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Luiz Waldvogel

Photo courtesy of the Brazilian White Center – UNASP.

Waldvogel, Luiz (1897–1990)

By The Brazilian White Center – UNASP

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The Brazilian White Center – UNASP is a team of teachers and students at the Brazilian Ellen G. White Research Center – UNASP at the Brazilian Adventist University, Campus Engenheiro, Coelho, SP. The team was supervised by Drs. Adolfo Semo Suárez, Renato Stencel, and Carlos Flávio Teixeira. Bruno Sales Gomes Ferreira provided technical support. The following names are of team members: Adriane Ferrari Silva, Álan Gracioto Alexandre, Allen Jair Urcia Santa Cruz, Camila Chede Amaral Lucena, Camilla Rodrigues Seixas, Daniel Fernandes Teodoro, Danillo Alfredo Rios Junior, Danilo Fauster de Souza, Débora Arana Mayer, Elvis Eli Martins Filho, Felipe Cardoso do Nascimento, Fernanda Nascimento Oliveira, Gabriel Pilon Galvani, Giovana de Castro Vaz, Guilherme Cardoso Ricardo Martins, Gustavo Costa Vieira Novaes, Ingrid Sthéfane Santos Andrade, Isabela Pimenta Gravina, Ivo Ribeiro de Carvalho, Jhoseyr Davison Voos dos Santos, João Lucas Moraes Pereira, Kalline Meira Rocha Santos, Larissa Menegazzo Nunes, Letícia Miola Figueiredo, Luan Alves Cota Mól, Lucas Almeida dos Santos, Lucas Arteaga Aquino, Lucas Dias de Melo, Matheus Brabo Peres, Mayla Magaieski Graepp, Milena Guimarães Silva, Natália Padilha Corrêa, Rafaela Lima Gouvêa, Rogel Maio Nogueira Tavares Filho, Ryan Matheus do Ouro Medeiros, Samara Souza Santos, Sergio Henrique Micael Santos, Suelen Alves de Almeida, Talita Paim Veloso de Castro, Thais Cristina Benedetti, Thaís Caroline de Almeida Lima, Vanessa Stehling Belgd, Victor Alves Pereira, Vinicios Fernandes Alencar, Vinícius Pereira Nascimento, Vitória Regina Boita da Silva, William Edward Timm, Julio Cesar Ribeiro, Ellen Deó Bortolotte, Maria Júlia dos Santos Galvani, Giovana Souto Pereira, Victor Hugo Vaz Storch, and Dinely Luana Pereira.

 

 

Luiz Waldvogel was an editor, translator, and writer for the Brazilian Publishing House.

Early Life, Conversion, and Education

Luiz Waldvogel was born October 27, 1897, in the city of Santa Cruz da Conceição, state of São Paulo, Brazil.1 He was the son of Johann Konrad Waldvogel (1841-1915), who was born in Schaffhausen, Switzerland,2 and Maria Augusta Maehl Waldvogel (1858-?), a Brazilian daughter of German immigrants, from Dona Francisca’s Cologne, current city of Joinville, state of Santa Catarina, Brazil. Luiz had as siblings: Elisa, Arnaldo, Augusta, Helena, Leopoldo, Margaret, Conrado, Rosa, Amália, Ema, Luiz, and Carolina.3 His father was a merchant in Santa Cruz da Conceição and also justice of the peace, counselor, and substitute mayor of the same city.4

Luiz was taught to read and write at the age of six by his own mother,5 and he began his studies in the public school of Vila Natal, in Santa Cruz da Conceição.6 When he was nine years old, he heard for the first time, at his house, a sermon from an Adventist pastor.7 This happened about the time of the conversion of his mother to Adventism. She was baptized in 1904 by Pastor Huldreich F. Graf,8 the first ordained minister to work in Brazil.9 Maria Waldvogel came to learn more about God through the influence of a Methodist pastor named João da Costa. The family also came to know the biblical message through mission letters and magazines shared by the Faiock and Meyer families,10 and the periodical O Arauto da Verdade (Herald of Truth).11

This message reached the hearts of Maria and her children, Luiz and Leopoldo Waldvogel. Leopoldo died a month after becoming a Sabbath keeper. His sudden death and the conversion of Maria and Luiz aroused strong opposition to the Adventist faith on the part of Johann Waldvogel. Although not yet baptized, at the age of 13, Luiz refused to sell alcoholic beverages or to work on Saturdays in his father’s warehouse. This increased his father’s opposition,12 and a few years later Johann Waldwogel died without having accepted the Adventist message.13

By that time, Luiz had the desire to study in the newly founded Adventist Seminary at Brazil College (now referred to as UNASP-SP). The exciting news about the beginning of this institution was read by him in the Revista Mensal (Monthly Review), currently Revista Adventista (Adventist Review).14 In May 1916 he was accepted as a student of the technical teaching course.15 On November 15 of the same year, he was baptized by Pastor John Boehm at that institution. Afterwards he canvassed during vacations in order to pay for his studies.16

Ministry

In the company of Alfredo Hoffmann, Luiz had his first experience as a student canvasser in the cities of Ribeirão Bonito, Dourado, and Bocaina, all in the state of São Paulo. On January 10, 1917, while still canvassing, he was invited by Pastor Augusto Pages, manager of the International Treaties Society in Brazil, now Brazilian Publishing House, to work temporarily as a publishing assistant.17 Luiz accepted the invitation, but did not adapt well to the position and sometime later he was invited to return to the seminary for another academic year.18 On March 15, 1918, Augustus Pages asked Luiz to return to the Brazilian Publishing House, for there was an urgent need for a worker. Again, although he wished to complete his studies, Luiz accepted the invitation.19

In 1919, despite urgent requests from BPH administrators for him to remain in the publishing house, Luiz returned to the seminary20 because he wanted to finish his course.21 In 1920 he and a group of friends founded, on the seminary campus, the student periodical O Seminarista (The Seminarian). Knowledge of the English language allowed him the opportunity, as a student, to translate important denominational publications22 and interpret sermons.23

On December 8, 1922, Luiz graduated in the first class of the Brazilian Adventist Seminary. In his class were eight other graduates: Adelina Zorub, Adolfo Bergold, Alma Meyer, Domingos Peixoto da Silva, Guilherme Denz, Rodolfo Belz, Teresa Filonila dos Santos, and Isolina Avelino, who would later become his wife.24 Luiz had met her and they started dating while both were boarding students.25 Soon after his graduation, Luiz was invited to work at the Brazilian Publishing House. His activities began on December 31, 1922, as an editorial assistant to the board, and secretary of the manager M. V. Tuker.26

On April 3, 1923, Luiz married Isolina in the city of Santo André, São Paulo,27 in a ceremony officiated at by Pastor Ricardo Wilfarth.28 From this marriage was born Heloísa Waldvogel (1925-2005), their only child.29 In order to develop his abilities for his work at BPH, Luiz started to take private classes in Portuguese, philosophy, and political economy from Dr. José Marques da Cruz, an intellectual Portuguese who had graduated from the University of Coimbra and was at that time living in São Paulo. He also continued to study French and German.30 In 1934 Luiz was elected chief editor of the Brazilian Publishing House.31

After completing 18 years of writing in 1936, the publisher’s administrative board authorized him to take an intensive course in theology at the Advanced Bible School in California, United States.32 On January 29, 1938, Luiz was ordained to the ministry in the São Paulo Central Church, on the recommendation of Pastors N. P. Nielsen, L. H Christian, and Domingos Peixoto da Silva.33 While serving at the Brazilian Publishing House, he assisted as a pastor, elder, and, for many years, director of the Youth Department at the Ipiranga Church in São Paulo city. He also acted as a pastor in two other nearby cities, Mauá and São Caetano do Sul.34

During his time at the Brazilian Publishing House, he worked as editor and sometimes co-editor of several periodicals, such as: O Atalaia (1934-1948),35 Revista Adventista (1934-1963),36 Rundschau der Adventisten, (1934-1938),37 Vida e Saúde (1939-1948),38 Review and Herald (World Edition) Portuguese (1949-1953),39 Escute (1953-1954),40 O Ministério Adventista (1954-1960),41 Noticias (1954-1960),42 O colportor Eficiente (1955-1962),43 Devoção Matinal (1957-1960),44 Diretrizes (1962),45 Nosso Amiguinho (1962),46 and the primary and junior Sabbath School Lessons (196247-1965).48

He also wrote the following books: Rastros Luminosos (1933), Vencedor em Todas as Batalhas (1937), Cântaro Partido–versos (1939), Matrimônio Feliz (1947), A Fascinante História do Livro (1952), Homens que Fizeram o Brasil (1953), Serões de Tio Silas (1960), O Triunfo Sobre a Dor (1966), Sabiá na Gaiola (1978), Jesus de Nazaré (1981), and Memórias do Tio Luiz (1987). He translated: O Raiar de um Novo Dia, Libertos do Temor, Quanto Tempo nos Resta?, Pastor, Estou Amando, O mundo de Deus, and also many daily devotionals and books by Ellen G. White.49 He wrote a regular column in the Adventist Review titled “Our Language,” which contained guidelines and advice for translators from English to Portuguese.50

Later Years and Legacy

Luiz retired in May 1965, but he continued to work as an elder in the church of Santo André. He later served as an elder at the IASP Church, (now referred to as UNASP-HT), in the city of Hortolândia, São Paulo state. Even while retired, he still answered questions sent by young people from all over Brazil in the section “Consultório da Juventude” (Youth Office), later called “Problemas da Juventude” (Youth Issues), from the Revista Adventista (Adventist Review).

He also preached, held revival meetings, weekend meetings, and lectures about love, courtship, engagement, and marriage. He wrote several articles for the Adventist Review. His last work was the book Oásis no Deserto (Oasis in the Desert), which contained poems he and his wife and written, along with letters and poems from his daughter.51 In 1987, on his 90th birthday, the BPH honored him by naming the publisher’s library after him.52 On August 11, 1990, Luiz died when he was 93 years old in Brasilia.53

He left a great legacy of leadership to the Seventh-day Adventist Church, with an outstanding performance at the Brazilian Publishing House, where he worked for 43 years, 30 as chief editor (1934-1965).54 The following words of Luiz reflect well his ministry: “I want to translate and write until the Lord comes. I want to be a son of the heavenly Father. I beg of you, humbly, to accept our translations and writings as our praise to Him.”55

Sources

Borges, Michelson. “Capítulo 10 - A passos largos.” Adventismo no Brasil, August 30, 2007. Accessed May 3, 2018. http://www.adventismo.criacionismo.com.br/2007/08/captulo-10-passos-largos.html.

Filho, Santo Fioramonte. “Trabalho Biográfico de Luiz Waldvogel.” Monografia, Instituto Adventista de Ensino, 1985.

Lopatka, Lênie. “Isolina Avelino Waldwogel: Abordagens Implícitas na Prática de Tradução de Poemas.” Trabalho de Conclusão de Curso, Brazil College, campus Engenheiro Coelho, 2013.

“Morre Isolina Waldvogel, Exímia Poetisa.” Revista Adventista, August 1980, 27-28. Accessed May 4, 2016. http://acervo.revistaadventista.com.br/capas.cpb.

“Morreu Luiz Waldvogel, o “dono” da CPB.” Revista Adventista, September 1990, 20-21. Accessed May 4, 2016. http://acervo.revistaadventista.com.br/capas.cpb.

Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook. Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, various years. https://www.adventistyearbook.org/.

Waldvogel, Luiz. Memórias de tio Luiz. 2nd edition, Tatuí, SP: Brazilian Publishing House, 1988.

Notes

  1. “Morreu Luiz Waldvogel, o “dono” da CPB,” Revista Adventista, September 1990, 20-21; and “Como Conservar o Espírito Jovem,” Revista Adventista, year 77, no. 7, September 1982, 9.

  2. Luiz Waldvogel, Memórias de Tio Luiz (Tatuí, SP: Casa Publicadora Brasileira, 1988), 13; and Ibid., 46.

  3. Ibid., 14.

  4. Ibid.

  5. Ibid., 18.

  6. Santo Fioramonte Filho, “Trabalho Biográfico de Luiz Waldvogel” (Monografia, Instituto Adventista de Ensino, 1985), 3.

  7. Waldvogel, 33.

  8. Ibid., 36.

  9. Michelson Borges, “Capítulo 10 - A passos largos,” Adventismo no Brasil, August 30, 2007, accessed May 3, 2018, http://www.adventismo.criacionismo.com.br/2007/08/captulo-10-passos-largos.html

  10. Waldvogel, 37.

  11. “Morreu Luiz Waldvogel, o ‘dono’ da CPB,” Revista Adventista, September 1990, 21.

  12. Waldvogel, 38.

  13. Ibid., 46.

  14. Ibid., 51.

  15. Waldvogel, 51.

  16. Ibid., 55.

  17. Ibid., 57-58.

  18. Ibid., 58.

  19. Lênie Lopatka, “Isolina Avelino Waldvogel: Abordagens Implícitas na Prática de Tradução de Poemas” (Trabalho de Conclusão de Curso, Centro Universitário Adventista de São Paulo, campus Engenheiro Coelho, 2013), 21.

  20. Waldvogel, 63.

  21. Lopatka, 21-22.

  22. Waldvogel, 68-69.

  23. Ibid., 71-72.

  24. Ibid., 75.

  25. Ibid., 101.

  26. Ibid., 115.

  27. “Morre Isolina Waldvogel, Exímia Poetisa,” Revista Adventista, year 75, no. 8, August 1980, 28.

  28. Waldvogel, 112.

  29. Ibid., 119-120.

  30. Ibid., 117-118.

  31. Ibid., 130.

  32. Ibid., 148.

  33. Ibid., 128.

  34. Santo Fioramonte Filho, “Trabalho Biográfico de Luiz Waldvogel” (Monograph, Brazil College, 1985), 13. Waldvogel, 174; Ibid., 223.

  35. “Brazil Publishing House,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1935), 256; and “O Atalaia,” Seventh-day Adventist Year Book (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1949), 316.

  36. “Brazil Publishing House,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (1935), 256; and “Brazil Publishing House,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1964), 371.

  37. “Rundschau der Adventisten,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1935), 279; and “Rundschau der Adventisten,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1939), 312.

  38. “Vida e Saúde,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1940), 294; and “Vida e Saúde,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1949), 316.

  39. “Brazil Publishing House,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1950), 323; and “Brazil Publishing House,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1954), 317.

  40. “Brazil Publishing House,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1954), 317; and “Brazil Publishing House,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1955), 263.

  41. “Brazil Publishing House,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1956), 263; and “O ministério Adventista,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1961), 329.

  42. “Brazil Publishing House,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1955), 263; and “Noticias,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1961), 329.

  43. “Brazil Publishing House,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1956), 271; and “Brazil Publishing House,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1963), 353.

  44. “Devocao Matinal,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1958), 297; and “Devocao Matinal,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1961), 328.

  45. “MV Directors Programs.” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1963), 370.

  46. “Nosso Amiguinho (Little Friend),” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1963), 370.

  47. “Sabbath School Lesson Quarterly (Primary and Kindergarten),” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1963), 370; and “Sabbath School Lesson Quarterly (Junior),” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1963), 370.

  48. “Sabbath School Lesson Quarterly (Primary and Kindergarten),” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1965/1966), 400; and “Sabbath School Lesson Quarterly (Junior),” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1965/1966), 400.

  49. “Morreu Luiz Waldvogel, o “dono” da CPB,” Revista Adventista, September 1990, 21.

  50. Lênie Lopatka, “Isolina Avelino Waldvogel: Abordagens Implícitas na Prática de Tradução de Poemas” (Trabalho de Conclusão de Curso, Centro Universitário Adventista de São Paulo, campus Engenheiro Coelho, 2013), 22.

  51. “Morreu Luiz Waldvogel, o “dono” da CPB,” Revista Adventista, September 1990, 21; and Luiz Waldvogel, Memórias de Tio Luiz (Tatuí, SP: Brazilian Publishing House, 1988), 223.

  52. “Morreu Luiz Waldvogel, o “dono” da CPB,” Revista Adventista, September 1990, 21.

  53. Ibid., 20.

  54. Ibid., 130; and “Morreu Luiz Waldvogel, o “dono” da CPB,” Revista Adventista, September 1990, 20-21.

  55. Waldvogel, 154.

×

UNASP, The Brazilian White Center –. "Waldvogel, Luiz (1897–1990)." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. April 28, 2021. Accessed August 04, 2021. https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=5GRE.

UNASP, The Brazilian White Center –. "Waldvogel, Luiz (1897–1990)." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. April 28, 2021. Date of access August 04, 2021, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=5GRE.

UNASP, The Brazilian White Center – (2021, April 28). Waldvogel, Luiz (1897–1990). Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. Retrieved August 04, 2021, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=5GRE.