Adventist International Institute of Advanced Studies (AIIAS)

By Stephen Guptill, and Dionisio Valdez Tuapin

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Stephen Guptill was AIIAS president from 2007 to 2019.

Dionisio Valdez Tuapin, Jr. is a registered librarian and a licensed professional teacher in the Philippines. He finished a degree in education, with specialization in library and information science at the Adventist University of the Philippines. He is currently working at Leslie Hardinge Library, AIIAS, Silang, Cavite. His previous work employment was at South Philippine Adventist College. He is married with two children. His passions are researching about Seventh-day Adventist history and trail running.

First Published: November 1, 2020

The Adventist International Institute of Advanced Studies (AIIAS) is a graduate school and seminary operated by the General Conference of Seventh-day Adventists (GC). It is located one hour south of Manila, Philippines, near Silang, Cavite. Its mission is to develop leaders through distinctively Seventh-day Adventist graduate education, excelling in spirituality, scholarship, and service. It serves students from all over the world and often has students and faculty from 70 countries at the same time. AIIAS offers a master’s program in public health and masters and doctoral programs in education, business, and theology.

Development that Led to Establishment of the School

In 1948 and 1952, the Far Eastern Division of the Seventh-day Adventist Church (FED), which covered the Asia-Pacific region, voted to establish the Seventh-day Adventist Theological Seminary, Extension School at Philippine Union College (PUC), which was then located in Baesa, Caloocan, Philippines. 1

The Church recognized that there was a growing need throughout the Far Eastern Division for college faculty and administrators with master’s and doctoral degrees. Sending people to upgrade in the United States was expensive and, at times, graduates remained in the U.S. after obtaining their degrees. Therefore, a graduate program in Theology was established at PUC. It was a small program at first, but it provided needed personnel with advanced degrees.2

In 1956, several graduate programs, primarily in the area of religion, were offered in Philippine Union College (now Adventist University of the Philippines or AUP).3 By the 1960s the number of Adventist colleges in the Far Eastern Division began to grow and mature. There were church-operated colleges in the Philippines, Singapore, Thailand, Indonesia, Hong Kong, Korea, Bangladesh, and Myanmar. 4 The FED felt the urgent need for qualified faculty throughout the region.

In 1973 the General Conference approved the name Seventh-day Adventist Theological Seminary, Far East (SDATS FE) for the Seminary at AUP5 and the first Seminary academic bulletin was published.6 The FED was eager for the program to serve the needs of the whole Division and took special interest in the program. In 1973, the SDATS FE held its first graduation.7 In 1974, the FED appointed an Advisory Council for the SDATS FE, with significant Division representation, to provide direction and support through the Philippine Union College board.8 In 1973, there was an action to establish a commission to have the FED assume administrative responsibility for the Graduate School and Seminary at AUP.9 At that time, AUP seemed ready for some relief in dealing with the graduate school. Meanwhile, the seminary celebrated the first conferral of the degree Master of Divinity in 1977.10

Founding of the School

In 1978, the SDATS FE was established. Dr. Leslie G Hardinge led the Seminary through the initial years, until 1983.11 Dr. Hardinge had a rich experience in ministry and education, having taught at Union College, Lincoln, Nebraska; Washington Missionary College (now Washington Adventist University near Washington, D.C.); Newbold College, (now Newbold College of Higher Education, Bracknell, England) and Pacific Union College, California. He had a Ph.D. from London University.12

In 1978, the Seminary became an institution of the FED, which took full control and financial responsibility for the SDATS FE/Asia Adventist Theological Seminary. The FED applied for registration with the Philippine Security and Exchange Commission (SEC), and in 1980, the SEC registered the SDATS FE as a distinct Educational Corporation. Because many of the students were mature leaders in their respective colleges and church institutions, the need for appropriate housing, outside the dormitories, was recognized. Therefore, several housing towers were constructed with funds from the FED.13 A team from the General Conference Department of Education was also dispatched to check the SDAT FE application for Master of Divinity.14

The SDATS FE continues today as an entity of the Adventist International Institute of Advanced Studies (AIIAS). In 1986, its name was changed to Asia Adventist Theological Seminary (AATS).15

Dr. Leslie Hardinge’s personal theological library provided the basis for the new institution’s library and became the foundation for what would become the AIIAS Leslie Hardinge Library.16

History of the School, with Emphasis on Important Events and Periods

In early 1984, the FED called Werner Vyhmeister, from Andrews University, to become dean of the Seventh-day Adventist Theological Seminary, Far East.17 Vyhmeister helped organize extension courses from Korea to Indonesia and from Bangladesh to Japan. It was hoped that, in this way, pastors would have the opportunity to get advanced education without needing to transfer to another country, especially with their families. Bible conferences were also organized by the FED in different parts of the division, supported by Vyhmeister and the new Seminary personnel.

In October of 1985, a decision was made to join the seminary with the graduate school—both supported by the FED—under one administration, directly dependent on the FED.

While the seminary was on the AUP campus, a number of buildings were added to house the seminary and graduate school. The FED assisted in building the Finster Chapel, where the Seminary and Graduate School met for chapel and other programs.18 There were classrooms downstairs used for the various programs. Also, a graduate school building was erected along with additional faculty houses, student towers, and an elementary school for the missionary children near the faculty homes.

Foreign students from other countries in the FED were having challenges with immigration, housing and general support. To remedy this situation the FED decided to explore the idea of creating a new institution which would be composed of both the Seminary and Graduate schools. Considerable discussion and thought were given as to how a new institution would relate to AUP. Given that AUP’s administration and board had long held the dream of university status which would require post-baccalaureate degrees if such status were to be obtained from the government of the Philippines, a decision was made that AUP would work toward university status and would serve the needs of students largely from the North Philippine Union Mission of the Philippines while the new institution would serve the needs of students of the FED territory as well as from and other world divisions. It was thought by many that a graduate school without an undergraduate program would not be allowed by the education department of the government. This proved not to be the case.19

Dr. Werner Vyhmeister and Dr. Roy Ryan worked through a Philippine law firm to develop a proposal to submit to the Philippine government for permission to establish a new institution to be known as the Adventist International Institute of Advanced Studies (AIIAS).20 After consultation with the law firm, it was determined that the best approach for approval of the new institution would be through the use of a presidential decree. The possibility of getting permission by any other means was problematic from both the perspective of time and process. In due course, the proposal for a new institution was submitted to Malacañang Palace for the issuance of a Presidential Decree. The political situation at the time was unstable, and the political climate was deteriorating for the Philippine president, Ferdinand Marcos. In early 1986, People’s Power in the country was growing, which resulted in increasing political pressure on the Marcos government, which eventually led to a change in government. During those days, no one could know for sure what had happened to the proposal presented to President Marcos.21

At the FED annual council of 1986, the FED committee considered the matter of the proposed new institution to be called AIIAS. Given that several months had gone by since the submission of the request for the proposed presidential decree and nothing had been heard about its granting, the FED committee decided not to pursue the decree further.22

It was decided that Roy Ryan, AIIAS Graduate School dean, would make the trip on Thursday, following the FED decision, to the lawyers to inform the law firm that the FED wished to withdraw the request for the issuance of a Presidential Decree in favor of the AIIAS. On the Wednesday before the planned trip to Manila on Thursday, the law firm sent a driver to the AUP campus to inform Vyhmeister and Ryan that on January 31, 1986, the president of the Philippines had signed a Presidential Decree establishing the Adventist International Institute of Advanced Studies. This was one of his very last acts before leaving the Philippines. The FED was notified on the Thursday morning of the signed Presidential Decree and decided to proceed and not withdraw the request for a Presidential Decree to establish the AIIAS as it had been signed.23

This information about the signed Presidential Decree was held in a very small circle for several weeks because a Presidential Decree did not become effective until published in the official gazette of the Philippines. The morning of February 25, 1986, saw Marcos’ final departure from the Philippines, a day after the publication in the official gazette with the text of the Adventist International Institute of Advanced Studies presidential decree.24 AIIAS was now a reality.

In 1987, a meeting was held in Singapore with AUP’s president’s council, FED representatives, and AIIAS administrators to decide what to do about the new institution. The session lasted five hours. It became clear that there would be an AIIAS. It would be funded by the FED and would be located on its own campus. The move would take place in 18 months as land and a new campus would have to be purchased and built and with Werner Vyhmeister as the president of AIIAS.25

With the legalization of AIIAS as an institution, Dr. Vyhmeister and Dr. Paoring Ragui, who later served for many years as AIIAS VP for Student Services, worked with the lawyers to obtain preferred visa permissions for the foreign faculty, staff and students coming to AIIAS. A program of networking with faculty and students from other seminaries in the area was implemented. One networking activity was a conference on biblical archaeology, given by well-known biblical archaeologist Dr. Siegfried Horn, who was teaching for the seminary, to which faculty and students of seminaries in and around Manila were invited. Another networking event which proved to be very helpful to AIIAS was the formation of the Philippine Theological Library Association, with Nancy Vyhmeister and Nimfa Sumagaysay, of AIIAS, in the leadership.26

By the end of 1986, there was progress in the seminary offerings. Seven students were in the M.Th. program, the minimum acceptable degree for teaching in institutions that formed part of the Association of Theological Education of Southeast Asia (ATESEA), the accrediting association to which the Seventh-day Adventist Seminary, Far East already belonged and the future AIIAS would belong. In addition, a new Doctorate of Pastoral Studies, in cooperation with ATESEA, began in mid-1987 with seven students. The SDA Seminary faculty were teaching most of the classes, in association with ATESEA.27 This group would be AIIAS’ first doctoral degree graduates.28

By this time, more than 200 students had participated in the Seminary’s extension programs in Taiwan, Korea, Bandung, and Klabat in Indonesia, and Japan. To meet the growing need for teachers, AIIAS leaders worked hard to convince the FED of the need for additional teachers in order to offer doctoral degrees.

When Dr. Werner Vyhmeister, Dr. Pat Jones, Dr. Roy Ryan, Dr, Fred Hardinge, and Dr. Don Van Ornam developed the name for the new institution, they considered a number of criteria. Given that it was anticipated that students would come from other world divisions with different education systems it was felt that the term “International Institute” would be better understood in other countries of the world. Given the aspirations in the Philippines of Philippine Union College, Central Philippine Adventist College and Mountain View College for future post-baccalaureate degrees it was felt that the terms Graduate School and Seminary should be avoided so the term “Advanced Studies” was used since it would have better meaning worldwide. The name “International Institute of Advanced Studies” was already submitted to a law firm, but they felt that it was important that the institution have the word Adventist in the name. Thus, AIIAS got its somewhat long name, without the term “University,” “Graduate School,” or “Seminary.”29

AIIAS was a bold venture in Adventist education. It was established as an exclusively graduate institution. That was, in many ways, unprecedented in the Adventist educational system. By offering masters and doctoral programs in only four primary areas--Theology, Business, Education, and Health--AIIAS has been able to focus on excellence in its faculty and learning resources. Gradually, higher-level programs were added, and academic research was strengthened. AIIAS began to be recognized for its academic excellence.

The decision to separate AIIAS from AUP led to a massive search for a new location! After deciding that the new institution should be developed in the Philippines, over 120 sites were visited, and the committee was taken to see five of the most promising. Many factors were considered when selecting the new campus site. Because of the many off-campus classes at distance learning centers around the Division, proximity to the airport was important. The cooler climate of Silang, Cavite, was also considered an advantage.30

AIIAS administrators Vyhmeister, Nestares, and Ryan located a property full of coffee plants and coconut trees, with 19 hectares (47 acres) of land located in Silang, on the Aguinaldo highway from Manila to Tagaytay.31 Negotiations for well drilling, electric lines, and the final price for the purchase of the property were made. Papers were signed on October 4, 1988, to purchase the AIIAS property.

February 1, 1989, was a big day! Groundbreaking took place on the new property. The AUP band played. There were speeches and important government people and their armed bodyguards all attending. The governor of the province of Cavite gave the main speech. Just as the sun came out after a rainstorm, twelve dignitaries, including Division leaders, the presidents of AUP and AIIAS, broke ground for the new AIIAS campus.32

Work began immediately to build student housing towers (A and B), faculty housing, classrooms, administration, library, and maintenance buildings. In 1991 AIIAS moved to the new campus near the city of Silang, Cavite.33 In the same year, AIIAS Theological Seminary launched the “1000 Missionary Movement,” a global mission project to train and place young missionaries in the Asia Pacific region. It was reared in the campus until 1995.34

Work progressed steadily, and inaugurations have become an annual event. Student housing towers (C to E) and the School of Graduate Studies building were added in 199235; Phillip Boughman Meditation and Prayer Garden, adorned with a waterfall streaming through a fountain, was inaugurated in 1994, the tennis court in January 1995, the gymnasium on November 16, 1995; and the Chan Sun Academic Center on March 2, 1996.36 By 1996, six student housing towers had been completed.37

The Seventh-day Adventist Church Annual Council, October 6, 1996, taken in Costa Rica, voted to make AIIAS a General Conference (GC) institution and expanded its service to serve the graduate needs of students from around the world.38 The Asia-Pacific Division APD (formerly FED) was split into two divisions, the Northern Asia-Pacific Division (NSD) and the Southern Asia-Pacific Division (SSD). AIIAS would continue to primarily serve both of the new divisions as well as students from other world Divisions.

The members of the AIIAS 70th graduation were officially welcomed in the newly organized alumni association on March 8, 1998, with Roy Ryan as the first elected president.39

On August 28, 2001, AIIAS was in a festive mood again as David Birkenstock led the ceremonies for the inaugural opening of the administration building, the elementary school extension, and two student housing towers (K and L).40 Tower L was the last student housing in AIIAS master plan, but enrollment growth led to the acquisition of a nine-apartment building outside the campus (Annex) and a property in the southern side of AIIAS.41

It is recognized that AIIAS has pioneered Adventist education in a number of ways. AIIAS has held distance learning programs off-campus throughout Asia as well as in South America, Eastern Europe, the Middle East, and Africa.42 AIIAS has been a leader in Adventist graduate online education since 2003, establishing best-practices guidelines that have been appreciated in the Philippines as well as Adventist education throughout the world. AIIAS was the first Adventist institution to graduate a student from a fully online master's program. It was the first Adventist institution to offer a Ph.D. in Business. AIIAS has been selected as a “Center of Excellence” by the regional theological association ATESEA, and helped lead the movement for academic accreditation in the Philippines for theological education at the doctoral level.43 AIIAS was one of the first institutions in the Philippines to have its theological Ph.D. programs accredited.44

Through the years, many leaders have played significant roles in the development of the campus. Before the creation of AIIAS, Dr. Alfonso Roda, AUP president, along with earlier leaders, played a vital part in establishing the AUP religion and graduate programs, which later became the basis for AIIAS.45 Dr. Leslie Hardinge, president of the SDA Theological Seminary, Far East, was a founding father. Werner Vyhmeister was the first president of the government-approved AIIAS. Roy Ryan had an important influence in developing the legal and academic foundations of AIIAS. He had a role in selecting the campus location, forming the campus master plan, and designing the buildings. In the late 1990s, he again was instrumental in campus development with the paving of campus roads and the building of several additional student housing towers.

Around the turn of the century, there were a string of developments in the academic arena. Philippine accreditation was sought for the graduate school program including the Philippine Accrediting Association of Schools, Colleges and Universities (PAASCU), which accredited the AIIAS MBA program, the first private institution to have an MBA accredited.46

AIIAS initiated its online program on October 6, 2003. The schools both started annual forums that continue to draw scholars from around the region today. The Seminary Forum began in 1998,47 and the Graduate School International Conference began in 1999.48 In 2007, the AIIAS African Theological Association (AATA) began when the AIIAS African students recognized a need to develop as scholars and planned a forum that subsequently has developed into an annual event of AATA with the annual publication of the Journal of AATA (JAATA).49

The AIIAS Asian Theological Society (AATS), as an entity, was first endorsed by the AIIAS Administrative Committee on January 23, 2013. Their first forum took place February 22, 2013.

New programs were added to the AIIAS curriculum. Under the leadership of Dr. Ronald Vyhmeister, an AIIAS Ph.D. in Business was approved by the Adventist Board of Higher Education in 2007. It was the first in the Adventist educational system.50 The Seminary’s Ph.D. programs were accredited by ATESEA in 2014 and were among the first institutions to have their Seminary Ph.D. programs accredited by ATESEA.51 In 2016, the Doctor of Missiology was established at AIIAS at the urging of the GC.52 That year also saw the establishment of the annual Preaching Seminar where outstanding preachers throughout the Adventist world come to share their preaching wisdom.53 In the mid-1990s, a Master of Arts in Nursing was offered, but it was short-lived.

Research is an integral part of AIIAS academic life. The Asia Pacific Research Center was established in 1998 to be the think tank of AIIAS, the Church, and other institutions. The Center has completed several funded research projects in collaboration with other universities and provided assistance to many researchers in the region.54 The Asian Qualitative Research Association (AQRA), founded by AIIAS faculty, has attracted more than a thousand members from universities and colleges throughout the world with its research seminars and annual convention, also began in 2016. It has significantly raised the profile of AIIAS in the Asian academic circles.55 AIIAS also publishes scholarly journals The Journal of Asia Adventist Seminary (JAAS) (1998)56 and International Forum (InFo) (1999)57 of the Graduate School.

English Center

The English Center has provided an essential campus component for AIIAS for many years. The academic community, recognizing the vital advantage of students having graduate level English skills, established entrance requirements based on standardized, international examinations that would be readily available in many countries. But often, students and their employers say that it was difficult for full-time employees to master a new language while fulfilling all their usual functions. Coming to AIIAS, leaving all else aside, and focusing on their language skills with capable teachers often was the best option to prepare for their graduate studies. Mastering English also opened new leadership opportunities to them upon returning to their fields after completing their graduate programs. Often children attending AIIAS Elementary and Academy, immersed in the stimulating environment of friends and school, pick up the language more rapidly than their parents. At times, the children coach their parents as they grow their skills together. But, unlike learning a language as a minority speaker, AIIAS is a community where many are on a journey of language development. The level of understanding and tolerance of less-than-perfect English makes it less intimidating to participate in conversations and discussions, knowing that others have or are working on their language skills as well.

The primary purpose of the AIIAS English Center is to provide an educational support service to prepare students to study in one of the graduate academic programs. The English language program offered on the campus of AIIAS has been developed by professionals to give students intensive and personalized instruction in the English language in an English-speaking environment.

The courses have been designed to help students learn English in line with well-recognized English language programs. The curriculum for the intensive English course has been divided into four levels. Depending on the results of a placement test, a student will be placed at the appropriate level.  

The English Center was staffed, for some time, with part-time teachers, AIIAS students, and volunteers. More recently, the English Center is staffed by capable, experienced full-time teachers to provide the best training for the students at all four English levels.58

AIIAS Library

The Leslie Hardinge Library was first established to meet the needs of the Seventh-day Adventist Theological Seminary, Far East. As dean of the Seminary, Dr. Leslie Hardinge worked to grow the seminary collection.59 The Library began to expand its collection beyond what came with the Seminary. Expanding programs in the Graduate School, beyond the scope of theology and religion resources, were added to include areas such as health, education, and business. Later, the addition of an English language program resulted in purchases in this area. Cultural coverage (Filipiniana and selected materials in other Asian languages) also began to form part of the collection as did Adventist publications and historical documents. In 1995, the library installed the 3M library security system.60 In 2001, curriculum materials and teacher resources were added. The media collection also increased. Theology and health have strong cassette-tape, slide, and film-strip collections. In 2002, the Library started to subscribe to electronic resources such as online journals and online databases covering all disciplines taught at AIIAS. In 2008, the analog collection was converted to digital format, and in 2010, the purchase of e-books began. In 2012, the library added the Asian Study Center and began building that collection. The Library continues to advance its purchases and subscription of updated format of resources which now consist of more than 60,000 titles plus online databases.

In 1991, when AIIAS moved to its new campus, the first academic building to be constructed was the Library. The building was opened for use in June 1991. Although the entire building was intended for library use, the administrative offices and a meeting hall were temporarily housed there.

In August 2001, the AIIAS Administration Building was inaugurated, and the administrative offices moved out of the library building.61 The vacated space has been renovated and has become the Library directors’ and supervisors’ offices and working area for technical services. The circulation desk, online catalogs and bound periodicals reading room were also renovated.62

In 2003, the Library auditorium space was returned to the Library and converted to serve as the Instructional & Media Resources Center (IMRC). The IMRC has listening rooms, an instructional materials development center, and a research computer laboratory.63 A second floor or mezzanine was added to the auditorium space.

In April 2007, the computer laboratory was transferred to the library building under the supervision of the library. The Asian Studies Center was inaugurated in March 2013,64 and in April 2014, eight cubicles were added, occupying part of the periodical section in the mezzanine, west wing.

The E. G. White Center became a branch office of the White Estate and is now named the Center for Adventist Research-Asia (CARA), inaugurated in June 2014.65 On May 1, 2018, another section in the Library was added. It is called AIIAS Creation Science Display which was inspired by the Geoscience Research Institute. Included in the display are fossils, minerals, and the personal seashell collection of Dr. Stephen Guptill.66

The Library has historically employed the Library of Congress Classification Scheme and LC Subject Headings for its book and media collection. The curriculum or teachers resource collection are the only resources classified and cataloged using Dewey Decimal Classification The Library adheres to AACR2R and catalogs to the second level of description. The Library maintained an author/title/subject card catalog until 1999. In January 2000, the Library moved its cataloging to online format through Library Solutions, an integrated library information system. The whole Library collection is available through the online public access catalog.67 The Library continues to maintain an up-to-date shelf list for backup purposes. In March 2015, the Library implemented the use of RDA, Resource Description and Access, for its cataloging. This is the new cataloging standard being used around the world.68

The Library expanded its professional personnel from one qualified librarian to two in 1998. In 2002, it added a third librarian. In 2006, two members of the staff finished their library science degrees from the University of the Philippines.69 During this time, there had been interim library directors from Argentina and the U.S. to train young librarians to manage the library.70 In 2007, local librarians took the posts as library director and associate library director. AIIAS library has five qualified librarians with government licenses, one professional librarian, and nine more employees as support staff.71 All other library personnel received basic computer literacy and library skills to enable them to cope with the electronic environment of a modern library.

AIIAS Online

AIIAS Online was initially conceived by Dr. John Wesley Taylor in 2000 and was subsequently developed and expanded under the direction of Dr. Dolf Oberholster.72 Early in 2002, there were two people hired for the online program to support the teachers and students, a manager of technical support and a course coordinator. On October 6, 2003, the first class was offered with 15 students taking the Master of Public Health Course. It was a blended program with some classes taught at a distance learning center and some online. Dr. Evelyn Almocera was the first online teacher with students mainly from Bangladesh at the beginning.73

In 2004, Leni Casimiro prepared a document on quality standards for the Online Education and an Online Teaching Handbook. She collaborated with the Adventist Virtual Learning Network, and the Sloan Consortium, Individuals, Institutions and Organizations committed to quality Online Education to help in her efforts.

In 2007. AIIAS Online graduated its first fully Online Masters students.74 It was probably the first in the Adventist Educational System. Since the first online class in 2003, students from more than 40 countries have enrolled in AIIAS Online. As enrollment grew, an Online Student Services Assistant was added to the online staff. AIIAS Online now supports other web-enhanced classes at AIIAS, opening opportunities for expanded learning opportunities in many classes both on and off campus.

AIIAS’ expertise on online education was a big advantage in 2020 when face to face classes were restricted due to the Taal volcano eruption and the COVID-19 pandemic. While other educational institutions struggled to switch to online classes, AIIAS reaped the benefits of two decades experience in online education.75

Campus Continued Development

In 1997, the SSD moved from Singapore to the AIIAS campus while waiting for the new SSD facilities to be built in Silang, Cavite, Philippines, just three kilometers from AIIAS. At that time student housing Towers I, J, K, and L were built for the SSD personnel and were important for student housing when SSD moved out a year later.76 The need for campus housing for families was increasing. More families were moving to AIIAS from countries outside the SSD. During this time, the gravel roads around the AIIAS campus were paved, giving the campus a much more professional appearance.

On March 26, 1999, the AIIAS Bell Tower, a 12-meter-high iconic structure on the AIIAS campus, was inaugurated. This was the fulfillment of the vision of Dr. Ina Longway, a member of the graduate school faculty. Dr. Longway was a positive force at AIIAS who rallied support and enlisted Dr. Edwin Reynolds (Seminary Faculty) to design the tower. Dr. Longway secured the bell for the tower as a gift from the Loma Linda Nursing Alumni Association.77

In 2003 a strip of land on the south side of the campus was purchased. This provided space for additional student housing towers which were constructed about that time.78

The years 2007-2019 were a time of steady capital development. Under the leadership of Dr. Stephen Guptill, AIIAS president at the time, extensions were added to both the graduate school (2006)79 and seminary building (2015).80 A pavilion was constructed at the center of Student Towers A to L (2015).81 The Siew Huy Auditorium was built after considerable discussion about whether it should be located next to the gate or on a small hill near the administration building. Road noise became the deciding factor for the selection of the site by the administration building. On October 16-18, 2010, AIIAS celebrated its grand opening.82

The planning and design took almost a year. Consideration was given to what other functions should be included in the building. It was decided to include 10 classrooms that could be used for Sabbath School rooms on the weekends. A function hall was planned for fellowship meals, school banquets, and gatherings. Offices were provided for pastoral staff and counseling rooms. A large media center was included. The auditorium was to be media friendly, with audio and video connections throughout the building, all connected to the media center and audio booth. A large stage was planned with a wooden floor, much like a professional concert hall. Large double doors were planned for entrance to the stage with a service road entrance that could deliver equipment, instruments, or props directly to the stage area. A baptistry was included at the back of the stage.83

When the media center was being envisioned as part of the building, leaders from the Hope Channel visited the school and gave valuable suggestions, including doubling the size of the studio. This was done, and later, Hope Channel Philippines chose to use the studio as their national broadcast center.84 The Media Center was designed with the intention to integrate media in the AIIAS curriculum in such areas as Media and Ministry, Public Health Promotion, Media Marketing in Business, and Media and Instruction in Education. These continue to be of interest in the institution’s academic plans. The media center offered a local AIIAS channel taking advantage of the campus TV cable system. Program schedules were developed with a variety of programs, most of which were from non-AIIAS sources. The structure was put in place to have AIIAS church and special programs recorded systematically with multiple cameras, live mixed. Certain programs were live streamed to the Internet. The studio was equipped with a green screen set where AIIAS news and other programs could be produced.85

Starting about 2015, the demographics of students at AIIAS began to shift. Increasing numbers of “cohort” classes were coming to take their classes on campus. This increased to six or more groups per year, each needing housing for 4-6 weeks at a time. To accommodate this need, additional student housing towers were required. New towers were built one after another, year after year for 4 years.86 Each year, the need was carefully assessed, and questions were raised as to the likelihood of these housing units being filled. But they always seemed to be needed in the end.87

Finally, in 2017-2018, the question was seriously considered as to where funding efforts should be directed. Should it be to raise funds for student scholarships or should funds be raised to provide housing for students. After prayer and contemplation, it was decided to solicit funding to build a student housing tower with the plan to use the income from the tower for student scholarships. The idea was a win–win solution. By investing in the student tower, donors were blessing AIIAS students with needed housing, while providing scholarship tuition. Through this effort, eight students receive full tuition scholarships every year: two in Public Health, two in Education, two in Business, and two in the Seminary.88

On October 1, 2018, Tower R was inaugurated. With it came an additional parking area and the extension of the grass mall and sidewalks along the south housing area. This housing tower provided units for larger families with several children.89

In 2020, the aftermath of Taal Volcano eruption (January 2020) and the COVID-19 pandemic (March 2020) took its toll in the AIIAS community. Dr. Ginger Ketting-Weller, the newly installed president,90 rallied the “AIIAS incident team” to assess the crisis, make contingency plans, and guide the AIIAS transition to online learning. In no time, the faculty, staff, and students were well adjusted to online work and classes. AIIAS’ investment on electronic resources, Information Technology and the 20-year pursuit of excellence in AIIAS Online paid off.

Faculty and students expanded their ministries online. Some of the innovative online ministries launched by AIIAS are the meeting points, an online evangelism targeting the secularized people in the cities; the AIIAS Professional Series, a professional enrichment webinar for pastors, frontline leaders and administrators; Christ’s Method of Management seminars, a Christian perspective of management seminar for members and leaders of our institutions; and the Tree Points ministry of the AIIAS pastoral office. The Kingfisher Garden, a student cooperative vegetable garden, was born and supplied the community with their fresh harvests. God’s Food Basket Ministry, a ministry for the self-supporting students, continued to serve its beneficiaries. Crises were turned into opportunities to minister to others in and out of campus.91

AIIAS Institutional Symbols

It was recognized that, as a relatively new institution, AIIAS did not have some of the associated institutional symbols such as a president’s medallion, an official school flag, a school song, or an institutional mace.

AIIAS President Dr. Guptill led the designing of the president’s medallion incorporating the school logo in the design.92 Cedric Lachenal, a gifted musician and conductor studying at the Seminary, offered to write the music for a school song. Dr. Guptill added the words. “AIIAS Press On” was approved by the board as the AIIAS school song and has been sung in chapel and school gatherings ever since.93

Recognizing the need for improving what was being used as a school flag, Dr. Guptill gathered flag designs from all over the world and rendered them with a color version of the AIIAS logo. After considering various designs, using the AIIAS primary colors, and with the help of the Public Relations Department, a new school flag was approved. The AIIAS flag is flown to represent all that AIIAS stands for as an institution. It embodies all its history, values, and mission.94

  • The green sections at the top and bottom of the flag represent the natural beauty of the campus.

  • The gold stripes on the flag represent the excellence in spirituality, scholarship, and service of the AIIAS mission.

  • The white band across the center of the flag represents integrity, a core value of AIIAS.

  • In the center of the flag is the institution’s logo.

About this time, it was also recognized that a consistent plan for campus signs was needed for road direction signs, school building signs, campus housing signs, and pedestrian directions. President Guptill and the PR Office worked together to plan and implement the campus signs that gave a professional and consistent look to the campus.

Large banners here and there around campus were beginning to distract from the professional campus look. Tasteful light-pole banner holders were installed in selected locations around campus and the tarpaulins were restricted to those locations and formats which helped maintain a dignified campus appearance.

AIIAS personnel observed that other institutions included an institution’s mace in their academic services. In 2014, Dr. Guptill designed a mace for AIIAS. The AIIAS mace is a physical symbol of the institution. When displayed, it represents the authenticity and authority of the occasion. The history of the mace harks back to leaders, which carried a scepter or staff, which represented their position and the authority of their domain (see Numbers 17 and Esther 5).95

The AIIAS mace is made with a beautiful hardwood common in the Philippines and on the AIIAS campus. The carved vines winding up the staff are symbolic of the Adventist faith, which is fully interlaced throughout the institution. The vines are reflective of Christ’s analogy in John 5 where He says, “I am the vine, ye are the branches." The trapezoidal cube near the top represents the four major curriculum areas of the institution – religion, business, health, and education. The top is crowned with a carved wreath holding a double-sided medallion of the AIIAS logo.96

AIIAS developed not only in its physical plant, but also in administrative information technology. AIIAS had early developed its own software for the student records management.97 It also used the Sun Plus software for financial management. But there still remained some significant IT needs.

In the Records Office, a special database was set up to scan students’ supporting documents for easy digital access from the student records software. This effort took almost two years to completely input all the past records. Now, all new supporting student documents are scanned as they are received.

Following the Records Office digital effort, the IT shifted its attention to digitizing the financial supporting documents for each journal entry. This makes checking the basis for journal entries much easier and greatly assists the audit process.

Consideration was then given to transition the document management system that was being used for the Records Office, Finance Office, and the Administration to a different database software that could accommodate media files and display them when needed in a media-friendly manner and provide access through the Internet to authorized people. This provided a wonderful way to not only preserve historical media, but to share it with appropriate individuals and groups.

AIIAS Board Leadership

AIIAS has had outstanding board leadership throughout its history, which has contributed to the success of the institution. Since AIIAS became a GC institution in 1996, board members have included leadership from the Education Department, Treasury, and Presidential of the GC, NSD, and SSD along with others.98

The two supporting Divisions (NSD and SSD) have included the AIIAS president on their executive committees and provide time for the AIIAS president’s report at each year-end meeting. Both the supporting Divisions collect an annual offering for AIIAS dating back to when the Far Eastern Division and the Asia-Pacific Division established AIIAS and looked to it for the primary development of its leadership.

AIIAS Academy

Makiling View Elementary School (AUP), the forerunner of AIIAS International Elementary School which now has become AIIAS Academy, was established for the benefit of the children of the faculty, staff, and graduate students. It received the Philippine government’s recognition in 1993.99 In 2014, AIIAS Academy worked to obtain permission from the Philippine Department of Education to offer a twelve-grade international high school program using the North American Curriculum. This was approved and the plan was to slowly increase the grade levels from grade 10 to grade 12. But it was just a year or two later that the Philippine government announced that it was transitioning the whole country’s educational system and expanding it to 12 grades. This put an urgency to the transition and the realization that additional school facilities were urgent. AIIAS was in the midst of AIIAS student-housing projects, and it did not seem possible to build new Academy school facilities at that time.

After some study, a plan was made to repurpose some of the rooms in the gym to accommodate the needs of the academy until a new school building could be constructed. In 2019, Dr. Ginger Ketting-Weller and the new principal, Dr. Jim Weller, officiated the groundbreaking ceremony of the new AIIAS Academy building.100 Elder Ted N. C. Wilson and his wife Nancy came not only to appreciate the newly built structure on November 15, 2021, but to bless and pray for the leadership of the Wellers.101

The new building maintains the AIIAS campus’ distinctive red-roof design, which has created a campus identity. It includes many features to make a stimulating learning environment for the students. Some of the distinctive features include Solomonic Pillars at the entrance, symbolic of the Godly wisdom requested by the Biblical King Solomon. The windows and railings are decorated with outlines and figures of youthful campus life. At the center of the building is a covered commons area that can be used for meetings and social gatherings.

Historical Role of the School

AIIAS was established at a time when academic and church leadership was urgently needed, not only in Asia, but throughout the world. AIIAS offers an excellent value in graduate education at about a third of the cost of other Adventist educational options.

AIIAS alumni have taken leadership positions throughout the world, including a General Conference officer and several department leaders, top leadership in several Divisions of the church and GC.102 AIIAS constituents, in coordination with the local government, have been very active in driving social change through its socially engaging health, leadership, evangelistic, and literacy programs.103 AIIAS has become well known in academic circles by frequent presentations at the Society of Biblical Literature (SBL), the International Conference, business forums, theological forums, and leadership in the qualitative research community. AIIAS has become a gateway to missions in the 10/40 window and other parts of the world. AIIAS has been an asset to the Adventist Church by preparing church leaders well founded in their faith and academic discipline.

What Remains to Be Done to Fulfill the Mission of the School

The mission of AIIAS is to develop leaders through distinctively Seventh-day Adventist graduate education, excelling in spirituality, scholarship, and service. For 43 years of operation, AIIAS has been instrumental in developing more than 3,500 Christ-centered leaders in the mission field from the 13 divisions of the General Conference of the Seventh-day Adventists.104

AIIAS will continue to fulfill its mission through a synergistic working relationship with the General Conference of the Seventh-day Adventists. Towards the years 2020-2025, through the leadership of Dr. Ginger Ketting-Weller, with the “I WILL GO” strategic focus in mind, AIIAS will:

  • “Increase access to the AIIAS educational experience. Access could be through such strategies as DLC programs, cohorts, creative scheduling, online degree options, short-term academic experiences, and student and faculty exchange programs;”105

  • “Develop unique strengths and opportunities in innovation that focuses on research that is relevant, through close collaboration with the church, industry and other stakeholders;”106

  • “Pursue various avenues for all students and employees to be involved in evangelistic outreach and mission;”107

  • “Provide strong technological skills development in academic programs, and in practical professional development of AIIAS members and constituency;”108

  • “Diversify the sources of funding to help grow new initiatives and fund operations,”109 and;

  • “Develop a system of institutional effectiveness and accountability, with an emphasis on data-driven decision-making.”110

List of Presidents

Seventh-day Adventist Theological Seminary, Far East (1978-1986): Leslie G. Hardinge (1978-1983); Werner Vyhmeister (1984-1986)

Adventist International Institute of Advanced Studies (1990-present): Werner Vyhmeister (1986-1990); Rolando Itin (1991-1992); John Pesulima (1992-1996); David Birkenstock (1996-2002); Julian Melgosa (2002-2006);111Stephen Guptill (2007-2019);112 Ginger Ketting-Weller (2019-present)113

Dr. Alfonso Roda, president of Philippine Union College during development of the graduate religion programs and the transfer of the theological seminary to the FED which later became AIIAS, is recognized for his formative leadership.

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Notes

  1. The plan in 1948 and 1952 was materialized in 1956. General Conference Committee, action 48-986, Philippine Union College, April 27, 1948, 986-987, General Conference Archives, accessed December 8, 2021, https://documents.adventistarchives.org/Minutes/GCC/GCC1948-04-05.pdf; General Conference Committee, action 52-694, Philippine Union College, February 21, 1952, 694-695, General Conference Archives, accessed December 8, 2021, https://documents.adventistarchives.org/Minutes/GCC/GCC1952-02.pdf; Walton J. Brown, comp., Patterns of Seventh-day Adventist education (Washington, DC: Department of Education, General Conference of Seventh-day Adventists, 1980).

  2. Bruce Norman, “Institute of advanced studies trains workers: faculty from 10 countries offer master’s degrees,” ARH, April 29, 1993, 20.

  3. L. E. Smart, “Theological Seminary Extension Course,” Far Eastern Division Outlook, July 1955, 2; Norman, “Institute,” 20; Silang reflections ‘81, (Silang, Cavite: Philippine Union College, 1981), 1.; L. E. Smart, “Theological Seminary Extension School,” Far Eastern Division Outlook, March 1956, 6; Irene Wakeham, “Seminary extension school graduation,” Far Eastern Division Outlook, July 1956, 7.

  4. Walton J. Brown, comp., Chronology of Seventh-day Adventist education (Washington, D.C.: Department of Education, General Conference of Seventh-day Adventists, 1979).

  5. General Conference Committee, action 73-1855, Far Eastern Division Theological Seminary-Authorization, October 25, 1973, 1854-1855, General Conference Archives, accessed July 7, 2021, https://documents.adventistarchives.org/Minutes/GCC/GCC1973-10c.pdf; General Conference Committee, action 73-1895, Philippine Union college Seminary name amended, December 27, 1973, 1895, General Conference Archives, accessed July 7, 2021, https://documents.adventistarchives.org/Minutes/GCC/GCC1973-12.pdf.

  6. “Seventh-day Adventist Theological Seminary, Far East, Faculty handbook, 1972,” Box arcFA-1, Faculty Documents, Leslie Hardinge Library Archives, AIIAS, Silang, Cavite.

  7. Norman R. Gulley, “Far East SDA seminary has first graduate,” ARH, June 22, 1972, 16.

  8. Far Eastern Division Committee, action 74-751, Division participation in the Graduate School and Seminary at PUC, November 17, 1974, 217-220, Southern Asia-Pacific Division Archives.

  9. Far Eastern Division Committee, action 73-628, Philippine Union College Graduate School and Seminary, November 1, 1973, 161, Southern Asia-Pacific Division Archives; Far Eastern Division Committee, action 74-25, Commission on PUC Graduate School and Seminary, January 10, 1974, 5-6, Southern Asia-Pacific Division Archives; Far Eastern Division Committee, action 74-374, PUC Graduate School and Seminary-Division administration, May 29, 1974, 92, Southern Asia-Pacific Division Archives.

  10. Norman R. Gulley, “Historic day for Far East seminary,” Southern Asia Tidings, June 1977, 5.

  11. “Seventh-day Adventist Theological Seminary [Far East],” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1980), 401; Nelson S. Pallasa, “Seminary and research center are dedicated,” ARH, August 1981, 19; Seventh-day Adventist Theological Seminary, Far East, “Relationship between the SDA Theological Seminary, Far East and Philippine Union College,” in The Faculty Handbook (Silang, Cavite: SDATS FE, 23 September 1979), 8.

  12. Leslie Gilbert Hardinge, “Personal Information Forms and Biographical Material,” December 31, 1950, 3. General Conference Archives; Leslie Hardinge, “Beliefs and practices of the Celtic church in Britain” (Ph.D. dissertation, King’s College, London, Department of Theology, London, 1964)

  13. Seventh-day Adventist Theological Seminary, Far East Board of Trustees, action 79-11, Legal status of the Seminary, May 15, 1979, 1, AIIAS Archives ; Seventh-day Adventist Theological Seminary, Far East Board of Trustees, action 80-11, Advance on specials, March 18, 1980, 2, AIIAS Archives; Seventh-day Adventist Theological Seminary, Far East Board of Trustees, action 80-25, Student housing, June 18, 1980, 2, AIIAS Archives; Paoring Ragui, “History and mission of AIIAS,” (Unpublished manuscript of a speech given during the installation of Stephen Guptill as the president of AIIAS in November 11, 2007), typescript.

  14. W. J. Brown, “Around the world in 45 days,” ARH, January 31, 1980, 19, 20.

  15. Asia Adventist Theological Seminary Board of Trustees, action 86-55, New name for seminary, November 10, 1986, 3, AIIAS Archives.

  16. Nelson S. Pallasa, “Library in Philippines Named,” ARH, December 1983, 18; Seventh-day Adventist Theological Seminary, Far East Board, action 83:08, Leslie Hardinge Library, May 4, 1983, AIIAS Archives.

  17. David Cooper, “Newsbeat,” ARH, September 27, 1984, 20.

  18. “Chapel features SDA symbolism,” ARH, December 9, 1982, 15.

  19. Roy E. Ryan, former Seminary Dean of AIIAS, interviewed by Michael W. Campbell, Silang, Cavite, Philippines, September 8, 2014, 5-6.

  20. Seventh-day Adventist Theological Seminary, Far East Board of Trustees, action 85-39, Updating of seminary documentation with SEC, authorize payment of fees, September 23, 1985, 1, AIIAS Archives; Seventh-day Adventist Theological Seminary, Far East Board of Trustees, action 85-62, Request of services of Dr. Roy Ryan, November 7, 1985, 2, AIIAS Archives; Roy E. Ryan, interview by Michael W. Campbell, 6.

  21. Roy E. Ryan, interview by Michael W. Campbell, 6.

  22. Ibid.

  23. Ibid.

  24. Presidential Decree No. 2021, Recognizing the Adventist International Institute of Advanced Studies as an educational institution of international character, granting it certain prerogatives conducive to its growth as such, and for other purposes, Manila: Official gazette, February 24, 1986, 10-11.

  25. Adventist International Institute of Advanced Studies Board of Trustees, action 87-41, AIIAS-Election of new officers, November 11, 1987, 3, AIIAS Archives; Adventist International Institute of Advanced Studies Board of Trustees, action 87-06, Relocation of the AIIAS, May 6, 1987, 1, AIIAS Archives.

  26. “The Philippine Theological Librarians Association,” ForATL News, June 2007, 1, accessed November 17, 2001, http://www.foratl.org/ns51.pdf.

  27. Asia Adventist Theological Seminary Board of Trustees, action 86-52, Doctor of Pastoral Studies program: cooperation with SEAGST, November 10, 1986, 3, AIIAS Archives.

  28. Rolando A. Itin, “Institute grants first doctoral degrees,” ARH, May 14, 1992, 20-21.

  29. Roy E. Ryan, “What’s in a name?” Flags 2, no. 8 (January 2011): 5; Julian Melgosa, “Meet the president,” an interview by Gina Wahlen, Flags, March 2006, 5.

  30. Roy E. Ryan, former Seminary Dean of AIIAS, interview by Michael W. Campbell; Seventh-day Adventist Theological Seminary, Far East Board of Trustees, action 85-62, November 7, 1985; Seventh-day Adventist Theological Seminary, Far East Board of Trustees, action 86-15, Travel authorizations, February 3, 1986, 1, AIIAS Archives.

  31. Roy E. Ryan, former Seminary Dean of AIIAS, interview by Michael W. Campbell; Nancy Vyhmeister, “AIIAS then and now,” AIIAS Highlights, January 8, 2004, 1.

  32. Adventist International Institute of Advanced Studies Board of Trustees, action 88-60, Laying of the foundation stone, new AIIAS campus, November 3, 1988, 2, AIIAS Archives; Adventist International Institute of Advanced Studies, “Groundbreaking program,” (Unpublished manuscript of invitation program, 1 February 1989) typescript; Larry Boughman and Roy Ryan, “Early days of AIIAS Campus,” Facebook, video, October 22, 2021, https://www.facebook.com/aiias/videos/532544211018824.

  33. “AIIAS--then and now,” AIIAS Highlights, March 3, 2005, 1.

  34. Jairyong Lee, 1000 Missionary Movement (Silang, Cavite: 1000 Missionary Movement Publication series, 1996), 51, 202; Jairyong Lee, “A great challenge before us,” AIIAS News 1, No. 2 (Second Semester 1992); “Report or AIIAS Board meeting, AIIAS Highlights, November 23, 1995, 1.

  35. “New buildings rising,” AIIAS News 1, No. 2 (Second Semester 1992): 7.

  36. Larry Boughman, major donor and a campus beautification specialist, named it after his son. “Phillip Boughman meditation and prayer garden dedication,” AIIAS Highlights, 3 March 1994, 1; “Tennis court grand opening,” AIIAS Highlights, January 26, 1995, 1; “Auditorium inauguration,” AIIAS Highlights, November 9, 1995, 3; Adventist International Institute of Advanced Studies Board of Trustees, action 89-07, Name of Academic Center of new AIIAS campus, February 6, 1989, 2, AIIAS Archives; “Chan Shun Academic Center inauguration held,” AIIAS Highlights, March 28, 1996. Chan Shun Academic Center includes the Administration, Leslie Hardinge Library, Seminary, Graduate School and Gymnasium buildings.

  37. “Amazing growth and change,” AIIAS Newsflash, 4, no. 2 (2001), 1.

  38. General Conference Committee Annual Council, action 148-96G, Adventist International Institute of Advanced Studies-reclassification as a General Conference institution, October 6, 1996, 96-173, General Conference Archives, accessed December 9, 2021, https://documents.adventistarchives.org/Minutes/GCC/GCC1996-10a.pdf.

  39. Reuel Almocera, “First AIIAS Alumni meeting,” AIIAS Newsflash 1, no. 4 (1998), 4.

  40. “Grand inauguration of new buildings,” AIIAS Newsflash 4, no. 3 (2001), 1, 4.

  41. “Amazing growth and change,” AIIAS Newsflash 4, no. 2 (2001), 1.

  42. Aimee Tapeceria, “Established for mission,” Flags, September 2013, 4-5; “Beyond the AIIAS walls...is a world thirsting for knowledge,” Flags, September 2013, 12.

  43. The Association for Theological Education in Southeast Asia and ATESEA Theological Union, “ATESEA Handbook 2014 edition, (Iloilo, Philippines: ATESEA, 2014), 68, accessed November 8, 2021, http://atesea.net/handbook/.

  44. G. T. Ng, “AIIAS a premier institution,” AIIAS Highlights, September/October 1999, 1.

  45. R.R. Senson, “PUC’s Theological Seminary receives accreditation,” ARH, August 23, 1973, 15.

  46. Dolf Oberholster, “Accreditation affirms educational excellence,” Flags, March 2014, 4.

  47. Francisco Gayoba, “International Theological Forum: ‘Millenium and prophecy’,” AIIAS Newsflash, July/August 1999, 1.

  48. Julian Melgosa, “SGS Forum: ‘Quality in higher education’,” AIIAS Newsflash, September/October 1999, 1.

  49. Michael Oluikpe, “AIIAS African Theological (AATA) Forum,” Flags, September 2011, 11.

  50. Ron Vyhmeister, “PhD in Business begins,” Flags, October 2007, 18; “Taking care of business at AIIAS,” Flags, March 2008, 10-11.

  51. Dolf Oberholster, “ATESEA accredits all AIIAS Seminary programs,” Flags, April 2015, 7.

  52. “AIIAS awards Doctor of Missiology program,” Flags, October 2016, 5.

  53. Michael W. Campbell, “AIIAS launches inaugural preaching lectureship,” Flags, February 2016, 24.

  54. “Asia Pacific Research Center,” AIIAS Newsflash, March/April 1998, 1; Sunia Fukofuka, “The Asia-Pacific Research Center,” Flags, October 2012, 6.

  55. Ingrid Oberholster, “Asian Qualitative Research Association starts at AIIAS,” Flags, February 2016, 26; Bruce Sumendap, “AQRA: looking beyond variables,” Flags, October 2016, 10.

  56. “A child is born,” Asia Adventist Seminary Studies 1 (1998), 1-3.

  57. “InFo is born,” AIIAS Newsflash, July/August 1999, 2.

  58. Frederick Oberholster, ed., Academic Bulletin 2020-2022 (Silang, Cavite: AIIAS, 2020), 16.

  59. Seventh-day Adventist Theological Seminary, Far East Board of Trustees, action 80:06, Increase of library fund, March 18, 1980, AIIAS Archives; Seventh-day Adventist Theological Seminary, Far East Board of Trustees, action 80:19, Appreciations, June 18, 1980, AIIAS Archives; Seventh-day Adventist Theological Seminary, Far East Board of Trustees, action 80-32, Library, November 12, 1980, AIIAS Archives; Seventh-day Adventist Theological Seminary, Far East Board of Trustees, action 81:04, Librarian’s request, April 2, 1981, AIIAS Archives.

  60. “AIIAS installs library security system,” AIIAS Highlights, September 7, 1995, 1.

  61. “Grand inauguration of new buildings,” AIIAS Newsflash 4, no.3 (2001): 1

  62. Felipe E. Tan, “Library renovation goes ahead,” AIIAS Newsflash 5, no. 2/3 (2001): 5.

  63. Felipe E. Tan, “Library relocates and expands media center,” AIIAS Newsflash 7, no. 1 (2004): 5.

  64. James Park, “Inauguration of Asian Studies Center,” Flags, September 2013, 22.

  65. Seventh-day Adventist Theological Seminary, Far East Board of Trustees, action 81-08, Date for EGW Center opening, April 2, 1981, AIIAS Archives; Adventist International Institute of Advanced Studies, “Ellen G. White Estate inauguration and dedication invitation,” (Silang, Cavite: Ellen G. White Estate, 28 June 2014); Michael W. Campbell, “Sharing the Gift of Prophecy across Asia: dedication of newly minted Ellen G. White Estate Branch Office,” Flags, April 2015, 5.

  66. Stephen Guptill and Sharnie Love Zamora, “A visit to the Creation Science Display,” Flags, October 2018, 4.

  67. Felipe E. Tan, “Chapel--Inauguration of the integrated system--history in the making,” AIIAS Highlights, 26 October 2000, 1; “A new era in the library,” Flags, March 2006, 10; Annete Melgosa, “Library automated,” AIIAS Newsflash 3, No. 2 (2000):, 1, 4.

  68. Leslie Hardinge Library, “Bringing great minds together: bibliographic services procedures,” (Unpublished manuscript, August 2016) typescript, 5; Leslie Hardinge Library, “Monograph WEMI workflow,” (Unpublished manuscript) typescript.

  69. Bernice Paras and Elizabeth Siapco’s thesis could be found in the AIIAS Leslie Hardinge Library.

  70. “Library gains two new librarians,” Flags, October 2006, 17; Chantal Klingbeil, “Welcome to the Cloutens,” Flags, March 2997, 16.

  71. Leslie Hardinge Library, Adventist International Institute of Advanced Studies, “Meet our staff,” accessed December 6, 2021, https://library.aiias.edu/about-us/meet-our-staff.

  72. Bruce Sumendap, “AIIAS Online celebrates 10th anniversary,” Flags, March 2014, 4.

  73. “Official launch of the first online course at AIIAS,” AIIAS Highlights, 9 October 2003; Julian Melgosa, “Meet the president,” an interview by Gina Wahlen; Jim Park, “Online on the cutting edge,” Flags, March 2006, 8-9.

  74. “Graduating class organizes,” Flags, October 2007, 19.

  75. Jim C. Weller, “From ash to Zoom: distance learning goes viral,” Flags, October 2020, 4; Leni Casimiro, “The one thing that COVID-19 cannot stop,” Flags, October 2020, 14.

  76. Max Langi, “Meet the Vice President for Finance,” an interview by Samuel Bangura, Flags, October 2006, 4-5; “New apartment towers to temporarily house Division,” AIIAS Newsflash, September 1997, 3; Ron Bissell, “A day to remember,” AIIAS Newsflash, January/February 1998, 1.

  77. Ina Longway, “AIIAS bell tower,” AIIAS Newsflash, March-April 1998, 2; Annete Melgosa, “Ringing in our mission,” AIIAS Newsflash, March/April 1999, 1.

  78. Julian Melgosa, “AIIAS purchases land,’ AIIAS Newsflash, Vol. 6, no. 1 (2003), 2; Fred Webb, “Property purchase (new land for AIIAS),” AIIAS Highlights, 13 February 2003, 1; Fred L. Webb, “Development of the AIIAS south complex,” AIIAS Highlights, 10 March 2005, 2.

  79. “The School of Graduate Studies is growing,” Flags, March 2008, 13.

  80. Michael W. Campbell, “Seminary expansion creates new opportunities for learning,” Flags, April 2015, 4; “New extension provides more room for growing AIIAS seminary,” Flags, February 2016, 13.

  81. Ingrid Oberholster, “Creating ‘third space’ at AIIAS,” Flags, April 2015, 20.

  82. “Dr. John Pesulima addresses student body,” AIIAS Week, November 19, 1992, 1; Ivy Ng, “Celebration marks ground breaking,” Flags, March 2007, 12; Shawna Vyhmeister, “Siew Huy auditorium: a new place to grow,” Flags, June 2010, 12-13.

  83. Stephen Guptill, “Plans for new building advanced,” Flags, October 2007, 14-15.

  84. Sharnie Love Zamora, “AIIAS and Hope Channel ties for TV outreach,” Flags, March 2017, 19.

  85. See AIIAS Media productions in: YouTube https://www.youtube.com/c/TVAIIAS/featured; Facebook https://www.facebook.com/aiias/; Twitter https://twitter.com/aiiasedu/; Instagram https://www.instagram.com/aiiasedu/.

  86. Ingrid Oberholster, “Student housing expansion,” Flags, September 2013, 20; Public Relations Office, AIIAS, “Inauguration of tower O,” Flags, March 2014, 21.

  87. Dolf Oberholster, “Student housing and enrollment,” Flags, September 2017, 5.

  88. Stephen Guptill, “New dormitory will provide additional housing and scholarship funds,” Flags, April 2016, 12; Bruce Sumendap, “Student scholarship tower opens,” Flags, October 2016, 15; Stephen Guptill, “AIIAS continues its campus development,” Flags, September 2017, 4; Stephen Guptill, “AIIAS constructs Tower R,” Flags, March 2018, 4.

  89. Sharnie Love Zamora, “Celebrating the inauguration of Tower R,” Flags, March 2019, 19.

  90. “Bruce Sumendap, “President’s installation ceremony highlights AIIAS’ unique mission,” Flags, March 2020, 14-15.

  91. Bruce Sumendap, Sharnie Love Zamora-Belarmino, “Resilient, tried and tested: the day it rained ash and blessings,” Flags, October 2020, 6-7; Dan Namanya, “Eyewitness : It started with a Facebook post,” Flags, October 2020, 9; Dalia Taylor, “Eyewitness: ready to serve,” Flags, October 2020, 10; Stkesworth Shadeed, “Pandemic produce: Kingfisher Garden,” Flags, October 2020, 20-21 ; Sharnie Love Zamora-Belarmino, “The basket that never goes empty,” Flags, July 2021, 4.

  92. Bruce Sumendap, “AIIAS graduation icons,” Flags, October 2016, 13.

  93. Watch the launching of the AIIAS school song on February 24, 2014 here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oWSeAvB_WCA.

  94. “AIIAS debuts new flag,” News, August 25, 2016, accessed December 14, 2021: https:/www.aiias.edu/aiias-debuts-new-flag/.

  95. Bruce Sumendap, “AIIAS graduation icons,” Flags, October 2016, 13; Frederick Oberholster, ed., Academic Bulletin 2020-2022, 11.

  96. Frederick Oberholster, ed., Academic Bulletin 2020-2022, 11.

  97. “AIIAS programmer develops new software,” Flags, October 2006, 12.

  98. “New management committee,” AIIAS Newssflash 4, no. 1 (2001): 1; Frederick Oberholster, ed., Academic Bulletin 2020-2022, 260.

  99. “AIIAS Elementary School recognized,” 1.

  100. Jim C. Weller and Sharnie Love Zamora-Belarmino, “Breaking ground for the new AIIAS Academy,” Flags, March 2020, 12.

  101. Ted N. C. Wilson, “Singing “We have this hope,” in the new building of AIIAS Academy,” Facebook video, accessed November 16, 2021, https://www.facebook.com/PastorTedWilson/videos/244681187648263.

  102. Some of the graduates of AIIAS are Pyung Duk Chun (first graduate), G. T. Ng, Lisa Beardsley-Hardy, Saw Samuel and Leonardo Asoy.

  103. AIIAS constituents organized four churches in Silang, the 1000 Missionary Movement, and International Children’s Care, Philippines and conducted numerous civic programs such as developing community water supply, medical missions, seminars, disaster response, gift giving, home improvements, literacy programs, etc.

  104. Sharnie Love Zamora-Belarmino, “Leaders as servants and stewards,” Flags, October 2020, 12.

  105. Adventist International Institute of Advanced Studies Administrative Committee, “AIIAS strategic plan: themes and goals,” accessed December 14, 2021, 2, Adventist International Institute of Advanced Studies.

  106. Ibid.

  107. Ibid.

  108. Ibid.

  109. Ibid.

  110. Ibid.

  111. “Former presidents of AIIAS,” Flags, June 2010, 4-5.

  112. “Presidential installation: new president installed at AIIAS,” Flags, March 2007, 6-7; Gina Wahlen, “New president installed at AIIAS,” AIIAS Highlights, 16 November 2006, 1.

  113. “Bruce Sumendap, “President’s installation,” 14-15.

×

Guptill, Stephen, Dionisio Valdez Tuapin. "Adventist International Institute of Advanced Studies (AIIAS)." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. November 01, 2020. Accessed April 15, 2024. https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=6ANS.

Guptill, Stephen, Dionisio Valdez Tuapin. "Adventist International Institute of Advanced Studies (AIIAS)." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. November 01, 2020. Date of access April 15, 2024, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=6ANS.

Guptill, Stephen, Dionisio Valdez Tuapin (2020, November 01). Adventist International Institute of Advanced Studies (AIIAS). Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. Retrieved April 15, 2024, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=6ANS.