986.

Robbins, A. J. “Dagupan City Church Dedication.” Far Eastern Division Outlook, August 1960.

Seventh-Day Adventist Yearbook. Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1945-1957.

Notes

  1. “Juan Bangloy obituary,” North Pacific Union Gleaner, May 5, 1986, 25.

  2. “Northern Luzon Academy,” Seventh-Day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1945), 241.

  3. “Northern Luzon Academy,” Seventh-Day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1938), 259.

  4. “Northeast Luzon Mission,” Seventh-Day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1949), 121.

  5. Patrocinia D. Abara, “Northeast Luzon Adventist School of Technology,” Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists, accessed, May 20, 2021, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=CARC&highlight=Northeast|Luzon|Academy.

  6. “Northeast Luzon Junior Academy,” Seventh-Day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1950), 278.

  7. “Philippine Union College,” Seventh-Day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1955), 228.

  8. “North Philippine Union Mission,” Seventh-Day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1957), 99.

  9. A. J. Robbins, “Dagupan City Church Dedication,” Far Eastern Division Outlook, August 1960, 7-8.

  10. Ibid.

  11. B. B. Alsaybar, “Two Missions Hold Summit Meeting,” Far Eastern Division Outlook, July 1961, 9-10.

  12. B. B. Alsaybar, “Red Cross Courses Completed,” Far Eastern Division Outlook, June 1962, 14-15.

  13. B. B. Alsaybar, “Come Ye Yourselves Apart,” Far Eastern Division Outlook, October 1962, 10-11.

  14. R. A. Van Arsdell, “Publishing Council,” Far Eastern Division Outlook, April 1961, 14.

  15. B. B. Alsaybar. “Biennial Session Actions Affecting Faculty,” Far Eastern Division Outlook, April 1966, 12.

  16. “Juan Bangloy obituary,” North Pacific Union Gleaner, May 5, 1986, 25.

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Bangloy-Cabanos, Naretta, Marvin Bangloy-Campit. "Bangloy, Juan Antonio (1906–1986)." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. January 06, 2021. Accessed November 29, 2022. https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=3CHQ.

Bangloy-Cabanos, Naretta, Marvin Bangloy-Campit. "Bangloy, Juan Antonio (1906–1986)." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. January 06, 2021. Date of access November 29, 2022, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=3CHQ.

Bangloy-Cabanos, Naretta, Marvin Bangloy-Campit (2021, January 06). Bangloy, Juan Antonio (1906–1986). Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. Retrieved November 29, 2022, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=3CHQ.