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West Amazon Conference headquarters facade in 2019.

Photo courtesy of West Amazon Conference Archives.

West Amazon Conference

By Ronivon da Silva dos Santos, and Adilson da Silva Vieira

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Ronivon da Silva dos Santos

Adilson da Silva Vieira

The West Amazon Conference is an administrative unit of the Seventh-day Adventist Church located in the territory of the Northwest Brazil Union Mission. It is headquartered on 3932 José Vieira Caúla Avenue, Zip Code 76.820-390 in the neighborhood of Agenor Martins de Carvalho in the city of Porto Velho, which is the capital of the state of Rondônia, Brazil.1

Territory and Statistics

The West Amazon Conference (Associação Amazônia Ocidental or AAmO) is responsible for the administration of Adventist churches in the northern region of the state of Rondônia in addition to the state of Acre and part of the Amazon. In northern Rondônia, it covers 18 cities with a total of approximately 988,785 inhabitants, of which 20,682 are Seventh-day Adventists and are spread over 207 congregations organized in 26 districts. It still has the entire state of Acre as its evangelistic field, which is comprised of 22 cities with a population of 829,619 inhabitants, 12,006 of whom are members of the Adventist Church. They are distributed in 14 pastoral districts and 131 congregations. The field also reaches seven more cities in the state of Amazonas. Thus, the estimated population of its entire area is 2,081,034 inhabitants,2 of which 35,386 are Seventh-day Adventists. The missionary field covered by the AAmO has a total of 43 pastoral districts with 367 congregations. The average is one Adventist per 60 inhabitants.3

In the AAmO territory, there are four educational institutions from the Adventist Educational Network, which are: Porto Velho Adventist Academy (CAPV), in the city of Porto Velho, with 953 students; Ariquemes Adventist Academy (EAA), in the city of Ariquemes, with 347 students; and Jaru Adventist Academy (EAJ), in the city of Jaru, with 159 students. These three academies are located in the state of Rondônia. There is also the Rio Branco Adventist Academy (CARB) in the city of Rio Branco in the state of Acre, with 614 students. In total, 2,073 students are served in the four units.4

The AAmO also evangelizes through technological resources, such as TV Novo Tempo [Hope Channel Brazil]. The station operates in an open channel in the cities of Alto Paraíso, Ariquemes, Cacaulândia, and Cujubim located in the state of Rondônia, and also the city of Humaitá in the state of Amazonas. The estimated potential reach is 1,171,236 people.5 The Adventist Development and Relief Agency International (ADRA) is also present in this missionary territory, providing development projects and services to the community. The ADRA headquarters office is located at the same address as the AAmO offices. And in order for the administrative activities of the field to be successfully developed, the AAmO has a total of 339 staff members, 64 of whom are church caretakers, 212 are teachers and employees in the Administrative Region of Acre and Rondônia, six are employees in the Serviço Educacional Lar e Saúde (SELS) [Educational Service Home and Health], three are canvassers,6 and 44 are employees who work in the AAmO office. There are 44 ordained pastors and 10 licensed pastors working in the ministerial area.7

The Origin of the SDA Work in the Conference Territory

The beginning of the Adventist work in the present AAmO missionary field can be told from the emergence of the Lower Amazon Mission, presently the North Pará Conference, in 1927. Its first president was Pastor John L. Brown, and its headquarters were located in the city of Belém, the capital of the state of Pará. Its organization was developed by the East Brazil Union Conference (presently the Southeast Brazil Union Conference), and its territory covered the states of Pará, Amazonas, Ceará, Maranhão, Piauí, Amapá, Acre, Rondônia, and Roraima. In all the area covered by the Lower Amazon Mission, there was not a single Adventist congregation. However, Pastor Brown and two canvassers, André Gedrath and Hans Mayr, were actively working there.8 In the following year, Pastor Leo Halliwell assumed the leadership of this administrative unit. He was the forerunner of missions in rivers, through the Light Bearer launch,9 along with his wife, Jessie Halliwell. The work done by this couple was fundamental to spreading the Gospel in northern Brazil.

In relation to Adventist work in the state of Acre, the role of canvasser Pedro Cunha Linhares was fundamentally important. His contact with the Adventist message took place on a Wednesday night in the city of Belém. When passing in front of an Adventist Church, Linhares was impressed with the hymns that were being sung, so he decided to enter the temple and attend the worship service. He was invited to come back more often. He studied the Bible with a church member and, in 1934, was baptized by Pastor Leo Halliwell. Later, Pedro Linhares was invited to become a canvasser-evangelist, and he accepted the invitation to canvass10 in the northern region of Brazil in 1937, including in his itinerary the capital of Acre, Rio Branco. The trip by a rowing canoe from Manaus to Rio Branco took approximately two months. Peter was a great preacher of the Gospel through canvassing, leading many people to baptism. He canvassed for 19 years, and over that period, he returned to Acre to do missionary work more three times.11

With the growth of the Lower Amazon Mission, in 1936, its entire missionary area of activity was ceded to a new SDA administrative unit, the North Brazil Union Conference (União Norte Brasileira or UNB). Upon this change, the new Union started to serve two missions: the Lower Amazon Mission, comprised by the states of Pará, Amazonas, and the Federal Territory of Acre, as well as the North Coast Mission (now the Ceará Conference), integrating the states of Ceará, Maranhão, and Piauí. At that time, the state of Amazonas was comprised of the present state of Roraima12 and part of the state of Rondônia.13

In 1940, a new administrative unit was organized--the Central Amazon Mission (presently the Central Amazon Conference - Associação Central Amazonas or ACeAm), headquartered in Manaus, the capital of Amazonas. Following the creation of this unit, there was considerable growth in the missionary field of that region. The increasing amount of institutions and members led the Central Amazon Conference (Lower Amazon Mission or MCA) and the UNB to study a new configuration for evangelistic work in the Amazon region.14 The SDA organization made many efforts to be able to evangelize the huge Amazon region, and at no time had the difficulties halted the purpose of the committed believers who worked to spread of the Gospel.

One of these people who engaged in the mission of preaching the Gospel was Ms. Maria do Carmo D’Ávila, known as “Ms. Carminha.” She came across Adventism when she lived in the city of Rio de Janeiro in southeastern Brazil. After a few years, she moved to the city of Manaus, where she was evangelized by Pastor Walkírio Lima. Subsequently, Ms. Carminha moved to the city of Porto Velho in the Federal Territory of Guaporé (now the state of Rondônia). As she arrived in the city, Ms. Carminha did not find any Adventist churches nearby to attend.15

In 1944, pastors Walter Streithorst, Walkírio Lima, and Itanel Ferraz arrived in Porto Velho. These ministers had known Ms. Carminha since they were in Manaus, and so they sought her out in order to talk. Ms. Carminha informed them that there was no Adventist presence at the place, a challenge to be overcome. Due to that fact, the pastors held the first evangelistic meetings in the house of Ms. Carminha in the Areal neighborhood to win people for the kingdom of God. Ms. Carminha was the first Adventist in the city of Porto Velho.16 Nowadays, Areal is a district with six congregations and a total of 668 members.17

In the Adventism history in Rondônia, one of the pioneers was canvasser Itamar Duarte Maduro. In 1944, he went from Manaus to Porto Velho to carry out the canvassing work. After realizing that the field was very promising, in 1945, he decided to settle there with his family. Itamar was a pioneer in preaching the Gospel through books as well as a prominent leader in the local church. The first pastor who took up residence in Porto Velho was Enoque Medrado. He was also a pioneer and was responsible for the churches in Rondônia and Acre. He remained in the district only in 1956 because after that year, he died in an accident. 18

The first Adventist Church in Porto Velho was built in 1960 and was located on Sete de Setembro Avenue in the city’s center. A year later (1961), the Sete de Setembro Adventist Academy was established, which is now Porto Velho Adventist Academy. However, the building where it located was sold in the 1980s, and with the money collected, three new lands were bought: one for the construction of the new Central Church Temple on Lauro Sodré Street in the Olaria neighborhood, where it is located nowadays; the second for the construction of Porto Velho Adventist Academy; and the third for the headquarters of the West Amazon Conference. The latter two were in Agenor de Carvalho neighborhood.19

In 1964, Mr. José Ubirajara de Santana arrived in the city of Rio Branco in Acre. On that occasion, he met three Adventists in the city who were from Manaus: Cipriano Santos, João Raimundo, and Alice Correia. They met on Sabbath mornings at the house of Brother Cipriano Santos to study the Sabbath School Lesson. Subsequently, they began to preach through radio programs, including “A Voz da Profecia” [“The Voice of Prophecy”].20 Around 200 people signed up to take the Bible course “A Bíblia Fala” [“The Bible Speaks”]. Many of them were baptized, including public figures at the time such as councilors and other officials. As the number of members increased, there was a need for a larger place for them to congregate. It was then that the MCA, through Cipriano, acquired a house that served as a meeting place for the new congregation. Currently, one of the pastoral houses in Rio Branco is located at that same address.21

With the expansion of Adventist work in Rio Branco, the MCA sent Pastor Waldomiro Reis to shepherd Adventists in the capital of Acre. Reis was the first pastor for the Rio Branco Central Church, and it was he who negotiated the purchase of the temple property located on 1115 Floriano Peixoto Street in the city’s center. This is the church address to this day. After the land was acquired, the Mission administrators sent a commission to verify the real situation of Adventists in the city. Once the need for a meeting place arose, the MCA sent funds to build Rio Branco Central Church in 1966. The congregation continued to grow, and on September 25, 1971, it was officially organized.22 Nowadays, the congregation has 441 active members. The temple was renovated and reinaugurated on May 20, 2017.23

Another work front that made Adventism develop in the state of Acre was the Adventist Educational Network. The Rio Branco Adventist Academy started its activities in 1968 at the initiative of some members such as José Ubirajara Santana. They decided to build two classrooms in the back of the Central Church. The school’s first name was Plácido de Castro Adventist Academy. However, it was only regularized in 1976, then receiving the name Rio Branco Adventist Academy.24

The Conference Organizational History

On June 5, 1979, the Executive Board of the Central Amazon Mission sent a request for the splitting of its missionary field to the South American Division (SAD), and it included the proposal to create a new Mission headquartered in Porto Velho. SAD leadership recognized that the missionary area of activity of the Central Amazon Mission was very extensive, and due to the splitting, the number of churches in the states of Acre and Rondônia would grow because the field was promising and was still developing.25 The name of the new Mission was approved on November 5, 1979, and so it came to be called the West Amazon Mission. With the approval of its higher body, the MCA Executive Board met on December 4, 1979, in order to register the field reconfiguration authorization.26 Thereafter, the construction of a head office for the new unit began. Its construction was only possible through contributions from the SAD, the Brazil Publishing House, the Central Amazon Mission and through a bank loan.27

The West Amazon Mission missionary field comprised the states of Acre and Rondônia. At the time of its foundation, the West Amazon Mission had 11 organized churches, 46 groups, 5,520 members, seven schools, and 14 pastors. Its first administrators were pastors Aníbal A. Pittau and Rui Linhares de Freitas as president and secretary-treasurer respectively.28 The first Mission Assembly was held within December 7-10, 1979.29 And the first location of the West Amazon Mission was at 768 Afonso Pena Avenue in the central part of the city of Porto Velho. The office remained at that address from January 1980 to August 1986. At that time, the field office moved to 3932 José Vieira Caúla Avenue in the neighborhood of Agenor de Carvalho in this same city, where it remains located to this day.30

With the significant growth of Adventist institutions in that region, on December 4, 1990, the Mission changed its status to the West Amazon Conference.31 On this occasion, the president of the administrative unit was Pastor Orlando Gonzáles Pineda with Pastor Dimas Cavalar as secretary. In the growth report of the West Amazon Conference, presented in that period, 50 churches, 144 groups, 18,665 members, 12 schools, and 30 pastors in its territory were already registered. In order to continue expanding and multiplying the results of its work, the Conference mission was to proclaim to all people in its missionary field the eternal Gospel for the salvation of everyone who believes and accepts Jesus as a savior.32

To fulfill this mission, in 1995, the AAmO leaders conducted an evangelism campaign in the city of Cruzeiro do Sul while aiming to reach the most distant cities in the state of Acre. At the time, all pastors who worked in the AAmO office were directed to Cruzeiro do Sul. Through this evangelism, many people were reached, and three new congregations were established.33 This was an important victory for the Conference due to the size of the challenge to evangelize that place. Cruzeiro do Sul, in Acre, is the furthest city from the headquarters of the AAmO office, 1,148 km away and with an estimated population of 87,673 inhabitants.34 For many years, the pastors responsible for that district traveled to the city to preach and baptize people once a year only. The trips were made by plane because there was no open road. Thus, it can be noted that the creation of this administrative unit collaborated so that the Church could serve districts further away from the headquarters with greater effectiveness, thus allowing the expansion of the Adventist message throughout this region.35

The Conference advanced not only in the missionary area, but also in the area of education. In 1980, with the authorization of the governing bodies, the operation of the Porto Velho Adventist Academy was approved. On this occasion, the academy address was at 1173 Sete de Setembro Avenue in the city’s center. On February 3, 1986, the academy moved to its new location on 2166 Mayor Chiquilito Erse Avenue in the neighborhood of Agenor de Carvalho. Fifteen years after this change, two more important events occurred regarding Adventist education. The first was the establishment of Jaru Adventist Academy through the vote no. 2001-073 of July 3, 2001, which launched its activities in 2002,36 and the second happened on November 14, 2001, when the Acre Department of Education authorized the implementation of High School in Rio Branco Adventist Academy.37

As for evangelistic actions, in 2004, the AAmO developed a program called “Caravana do Poder” [“Caravan of Power”], which had Pastor Alejandro Bullón as speaker. The administrators and departmental leaders, with over 50 young people from various cities, oversaw this project. The Caravan aimed to tour the main cities in the state of Rondônia. During the day, young people collected food to be delivered to city halls for needy families. At night, Pastor Bullón preached in large auditoriums such as gymnasiums, soccer fields, and exhibition parks. At the time, many people heard and were interested in the message. This program was developed over a period of 4 years and was quite successful.38

The Gospel continued to be preached, and the number of Adventists increased so much that, in 2006, the Conference was serving 67,670 members in 38 districts with 338 congregations and 16 schools. Among these schools was the West Amazon Adventist Academy (Instituto Adventista da Amazonia Ocidental or IAAMO), which operates in a boarding school system, and is currently administered by the Northwest Brazil Union Conference.39 With the development of the church in the northern region of Brazil, there was a need for an administrative reorganization in the states of Rondônia and Acre in order to better serve members. Thus, in 2007, the AAmO missionary territory was divided, giving rise to the South Rondônia Conference (Associação Sul de Rondônia or ASuR), which was inaugurated on November 11, 2007. This new conference, headquartered in the city of Ji-Paraná in Rondônia, was responsible for serving Adventists in the southern region of Rondônia and the city of Rondolândia in the state of Mato Grosso. Since then, the two fields have been working to spread the Gospel to those who live in that territory.40

As of 2010, the North Brazil Union Mission underwent a territorial reconfiguration. Considered one of the largest Unions in the world in territorial extension, the UNB had part of its mission field split, which corresponded to the states of Amazonas, Acre, Rondônia and Roraima. Due to the splitting of this territory, the administrative units that serve these states (AAmO, ASuR, ACeAm and Amazonas-Roraima Conference – Associação Amazonas Roraima or AAmaR), became part of the Northwest Brazil Union Mission, and is headquartered in Manaus.41

Far from there, on January 12, 2010, a remarkable event occurred in Haiti. A magnitude 7.0 earthquake struck the city, resulting in many people being injured, becoming homeless, and killed. Thousands of Haitians immigrated to Brazil, and many of them entered the country through the city of Cobija in Bolivia, bordering the city of Brasiléia in Acre. These immigrants saw in Brazil an opportunity to survive and help their families who remained in Haiti.42 When they arrived in Brazil, many of them immediately migrated to the South and Southeast regions of the country. However, some remained in Porto Velho, including Adventists. These members met in some churches in the capital; nevertheless, they faced some difficulties since there was no place to worship in their native language. Given this, AAmO leaders planned to build a church so Haitian members could worship in their own language and culture. The project was partnered with the AAmO churches secretaries, and they fully funded the construction of this new temple. Its organization happened on September 27, 2013, and this congregation started to serve 35 Haitian members.43

As part of the Amazon Region, the AAmO missionary area of activity has many indigenous tribes. According to Acre Pro-Indian Commission (Comissão Pró-Índio do Acre or CPI-ACRE), there are approximately 27 ethnic groups distributed across 36 indigenous lands in the state of Acre. According to the CPI-ACRE, the indigenous population is approximately 18,696 people.44 In 2010, through an evangelistic effort made by Pastor Wladimir de Oliveira,45 many Indians from the village of Camicuã were baptized. Then, a church was built so that they could congregate. The Camicuã Church has 46 members nowadays and belongs to the district of Boca do Acre in the state of Amazonas.46

At that time, the only city that did not have an Adventist church in the state of Acre was Porto Walter. This city is bordered by the cities of Marechal Thaumaturgo and Cruzeiro do Sul, and its population is 11,720 inhabitants.47 In 2014, from a project developed between the church secretaries and the AAmO administration, a temple was built in Porto Walter with all the resources donated by the secretaries. The new church was inaugurated on November 12, 2014, and now it has 149 members and belongs to the Cruzeiro do Sul district.48

The Adventist Church continues to develop important projects in the AAmO missionary area of activity. Due to that, local authorities often recognize the importance of the Church and support it. An example of that is the legislative bill that establishes an official date in the calendar of the capital of Rondonia for the program “Quebrando o Silêncio” [“Breaking the Silence”]. On September 20, 2016, this project was voted on and approved by the Porto Velho City Council.49 The date chosen and approved by parliamentarians was the same date that the campaign is celebrated by the SDA Church throughout the South American territory: the fourth Saturday of August.50

Since its establishment, the AAmO has stood out for maintaining a good standard of estate development in churches and institutions. It is also concerned with the integral development of the Church as shown by the projects highlighted in its history. An example of this is that, on May 27, 2017, the group “+ Perto” [“Closer”] was organized, and with this inauguration, all neighborhoods of Porto Velho now have an Adventist presence, making this capital the second in the world with this accomplishment. The first was the city of Manaus in Amazonas, in 2014.51 During the inauguration ceremony, directors of the DSA, of the Northwest Brazil Union Mission and of the Administrative Units led by the Union were present. On that same day, there was a great celebration which was attended by 8,000 people, marking the SDA history in that state.52

On the assistance front, ADRA has been developing projects to meet the needs of the population. In partnership with local churches, ADRA promotes professional courses for communities in need. The first session of these courses certified more than 60 students in Basic Mechanics, Basic Electrical, Secretariat, and Bakery. This type of initiative has been an essential missionary tool of the SDA Church in the AAmO territory. In the state of Rondônia, one example of these actions is the “Projeto Renascer” [“Reborn Project”] developed in an urban community in the East Zone of Porto Velho. In this community, continuous voluntary services of medical and dental care, lectures, activities for children, and other social actions are provided. ADRA also manages a music educational project that serves more than 30 children in the community who are between 8 and 12 years old with music, Spanish, and choir lessons. Another project is the “Trailer Odontológico” [“Dental Trailer”] developed in communities needing these services. Assistance is provided in partnership with city halls, churches, communities in general, and with government support. The trailer was inaugurated on May 27, 2017, and since then, ADRA has served thousands of people across the state of Rondônia through this initiative.53

ADRA Rondônia also carries out a project called “Mãos que Servem” [“Serving Hands”] which covers assistance actions aimed at homeless people in the city of Porto Velho, offering meals, clothing donations and emotional counseling. The reality of people in these circumstances is quite cruel: There are more than 1,500 homeless people in the city, and many of them have been drug addicts. ADRA plans to soon manage a support center for these people that will operate daily with professional workshops and psychological counseling. Until this plan becomes a reality, the agency offers every Monday through a group of volunteers, assistance action for those who have nothing to eat or anywhere to sleep.54

On July 10, 2019, the Adventist Church took an important step towards evangelizing institutional inmates. On this day, the Secretariat of Justice of Rondônia and the SDA Church started a partnership that will allow TV Novo Tempo [Hope Channel Brazil] to be available on TV sets used by prisons in the state of Rondônia. In Porto Velho alone, there are 14 prison units, and the objective of this project is for thousands of people access “educational content in the health and spiritual areas.” At first, this program will undergo a testing phase. After approval, the next phase will be its implementation in all state prison units. The initiative for this project came from a public person who noticed a change in the life of his own brother once he became a viewer of the channel. Government officials and Adventist Church leaders believe that the broadcaster’s schedules may contribute to the rehabilitation of detainees.55

Although it has achieved important goals in its journey, missionary work in the West Amazon Conference field is still challenged by its geographical extension. The farthest city under its administration in the state of Rondônia (Jaru) is approximately 1,434 km away from the farthest one under its administration in the state of Acre (Cruzeiro do Sul)56. This does not include the cities covered by the state of Amazonas. This geographical extension, aggravated by difficulties in access, makes the preaching of the Gospel in this region very challenging. In order to respond to these realities, one of the main projects for the coming years is the establishment of a mission in Acre. With the implementation of another administrative unit, it is expected that more people will come to know biblical truths. This objective has guided the efforts of this Conference. The goal is that up to the maximum of 8 years this dream may be realized, and the West Amazon Conference can continue successfully fulfilling its mission.

Chronology of Administrative Leaders57

Presidents: Aníbal A. Pittau (1979-1982); Job F. Santos (1982-1986); Adamôr L. Pimenta (1986-1989); Orlando G. Pineda (1989-1992); José C. Barbosa (1992-1998); Manoel A.F. Cintra (1998-2003); Ranieri B. Sales (2003-2005); Joab E.F. Chagas (2005-2010); Moisés B. Souza (2010-2015); Emerson A.N. Campanholo (2015-Present).

Secretaries: Rui L. Freitas (1979-1982); Elioenai P. Serpa (1982-1983); Anastácio C. Ximenes (1983-1986); Orlando G. Ferreira (1986-1989); Dimas Cavalar (1990-1992); Rui L. Freitas (1992-1996); Manoel A.F. Cintra (1996-1998); Montano B. Netto (1998-1999); Joab E.F. Chagas (1999-2005); Nelson Suci (2005-2006); Sidney H. Franco (2006-2010); Francisco A.S. Cavalcante (2010-2014); Emerson A.N. Campanholo (2014-2015); Ronivon S. Santos (2015-2018); Marcelo N. Miranda (2018-Present).

Treasurers: Rui L. Freitas (1979-1982); Elioenai P. Serpa (1982-1983); Anastácio C. Ximenes (1983-1986); Orlando G. Ferreira (1986-1989); Dimas Cavalar (1990-1992); Rui L. Freitas (1992-1996); Gideon O. Basílio (1996-2002); José M. Assis (2003-2006); Nelson V. Pinto (2006-2016); Natanael A. Cunha (2016-Present).58

Sources

“A capital mais evangelizada” [“The most evangelized capital”]. Revista Adventista, February 2014.

Acre. Cruzeiro do Sul. 2010 Brazil Census. Overview. IBGE, accessed May 14, 2019, https://bit.ly/2xxgURd.

Brasil Escola. https://brasilescola.uol.com.br/.

Cavalcanti, Francisco Abdoval da Silva. A conquista de uma cidade: conheça a história da capital mais evangelizada do Brasil [The conquest of a city: discover the history of the most evangelized capital in Brazil]. Tatuí, SP: Brazil Publishing House, 2016.

Central Amazon Conference Minutes, June 1979, vote no. 1979-072.

Central Amazon Conference Minutes, November 1979, vote no. 1979-199.

Central Amazon Conference Minutes, December 1979, vote no. 1979-226.

Central Amazon Conference Minutes, December 1979, vote no. 1979-302.

Centro Nacional da Memória Adventista [National Center of Adventist History]. https://bit.ly/2SYs3kN.

CPI-ACRE. http://www.cpiacre.org.br/.

Guimarães, Jorge Pedrosa. “Crescimento do Movimento Adventista na Missão Central Amazonas” [“Growth of the Adventist Movement in the Central Amazon Mission”]. Monograph, Brazil College, 1988.

Hack, Ana. “Capital celebra uma igreja em cada bairro” [“Capital celebrates one church in each neighborhood”]. Notícias Adventistas [Adventist News] (Online), June 2, 2017.

Hack, Ana. “Novo Tempo será implantada em presídios de Rondônia” [“Hope Channel Brazil will be implemented in prisons in Rondônia”]. Notícias Adventistas [Adventist News] (Online), July 12, 2019.

InfoEscola. https://www.infoescola.com/.

Lemes, Vanessa. “Quebrando o Silêncio tem data no calendário de Porto Velho” [“Breaking the Silence has a date on the Porto Velho calendar”]. Notícias Adventistas [Adventist News], September 20, 2016.

Lessa, Rubens. Construtores de Esperança: na trilha dos pioneiros adventistas da Amazônia [Builders of Hope: on the trail of Adventist pioneers in the Amazon]. Tatuí, SP: Brazil Publishing House, 2016.

Luzeiro [Light Bearer]. https://www.luzeiro.org/.

Melo, D. S. “O que Vai Pela Missão Central-Amazonas” [“What happens in the Central Amazon Mission”]. Revista Adventista 56, no. 9 (September 1961).

Novo Tempo [Hope Channel Brazil]. https://www.novotempo.com/.

Portal da Educação Adventista [Adventist Education Website]. https://www.educacaoadventista.org.br/.

Portal São Francisco [São Francisco Website]. https://www.portalsaofrancisco.com.br/.

Rio Branco Adventist Academy. Facebook post, “Nossa História” [“Our History”], March 1, 2019, https://bit.ly/2yUePft.

Rondônia. Porto Velho. 2010 Brazil Census. Overview. IBGE, accessed August 24, 2016, https://bit.ly/2IJakeu.

Rota Mapas [Route Maps]. https://www.rotamapas.com.br/.

Seventh-day Adventist Church (Brazil) website. http://www.adventistas.org/pt/.

Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook. Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association. Various years. https://www.adventistyearbook.org/.

Sistema Adventista de Docentes [Adventist Teachers System]. http://sad.aamo.org.br.

Sistema Adventista de Gestão de Igrejas [Adventist Management System of Churches]. https://www.acmsnet.org.

West Amazon Conference Minutes, December 1979, vote no. 1986-122.

West Amazon Conference Minutes, July 2001, vote no. 2001-073.

West Amazon Conference Minutes, May 2006, vote no. 2006-022.

West Amazon Mission Minutes, April 1983, vote no. 1983-032.

West Amazon Mission Minutes, December 1979, vote no. 1979-001.

West Amazon Mission Minutes, December 1990, vote no. 1990-263.

West Amazon Mission Minutes, July 2001, vote no. 2001-073.

Wilcox, E. H. “Tres Mil e Duzentos Kilometros de Lancha Pelo Amazonas” [“Three thousand and two hundred kilometers in a launch through the Amazon”]. Revista Adventista 25, no. 7 (July 1930).

Notes

  1. Seventh-day Adventist Online Yearbook, “West Amazon Conference,” accessed February 7, 2019, https://bit.ly/2UGLrWi.

  2. 2010 Brazil Census, Porto Velho, Rondônia, overview, IBGE, accessed August 24, 2016, https://bit.ly/2IJakeu; Seventh-day Adventist Online Yearbook, “West Amazon Conference,” accessed February 7, 2019, https://bit.ly/2UGLrWi.

  3. Sistema Adventista de Gestão de Igrejas [Adventist Management System of Churches] (ACMS), information provided by the registry secretary May 9, 2019, https://www.acmsnet.org.

  4. Sistema Adventista de Docentes [Adventist Teachers System] (SAD), information provided by the education secretary May 9, 2019, http://sad.aamo.org.br.

  5. Tito Rocha (Hope Channel Brazil expansion director), interviewed by Ronivon da Silva dos Santos, October 30, 2017.

  6. An evangelist canvasser of the Seventh-day Adventist Church is the missionary who “develops his ministry by acquiring and selling to the public the publications edited and approved by the Church, to transmit to his fellow-men the eternal Gospel that brings salvation and physical and spiritual well-being.” Seventh-day Adventist Church (Brazil) website, “Colportagem” [“Canvassing”], accessed February 4, 2020, http://bit.ly/2J6tY1I.

  7. Sistema Adventista de Pagamento [Adventist Payment System] (APS), information provided by the HR manager May 9, 2019.

  8. E. H. Wilcox, “Tres Mil e Duzentos Kilometros de Lancha Pelo Amazonas” [“Three thousand and two hundred kilometers in a launch through the Amazon”], Revista Adventista 25, no. 7 (July 1930): 13.

  9. “The first Light Bearer Missionary Launch was inaugurated in July 1931 by the couple Leo and Jessie Halliwell, aiming to bring health education and free medical and dental assistance to the riverside population in the Amazon. [...] During these 80 years, thousands of people were directly benefited by the support provided by the launches. In many cases, this was the only way of these people to get some medical and dental assistance.” Luzeiro [Light-bearer], “História” [“History”], accessed January 22, 2020, https://www.luzeiro.org/.

  10. Canvassing work is a “voluntary distribution activity and independent of religious publishing and themes related to health and family quality of life.” Those who work in canvassing works are known as canvassers. Seventh-day Adventist Church (Brazil) website, “Colportagem” [“Canvassing Work”], accessed February 14, 2020, https://bit.ly/2RQirbB.

  11. Centro Nacional da Memória Adventista [National Center of Adventist History], accessed April 6, 2020, https://bit.ly/2ubvpsq.

  12. Portal São Francisco [São Francisco website], “Roraima,” accessed August 5, 2019, https://bit.ly/2YnaZuq.

  13. InfoEscola, “História de Rondônia” [Rondônia History], accessed August 5, 2019, https://bit.ly/2KijYEL.

  14. Jorge Pedrosa Guimarães, “Crescimento do Movimento Adventista na Missão Central Amazonas” [“Growth of the Adventist Movement in the Central Amazon Mission”], Monograph, Brazil College, 1988, 11.

  15. Rubens Lessa, Construtores de esperança: na trilha dos pioneiros adventistas da Amazônia [Builders of Hope: on the trail of Adventist pioneers in the Amazon], Tatuí, SP: Brazilian Publishing House, 2016, 35; Francisco Abdoval Cavalcanti, A conquista de uma cidade: conheça a história da capital mais evangelizada do Brasil [The conquest of a city: discover the history of the most evangelized capital in Brazil], Tatuí, SP: Brazil Publishing House, 2016, 90-91.

  16. Ibid.

  17. Sistema Adventista de Gestão de Igrejas [Adventist Management System of Churches] (ACMS), information provided by the registry secretary May 9, 2019, https://www.acmsnet.org.

  18. Lessa, Construtores de esperança: na trilha dos pioneiros adventistas da Amazônia [Builders of Hope: on the trail of Adventist pioneers in the Amazon], 35; Cavalcanti, A conquista de uma cidade: conheça a história da capital mais evangelizada do Brasil [The conquest of a city: discover the history of the most evangelized capital in Brazil], 90-91.

  19. Ibid.

  20. “The Voice of Prophecy is the oldest evangelical program on Brazilian radio, starting in 1943. Since its beginning, it has had the musical participation of the Arautos do Rei [The Kings Heralds] quartet. Currently, the program has its version, also for TV, and is presented by Pastor Gilson Brito, who has been in the pastoral ministry for over 30 years. Biblical sermons that present the message of hope and salvation.” Hope Channel Brazil, “A Voz da Profecia” [“The Voice of Prophecy”], accessed January 28, 2020, https://bit.ly/2RzGrRh.

  21. Silas Santana (member of the SDA Rio Branco Central Church), interviewed by Ronivon da Silva dos Santos, May 10, 2019.

  22. Ibid.

  23. Sistema Adventista de Gestão de Igrejas [Adventist Management System of Churches] (ACMS), information provided by the registry secretary May 9, 2019, https://www.acmsnet.org.

  24. Colégio Adventista de Rio Branco [Rio Branco Adventist Academy], Facebook post, “Nossa História” [“Our History”], March 1, 2019, accessed August 12, 2019, https://bit.ly/2yUePft.

  25. Central Amazon Conference Minutes, June 1979, vote no. 1979-072, 26; Naomi Rosas Pinheiro (ACeAm registry secretary), email message to Ronivon da Silva dos Santos, November 8, 2018.

  26. Central Amazon Conference Minutes, November 1979, vote no. 1979-199, 93; Naomi Rosas Pinheiro (ACeAm registry secretary), email message to Ronivon da Silva dos Santos, November 8, 2018.

  27. Central Amazon Conference Minutes, December 1979, vote no. 1979-226, 107; Naomi Rosas Pinheiro (ACeAm registry secretary), email message to Ronivon da Silva dos Santos, November 8, 2018.

  28. West Amazon Mission Minutes, December 1979, vote no. 1979-001, 01; Leila Cristina da Silva Teodoro (AAmO registry secretary), email message to Ronivon da Silva dos Santos, August 24, 2016.

  29. Central Amazon Conference Minutes, December 1979, vote no. 1979-302, 169; Naomi Rosas Pinheiro (ACeAm registry secretary), email message to Ronivon da Silva dos Santos, November 8, 2018.

  30. West Amazon Mission Minutse, December 1979, vote no. 1979-001, 01; Leila Cristina da Silva Teodoro (AAmO registry secretary), email message to Ronivon da Silva dos Santos, August 8, 2018.

  31. West Amazon Conference Minutes, December 1979, vote no. 1986-122, 35; Leila Cristina da Silva Teodoro (AAmO registry secretary), email message to Ronivon da Silva dos Santos, October 31, 2017.

  32. West Amazon Mission Minutes, December 1990, vote no. 1990-263, 134; Leila Cristina da Silva Teodoro (AAmO registry secretary), email message to Ronivon da Silva dos Santos, October 31, 2017.

  33. Ibid.

  34. 2010 Brazil Census, Cruzeiro do Sul, Acre, overview, IBGE, accessed May 14, 2019, https://bit.ly/2xxgURd.

  35. Raimundo dos Santos de Oliveira (AAmO district pastor), interviewed by Ronivon da Silva dos Santos, May 14, 2019.

  36. West Amazon Mission Minutes, July 2001, vote no. 2001-073, 21; Leila Cristina da Silva Teodoro (AAmO registry secretary), email message to Ronivon da Silva dos Santos, October 31, 2017.

  37. Colégio Adventista de Rio Branco [Rio Branco Adventist Academy], Facebook post, “Nossa História” [“Our History”], March 1, 2019, accessed August 12, 2019, https://bit.ly/2yUePft.

  38. Luciana Rodrigues Sicsu (registry secretary of the AAmO presidency), interviewed by Ronivon da Silva dos Santos, November 13, 2018.

  39. West Amazon Mission Minutes, April 1983, vote no. 1983-032, 14; Leila Cristina da Silva Teodoro (AAmO registry secretary), email message to Ronivon da Silva dos Santos, November 8, 2018. For more information on the history of the IAAMO, see the article “Instituto Adventista da Amazônia Ocidental” [“West Amazon Adventist Academy”] in this Encyclopedia.

  40. Elizabeth Dias (UNB registry secretary), interviewed by Ronivon da Silva dos Santos, November 14, 2016.

  41. “Northwest Brazil Union Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Hagerstown, MD.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 2011), 298-301. For more information on the history of the Northwest Brazil Union Mission, see the article “União Noroeste Brasileira” [“Northwest Brazil Union Mission”] in this Encyclopedia.

  42. Brasil Escola, “O terremoto no Haiti” [“The earthquake in Haiti”], accessed October 31, 2017, https://bit.ly/3bQgRiK.

  43. Francisco Abdoval da Silva Cavalcanti (MisOM executive secretary), interviewed by Ronivon da Silva dos Santos, October 31, 2017.

  44. CPI-ACRE, “Povos e terras indígenas do Acre” [“Acre indigenous peoples and lands”], accessed April 24, 2019, https://bit.ly/2SGOKvd.

  45. Nazaré Sales da Silva (Camicuã group director, Sena Madureira district), interviewed by Ronivon da Silva dos Santos, November 9, 2018.

  46. Sistema Adventista de Gestão de Igrejas [Adventist Management System of Churches] (ACMS), information provided by the registry secretary November 13, 2018, https://www.acmsnet.org.

  47. 2010 Brazil Census, Cruzeiro do Sul, Acre, overview, IBGE, accessed May 14, 2019, https://bit.ly/2xxgURd.

  48. Sistema Adventista de Gestão de Igrejas [Adventist Management System of Churches] (ACMS), information provided by the registry secretary May 14, 2019, https://www.acmsnet.org.

  49. “Breaking the Silence is an annual project, developed since 2002, by the Seventh-Day Adventist Church in 8 countries of South America (Argentina, Brazi, Ecuador, Paraguay, Peru, and Uruguay) that aims to educate and prevent against the domestic abuse and violence.” Seventh-day Adventist Church (Brazil) website, “Quebrando o Silêncio” [“Breaking the Silence”], accessed February 4, 2020, https://bit.ly/2WoDfIW.

  50. Vanessa Lemes, “Quebrando o Silêncio tem data no calendário de Porto Velho” [“Breaking the Silence has a date on the Porto Velho calendar”], Notícias Adventistas [Adventist News], September 20, 2016, accessed March 23, 2019, https://bit.ly/2Uz3Suf.

  51. “A capital mais evangelizada” [“The most evangelized capital”], Revista Adventista, February 2014, 40.

  52. Ana Hack, “Capital celebra uma igreja em cada bairro” [“Capital celebrates one church in each neighborhood”], Notícias Adventistas [Adventist News], June 2, 2017, accessed August 13, 2019, https://bit.ly/31AGsXe.

  53. João Paulo Dias Carvalho (ADRA Rondônia regional manager), email message to Ronivon da Silva dos Santos, November 18, 2016.

  54. Idem.

  55. Ana Hack, “Novo Tempo será implantada em presídios de Rondônia” [“Hope Channel Brazil will be implemented in prisons in Rondônia”], Notícias Adventistas [Adventist News], July 12, 2019, accessed August 12, 2019, https://bit.ly/31wUqtc.

  56. Rota Mapas [Route Maps], “Distância entre Cruzeiro do Sul - AC e Jaru” [“Distance from Cruzeiro do Sul - AC to Jaru”], accessed May 15, 2019, https://bit.ly/2H50bX8.

  57. “West Amazon Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1981), 277; “West Amazon Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Nampa, ID.: Pacific Press Publishing Association, 2018), 250. For a more detailed check on all administrative leaders of the West Amazon Conference, see the SDA Yearbooks from 1981 to 2018.

  58. More information about the AAmO can be found on their website athttp://aamo.adventistas.org/ or through their social media on Facebook: @AdvAcreRondonia; Twitter: @AdvAcreRondonia; Instagram: @advacrerondonia; and Youtube: Adventistas Acre e Rondônia.

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Santos, Ronivon da Silva dos, Adilson da Silva Vieira. "West Amazon Conference." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. April 28, 2021. Accessed May 14, 2021. https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=5GDF.

Santos, Ronivon da Silva dos, Adilson da Silva Vieira. "West Amazon Conference." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. April 28, 2021. Date of access May 14, 2021, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=5GDF.

Santos, Ronivon da Silva dos, Adilson da Silva Vieira (2021, April 28). West Amazon Conference. Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. Retrieved May 14, 2021, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=5GDF.