Jayne, Julius Edward (1864–1933)

By Nathalie Johansson

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Nathalie Johansson, B.A. (English and History), M.A. (English) (University of Southern Denmark), currently (2019) serves as the management assistant to the Treasury Department the Trans-European Division of the Seventh-day Adventists in St. Albans, England. Johansson plans to complete a Ph.D. in Adventist History in the near future.

Julius Edward Jayne served as the president of the Conference and Tract Society; editor of The Home Missionary; secretary of the Foreign Mission Board; and president of the Southern New England Conference, Greater New York Conference, and British Union Conference.

Early Life and Work

Jayne was born on December 4, 1864.1 He was converted to the Adventist faith in 1885, and in 1886 he received his license to preach.2 Jayne married Mary R. Burleigh in 1885, and they commenced work for the church in Bloomington, Nebraska.3 In 1893 Jayne was called to move from Nebraska to Maine, to take up the position of president of the Conference and Tract Society.4 He remained in this position until 1897, when he became the editor of The Home Missionary.5 Two years later, in 1899, he became secretary of the Foreign Mission Board, located at 150 Nassau Street, New York.6

In 1913, on the recommendation of the division and the union, Jayne became president of the Southern New England Conference.7

Greater New York Conference

Three years later, in 1916, Jayne was elected as president of the Greater New York Conference.8 During his time as president, Jayne got involved in several projects. In 1919 he helped to sort out an apartment, so that church workers had a place to stay.9 In 1920 he and the executive committee spent several months finishing a deal to acquire a new church property for the English church of Manhattan and the Bronx.10 Acquiring the property gave a significant boost to the missionary outreach in that area of New York.

A deal to purchase a building on Forty-seventh Street between Third and Fourth avenues in Brooklyn for the use of the Brooklyn Swedish church was made in 1921 with the help and support of Jayne.11 Because of his success, Jayne was elected for another term as president in 1922.12

British Union Conference

On October 18, 1922, it was reported in The Missionary Worker that the General Conference had recommended Jayne as the new president of the British Union Conference.13 The recommendation was based on Jayne’s years of administrative experience, together with his experience as president of the Greater New York Conference. It was noted that under Jayne’s leadership, the Greater New York Conference had become one of the strongest conferences in the denomination. The British Union Conference accepted Jayne by unanimous vote as their new president.14

The Atlantic Union autumn council in October 1922 endorsed Jayne’s call to be president of the British Union Conference.15 Jayne was expected to arrive in England by the first of December the same year.16

Jayne attended the European Division Committee’s winter meetings, which were held at Stanborough Park December 26, 1923, to January 2, 1924.17 At the meetings Jayne made a strong appeal for the work in Great Britain. The speech was so powerful that it drew applause from the crowd, and the British people present felt that Jayne was the right spokesperson for the British church. In his speech Jayne had asked why the membership in Britain had grown much slower than in other fields and advocated for improving and extending the evangelistic work in Britain.18 As a result of the speech, the budget for the British Union Conference was approved without any problems.

Later that year Jayne was to report by letter to W. A. Spicer the progress of the evangelistic work in London by L. W. Barras and W. Maudsley where in 1923 there had been a net increase in membership of 155.19 In the same letter, Jayne stated that there were a number of other evangelistic meetings being held in other parts of England, as well as two in Wales (Cardiff and Swansea), two in Scotland (Glasgow), and one in Ireland (Belfast), with a plan for another in Dublin to commence shortly.

In 1924 Jayne reported that there were 120 congregations in Britain. He advocated stronger evangelistic efforts and a greater emphasis on foreign missions.20

On March 31, 1926, in the Stanborough Park College chapel, Watford, the British Union said farewell to Jayne and his wife before they returned to the United States.21 Several people stood up to pay tribute to Jayne. Brother Baird remarked that Jayne had often worked long night hours, as he had seen lights in Jayne’s office even until midnight and beyond. He was impressed by Jayne’s commitment to God’s cause.22 Dr. Ruble mentioned that Jayne had done an excellent job in organizing and training the men who were under his administration. Therefore he was confident that everything would continue to run smoothly even after Jayne’s departure.23 M. J. Saunders mentioned in The Missionary Worker that Mrs. Jayne was sad about leaving and was in tears as she had thought about their plans and dreams for the British Union, which had not been fully fulfilled.24

The Last Years

Jayne spent the last years of his life in the United States, where, among other things, he provided assistance to the Acushnet Sanitarium, located in Massachusetts.25 On June 14, 1933, Jayne passed away in New Bedford, Massachusetts.26

Legacy

Jayne left behind a legacy of dedicated service to the church. When he was converted to the Adventist faith in 1885, it only took a year before he received a license to preach the Adventist message. From then on, he served the church in whatever capacity he was called to, thereby being a great example for generations of Adventists to follow.

Sources

Campbell, M. N. “Recent Changes.” The Missionary Worker, October 18, 1922.

“Daily Bulletin of the General Conference.” Review and Herald, March 3, 1893.

“Death of Elder J. E. Jayne.” Review and Herald, July 6, 1933.

“Editor.” The Home Missionary, October 1897.

Guthrie, W. M. “A Visit.” Lake Union Herald, November 26, 1919.

Jayne, J. E. “Items.” Atlantic Union Gleaner, September 7, 1921.

———. “A World-Wide Work.” The Missionary Worker, July 25, 1924.

“Mary R. Jayne obituary.” ARH, December 31, 1942.

Maxwell, A. S. “The Editor’s Page.” The Missionary Worker, January 11, 1924.

“Officers of the Board.” The Missionary Magazine, November 1900.

Quinn, R. D. “The Union Conference.” Atlantic Union Gleaner, November 19, 1913.

Sanders, M. J. “Farewell.” The Missionary Worker, April 9, 1926.

Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook. Accessed February 2, 2020. http://documents.adventistarchives.org/Yearbooks/YB1916.pdf.

Slade, E. K. “Greater New York Conference.” Atlantic Union Gleaner, June 28, 1922.

———. “Recent Visits.” Atlantic Union Gleaner, May 12, 1920.

Spicer, W. A. “In Greater London.” ARH, May 1, 1924.

The Ellen G. White Encyclopedia. Hagerstown, Maryland: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 2013. S.v. "Jayne, Julius Edward."

Notes

  1. “Death of Elder J. E. Jayne,” obituary citation, ARH, July 6, 1933, 24.

  2. The Ellen G. White Encyclopedia (2013), s.v. "Jayne, Julius Edward"; H. Shultz, “Nebraska Conference Proceedings,” ARH, December 7, 1886, 675.

  3. “Mary R. Jayne, obituary,” ARH, December 31, 1942, 26.

  4. “Daily Bulletin of the General Conference,” ARH, March 3, 1893, 1.

  5. “Editor,” The Home Missionary, October 1897, 1.

  6. “Officers of the Board,” The Missionary Magazine, November 1900, 2.

  7. R. D. Quinn, “The Union Conference,” Atlantic Union Gleaner, November 19, 1913, 1.

  8. Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook, accessed February 2, 2020,http://documents.adventistarchives.org/Yearbooks/YB1916.pdf.

  9. W. M. Guthrie, “A Visit,” Lake Union Herald, November 26, 1919, 1.

  10. E. K. Slade, “Recent Visits,” Atlantic Union Gleaner, May 12, 1920, 1.

  11. J. E. Jayne, “Items,” Atlantic Union Gleaner, September 7, 1921, 1.

  12. E. K. Slade, “Greater New York Conference.” Atlantic Union Gleaner, June 28, 1922, 3.

  13. M. N. Campbell, “Recent Changes,” The Missionary Worker, October 18, 1922, 2.

  14. Ibid.

  15. Ibid.

  16. Ibid.

  17. A. S. Maxwell, “The Editor’s Page.” The Missionary Worker, January 11, 1924, 8.

  18. Ibid.

  19. W.A. Spicer, “In Greater London,” ARH, May 1, 1924, 21.

  20. J. E. Jayne, “A World-Wide Work,” The Missionary Worker, July 25, 1924, 1, 2.

  21. M. J. Sanders, “Farewell,” The Missionary Worker, April 9, 1926, 2.

  22. Ibid.

  23. Ibid, 3.

  24. Ibid.

  25. Fortin and Moon.

  26. “Death of Elder J. E. Jayne.”

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Johansson, Nathalie. "Jayne, Julius Edward (1864–1933)." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. January 09, 2021. Accessed March 04, 2021. https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=6CR2.

Johansson, Nathalie. "Jayne, Julius Edward (1864–1933)." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. January 09, 2021. Date of access March 04, 2021, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=6CR2.

Johansson, Nathalie (2021, January 09). Jayne, Julius Edward (1864–1933). Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. Retrieved March 04, 2021, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=6CR2.