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Norman and Rubina Ferris

Photo courtesy of Ervin Ferris.

Ferris, Norman Asprey (1902–1958) and Rubina May (Chatman) (1899–2003)

By Shirley Tarburton

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Shirley Tarburton, M.Litt. (Distinction) (University of New England, Armidale, New South Wales, Australia) retired in 2008 after 40 years teaching church-school (mainly high school but including eight years at university). An Australian, she has taught in four mission fields, Australia, and New Zealand. She has authored five books and co-authored one on church history, biography and family history, as well as several magazine articles. She is married to Dr. Michael Tarburton with two adult children and four grandchildren.

 

First Published: January 29, 2020

Norman Ferris was a Seventh-day Adventist pastor and missionary who was awarded an M.B.E. (Member of the British Empire) by Queen Elizabeth II for his services to the people of the Solomon Islands and Pitcairn.

Early Years

Norman Asprey Ferris was born on November 20, 1902, in the small country town of Devenish in Victoria, Australia, to orchardist Arthur Houston Ferris (1869-1961) and his wife, Jessie (nee Dunlop, 1879-1958).1 Norman was their eldest child, and was later joined by two brothers, twins, Walter (1904-1985) and David (1904-1987), and three sisters, Esther (1906-1922), Muriel (Mrs. Peter Ferris, 1918-2006), and Edna (Mrs. Verner Heise, 1922-2006).

Education and Marriage

When he was nearly two years old, Norman’s parents became Seventh-day Adventists,2 and soon afterwards they left their orchard to become Adventist evangelists.3 After working in many Victorian rural towns, when Norman was eight years old, they went as Adventist missionaries to Norfolk Island, serving there for the next ten years.4

Most of Ferris’s schooling was provided by his parents. Not long after arriving on Norfolk Island, he became fascinated with the local sawmill where the church members were sawing boards from pine trees donated for the building of their new church.5 When he was old enough he was allowed to join his father at the sawpit using the huge crosscut saws to cut the boards.6 He became so skilled at this that he continued sawmilling until he left Norfolk Island in 1918 to work at the Warburton Sanitarium in order to earn money to attend college.7

After working at Warburton for three years, Ferris enrolled in the missionary course at the Australasian Missionary College (now Avondale College) in March 1921. However, in 1922, when he was part-way through his course, it was discontinued and he never completed a program.8 Despite this disappointment, in 1924 he was appointed tent master for an evangelistic series being run at Wagga Wagga, New South Wales (NSW),9 and then for another series at Cootamundra, NSW, run by E. G. Whittaker.10 When that series finished he was appointed to work in Blacktown (a western suburb of Sydney) over the summer months with J. Thompson, studying the Bible with people whose interest had been awakened by the camp meeting held in the area.11 This was followed by a tent evangelistic series that continued into 1925.12

During his college years, Ferris became acquainted with Rubina (Ruby) May Chatman who was also studying at Australasian Missionary College. Chatman graduated from the missionary course in 1921 and from the Business course in 1923. Before she commenced work as a secretary at the Sanitarium Wholesale Office in Sydney, Ferris took her to Lord Howe Island, where his family was now living, to meet his parents.13 All went well, and they were married in the Concord (Sydney) Seventh-day Adventist Church on October 3, 1925.14

Rubina Chatman

Known as Ruby, Rubina May Chatman was the second child of Alfred Ernest Chatman (1869-1961) and his wife Catherine Kent (1874-1949), whose father, Thomas Robert Kent, became a Sabbath-keeper in 1895 and a Seventh-day Adventist in 1898.15 Ruby Chatman was born on November 8, 1899, in Eugowra, New South Wales.16 She had an older sister, Mary Ann Julia (Pennington, 1898-1977), and two younger brothers, Alfred Ernest, Jr. (1901-1998), and Leslie Albert (1905-1976). When Ruby Chatman was nearly two years old, her parents also became Seventh-day Adventists.17

The front room of the Chatman home was turned into a schoolroom, but by the time Ruby Chatman commenced her schooling, a schoolhouse had been built on a neighboring farm and she attended church school there.18 When she was eighteen, she was sent to Avondale to attend college and completed her studies four years later.19

Career

At the time of his marriage, Ferris was on Pastor E. G. Whittaker’s evangelistic team, which was running a tent evangelistic series in the Sydney suburb of Ryde.20 In January 1926, the tent was transferred to Gladesville21 and a church was raised up as a result.22

At the Australasian Union Conference meetings held in September 1926, the Ferrises were asked to work in the Solomon Islands.23 In preparation, they joined six other prospective missionary couples in a series of classes at the Sydney Sanitarium in November, receiving instruction on nursing and tropical diseases.24 Early in 1927, while awaiting medical clearance before embarkation, they attended another series of lectures on tropical medicine at Sydney University, which they found very helpful.25 Ferris was also sent west of the Great Dividing Range to collect for the Appeal for Missions in Orange and Dubbo, New South Wales.26

On March 16, 1927, the Ferrises finally sailed for their new mission and in due course arrived at Batuna in the Marovo Lagoon, Solomon Islands, where the mission headquarters was located. While their house was being built, they shared the home of another missionary family. Their first task was to learn the language and this was facilitated by teaching in the school (through an interpreter) in the mornings, and by Ferris working in the school gardens with the boys in the afternoon.27

Due to the lack of medical facilities in the Solomons, Ruby Ferris returned to Sydney the following year to give birth to their first child. She was weak from malaria, but safely delivered a daughter, Norma Estelle.28 However, the baby developed heart problems. After spending several months in Sydney, Ruby Ferris left Norma with her sister, Mary, who was a nurse,29 and returned to the Solomons alone in October.30

Before the Ferrises could move into their new house at Batuna, they were relocated to Dovele on the island of Vella Lavella where they lived in a leaf house with an iron roof. 31 Ruby Ferris soon became pregnant again and arranged to go to the hospital at the Methodist mission several miles away. Here, Raymond Harrison was born.32 While they were still in the hospital a storm destroyed their house at Dovele. Consequently, they moved back to Batuna.33

As furlough approached in 1930, the mission president suggested that Ruby Ferris, now weak from malaria, take the baby back to Sydney to recover her health and spend some time with Norma. Norman Ferris would join his family a few months later.34 Feeling much better by April, Ruby Ferris and the two children sailed to Lord Howe Island to be reunited with Ferris when he arrived to visit his parents and meet his two-year-old daughter for the first time. The family returned to the Solomons in October 1930, not knowing where they would be located.35

After an eventful trip, during the latter part of which Ruby Ferris and the children were knocked overboard from their small inter-island ship when it struck a rock, the Ferrises finally arrived at Batuna only to learn they were to open a new mission station on Guadalcanal.36 An islander, Jugha, had been working there, but the interest aroused was now too great for him to cope alone.37

Ferris took the mission boat, Melanesia, loaded with some boards and roofing iron with which to construct a two-roomed shelter for them at Wanderer Bay on the south-western coast.38 It was a hostile environment. Mosquitoes were abundant and the villagers, adherents of the Anglican mission, wanted nothing to do with them. However, with kindness and loving medical care, the Ferrises eventually won their way into the people’s hearts. Many calls for medical help came to them and were often followed by a request for a teacher to be placed in the village.39 Although based on Guadalcanal, Norman Ferris travelled widely among the other islands of the group holding meetings, running clinics, planning the erection of new churches, and generally supporting the island missionaries in their work.40

The Ferrises were repeatedly beset by health problems, suffering bouts of malaria and struggling with other assaults on their health. In August 1931, Norman Ferris was struck with a severe case of renal colic.41 He was taken to the doctor at Tulagi who sent him to the Sydney Sanitarium on the steamer, Montoro, which, providentially, was leaving the next day.42 He returned, restored to health, six weeks later, much to the relief of his wife, who had been running the isolated mission station by herself.43

In mid-1932, a better location was found for the Guadalcanal mission, with room to build a school, so the Ferris family moved to Kopiu at the eastern end of the island.44 Here they lived for the next ten years. Their second son, Ervin Alfred, was born at the government hospital on Tulagi Island, the British administrative center for the Solomon Islands.45 While awaiting this event, Ferris was invited by a chief, Mou, to come and teach his people.46 He sailed across to the Tasamati Coast of Guadalcanal, visible from Tulagi, but unentered by the Adventist mission. Leaving the mission launch, he took Ibi (Imbi), his cook, and ventured ashore. Here they were intercepted by Ngata, a devil-priest, who said he had been sent by a devil to kill Ferris. He came towards them shouting, “Kill him, kill Ibi!” But Ngata put down his club and listened to the gospel story along with the other villagers.47 They begged for a teacher, but there were none available. At this Ibi said he would stay and teach the people.48 Not only was Mou converted, but this devil-priest was thoroughly converted, baptized, and became a missionary to his people. Thus, the Adventist mission gained access to this formerly closed district49 and was able to spread the gospel to the largest of the Solomon Islands.

Near the end of 1932, Ferris experienced another breakthrough when permission was received from the Resident Commissioner to visit the officially restricted islands of Rennell and Bellona.50 No mission had been permitted to work in these southern-most islands of the Solomons inhabited by Polynesians. Tekika, the chief’s son, made the request through a trader for a missionary to visit and the trader introduced him to Norman Ferris. Tekika gave him a carved stick as a ‘passport,’ and this ensured the mission party’s welcome on the islands once permits were issued.51 It was a further seven years before Adventist teachers were permitted to reside permanently on these islands, but in the meantime some of the native young men attended the Adventist boarding school at Batuna and took the gospel back to their people.52

Because of their isolation, Ferris was assigned sole use of a mission boat, the Marara, with a powerful engine financed by the Thirteenth Sabbath School offering for the third quarter of 1934.53 During their furlough at the end of 1934 and the early part of 1935, Ferris reported on their mission work in many meetings at six conference camps. He was accompanied by the Solomon Island pastor, Kata Ragoso, for whom he translated.54 During their speaking tour, both men were both ordained to the gospel ministry.55 Ferris’s ordination took place at the Parramatta (Sydney) Camp on October 6, 1934.56

In 1936, Pastors Ferris and Ragoso were appointed as delegates to the General Conference Session to be held in San Francisco.57 On the way, at a stopover in Suva, Fiji, Ferris became infected with typhoid, which was epidemic there.58 Upon reaching California he was immediately hospitalized, but mistakenly diagnosed with malaria. He came very close to death, and was unconscious for twelve and a half hours, but recovered.59 On his return to Sydney his poor health necessitated a six-month medical leave.60

Norman Ferris’s recovery was slow, but he eventually returned to the Solomons on April 17, 1937.61 Ruby Ferris stayed behind until after the birth of their fourth child, Marilyn Frances, on July 6, 1937.62 She and three of the children then joined him in October; Norma continued to stay with her aunt for a few more months until she was stronger.63

In the mountains of central Guadalcanal, more and more villages requested Adventist teachers.64 Other missions, hearing of this, offered their teachers but were told no, they were waiting for the Adventist teachers.65 The expanding ministry kept Ferris away from home much of the time, visiting the villages and placing teachers with them. By August 1939, he had a team of 36 teachers,66 90 baptized members, and 600 registered Sabbath School members.67 The official government census reported 1,000 citizens claiming to belong to the ‘Sabbath Mission.’68

At the end of 1939, Ferris was asked to extend his territory to include the adjacent island of San Christoval.69 Calls for teachers to teach the gospel continued to increase until he could no longer meet the demand.70 Dedicated island leaders took on much of the responsibility of strengthening the growth of the mission while Ferris took overall direction of the two islands71 and continued to advocate for a permanent presence in the still-restricted islands of Rennell and Bellona.72 He was permitted to take a group of missionaries to visit these islands for one week in July 1940,73 and they were encouraged to learn that despite no official church worker being permitted permanent entry, the mission-trained Rennell islanders were operating 16 churches with 850 Sabbath school members and seven schools with an enrollment of 150. There were ten churches on Bellona.74

World War II

Early in 1940, the civil administration began to feel some concern over World War II enemy activity and set up a system of coast-watchers throughout the mission territory.75 The Ferrises sent their two eldest children back to Australia to live with Ruby Ferris’s parents and attend school.76 In September, little Ervin joined his siblings77 and was discovered to be suffering from a tropical infection, which necessitated prolonged, painful treatment.78 Norman and Ruby Ferris applied for permanent return to Australia79 and Ruby Ferris followed with their youngest child in February 1941,80 ahead of her husband who stayed until October.81 Just before Ferris left the Solomon Islands, his effort to mediate opposition to the Adventist mission working on the island of Ysabel was rewarded,82 and he was able to make one last one-week trip to Rennell and Bellona.83

In 1942, Ferris accepted an appointment as the Missionary Volunteer (MV) Secretary for the South Australian Conference84 and the family moved to Adelaide. Ferris had hoped to ship the family’s household goods back to Australia before the Japanese invasion, but this proved impossible and they were all lost.85 He was able to take one box with him, which proved not to be the box of linen he thought it, but all his navigational charts. These were confiscated by the navy and ended up with General Douglas MacArthur86 at his headquarters in Brisbane.87

These maps, as amended by Ferris, showed shipping hazards recorded on no other charts, and General MacArthur called him in for consultation. The South Australian Conference gave him leave and he was taken to Sydney, where he spent three weeks briefing the Allied Geographical Section of Defense High Command about navigation in the waters around the Solomons.88 On his return to Adelaide, he was again consulted by senior defense personnel.89 “When the allied forces landed in the Solomons on August 7 and 8, 1942, MacArthur appointed Ferris to pilot the ships, which he did successfully. Ferris remained in the Solomons for some weeks.”90 To signify the authority vested in him as pilot of the fleet, MacArthur gave Ferris his personal ring to wear during the operation. He was not permitted to talk of any of this until after the war.91

Post-War Mission Re-establishment

Hearing of the privations suffered by the Adventist church members in the Solomons because of the war, in January 1944 Ferris sought permission from the conference leaders to coordinate a relief effort.92 He resigned his position in Adelaide and applied for an entry permit for the Solomons. While waiting, he was based at Adventist church headquarters in Wahroonga.93 He made contact with the local church leaders in the Solomons,94 procured supplies for the missions and various items needed by the Adventist workers, and he kept in contact with Solomon Islands’ administrative officials. 95 He spent the rest of the year travelling around Australia, speaking at various meetings96 and raising support for the missions.

Ferris was eventually granted a permit in late April 194597 and, provided free transportation with U.S. troops, arrived in the Solomons on June 3.98 Four Marovo church members saw him in an American uniform and were were astonished that he was with the official group of high-ranking officers.99 He obtained transport to the Marovo Lagoon where he was able to meet Pastor Kata Ragoso.100 Ferris was amazed when he was shown the MV Portal, which Ragoso had successfully kept hidden all through the war.101 After getting it into operational order, he was able to visit all the mission stations, distribute supplies,102 and assist in their re-establishment.103 While doing this, he also enabled the re-entering Adventist missionaries to travel to their various stations throughout the Solomons104 and, working under Sir Cosmo Parkinson,105 served as liaison between the Australian authorities and the islanders in the transition from military to post-war civil administration.106

In Australia

His work completed, Ferris returned to Australia on February 15, 1946.107 He immediately commenced108 extensive travel throughout Australia, translating for Pastor Simi of the Solomon Islands during a speaking tour to raise money for the mission field.109 While attending meetings in Queensland, he received an urgent summons to return home to Cooranbong. His eldest son had suffered a serious accident at work in the Cooranbong Sanitarium Health Food factory on May 12. Ferris arrived in time to speak with Ray before he died four days later.110

At the Australasian Union Conference Annual Meeting a few months later, Ferris was appointed to be preceptor of the young men (dean of men) for Australasian Missionary College at Avondale.111 This was a great relief to Ruby Ferris who was not yet ready to leave the place of her son’s burial.112 Their remaining children were settled in their studies at Avondale and it was a comfort to remain there for some time.113

During his three years as preceptor and Bible teacher, Ferris and his wife touched many lives. He introduced Master Comrade (now Master Guide) training at the college114 and undertook the course himself, being invested in November 1952.115 He supported other extra-curricular activities, such as the choir,116 ran a baptismal class,117 and represented the college as a speaker at camps.118 At the same time, he kept a close eye on the re-supply of mission boats to the islands, taking leave to assist sailing the Vinaritokae to Honiara, Solomon Islands, in January 1949,119 and the Ka Sali to the New Hebrides (now Vanuatu) in April 1949.120 The Ferrises hosted the Leleo’s New Hebridean crew for several months after it was damaged in a storm.121

Return to Mission Service

At the completion of his term at Avondale, Ferris pastored the Camperdown, Victoria, Seventh-day Adventist Church.122 Just before their move to Camperdown, they celebrated the marriage of their daughter Norma to Barry Crabtree, at Avondale on January 10, 1951.123 After just one year at Camperdown, the Ferrises accepted an appointment to Pitcairn Island.124 However, it took many months for the permits to be issued and it was the first week of December 1952, before they arrived.125 Reports had been circulated that “due to spiritual stress caused by the Seventh-day Adventist faith” the islanders had suffered mental deterioration.126 This made the High Commission, based in Fiji, reluctant to allow missionaries to continue working there.127 However, the High Commissioner, Sir Ronald Garvey, had known Ferris in the 1920s in the Solomons when they were both starting out in their careers and said he would trust Pitcairn to him.128

Ferris ran a class teaching St. John First Aid, and when the work was completed, the candidates were examined by doctors on visiting ships.129 One doctor, from London, made the examination particularly difficult in order to test the ‘mental deterioration’ accusations. All but one of the candidates received a very high pass, and the examiner stated that he found “no sign of mental deterioration, but that the islanders were a happy, normal group, who were equal to any group that he had examined anywhere.”130 This assessment was confirmed by other official visitors, who were also impressed by all the various activities engaged in on the island.131

Norman and Ruby Ferris did all they could to improve the life of the islanders. He mended their pedal organs,132 assisted with repairing engines and boats, repaired sewing machines and lamps,133 as well as carrying out his pastoral work. Ruby Ferris cared for the sick, visited homes,134 and helped arrange special events such as the Coronation Celebration.135 Their original permit was limited to a twelve-month stay, but in response to a petition from the islanders the High Commission extended it for another year.136 In mid-1954, Ferris was a delegate to the General Conference Session in the United States.137 While there he received donations for rebuilding the Pitcairn church138 and was able to arrange for timber with which to construct it.139 The new church was dedicated on October 17, 1954,140 before the Ferris family (they had been joined by Marilyn during 1954141) left on furlough two days later.142

MBE Investiture

While on furlough, Ferris travelled to Fiji to attend the session of the Australasian Union which met January 4-10, 1955, and he was able to report to Sir Ronald Garvey in person.143 Ferris was surprised to learn that in the Queen’s New Year’s Honours list for the Colonies of Fiji and Pitcairn and the Kingdom of Tonga, he had been awarded Membership of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire (MBE) on Sir Ronald’s recommendation.144 This honor was warmly received by those at the union session as “a vindication of the church on Pitcairn.”145 Later, upon his return to Australia, he was invested in a ceremony at Government House in Sydney.146

On December 23, 1954, Ferris officiated at Ervin’s marriage to Leila Davey in Ayr.147 Norman and Ruby Ferris’s furlough became extended when no return booking was available until the High Commission in Fiji intervened and they were able to return to Pitcairn in March 1955.148 During this mission term, Ferris made new pews for the church in his ‘spare time’149 and took every opportunity to witness to the over 27,000 people on the passenger ships that paused at Pitcairn on their trans-Pacific voyages.150 When it was time for them to leave Pitcairn at the end of 1955, a scientific team, led by Thor Heyerdahl, commenced an anthropological study of the Pitcairn Islanders, believing they represented upward evolutionary progress, and that their development held insights into Polynesian origins.151 They were dismayed to learn that the islanders firmly believed in the Genesis creation story and could repeat oral history that supported it.152

Return to Australia

The Ferrises travelled on the Rangitata to New Zealand153 and gave presentations at the camp meeting before continuing to Australia.154 They considered an invitation to work in Fiji, but as they were now grandparents, they requested a position in Australia.155 Until one became available, Ferris engaged in fundraising for missions.156

On February 7, 1956, Marilyn, their youngest, married Arthur Davey, Ervin’s brother-in-law, at Avondale. The newlyweds moved to Ayr in the far north of Queensland.157 This meant that the Ferris’s two younger children were now both living in Queensland. Meanwhile, as Ferris had lived on both Norfolk Island and Pitcairn, he was invited to be involved in celebrations being planned to mark the centennial of the Pitcairn Islanders’ arrival on Norfolk Island, where many of them still remained. The Adventist Church was very influential in the islanders’ lives for many years and was strongly represented during the celebrations, which took place in the second week of July 1956.158

About the same time, Ferris was invited to take the superintendency of the Mona Mona Aboriginal Mission in North Queensland.159 He was attracted by the challenge that this posed, and also that it was not too far from his children.160 The Ferrises soon endeared themselves to those living at the mission,161 and Norman Ferris found plenty of scope for his many talents. He repaired the sawmill, upgraded the engineering workshop, encouraged the completion of the hospital, and supported the school staff, ensuring they had the equipment they needed.162 There was plenty for Ruby Ferris to do, running the store and helping with money management, and government documentation.163

As usual, Ferris taught a baptismal class and the first baptism took place at the end of 1956.164 Early in 1957, when an aboriginal church of twenty-nine members was organized at nearby Kuranda, the Mona Mona choir and band conducted by Ferris, pleased all present with their special music.165 He also took the band to camp meeting at Townsville, where they played in the streets of the town, encouraging citizens to come to the evangelistic meetings on the campground.166

In November 1957, the mission received a blow when the sawmill and a considerable amount of timber ready for sale was destroyed by fire.167 This had become a major source of funding for the mission, so Ferris set about trying to raise funds to rebuild it and to obtain machinery to replace what was lost.168

Death

In July 1958, the Ferris’s drove to Ayr to celebrate Marilyn’s birthday and on the way home detoured to Charters Towers in order to obtain some advice from Cecil McCamley, an Adventist businessman who ran a sawmill.169 Leaving there on July 7, they had reached the outskirts of Townsville when they were struck by a speeding car that crossed to their side of the road.170 Norman Ferris, now 55 years old, took the brunt of the impact and died upon reaching the hospital.171 Ruby Ferris was severely, though not fatally, injured, and had a long recovery.172 After thirty-three and a half years of service, Norman Ferris was buried by his children at Ayr on Friday, July 11, 1958. Ruby Ferris was still in a hospital 90 kilometers away.

Ruby

Several weeks later, Ruby Ferris was transferred to the Ayr hospital, and was discharged near the end of the year.173 After spending some time with each of her daughters and their families, she took a position in Ayr as matron of a Country Women’s Association boarding hostel for students living far from home, where she remained for thirteen years.174 After she retired at seventy years of age, she enjoyed overseas travel, including two visits to General Conference Sessions and extensive tours of the United States. She settled in a retirement village near Avondale for thirteen years, before returning to Ayr for a period of time with Marilyn’s family.175 In 1989, her 90th year, Ruby Ferris returned to the Solomon Islands for the first time since World War II. The occasion was the commemoration of the founding of the Adventist mission on the north coast of Guadalcanal by Norman Ferris and Ibi (Imbi). A memorial plaque was unveiled and Ruby Ferris was thrilled to once again be where she served in her youth, and to meet descendants of those for whom she and Norman Ferris had worked.176

Ruby Ferris’s last six years were spent at the Adventist retirement complex at Victoria Point, Brisbane, where she passed away on January 22, 2003, at 103 years of age.177

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Pascoe, A. L. “From a Superintendent’s Diary – No. 3.” Australasian Record, September 4, 1939.

Pascoe, A. L. “Permission Granted at Last to Visit Rennell and Bellona.” Australasian Record, September 9, 1940.

“Pastor G. Peacock and Brother N. A. Ferris …” Australasian Record, October 12, 1931.

“Pastor Ragoso Writes from Batuna, Solomon Islands.” Australasian Record, April 17, 1944.

“Pastors W. G. Turner, N. A. Ferris …” Australasian Record, May 11 1936.

Piper, A. H. “Ferris-Chatman.” Australasian Record, October 26, 1925.

“Reports are reaching us …” Australasian Record, September 3, 1934.

Richards, W. J. “Aboriginal Church Organised.” Australasian Record, April 1, 1957.

Richards, W. J. “Ferris.” Australasian Record, August 18, 1958.

Roenfelt, E. E. “Opposition Overcome in the Solomons.” Australasian Record, June 30, 1941.

Roenfelt, E. E. “Through the Solomon Islands – No. 1.” Australasian Record, September 5, 1938.

Rogers, M. E. “Links.” Australasian Record, June 30, 1947.

Rusa, George. The Floating Log. Cooranbong, NSW: Heather Dixon, 2005.

Scragg, W. M. R. “Progress in South Australia.” Australasian Record, August 28, 1944.

“The Sea Must Be Reckoned With.” Australasian Record, February 14, 1955.

“Sister Norman Ferris …” Australasian Record, November 12, 1928.

Stewart, A. G. “In the Islands of the Sea – Divine Predictions Fulfilled.” Australasian Record, May 2, 1938.

Stewart, A. G. “Report of Vice-President for the Island Field. Annual Council, 1939.” Australasian Record, September 25, 1939.

Stewart, A. G. “Special! Another Urgent Call, Rennell Islands.” Australasian Record, May 22, 1939.

Stickleu, G. E. “His Last Service” Australasian Record, August 18, 1958.

Stratford, S. V. “Australasian Union Conference Secretary’s Report.” Australasian Record, October 1, 1945.

Stratford, S. V. “Raymond Ferris obituary.” Australasian Record, June 3, 1946.

“That we invite …” Australasian Record, October 4, 1926.

“Thirty-One Sail for the Islands in One Week.” Australasian Record, March 28, 1938.

“Tiny Pitcairn, a Bulwark Against Evolution.” Australasian Record, February 20, 1956.

Turner, W. G. “South N.S.W. Conference Session.” Australasian Record, March 25, 1946.

“Union Conference Annual Meeting.” Australasian Record, October 28, 1946.

Victorian Births Index. “Ferris, Norman Asprey.” 1902/24996.

Ward, Myrtle L. “Coronation Celebrations on Pitcairn.” Australasian Record, August 10, 1953.

Whittaker, E. G. “The Ryde-Gladesville Mission.” Australasian Record, November 22, 1926.

Worker’s Biographical Record. “Norman Asprey Ferris.” South Pacific Division of the General Conference Archives.

Wright, Zena. “Descendants Re-enact Guadalcanal’s Past.” Australasian Record, March 25, 1989.

Notes

  1. Victorian Births Index, “Ferris, Norman Asprey,” 1902/24996.

  2. “On his return to Melbourne …” Australasian Record, August 15, 1904, 7.

  3. “Monthly Summary of Canvassing Work, Victoria.” Australasian Record, November 1, 1905, 6.

  4. “Brother A. H. Ferris …” Australasian Record, May 17, 1920, 8.

  5. “Henceforth a Crown.” Australasian Record, April 24, 1961, 13.

  6. Worker’s Biographical Record, “Norman Asprey Ferris,” South Pacific Division of the General Conference Archives.

  7. Ibid.

  8. Ibid.

  9. Ruby Ferris, “Memoirs,” 1999, unpublished manuscript, copy in possession of author.

  10. “Brother E. G. Whittaker reports …” Australasian Record, March 3, 1924, 5.

  11. “Four tent missions …” Australasian Record, November 10, 1924.

  12. Worker’s Biographical Record, “Norman Asprey Ferris,” South Pacific Division of the General Conference Archives.

  13. Ruby Ferris, “Memoirs,” 1999, unpublished manuscript, copy in possession of author.

  14. A. H. Piper, “Ferris-Chatman.” Australasian Record, October 26, 1925, 7.

  15. R. K. Brown, “A Book, A Man and God,” Australasian Record, November 9, 1985, 1.

  16. Ruby Ferris, “Memoirs,” 1999, unpublished manuscript, copy in possession of author.

  17. A. H. Piper, “Chatman.” Australasian Record, May 2, 1949, 7.

  18. Ruby Ferris, “Memoirs,” 1999, unpublished manuscript, copy in possession of author.

  19. Ibid.

  20. Ibid.

  21. E. G. Whittaker, “The Ryde-Gladesville Mission.” Australasian Record, November 22, 1926, 5-6.

  22. Ruby Ferris, “Memoirs,” 1999, unpublished manuscript, copy in possession of author.

  23. “That we invite …” Australasian Record, October 4, 1926, 32.

  24. “By special arrangement …” Australasian Record, November 22, 1926, 8.

  25. Ruby Ferris, “Memoirs,” 1999, unpublished manuscript, copy in possession of author.

  26. “Brother Norman Ferris …” Australasian Record, March 14, 1927, 8.

  27. Ruby Ferris, “Memoirs,” 1999, unpublished manuscript, copy in possession of author.

  28. Ibid; Worker’s Biographical Record, “Norman Asprey Ferris,” South Pacific Division of the General Conference Archives.

  29. Ruby Ferris, “Memoirs,” 1999, unpublished manuscript, copy in possession of author.

  30. “Sister Norman Ferris …” Australasian Record, November 12, 1928, 8.

  31. Ibid.

  32. Worker’s Biographical Record, “Norman Asprey Ferris,” South Pacific Division of the General Conference Archives.

  33. Ruby Ferris, “Memoirs,” 1999, unpublished manuscript, copy in possession of author.

  34. Ibid.

  35. “Brother and Sister Norman A. Ferris …” Australasian Record, October 27, 1930, 8.

  36. Ruby Ferris, “Memoirs,” 1999, unpublished manuscript, copy in possession of author.

  37. Ibid.

  38. Ibid.

  39. Ibid.

  40. “From the Solomon Islands . . .” Australasian Record, March 2, 1931, 8.

  41. Ruby Ferris, “Memoirs,” 1999, unpublished manuscript, copy in possession of author.

  42. “Following a radio message …” Australasian Record, August 31, 1931, 8.

  43. “Pastor G. Peacock and Brother N. A. Ferris …” Australasian Record, October 12, 1931, 8.

  44. “Brother A. F. Parker writes …” Australasian Record, June 6, 1932, 8.

  45. Norman Asprey Ferris, Worker’s Biographical Record. South Pacific Division of the General Conference Archives. Folder: “Ferris, Norman Asprey.” Document: “Worker’s Biographical Record.”

  46. Zena Wright, “Descendants Re-enact Guadalcanal’s Past,” Australasian Record, March 25, 1989, 10.

  47. Ruby Ferris, “Memoirs,” 1999, unpublished manuscript, copy in possession of author.

  48. Ibid; Zena Wright, “Descendants Re-enact Guadalcanal’s Past,” Australasian Record, March 25, 1989, 10.

  49. Ruby Ferris, “Memoirs,” 1999, unpublished manuscript, copy in possession of author.

  50. L. A. Borgas, “Visit to Rennell Island,” Australasian Record, February 6, 1933, 2.

  51. N. A. Ferris, “Toward the close …” Australasian Record, February 13, 1933, 3.

  52. A. G. Stewart, “Special! Another Urgent Call, Rennell Islands,” Australasian Record, May 22, 1939, 4.

  53. “Reports are reaching us …” Australasian Record, September 3, 1934, 8.

  54. Norman A. Ferris, “’Thank You’ and ‘Good-Bye’,” Australasian Record, May 20, 1935, 2-3.

  55. “Ordinations to the Ministry,” Australasian Record, September 17, 1934, 8.

  56. Norman Asprey Ferris, Worker’s Biographical Record. South Pacific Division of the General Conference Archives. Folder: “Ferris, Norman Asprey.” Document: “Worker’s Biographical Record.”

  57. “Pastors W. G. Turner, N. A. Ferris …” Australasian Record, May 11 1936, 8.

  58. Ruby Ferris, “Memoirs,” 1999, unpublished manuscript, copy in possession of author.

  59. “It is good to see …” Australasian Record, October 5, 1936, 8.

  60. Ruby Ferris, “Memoirs,” 1999, unpublished manuscript, copy in possession of author.

  61. “Dr. E. W. Finkle and Pastor N. A. Ferris …” Australasian Record, May 3, 1937, 8.

  62. Ruby Ferris, “Memoirs,” 1999, unpublished manuscript, copy in possession of author.

  63. “Mrs. Norman Ferris …” Australasian Record, October 11, 1937, 8; “Thirty-One Sail for the Islands in One Week.” Australasian Record, March 28, 1938, 8.

  64. Norman A. Ferris, “In the Mountains of Guadalcanal,” Australasian Record, February 28, 1938, 2.

  65. A. G. Stewart, “In the Islands of the Sea – Divine Predictions Fulfilled,” Australasian Record, May 2, 1938, 12-14.

  66. A. L. Pascoe, “From a Superintendent’s Diary – No. 3,” Australasian Record, September 4, 1939, 4.

  67. E. E. Roenfelt, “Through the Solomon Islands – No. 1,” Australasian Record, September 5, 1938, 3.

  68. A. G. Stewart, “Report of Vice-President for the Island Field. Annual Council, 1939,” Australasian Record, September 25, 1939, 1-2.

  69. W. Martin, “The Solomon Islands,” Australasian Record, January 15, 1940, 3.

  70. H. T. Elliott and A. G. Stewart, “What Hath God Wrought!” Australasian Record, May 20, 1940, 9-11.

  71. A. R. Barrett, “Past and Present in the Solomon Islands,” Australasian Record, June 10, 1940, 3-4.

  72. A. L. Pascoe, “Come Over and Help Us,” Australasian Record, July 15, 1940, 7.

  73. A. L. Pascoe, “Permission Granted at Last to Visit Rennell and Bellona,” Australasian Record, September 9, 1940, 3.

  74. A. L. Pascoe, “The Solomons and the Rennell Group,” Australasian Record, August 26, 1940, 3-4.

  75. Ruby Ferris, “Memoirs,” 1999, unpublished manuscript, copy in possession of author.

  76. Ibid.

  77. “News Notes,” Australasian Record, October 14, 1940, 8.

  78. Ruby Ferris, “Memoirs,” 1999, unpublished manuscript, copy in possession of author.

  79. Ibid.

  80. “Brevities,” Australasian Record, March 3, 1941, 8.

  81. “Brevities,” Australasian Record, October 27, 1941, 8.

  82. E. E. Roenfelt, “Opposition Overcome in the Solomons,” Australasian Record, June 30, 1941, 3.

  83. N. A. Ferris, “Our Visit to Rennell and Bellona,” Australasian Record, August 4, 1941, 3.

  84. “Nominations, Appointments and Transfers,” Australasian Record, October 6, 1941, 8.

  85. Ruby Ferris, “Memoirs,” 1999, unpublished manuscript, copy in possession of author.

  86. Ibid.

  87. “Douglas MacArthur,” Wikipedia, revised February 21, 2019, accessed February 22, 2019, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Douglas_MacArthur,.

  88. Ibid.

  89. Ervin Ferris e-mail message to author, September 28, 2016; “Brevities,” Australasian Record, April 3, 1944, 8.

  90. Ervin Ferris e-mail message to author, September 28, 2016.

  91. Ibid.

  92. E. H. Guilliard, “South Australian Conference,” Australasian Record, March 27, 1944, 3.

  93. “Brevities,” Australasian Record, April 3, 1944, 8.

  94. “Pastor Ragoso Writes from Batuna, Solomon Islands,” Australasian Record, April 17, 1944, 5.

  95. “Brevities,” Australasian Record, May 29, 1944, 8.

  96. W. M. R. Scragg, “Progress in South Australia,” Australasian Record, August 28, 1944, 4; Eileen M. Dwyer, “Greetings from Inverell, North N.S.W.,” Australasian Record, December 4, 1944, 5.

  97. “Brevities,” Australasian Record, May 21, 1945, 8.

  98. N. A. Ferris, “Back in the Solomon Islands,” Australasian Record, July 2, 1945, 4-5.

  99. George Rusa, The Floating Log (Cooranbong, NSW: Heather Dixon, 2005), Part 1 B, 41.

  100. S. V. Stratford, “Australasian Union Conference Secretary’s Report,” Australasian Record, October 1, 1945, 5-6.

  101. Ibid; George Rusa, The Floating Log (Cooranbong, NSW: Heather Dixon, 2005), Part 1 B, 1.

  102. N. A. Ferris, “God Sent Food in Answer to Prayer,” Australasian Record, August 27, 1945, 4.

  103. George Rusa, The Floating Log (Cooranbong, NSW: Heather Dixon, 2005), Part 1 B, 15; Norman Ferris, “Faith Strengthened in the Solomons,” Australasian Record, January 14, 1946, 5.

  104. A. R. Barrett, “Voyage to the Solomons,” Australasian Record, January 21, 1946, 5, 8.

  105. “Adventist Missionary Honoured by the Queen.” Australasian Record, January 31, 1955, 1.

  106. George Rusa, The Floating Log (Cooranbong, NSW: Heather Dixon, 2005), Part 1 B, 15.

  107. “Brevities,” Australasian Record, March 11, 1946, 8.

  108. W. G. Turner, “South N.S.W. Conference Session,” Australasian Record, March 25, 1946, 4.

  109. A. W. Anderson, “South Australian Conference Session,” Australasian Record, April 22, 1946, 4.

  110. S. V. Stratford, “Raymond Ferris obituary,” Australasian Record, June 3, 1946, 7.

  111. “Union Conference Annual Meeting,” Australasian Record, October 28, 1946, 8.

  112. Ruby Ferris, “Memoirs,” 1999, unpublished manuscript, copy in possession of author.

  113. Ibid.

  114. M. E. Rogers, “Links,” Australasian Record, June 30, 1947, 5, 8.

  115. M. M. C., “Never Before!” Australasian Record, December 8, 1952, 8.

  116. K. Moxon, “Avondale Symphonic Choir Sings at Newcastle Eisteddford,” Australasian Record, October 27, 1947, 4-5.

  117. “Brevities,” Australasian Record, July 12, 1948, 8.

  118. Estelle Morrison, “’Maranatha’ – The Lord is Near,” Australasian Record, February 16, 1948, 5.

  119. N. A. Ferris, “An Exhilarating Trip Round the Coral Sea,” Australasian Record, February 28, 1949, 4-5.

  120. A. H. Ferris, “Dedication of the ‘Ka Sali’,” Australasian Record, May 2, 1949, 4; “Brevities,” Australasian Record, May 16, 1949, 8.

  121. “Brevities,” Australasian Record, September, 19, 1949, 8.

  122. “Brevities,” Australasian Record, February 26, 1951, 8.

  123. W. G. Murdoch, “Crabtree - Ferris,” Australasian Record, March 5, 1951, 7.

  124. “Brevities,” Australasian Record, February 25, 1952, 8.

  125. Mrs. Norman Ferris, “Pitcairn Calling,” Australasian Record, April 20, 1953, 9.

  126. N. A. Ferris, “A Loyal Church on Pitcairn Island,” ARH, July 22, 1954, 20.

  127. Ibid.

  128. Ruby Ferris, “Memoirs,” 1999, unpublished manuscript, copy in possession of author.

  129. “Brevities,” Australasian Record, October 19, 1953, 16.

  130. N. A. Ferris, “A Loyal Church on Pitcairn Island,” ARH, July 22, 1954, 20.

  131. Norman A. Ferris, “Extracts from a Letter from Pitcairn,” Australasian Record, August 17, 1953, 8.

  132. “Brevities,” Australasian Record, May 11, 1953, 8.

  133. Norman A. Ferris, “Extracts from a Letter from Pitcairn,” Australasian Record, August 17, 1953, 8.

  134. Ibid.

  135. Myrtle L. Ward, “Coronation Celebrations on Pitcairn.” Australasian Record, August 10, 1953, 8.

  136. Ruby Ferris, “Memoirs,” 1999, unpublished manuscript, copy in possession of author.

  137. “Brevities,” Australasian Record, May 17, 1954, 16.

  138. Ruby Ferris, “Memoirs,” 1999, unpublished manuscript, copy in possession of author.

  139. G. Branster, “News Notes from Central Pacific Union Mission,” Australasian Record, June 14, 1954, 4.

  140. G. Branster, “Report of Central Pacific Union Mission,” Australasian Record, January 3, 1955, 11-13.

  141. “Brevities,” Australasian Record, November 29, 1954, 16.

  142. “The Sea Must Be Reckoned With,” Australasian Record, February 14, 1955, 4.

  143. “Adventist Missionary Honoured by the Queen.” Australasian Record, January 31, 1955, 1.

  144. Ibid.

  145. Ibid.

  146. Ruby Ferris, “Memoirs,” 1999, unpublished manuscript, copy in possession of author; Marilyn Peatey e-mail message to author, February 28, 2019.

  147. C. M. G., “Ferris – Davey,” Australasian Record, February 7, 1955.

  148. “Brevities,” Australasian Record, March 28, 1955, 8.

  149. N. A. Ferris, “Pitcairn Creates Goodwill,” Australasian Record, October 31, 1955, 16.

  150. Ibid; “Brevities,” Australasian Record, May 23, 1955, 8; N. A. Ferris, “Tiny Pitcairn, a Bulwark against Evolution,” Australasian Record, February 20, 1956, 7-8.

  151. N. A. Ferris, “Tiny Pitcairn, a Bulwark against Evolution,” Australasian Record, February 20, 1956, 7-8.

  152. Ibid.

  153. Ibid.

  154. Ruby Ferris, “Memoirs,” 1999, unpublished manuscript, copy in possession of author.

  155. Ibid.

  156. Ibid.

  157. W. J. Hawken, “Davey – Ferris,” Australasian Record, March 26, 1956, 7.

  158. N. A. Ferris, “Norfolk Looks Back 100 Years,” Australasian Record, July 23, 1956, 8-9.

  159. “Brevities,” Australasian Record, July 30, 1956, 8.

  160. Ruby Ferris, “Memoirs,” 1999, unpublished manuscript, copy in possession of author.

  161. G. E. Stickleu, “His Last Service,” Australasian Record, August 18, 1958, 7.

  162. N. A. Ferris, “Monamona Mission in Good Running Order,” Australasian Record, January 14, 1957, 4.

  163. Ibid.

  164. Evan D. Hay, “Joy for the Joyless,” Australasian Record, April 22, 1957, 8.

  165. W. J. Richards, “Aboriginal Church Organised,” Australasian Record, April 1, 1957, 3.

  166. “News from Queensland,” Australasian Record, June 17, 1957, 3.

  167. “Brevities,” Australasian Record, January 6, 1958, 8.

  168. Ruby Ferris, “Memoirs,” 1999, unpublished manuscript, copy in possession of author.

  169. Ibid.

  170. Ibid.

  171. W. J. Richards, “Ferris,” Australasian Record, August 18, 1958, 15.

  172. Ibid.

  173. Ruby Ferris, “Memoirs,” 1999, unpublished manuscript, copy in possession of author.

  174. Ibid.

  175. Ibid.

  176. Zena Wright, “Descendants Re-enact Guadalcanal’s Past,” Australasian Record, March 25, 1989, 10.

  177. Ervin Ferris, Barry Crabtree, “Ferris,” Australasian Record, March 15, 2003, 14.

×

Tarburton, Shirley. "Ferris, Norman Asprey (1902–1958) and Rubina May (Chatman) (1899–2003)." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. January 29, 2020. Accessed May 20, 2022. https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=57VX.

Tarburton, Shirley. "Ferris, Norman Asprey (1902–1958) and Rubina May (Chatman) (1899–2003)." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. January 29, 2020. Date of access May 20, 2022, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=57VX.

Tarburton, Shirley (2020, January 29). Ferris, Norman Asprey (1902–1958) and Rubina May (Chatman) (1899–2003). Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. Retrieved May 20, 2022, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=57VX.