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Tocantins Mission headquarters, 2019.

Photo courtesy of Tocantins Mission Archive.

Tocantins Mission

By Julia Castilho, Lusmara da Silva França, and Otoniel Ferreira

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Julia Castilho

Lusmara da Silva França

Otoniel Ferreira

First Published: July 3, 2021

Tocantins Mission (TOCS) is an administrative unit of the Seventh-day Adventist Church located in the territory of the West Central Brazil Union Mission (WCBU). Its headquarters is currently at Norte Sul Av. 06, Block 106 Sul, Lot 6, Plano Director Sul District, zip code 77020-090, in the city of Palmas, state of Tocantins, Brazil.1

Its territory is the state of Tocantins, which has an area of 107,228,450 sq. mi. (277,720,412 km²), and has an estimated population of 1,328,359 inhabitants.2 This population is distributed in 139 towns. In 85 of these towns, there is at least one Adventist congregation, whether an organized church or an organized company. In its territory, TOCS has 13,214 members spread throughout the 202 congregations in the region. Thus, there is an average of one Adventist for each 100 inhabitants.3

In TOCS’s territory there are three Adventist schools: Palmas Adventist Academy, established in 1994 in the city of Palmas has with 1,135 students; Araguaina Adventist Academy, established in 1982 in Araguaína has 830 students; and Gurupi Adventist Academy, established in 1969 in Gurupi has 674 students,4 for a total student population of 2,639.

In addition to schools, there is also Hope Channel FTA broadcast over-the-air, which was inaugurated in December 2012 in Palmas, the state capital of Tocantins to intensify the preaching of the gospel. This communication channel has a potential audience of 228,332 inhabitants in the city, as well as cable TV subscribers and satellite dish owners spread throughout the state.5

Overseeing all Adventist activities in the region, TOCS has 29 ministers: 19 ordained ministers (two in administrative roles, two department secretaries, and 15 as district pastors) and 10 licensed ministers (9 as district pastors and 1 as a school pastor). In addition to these, the field has 312 employees serving at the administrative headquarters and in schools, of which seven are workers in administrative roles and school management.6

Origin of Seventh-day Adventist Work in the Mission Territory

Tocantins was the last Brazilian state to be established. Previously, the territory that now belongs to this federation unit was part of the state of Goiás. However, with the transfer of the Federal District to central Brazil and the consequent inauguration of Brasilia in 1960, the northern region of Goiás began to develop at a faster pace. This was driven by factors such as the construction of highway BR-010 (commonly known as the Belém-Brasilia highway), gold and limestone mining, and timber extraction. All these factors, in addition to other political and economic movements, contributed to a further expansion of population, agriculture, and trade.7

Given these developments, the proposal to create a new Brazilian state was presented to the National Congress. This proposal was approved in 1985. However, it was vetoed in by then President José Sarney. In November 1985, the proposal to create the state of Tocantins was again submitted to the Congress and was again approved by the legislative. However, it once again received a presidential veto, with the explanation that Brazil's economic momentum was not favorable for such a thing.8

Finally, in 1988, when the Federal Constitution was promulgated, a popular amendment was presented to the Constituent Assembly with about 80,000 signatures, which reinforced the proposal to create this new Brazilian state. The proposal was voted on and accepted on the same day, October 5, 1988, the date that marks the establishment of the state of Tocantins.9

The stories of how the first congregations of the Seventh-day Adventist Church in Tocantins emerged happened while the area was still part of Goiás. The first Adventist groups gathered in different places around the state such as the municipalities of Araguacema, Araguaína, and Ponte Alta do Bom Jesus. Thus, a brief story of each of these events will be presented.10

Araguacema was the city where the first converts to Adventism emerged in the state. This story of the development of the work in Tocantins began with Mrs. Ernestina Pereira Leite during the 1940s.11 After quarreling with her husband, Manoel Athaíde, Ernestina moved, with her two children, to the city of Goiânia, capital of Goiás. There, a lady presented the Adventist message to Ernestina, who readily accepted the gospel. Ernestina was then baptized in the city of Araguari, in Minas Gerais State, along with her eldest son, Jose Wilson Leite.12

After Ernestina moved to Goiânia, her husband decided to become a parish priest and began studying theology at a Catholic seminary. As soon as he finished his studies, he returned to Araguacema and began his ministry with the church there. Sometime later, Manoel (Ernestina’s husband come priest) founded an academy (the only one in town) where he taught Grades 1 to 6. Considering that some students lived in the school, this place also functioned as an orphanage, which was financially supported by the state and the Catholic church. Students from various cities, including Goiânia, were studying there.13

Sometime later, Manoel Athaíde died, struck by a bolt of lightning during a visit to his property. Therefore, rightfully his property belonged to his wife because, at that time, divorce was not legal (it was later legalized by the 1977 Brazilian constitution).14

Since Manoel was a servant of the Catholic church, the bishop of the diocese sought to take possession of the deceased’s property for the church. His possessions were basically land, cattle, a house, and the school he had founded. However, his widow protested, claiming that, by right, the property belonged to her and her children.15 After a fierce legal dispute, the judge ruled that the assets did, in fact, belong to Ernestina. Given this, she decided to return to Araguacema and take over direction of the school. In addition, she began to evangelize the city. She held a Sabbath School every Saturday morning at her residence, and thus preached the message constantly.16

Ernestina Leite was a great missionary and led several people to make a decision for baptism. So, at the end of 1948, the first church in Araguacema was started, and also the first church in Tocantins. The first baptism in Araguacema took place in 1954 with about 10 people being baptized. Among those baptized was Rute Pereira Leite, Ernestina's daughter-in-law and a member of the Araguacema Church to this day. Ruth was the first to enter the baptismal tank and she is considered the first person baptized in the Seventh-day Adventist Church in the state of Tocantins.17

Regarding the school, which was under her responsibility, the widow found it difficult to keep it open as she no longer had financial help from the state or from the Catholic Church. There were about 60 students who needed to be fed daily, as well as several employees and teachers to be paid. It seemed impossible to keep up without help.18

Ernestina started asking for resources from her friends and the community. And it was through voluntary help and donations that she was able to keep the school active. As hard as it was, Ernestina managed to keep the school going for many years and her work was fruitful. Among the children attending the school was Rute Pereira Leite, Ernestina's daughter-in-law and Edmar Ribeiro Martins, who later became a pastor. He was the first from the school in 1957 to go study at Brazil College,19 which later became Brazil Adventist University Academy of São Paulo.20

In 1965, the president of then Goiás-Minas Mission, Pastor Wilson Sarli, learned of the situation and began to donate food and money to Ernestina’s school. In addition, he assisted her by sending students who finished primary education at her school and went on to Brazil College. Dozens of students who studied at Ernestina's school became workers in the Adventist organization. These include Dr. Adam, who served as clinical director of the Adventist Hospital in Manaus for 18 years, Pastor Diomar Cruz, Ernestina's nephew, and Diói Cruz, son of Diomar, who served as dean of the Adventist International Institute of Advanced Studies in the Philippines. Several former students went on to work at the Brazil Publishing House.21

Adventism also flourished elsewhere. In the town of Ponte Alta do Bom Jesus, the first Adventist church built was the result of the migration of Adventists from the city of Barreiras, state of Bahia.22 Some of these people were evangelized by the well-known missionary Plácido da Rocha Pita, who played a great role in evangelizing the Brazilian Northeast Region.23

Between 1963 and 1969, Pastor Wilson Sarli, then president of the former Goias-Minas Mission, learned of the Adventist groups meeting in Ponte Alta. He traveled to the place with a district pastor. They baptized several people and organized church meetings. The pioneers of the church in this region were Ziraías and his family, who are still very dedicated to the work and very active in the city.24

Regarding the city of Araguaína, it was in the early 1960s that the Adventist message began to spread in the region. As far as anyone knows, it happened through the work of two canvassers who arrived in the city. Once they entered a bar and sold the book The Life of Jesus to two customers. One of these clients named José Ribamar, after reading Adventist literature for about 50 years, decided in 2013 that he wanted to be baptized. Today, he is a member of the Seventh-day Adventist Church and lives in the city of Arapoema, Tocantins.25

The Adventist church of Araguaína started in 1968 with the arrival of the couple Joaquim and Maria Martins and Antonio Gabriel with his family. As time went on, the number of Adventists increased in that region, which required somewhere to gather.26 The first meetings of the church in Araguaína took place in a rented hall in the Entroncamento neighborhood. After some time and after having moved several times, the group bought a piece of land at 13 de Maio St., where they built a small hall that was divided into two rooms, one for the children and one for the adults. Later, after the church was built, the previous hall became the first Adventist school in the city.27

In 1974 and 1975 several isolated families settled along the busy BR-010 highway (Brasília-Belém highway). Along with these families, several groups of Adventist brothers also settled at various points along the highway. Thus, given the advancement of the work and the Adventist presence in this region, the first North Goiás Campmeeting could take place in the city of Araguaína. At the time, there was at least one Seventh-day Adventist Church and one school linked to the Adventist church in the city of Gurupi, which is also part of the vast region that today is the territory of the Tocantins Mission.28

In 1988, due to the creation of the state of Tocantins and the establishment of its capital in Palmas, many Adventists moved to that city. Soon the work of evangelism began. Thus, by divine blessings coupled with the great effort put forth by the missionaries in 1997, about a decade later, there were already at least nine congregations between organized churches and organized companies in this city, as well as an Adventist school. Between 1995 and 1997, just in Palmas, about 200 people were baptized. Furthermore, a neighboring city where there had been no Adventist presence was reached by the gospel message.29

Missionary work continued to grow, and along with the need to further expand the Church in this large region of the country, the need for a new administrative unit became evident. One of the challenges faced at the time was that the territory was far from the Central Planalto Conference, located in Brasilia, the conference that managed the churches of the region. In addition, there was the challenge of reaching the many cities that were still without an Adventist presence. This would soon change with the creation of the Tocantins Mission.

Conference Organizational History

TOCS's history can be told from the planting of Tocantins Missionary Post in 2003. After a long period of planning and analysis to confirm the feasibility of dividing the territory of Central Planalto Conference, the creation of the mission was finally decided by vote of the SDA Ordinary Executive Board of the West Central Brazil Union Mission, on April 7, 2008. The Tocantins Mission was created to watch over the Adventist churches and schools in the state of Tocantins.30

The first executive meeting of the Tocantins Mission took place on November 29, 2008, in Palmas, capital of the state of Tocantins.31 When the work started, TOCS oversaw about 10,827 members in 13 pastoral districts and 122 congregations. In addition, there were five schools, and at least 28 active canvassers within the mission's territory. Of the 139 towns in the state that were part of its mission field, only 66 had an Adventist presence. It is worth noting that since the beginning of its activities until today, TOCS has been responsible for the same territory without being reorganized.32

The first administrators of Tocantins Mission were Pastor Marcos Militão dos Santos, president, and Paulo Fabrício Dias Júnior, secretary and treasurer. This leadership was approved by action no. 2008-040, during the Plenary Ordinary Meeting of the West Central Brazil Union Mission Executive Board, held on May 3 and 4, 2008, at the Hotel Jandaia, in the city of Campo Grande, state of Mato Grosso do Sul.33

Among the people who contributed to the formation of TOCS, were the administrators of the West Central Brazil Union Mission and the Central Planalto Conference who conducted the studies and whose committees approved the creation of the new mission. These leaders were pastors Helder Roger Cavalcanti Silva, Cicero Ferreira Gama, and Jairo Cesar Silva dos Anjos, from WCBU, and Pastor Jairo Emerick Torres, president of the Central Planalto Conference at that time.

Provisionally, Tocantins Mission was headquartered in a rented property at Quadra 208 Sul, Alameda 03, Lotes 24/26, in the capital Palmas, Tocantins. This happened while its permanent headquarters was being built at Quadra 106 Sul, NS 6, Lot 6. The opening of this headquarters took place on August 27, 2009, and since then the office of this church administrative unit has remained in the same location.34

In fulfilling the mission and preaching the gospel, TOCS has sought to adjust its plans and goals to achieve the best results in line with the vision and mission of the Church as a whole. Projects have been developed each year, such as Impacto Esperança (Hope Impact),35 Breaking the Silence Project,36 Semana Santa nos Lares (Passion Week in Homes), AdoleJovem (Teen and Youth), and other projects such as the Life and Health Fair,37 Mutirão de Natal (Christmas Joint Effort),38 projeto Vida por Vidas (Life For Lives Project),39 and Caleb Mission,40 among others.

AdoleJovem was introduced in the second semester of 2014, and since then has been carried out annually, with prior registrations made through the WCBU intranet, with an average participation of 500 teenagers and youth per time.41 AdoleYoung's primary goal has been to awaken, motivate, and train the “young generation” to be directly involved in fulfilling the mission, that is, sharing the gospel and making new disciples. The results have been remarkable and very significant. More and more teenagers and young people have participated and have been truly involved in fulfilling the mission.42

Another project that has received special attention is the Conquest of Great Cities Project, which officially entered the TOCS calendar in 2013. This project has been undertaken to advance Adventist work in challenging regions such as large cities. This year, the project was carried out in the state capital, Palmas. In previous years it was held in the largest cities elsewhere in the state, namely: Araguaína in 2014; Gurupi in 2015; Porto Nacional in 2016, and Paraíso do Tocantins in 2017. This project aims to present the Seventh-day Adventist Church in a relevant way to the community in which it operates.43

The activities of the Conquest of the Great Cities Project are carried out over a week and at the end of the week, the event is closed with a great spiritual celebration, attended by well-known Adventist singers and speakers. The project contributes to awakening the membership to a mission accomplishment through programs and joint actions, developed throughout the week of special activities. It is hoped these will become a routine for each congregation. During each project, evangelistic meetings were held and new congregations were opened.44

All these activities show that the creation of TOCS has helped fulfill the Church's mission and provided more efficient service to congregations throughout the state. Now the administrative headquarters is much closer than before when all congregations and Adventists in the state were overseen from a headquarters in Brasilia. Proximity facilitated training, church organization, councils, and other projects more effectively.45

An important lesson learned from the history of the Tocantins Mission is the importance of administrative leaders being close to serve the churches and groups in their challenging local realities. As leaders spend more time in the communities they oversee, they come to better understand the challenges and needs of the many contexts and can thus more appropriately help the local churches. The training, meetings, and conference contribute positively to this purpose.46

During TOCS's 12 years of operation, the Adventist work has developed in Tocantins. This is a very promising region for preaching and a place in Brazil where the church still has great possibilities for advancement. Its main challenge in the years to come will be to continue with the same evangelistic force. This requires a missionary generation of teens, youth, adults, and seniors together in a mobilized church for the mission to expand the kingdom of God. We need to think big, to leave it in God's hands and to be together in the fulfillment of the mission.47

Moreover, an important way to motivate a missionary generation in such a secular society is to work with each new generation of Adventists to provide them with opportunities and tools to work and be significant in the cause of the gospel. It helps young people understand “that they are not in this world just to earn material goods, but they're here to raise a generation of missionaries. And God said that He will pour out His Holy Spirit and give His power.” At TOCS we work so that this "generation can fulfill this prophetic role that God has left to us.”48

Chronology of Administrative Executives49

Presidents: Marcos Militão dos Santos (2008-2011); Salomão Sarmento de Souza (2011-2017); Evaldo de Souza Oliveira (2017-2019); Richard Figueredo (2019-).

Secretaries: Paulo Fabrício Dias Júnior (2008-2009); Adilson Porfírio de Miranda (2009-2011); Marcos Roberto P. Nunes (2011-2013); Mark Wallacy da Costa Ribeiro (2013-2015); Giulian Lopes Vasques (2016-2018); Regerson Molitor da Silva (2018-).

Treasurers: Paulo Fabrício Dias Jr. (2008-2011); Abraão da Cruz Vicente (2012-2014); Rogério José de Sousa (2014-2015); Alex Sandro Quevedo Ramos (2015-2019); Wellington Cesar de Melo (2019-).50

Sources

Acosta, Rafael. “Aldeia recebe 5,5 toneladas de alimentos do Mutirão de Natal” [Village gets 5.5 tons of food in Christmas Joint Effort]. Adventist News (Online), December 14, 2016.

Acosta, Rafael. “Livros gratuitos levam esperança no Tocantins” [Free books bring hope to Tocantins]. Adventist News (Online), June 2, 2017.

Acosta, Rafael. “Veja como foi o Dia Mundial dos Jovens Adventistas no Tocantins” [See how the International Day of Adventist Youth was in Tocantins]. Adventist News (Online), March 20, 2017.

Agency of the Development of Tourism, Culture and Creative Economy State of Tocantins. https://adetuc.to.gov.br/.

Aias, Jessie. “AdoleJovem para Palmas, Gurupi e região está chegando. Saiba como participar” [AdoleJovem is coming to Palmas, Gurupi, and area. Learn how to join]. Adventist News (Online), August 7, 2014.

Barbosa, Manoel. “Um pouco de história... contada por quem a viveu!” [A little bit about stories... told by those who lived it!] Revista Vitrine [Vitrine Review] TOCS 1, year 1 (1st semester of 2011): 4-5.

Gonsalves, Alex. “Quebrando o Silêncio em Porto Nacional” [Breaking the Silence in Porto Nacional]. Adventist News (Online), September 6, 2016.

Gonsalves, Alex. “Feira de Saúde Impressiona população de Porto Nacional” [Health Fair Impresses the population in Porto Nacional]. Adventist News (Online), September 5, 2016.

Management System of the Adventist Church (ACMS) – West Central Brazil Union Mission, 2019.

Minute of the Ordinary Board of the West Central Brazil Union Mission of the Seventh-day Adventist Church, April 7, 2008.

Minute of the Plenary Ordinary Board of the West Central Brazil Union Mission of the Seventh-day Adventist Church, May 3 and 4, 2008.

Minute of the I Quadrennial Assembly of Tocantins Mission, November 29, 2008.

Minute of the Ordinary Meeting of the Executive Board of the West Central Brazil Union Mission of the Seventh-day Adventist Church, April 2008, vote no. 2008-037.

Minute of the Plenary Ordinary Meeting of the Executive Board of the West Central Brazil Union Mission of the Seventh-day Adventist Church, May 2008, vote no. 2008-040.

Moróz, David. “As últimas do Brasil – Central” [The latest in Brazil - Central], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], January 1975.

“O desabrochar de Palmas” [Palmas’ unfoldment]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], March 1997.

Pita, Plácido da Rocha, Por que mudei de exército [Why have I changed armies]. Tatuí, SP: Brazil Publishing House, 1980.

Porto, Gabriela. “Richard Figueredo conta sua trajetória e revela os objetivos que sonha alcançar para o Tocantins” [Richard Figueiredo tells his journey and reveals the goals he dreams of achieving for Tocantins]. Adventist News (Online), June 13, 2019.

Póvoa, Liberato. “Por que Sarney, há 30 anos vetou a criação do Tocantins” [Why did Sarney, 30 years ago vetoed the creation of Tocantins], DM/Política & Justiça [Daily Morning/Politics & Justice], March 14, 2015.

Seventh-day Adventist Church Portal. http://www.adventistas.org/pt/.

Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook. Various years. https://www.adventistyearbook.org.

Solidarity Adventist Action, https://www.adventistas.org/pt/asa/projetos/.

Tocantins. Brazilian Census 2017. IBGE [Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics], March 5, 2018, https://ww2.ibge.gov.br.

“Tocantins reúne 1000 jovens e adolescentes em um dia de Comunhão, Relacionamento e Missão” [Tocantins gathers youth and teenagers in a Communion, Relationship, and Mission Day]. Adventist News (Online), October 9, 2014.

Tocantins Portal. https://portal.to.gov.br/.

“Um pouco de História... Contada por quem a viveu [A little bit about stories... told by those who lived it], Revista Multiplique Esperança [Share Hope Review], December 2016.

Notes

  1. “Tocantins Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Nampa, ID.: Pacific Press Publishing Association, 2018), 266.

  2. Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook, “Tocantins Mission,” accessed on August 15, 2019, http://bit.ly/2yZQxk7.

  3. Ibid; Management System of the Adventist Church (ACMS) – West Central Brazil Union Mission, 2019.

  4. Information obtained in the School Secretary System – Adventist Education – 2019.

  5. Ibid.

  6. Ibid.; Management System of the Adventist Church (ACMS) – West Central Brazil Union Mission, 2019.

  7. Tocantins Portal, “Tocantins – History” accessed on July 2, 2019, http://bit.ly/304mrrh.

  8. Liberato Póvoa, “Por que Sarney, há 30 anos vetou a criação do Tocantins” [Why did Sarney, 30 years ago vetoed the creation of Tocantins], DM/Política & Justiça [Daily Morning/Politics & Justice], March 14, 2015, accessed on June 29, 2019, http://bit.ly/2FNZgtr.

  9. Agency of the Development of Tourism, Culture and Creative Economy State of Tocantins, “Trajetória de luta pela criação do Tocantins” [Struggle path for the creation of Tocantins], accessed on June 29, 2019, http://bit.ly/2JhG9Jn.

  10. “Um pouco de História... Contada por quem a viveu [A little bit about stories... told by those who lived it], Revista Multiplique Esperança [Share Hope Review], December 2016, 5.

  11. Ibid., 6.

  12. Diomar Cruz, email message to the authors, June 21, 2019.

  13. Ibid.

  14. Brazilian Institute of Family Law, “A trajetória do divórcio no Brasil: A consolidação do Estado Democrático de Direito” [Divorce’s path in Brazil: The consolidation of the Democratic State of Law] Jusbrasil, 2010, accessed on June 29, de 2019, http://bit.ly/2xpEk7B.

  15. “Um pouco de História... Contada por quem a viveu [A little bit about stories... told by those who lived it], Revista Multiplique Esperança [Share Hope Review], December 2016, 6.

  16. Ibid.

  17. Ibid., 7.

  18. Ibid.

  19. In South America, it is common to call a high school level institution a college. A tertiary institution is called a university.

  20. Diomar Cruz, email message to the author, June 21, 2019.

  21. “Um pouco de História... Contada por quem a viveu [A little bit about stories... told by those who lived it], Revista Multiplique Esperança [Share Hope Review], December 2016, 7.

  22. Ibid.

  23. Plácido da Rocha Pita, Por que mudei de exército [Why have I changed armies] (Tatuí, SP: Brazil Publishing House, 1980).

  24. “Um pouco de História... Contada por quem a viveu [A little bit about stories... told by those who lived it], Revista Multiplique Esperança [Share Hope Review], December 2016, 7.

  25. Ibid., 8.

  26. Ibid.

  27. Ibid.

  28. David Moróz, “As últimas do Brasil – Central” [The latest in Brazil - Central], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], ano 70, no. 1 (January 1975): 12.

  29. “O desabrochar de Palmas” [Palmas’ unfoldment], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], March 1997, 24.

  30. Minute of the Ordinary Board of the West Central Brazil Union Mission of the Seventh-day Adventist Church, April 7, 2008.

  31. Minute of the I Quadrennial Assembly of Tocantins Mission, November 29, 2008.

  32. Management System of the Adventist Church (ACMS), accessed on March 18, 2018; Adventist School Secretary System, accessed on March 12, 2018.

  33. Minute of the Plenary Ordinary Meeting of the Executive Board of the West Central Brazil Union Mission of the Seventh-day Adventist Church, May 2008, vote no. 2008-040.

  34. Manoel Barbosa, “Um pouco de história... contada por quem a viveu!” [A little bit about stories... told by those who lived it!] Revista Vitrine [Vitrine Review] TOCS 1, year 1 (1st semester of 2011): 4-5.

  35. Hope Impact is a project that is carried out by the Seventh-day Adventist Church in South America that motivates reading and provides the annual mass distribution of books. Accessed on May 28, 2019, https://bit.ly/2WZNdzY; Rafael Acosta, “Livros gratuitos levam esperança no Tocantins” [Free books bring hope to Tocantins], Adventist News, June 2, 2017, accessed on July 2, 2019, http://bit.ly/2RNc8oH.

  36. An educational program that seeks to prevent abuse and domestic violence. Breaking the Silence is an annualy project promoted by the Seventh-day Adventist Church every year in eight different countries in South America, (Argentina, Brazil, Bolivia, Chile, Ecuador, Paraguay, Peru and Uruguay) since 2002. Accessed on June 18, 2018, http://bit.ly/2XKQd70; Alex Gonsalves, “Quebrando o Silêncio em Porto Nacional” [Breaking the Silence in Porto Nacional]. Adventist News, September 6, 2016, accessed on September 2, 2019, http://bit.ly/2Nt245I.

  37. Official Nonprofit Seventh-day Adventist Church Ministry of Health program conducted by volunteers. It aims to contribute to the establishment of a healthier and happier lifestyle, with a significant economy, in pursuit of their own and their families' welfare. Accessed on June 18, 2018, http://bit.ly/2Xh5fNh; Alex Gonsalves, “Feira de Saúde Impressiona população de Porto Nacional” [Health Fair Impresses the population in Porto Nacional]. Adventist News, September 5, 2016, accessed on July 2, 2019, http://bit.ly/2RNdsb9.

  38. A Social project of the Seventh-day Adventist Church that aims to promote a decent Christmas dinner for people living in poverty who, on this festive date, do not even have the basics for survival: a plate of food. ASA – SDA, accessed on July 18, 2018, http://bit.ly/2xtAxGc; Rafael Acosta, “Aldeia recebe 5.5 toneladas de alimentos do Mutirão de Natal” [Village gets 5.5 tons of food in Christmas Joint Effort], Adventist News, December 14, 2016, accessed on July 2, 2019, http://bit.ly/2Np9hDI.

  39. The project aims to contribute to blood centers by encouraging blood donation. Accessed on June 18, 2018, http://bit.ly/2Xl0ebG; Rafael Acosta, “Veja como foi o Dia Mundial dos Jovens Adventistas” [See how the International Day of Adventist Youth was], Adventist News, March 20, 2017, accessed on July 2, 2019, http://bit.ly/2J5lxVE.

  40. A volunteer program of social service and testimonies that challenge the Adventist youth to devote their vacations to evangelize in places where there’s no Adventist presence, to empower the small congregations and bring new people to the kingdom of God. Accessed on June 18, 2018, http://bit.ly/2HRpvRi; “Jovens levam esperança aos idosos dos asilos de Porto Nacional” [Youth brings hope to nursing homes in Porto Nacional]. Adventist News, September 9, 2016, accessed on July 2, 2019, http://bit.ly/2XO8mAC.

  41. Jessie Aias, “AdoleJovem para Palmas, Gurupi e região está chegando. Saiba como participar” [AdoleJovem is coming to Palmas, Gurupi, and area. Learn how to join]. Adventist News, August 7, 2014, accessed on July 2, 2019, http://bit.ly/2XkMAAc.

  42. “Tocantins reúne 1000 jovens e adolescentes em um dia de Comunhão, Relacionamento e Missão” [Tocantins gathers youth and teenagers in a Communion, Relationship, and Mission Day]. Adventist News, October 9, 2014, accessed on July 2, 2019, http://bit.ly/328CeHc.

  43. Management System of the Adventist Church (ACMS), accessed on March 18, 2018.

  44. Ibid.

  45. Evaldo Oliveira, email message to the authors, March 25, 2019.

  46. Ibid.

  47. Executive Board Minute of the UCOB, June 5, 2019; Gabriela Porto, “Richard Figueredo conta sua trajetória e revela os objetivos que sonha alcançar para o Tocantins” [Richard Figueiredo tells his journey and reveals the goals he dreams of achieving for Tocantins]. Adventist News, June 13, 2019, accessed on July 2, 2019, http://bit.ly/2Xe7SQ4.

  48. Ibid.

  49. Júlia R. Castilho Nunes, email message to Carlos Flavio Teixeira (ESDA Editor), January 1, 2019; “Tocantins Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Hagerstown, MD.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 2010), 301; “Tocantins Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Nampa, ID.: Pacific Press Publishing Association, 2018), 266. For a more detailed verification about all presidents, secretaries, and treasurers, consult the yearbooks from 2009 to 2018.

  50. More info about Tocantins Mission can be checked on the website: TOCS.org.br/, or on social media: Facebook: @missaodotocantins and Youtube: Adventistas Tocantins.

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Castilho, Julia, Lusmara da Silva França, Otoniel Ferreira. "Tocantins Mission." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. July 03, 2021. Accessed February 08, 2023. https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=7GL8.

Castilho, Julia, Lusmara da Silva França, Otoniel Ferreira. "Tocantins Mission." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. July 03, 2021. Date of access February 08, 2023, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=7GL8.

Castilho, Julia, Lusmara da Silva França, Otoniel Ferreira (2021, July 03). Tocantins Mission. Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. Retrieved February 08, 2023, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=7GL8.