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Solomon Islands Mission office, Palm Drive, Lunga, Honiara, Solomon Islands.

Photo courtesy of Travis Ronnie and Silent Tovosia. 

Solomon Islands Mission

By Barry Oliver

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Barry Oliver, Ph.D., retired in 2015 as president of the South Pacific Division of Seventh-day Adventists, Sydney, Australia. An Australian by birth Oliver has served the Church as a pastor, evangelist, college teacher, and administrator. In retirement, he is a conjoint associate professor at Avondale College of Higher Education. He has authored over 106 significant publications and 192 magazine articles. He is married to Julie with three adult sons and three grandchildren.

The Solomon Islands Mission is the Seventh-day Adventist administrative unit for the Solomon Islands, a nation located in the southwest Pacific Ocean. The Solomon Islands has one of the highest proportions of Seventh-day Adventists to population in the world. In 1918, the ratio was one baptized Seventh-day Adventist for every twelve people in the country.1

The territory of the Solomon Islands Mission is the “Solomon Islands.”2 It is a part of and responsible to the Trans Pacific Union Mission which is based in Tamavua, Suva, Fiji Islands. The Trans Pacific Union comprises the Seventh-day Adventist Church entities in the countries of American Samoa, Fiji, Kiribati, Nauru, Niue, Samoa, Solomon Islands, Tokelau, Tonga, Tuvalu, and Vanuatu. The administrative office of the Solomon Islands Mission is located at Palm Drive, Lunga, Honiara, Solomon Islands, on the southern outskirts of the nation’s capital. The postal address is PO Box R145, Ranandi, Honiara, Solomon Islands.3

The mission operates under General Conference and South Pacific Division (SPD) operating policies. Those policies state that the officers of the Solomon Islands Mission are elected by the Trans Pacific Union Mission.4 “The mission president elected by the union is a member of the union committee, and is the union representative in the conduct of the work in the mission. The president shall, with the local mission committee, supervise and carry forward the work in the local mission.”5 Mission associate officers and departmental personnel are elected at a duly called session of the mission where representatives from all churches in the mission are present.6

In 2018, the Solomon Islands Mission had 196 organized churches and 409 companies. Church membership at the end of 2017 was 52,703. The mission had 1,064 active employees. Its tithe receipts for 2016 totaled US$2,242,669. Its tithe and offerings per capita were US$59.12, one of the lowest in the South Pacific Division.7

The Schools of the Mission

The Solomon Islands Mission operates the largest Adventist education system in the South Pacific Division. At the end of 2017, there were ninety-three primary and/or secondary Adventist schools in the mission with a total of 15,967 students. There were 728 teaching staff in the schools.8

Aboru Adventist Primary School, located at Makira, Ulawa Province, had an enrollment of 230 students ranging from kindergarten to grade 6 with a teaching staff of six.

Anata Adventist Primary School, located in the Choiseul Province, had an enrollment of seventy-six students ranging from in kindergarten to grade 6 with a teaching staff of five.

Areatakiki Adventist Primary School, located on Guadalcanal, had an enrollment of 139 students from kindergarten to grade 6 with a teaching staff of five.

Aruligo Adventist Primary School, located on Guadalacanal, had an enrollment of 277 students from kindergarten to grade 6 with a teaching staff of eight.

Atoifi Adventist Primary School, located at Atoifi Hospital, on Malaita, had an enrollment of sixty-six in grades 1 to 6 with a teaching staff of four.

Babala Adventist Primary School, located on Guadalacanal, had an enrollment of 208 students ranging from kindergarten to grade 6 with a teaching staff of six.

Bareho Adventist Primary School, located in the Western Province, had an enrollment of 171 students from kindergarten to grade 6 with a teaching staff of six.

Batuna Adventist Primary School, located at Batuna, Marovo Lagoon, Western Province, had an enrollment of 154 students from kindergarten to grade 6 with a teaching staff of seven.

Beka Beka Adventist Community High School, located in the Western Province, had an enrollment of 455 students in grades 7 to 12 with a teaching staff of sixteen.

Betikama Adventist College, located on Palm Drive, Lunga, Honiara, the school has an enrollment of 563 in grades 7 to 13 with a teaching staff of twenty-eight.9

Bili Adventist Primary School, located on the Marovo Lagoon, Western Province, had an enrollment of sixty-five ranging from kindergarten to grade 6 with a teaching staff of four.

Boboe Adventist Primary School, located in the Western Province, had an enrollment of eighty-two students in grades 1 to 6 with a teaching staff of four.

Buinitusu Adventist Primary School, located on the Marovo Lagoon, Western Province, had an enrollment of fifty students in kindergarten to grade 6 with a teaching staff of three.

Bulungali Adventist Primary School, located on the island of Malaita, had an enrollment of 201 students in grades 1 to 6 with a teaching staff of seven.

Buri Adventist Primary School, located in the Western Province, had an enrollment of 143 students ranging from kindergarten to grade 6 with a teaching staff of six.

Burns Creek Adventist Community High School, located in Lunga, Honiara, had an enrollment of 1,183 students ranging from kindergarten to grade 12 with a teaching staff of forty-one.

Buruku Adventist Community High School, located in Honiara, had an enrollment of 440 ranging from kindergarten to grade 11 with a teaching staff of twenty.

Ghatere Adventist Primary School, located in the Western Province, had an enrollment of sixty-five students in grades 1 to 6 with a teaching staff of three.

Ghobua Adventist Primary School, located on Guadalacanal, had an enrollment of 279 students ranging from kindergarten to grade 6 with a teaching staff of eight.

Gwaunasu Adventist Community High School, located on the island of Malaita, the school has an enrollment of 367 in kindergarten to grade 9 with a teaching staff of seventeen.

Haiparia Adventist Primary School, located on Guadalacanal, had an enrollment of ninety-two students ranging from kindergarten to grade 6 with a teaching staff of four.

Hinakole Adventist Primary School, located in the Western Province, had an enrollment of 141 students ranging from kindergarten to grade 6 with a teaching staff of six.

Horohana Adventist Primary School, located on Guadalacanal, had an enrollment of 110 in kindergarten to grade 6 with a teaching staff of five.

Hovi Adventist Primary School, located in Isabel Province, had an enrollment of ninety-four students ranging from kindergarten to grade 6 with a teaching staff of four.

Imbo Adventist Primary School, located on the island of Malaita Province, had an enrollment of 134 students from kindergarten to grade 6 with a teaching staff of eight.

Iriri Adventist Primary School, located in the Western Province, had an enrollment of eighty students ranging from kindergarten to grade 6 with a teaching staff of five.

Jack Harbour Adventist Primary School, located in the Western Province, had an enrollment of 133 students ranging from kindergarten to grade 6 with a teaching staff of four.

Jare Adventist Primary School, located on the island of Choiseul, had an enrollment of twenty-one students in grades 1 to 4 with a teaching staff of four.

Jella Adventist Primary School, located in the Western Province, had an enrollment of eighty-seven students ranging from kindergarten to grade 6 with a teaching staff of five.

Jones Adventist Primary School, located in the Western Province, hadan enrollment of 948 students ranging from kindergarten to grade 6 with a teaching staff of four.

Jones Adventist College, located in the Western Province, had an enrollment of 392 students in grades 7 to 12 with a teaching staff of twenty-three.

Kafolulae Adventist Primary School, located on the island of Malaita, had an enrollment of ninety-nine students ranging from kindergarten to grade 6 with a teaching staff of five.

Katurasele Adventist Primary School, located on the island of Choiseul, had an enrollment of seventy students in grades 1 to 6 with a teaching staff of five.

Kaza Adventist Primary School, located in the Western Province, had an enrollment of 102 students ranging from kindergarten to grade 6 with a teaching staff of four.

Kokete Adventist Primary School, located in the Western Province, had an enrollment of 106 students ranging from kindergarten to grade 6 with a teaching staff of seven.

Kopiu Adventist Community High School, located on Guadalacanal, had an enrollment of 320 students ranging from kindergarten to grade 11 with a teaching staff of eighteen.

Kukele Adventist Community High School, located in Honiara, had an enrollment of ninety-three students in grades 7 to 9 with a teaching staff of nine.

Kukudu Adventist College,10 located at Kukudu, via Gizo, Western Province, had an enrollment of 494 students in grades 7 to 13 with a teaching staff of twenty-four.

Kukudu Adventist Primary School, located at Kukudu, via Gizo, Western Province, had an enrollment of 174 students ranging from kindergarten to grade 6 with a teaching staff of eight.

Kukum Adventist Primary School, located in Honiara, had an enrollment of 591 students ranging from kindergarten to grade 6 with a teaching staff of fifteen.

Kwailabesi Adventist Primary School, located on the island of Malaita, had an enrollment of 202 students ranging from kindergarten to grade 6 with a teaching staff of seven.

Kwarifau Adventist Primary School, located on the island of Malaita, had an enrollment of 152 students ranging from kindergarten to grade 6 with a teaching staff of five.

Lokuru Adventist Primary School, located on the island of Rendova, Western Province, had an enrollment of 254 students ranging from kindergarten to grade 6 with a teaching staff of ten.

Luluga Adventist Primary School, located on Guadalacanal, had an enrollment of 195 students ranging from kindergarten to grade 6 with a teaching staff of eight.

Manafaeni Adventist Primary School, located on the island of Malaita, had an enrollment of 139 students ranging from kindergarten to grade 6 with a teaching staff of seven.

Mano Adventist Primary School, located on the island of Malaita, had an enrollment of sixty-three students ranging from kindergarten to grade 6 with a teaching staff of three.

Mase Adventist Primary School, located in the Western Province, had an enrollment of 126 students ranging from kindergarten to grade 6 with a teaching staff of five.

Mataga Adventist Primary School, located on Guadalacanal, had an enrollment of thirty-six students in grades 1 to 6 with a teaching staff of three.

Mataiho Adventist Primary School, located in Rendel Province, had an enrollment of sixty-one in grades 1 to 6 with a teaching staff of six.

Mendina Adventist Primary School, located in Western Province, had an enrollment of 133 students ranging from kindergarten to grade 6 with a teaching staff of six.

Moah Adventist Primary School, located in Rendel Province, had an enrollment of seventy-four in kindergarten to grade 6 with a teaching staff of seven.

Mondo Adventist Primary School, located in the Western Province, had an enrollment of 113 students ranging from kindergarten to grade 6 with a teaching staff of seven.

Naha Adventist Primary School, located on Guadalacanal, had an enrollment of 307 students ranging from kindergarten to grade 6 with a teaching staff of twelve.

Nalei Adventist Primary School, located on Guadalacanal, the school has an enrollment of 135 students ranging from kindergarten to grade 6 with a teaching staff of seven.

Namorako Adventist Primary School, located on the island of Malaita, had an enrollment of seventy students ranging from kindergarten to grade 6 with a teaching staff of four.

Nela Adventist Primary School had an enrollment of sixty-three in grades 1 to 6 with a teaching staff of two.

Ngonihau Adventist Community High School, located on the island of Malaita, had an enrollment of 262 students ranging from kindergarten to grade 9 with a teaching staff of eleven.

Niuleni Adventist Primary School, located on the island of Malaita, had an enrollment of fifty-seven ranging from kindergarten to grade 6 with a teaching staff of seven.

Palm Drive Adventist Primary School, located on Palm Drive, Lunga, Honiara, had an enrollment of 151 students in grades 1 to 6 with a teaching staff of six.

Patuboliboli Adventist Primary School, located in the Western Province, had an enrollment of eighty-four students in grades 1 to 6 with a teaching staff of seven.

Peava Adventist Primary School, located on the Marovo Lagoon, Western Province, the school has an enrollment of sixty-five in kindergarten to grade 6 with a teaching staff of three.

Penjuku Adventist Primary School, located on the Marovo Lagoon, Western Province, the school has an enrollment of 127 in kindergarten to grade 6 with a teaching staff of five.

Posarae Adventist Primary School, located on the island of Choiseul Province, had an enrollment of 115 students ranging from kindergarten to grade 6 with a teaching staff of five.

Puzivai Adventist Community High School, located on the island of Choiseul, had an enrollment of 254 students in grades 1 to 11 with a teaching staff of fourteen.

Ramata Adventist Primary School, located at the northern end of the island of New Georgia, Western Province, had an enrollment of 55 in grades 1 to 6 with a teaching staff of four.

Rate Adventist Primary School, located on the island of Malaita, had an enrollment of 287 students ranging from kindergarten to grade 6 with a teaching staff of eight.

Rummo Adventist Primary School, located on the island of Malaita, had an enrollment of 340 students ranging from kindergarten to grade 6 with a teaching staff of nine.

Ruruvai Adventist Primary School, located on the island of Choiseul, had an enrollment of sixty-four students in grades 1 to 6 with a teaching staff of five.

Salamarao Adventist Primary School, located on Guadalacanal, had an enrollment of forty-six students ranging from kindergarten to grade 6 with a teaching staff of five.

Solosaia Adventist Primary School, located on Guadalacanal, had an enrollment of 189 students in grades 1 to 6 with a teaching staff of five.

Sombiro Adventist Primary School, located on the Marovo Lagoon, Western Province, had an enrollment of eighty-four students ranging from kindergarten to grade 6 with a teaching staff of four.

Sukiki Adventist Primary School, located on Guadalacanal, had an enrollment of ninety-three students ranging from kindergarten to grade 6 with a teaching staff of six.

Tagibangara Adventist Primary School, located on the island of Choiseul, the school has an enrollment of 146 in kindergarten to grade 6 with a teaching staff of eight.

Taifala Adventist Primary School, located at East Kwaio, on the island of Malaita, had an enrollment of 170 students ranging from kindergarten to grade 6 with a teaching staff of seven.

Talakali Adventist Community High School, located on the island of Malaita, had an enrollment of 296 in kindergarten to grade 9 with a teaching staff of seventeen.

Taora Adventist Primary School, located on the island of Choiseul Province, had an enrollment of twenty-four in grades 1 to 4 with a teaching staff of two.

Tarama Adventist Primary School, located on the island of Choiseul Province, had an enrollment of eighty-one in grades 1 to 6 with a teaching staff of five.

Tau Adventist Primary School, located on Guadalacanal, had an enrollment of 195 students ranging from kindergarten to grade 6 with a teaching staff of seven.

Telina Adventist Primary School, located at Telina, Marovo Lagoon, Western Province, had an enrollment of 140 students ranging from kindergarten to grade 6 with a teaching staff of five.

Tenakoga Adventist Community High School, located on Guadalacanal, had an enrollment of 482 students ranging from kindergarten to grade 12 with a teaching staff of twenty-four.

Tetemara Adventist Primary School, located in the Western Province, had an enrollment of 113 students ranging from kindergarten to grade 6 with a teaching staff of seven.

Tombe Adventist Primary School, located on the Marovo Lagoon, Western Province, had an enrollment of 103 students ranging from kindergarten to grade 6 with a teaching staff of six.

Townend Adventist Primary School, located at Auki, on the island of Malaita, had an enrollment of 221 students ranging from kindergarten to grade 6 with a teaching staff of twelve.

Tuki Adventist Primary School, located on Kolombangara Island, Western Province, had an enrollment of sixty-nine ranging from kindergarten to grade 6 with a teaching staff of four.

Ulona Adventist Primary School, located on the Marovo Lagoon, Western Province, had an enrollment of eighty-five students ranging from kindergarten to grade 6 with a teaching staff of five.

Uluga Adventist Primary School, located on the island of Malaita, had an enrollment of 170 students ranging from kindergarten to grade 6 with a teaching staff of eight.

Umaki Adventist Primary School, located on the island of Malaita, had an enrollment of fifty-eight students ranging from kindergarten to grade 6 with a teaching staff of five.

Vare Tutty Adventist Primary School, located on the island of Vella Ia Vella, Western Province, had an enrollment of 162 students in grades 1 to 6 with a teaching staff of seven.

Varu Adventist Primary School, located on Kolombangara Island, Western Province, had an enrollment of ninety-six in grades 1 to 6 with a teaching staff of four.

Varuga Adventist Primary School, located on the island of Choiseul, had an enrollment of eighty-six ranging from kindergarten to grade 6 with a teaching staff of six.

Vavanga Adventist Primary School, located in the Western Province, had an enrollment of fifty-six students in grades 1 to 6 with a teaching staff of four.

Veraligi Adventist Primary School, located on Guadalacanal, had an enrollment of ninety-one ranging from kindergarten to grade 4 with a teaching staff of five.

Veramogho Adventist Primary School, located on Guadalacanal, had an enrollment of eighty students ranging from kindergarten to grade 6 with a teaching staff of six.

Hoda Adventist Theological School, located near Kukudu in the Western Solomon Islands, provides a training program for lay people and some ministerial students. It commenced operation in 2003. The enrollment at Hoda for 2019 was twenty-five with eight students on the reserve list. A number of students are sponsored by their local church. The Solomon Islands Mission is working with Fulton Adventist University College to run a Certificate IV Theology training program for Hoda graduates who are serving in local churches.11

Batuna Adventist Vocational School,12 located in the Marovo Lagoon of the Western Province, commenced operation in 1924 after several years of preparation.13 It ceased to exist as a Training School in 1948 and was succeeded by the Betikama Missionary School in Honiara, Guadalcanal. By 1954, the new school was renamed Betikama Central School.14 Batuna Adventist Vocational School was established on the site in 1980 having moved there from Kukudu.15

The Clinics and Health Centers of the Mission

At the time of writing, the Solomon Islands Mission operated eighteen clinics and health centers.

Balolava Clinic. P.O. Box R145, Ranandi, Honiara, Solomon Islands.

Batuna Clinic. Batuna Postal Agency, Marovo Lagoon, Western Province; Solomon Islands.

Dovelle Clinic. Dovelle Postal Agency, via Gizo, Vella La Vella Island, Western Province; Solomon Islands.

Haiparia Clinic. P.O. Box R145, Ranandi, Honiara, Solomon Islands.

Herianiau Clinic. P.O. Box R145, Ranandi, Honiara, Solomon Islands.

Honoa Clinic. Atoifi Postal Agency, Malaita, Solomon Islands.

Kukudu Clinic. P.O. Box R145, Ranandi, Honiara, Solomon Islands.

Kwailabesi Clinic. P.O. Box R145, Ranandi, Honiara, Solomon Islands.

Madakacho Clinic. P.O. Box R145, Ranandi, Honiara, Solomon Islands.

Ngarigohu Clinic. P.O. Box R145, Ranandi, Honiara, Solomon Islands.

Nodana Clinic. Buala Postal Agency, Isabel Province, Solomon Islands.

Nuatabu Clinic. P.O. Box R145, Ranandi, Honiara, Solomon Islands.

Oreta Clinic. P.O. Box R145, Ranandi, Honiara, Solomon Islands.

Sango Clinic. Atoifi Postal Agency, Malaita, Solomon Islands.

Su’olopo Clinic. P.O. Box R145, Ranandi, Honiara, Solomon Islands.

Taramata Clinic. P.O. Box R145, Ranandi, Honiara, Solomon Islands.

Uhu Clinic. P.O. Box R145, Ranandi, Honiara, Solomon Islands.

Viru Clinic. P.O. Box R145, Ranandi, Honiara, Solomon Islands.

The Organizational History of the Mission: Structure

Griffiths F. Jones first arrived in the Solomon Islands in 1914. He established a mission station at Viru Harbor and then moved on to other sites in the Marovo Lagoon.16 In early 1915, Oscar and Ella Hellestrand joined Jones and were stationed at Viru Harbor where they taught about forty students and provided medical services.17 Meanwhile, Jones sailed further afield searching for people willing to establish an Adventist mission station. Just a few months later in 1915, Donald and Lilian Nicholson arrived in the Solomon Islands and were stationed at Sasaghana, a village on the Marovo Lagoon.18 Lilian Nicholson’s school officially opened on September 13, 1916.19

Sasaghana

Sasaghana became the headquarters for the Adventist work in the Solomon Islands. The first annual council held in the Solomon Islands took place at Sasaghana over the 1917/1918 new year period.20 During the meeting, ten people were baptized, the first Adventist converts in the Solomon Islands. At the same time, a decision was made to move the mission headquarters to Telina, another village on the Marovo lagoon and the site of the second mission station. This move was enthusiastically supported by Chief Tatangu.21

Telina

Donald and Lillian Nicholson were transferred to Telina where they established the new mission station and Lilian Nicholson once again conducted the school.22 When a new mission boat, the ketch Melanesia, was added to the fleet in 1917, its initial home anchorage was Telina Station.23

The Nicholsons were transferred to the New Hebrides in 1920.24 Later that year Harold and Madeline Wicks arrived at Telina. Harold Wicks took over as superintendent of the Solomon Islands Mission, replacing the first pioneer superintendent, Griffiths F. Jones.25 However, it was becoming increasingly evident that the site at Telina was insufficient and a search for a larger piece of land on which to establish the mission was commenced. Various sites were suggested and inspected until, in 1920, land at Batuna was selected for development.26 On Sabbath July 2, 1921, the first local church to be formally organized in the Solomon Islands was organized at Telina.27

Batuna

During the early years of Wicks’s tenure as superintendent of the Solomon Islands Mission, plans were made to transfer mission headquarters from Telina across the lagoon to Batuna and its high ground called Motusu.28 Archibald and Hilda Barrett joined the staff at Batuna in 1923. The Barretts’ tasks were to oversee the building of the training school at Batuna and to serve as secretary /treasurer for the Solomon Islands Mission.29 The official opening of the school took place on February 11, 1924. 30

Honiara

Batuna was the administrative center for the Solomon Island Mission for some twenty-four years. Then in 1945, without closing Batuna completely, mission headquarters were transferred to a new base in the capital, Honiara.31

In 1947, the Solomon Islands Mission was divided into three districts. The Western District included Choiseul, Vella Lavella, Ranonga, Rendova, Kolumbangara, and the Marovo. Wallace R. Ferguson was appointed district director and stationed at Kukudu, Kolumbangara. The Malaita District, which included Malaita and Ysabel, was directed by John H. Newman and stationed at Kwailabesi, Malaita. The Eastern District, including Guadalcanal and Christoval, was directed by Kata Ragoso who was stationed at Kopiu, Guadalcanal. His appointment marked the first time a Pacific islander was appointed district director in a local mission of in the Australasian Union Conference.32

In 1950, the Solomon Islands Mission was divided into the Western Solomon Islands Mission and the Eastern Solomon Islands Mission.33 Initially, the headquarters of the Western Solomons Mission were at Batuna on the Marovo Lagoon, Western Province. However, with the appointment of W. R Ferguson as mission president, the headquarters moved to Kukudu on the island of Kolumbangara.34 The headquarters of the Eastern Solomon Islands Mission were at Kukum, Honiara, on the island of Guadalcanal.35 The first president of the Western Solomons Mission was John D. Anderson, and the first president of the Eastern Solomons Mission was John H. Newman.36

At the half-yearly meetings of the Australasian Union Conference Executive Committee in May 1963, it was decided to form the Malaita Mission.37 Initially, the decision was conditional on sufficient human and financial resources.38 However, at the beginning of 1964, Peter Cummings and his family arrived on Malaita as the first president of the mission.39 The new mission headquarters were at Kwailabesi.40 The Solomon Islands now had three local missions: Western Solomons, Eastern Solomons, and Malaita.

This administrative structure with three local missions in the Solomon Islands continued until 2006 when on June 21, the Trans Pacific Union Mission (TPUM) executive committee voted to amalgamate the three local missions into one. Under the leadership of TPUM’ president, Lawrence Tanabose, and guided by the South Pacific Division, the new mission was named the Solomon Islands Mission. The action took effect on January 1, 2007.41 The leadership of the Mission was comprised of Andrew J. Kingston, president; Benjamin Asa, general secretary; Teddy Kingsley, chief financial officer; and Fraser Alekevu and Betty Pikacha as associate chief financial officers.42 The mission headquarters were located at Palm Drive, Lunga, Honiara, Solomon Islands. In order to better care for the pastoral and administrative needs of the mission, it was divided into ten regions. Each region had a regional director who answered to the mission administration and had oversight of the operation of the church in each respective region.43

In 2020, the mission was organized into three sub-regions—the western, central and northern. The western sub-region extends from the Shortland islands to Gatokae, including Choiseul Island. The Central sub-region extends from Santa Isabel, Russell Islands, Guadalcanal, San Cristobal (Makira), Rennell & Bellona, to Temotu province and the outer islands. The northern sub-region includes Malaita, the Floridas, Ulawa, and Malaita Outer islands.

The Organizational History of the Mission: Union Affiliation

Australasian Union Conference

Until 1949, all of the local conference and mission entities in the Australasian Union Conference, including the Solomon Islands Mission, related directly to the union with headquarters in Sydney. At a specially called session of the Australasian Union between August 16 and 21, 1948, a proposal for a major reorganization was presented, discussed, and approved. Australia and New Zealand were divided between two union conferences known as the Trans-Tasman Union Conference, and the Trans-Commonwealth Union Conference. The mission territories were divided into two union missions known as the Coral Sea Union Mission and the Central Pacific Union Mission.

Coral Sea Union Mission

The Solomon Islands Mission was made a part of the Coral Sea Union Mission. The territory of the Coral Sea Union Mission was “Papua, the Mandated Territory of New Guinea, and the British Solomon Islands Protectorate.”44

Bismark Solomons Union Mission

In 1953, the territory of the Coral Sea Union Mission was divided into the Coral Sea Union Mission and the Bismarck-Solomons Union Mission.45 The Coral Sea Union Mission continued to have its headquarters in Lae, New Guinea. The reorganized union now had as its territory “Papua and the mainland of the Mandated Territory of New Guinea; comprising the Central Papuan, Eastern Highlands, Eastern Papuan, Madang, Morobe, Sepik, Papuan Gulf, Western Highlands, and Western Papuan Missions.”46 The Solomon Islands Missions were now part of the Bismarck-Solomons Union Mission. The Bismarck-Solomons Union had its headquarters in Rabaul on the island of New Britain. Its territory was “Admiralty Islands, Saint Matthias Group, New Hanover, New Ireland and adjacent islands, New Britain and adjacent islands, Bougainville and adjacent islands, and the British Solomon Islands Protectorate; comprising the Bougainville, Eastern Solomon Islands, Malaita, Manus, New Britain, New Ireland, and Western Solomon Islands Missions.”47

Western Pacific Union Mission

In 1972, there was yet another reorganization of the union missions in the Australasian Division. The Western Pacific Union Mission was organized bringing together parts of the former Bismarck-Solomons Union Mission and the Central Pacific Union Mission. A Central Pacific Union Mission remained, but it was now reconstituted and the Gilbert and Ellice Islands Mission was now a part of the Western Pacific Union Mission. The headquarters for the new Western Pacific Union Mission were in Honiara in the Solomon Islands.48

Trans Pacific Union Mission

In 2000, another major reorganization of the unions in the South Pacific Division occurred at the South Pacific Division session.49 This change involved all of the unions, not just the union missions as was the case in 1972. The total number of unions in the division was reduced from five to four. A union mission, initially designated as the Western Pacific Union Mission but shortly thereafter designated as the Trans Pacific Union Mission, was formed. The former Central Pacific Union was dissolved and the Solomon Islands Missions were now a part of the newly named Trans Pacific Union Mission.50 That union had its headquarters in the same place as the former Central Pacific Union Mission: Tamavua, Suva, Fiji.51 The Solomon Islands Mission as formed in 2006-2007 continues as a part of the Trans Pacific Union.

Superintendents/Presidents in the Solomon Islands

Solomon Islands Mission (1914-1950): Griffiths F. Jones (1914-1920); Harold B. P. Wicks (1920-1927); Gerald Peacock ( 1927-1932); Ludwig A. Borgas ( 1932-1934); W. C. Broad (1934-1937); A. L. Pascoe (1937-1941); Hamley Perry (1941-1942); Kata Ragoso (1942-1945); Herbert White (1945-1948) John D. Anderson (1948-1950).

Western Solomon Islands Mission (1950-2006): John D. Anderson (1950); Wallace R. Ferguson (1951-1953); Kata Ragoso (1953-1956); Wallace R. Ferguson (1957-1960); J. Percy Holmes (1961-1964); Wallace R. Ferguson (1965-1968); Albert A. Godfrey (1969-1972); Ian Watts 1972-1977); Bryce A. Andrews (1977-1982); David R. Tasker (1982-1987); Nathan Rore (1987-1988); Wilfred Liligeto (1990-1995); Piuki Tasa (1995-2000); Jones P. Jama (2000-2006).

Eastern Solomon Islands Mission (1950-2006): John H. Newman (1950-1953; Wallace R. Ferguson (1954-1956); Roy A. Harrison (1960-1965); J. Percy Holmes (1967-1969); Hugh A. Dickins (1970); Elisha Gorapava ( 1970); Ross Miller (1971-1972); Wilfred Billy (1973-1980); Lawrence Tanabose (1981-1983); Nathan Rore (1984-1987); Errol Wright (1988-1990); Newton Galo (1991-1994); Ray Eaton (1995-2000); Martin Losi (2001-2005); George Fafale (2005-2006).

Malaita Mission (1964-2006): Peter Cummings (1964-1970); Nathan Rore (1970-1975); Louis Solomon (1975-1980); Defe Sifoni (1981-1985); Baxton Rimana (1986-2000); George Fafale (2001-2005); Samuel Panda (2006).

Solomon Islands Mission (2007-): Andrew Kingston (2007-2009); Wayne Boehm (2010-2012); George Fafale (2013-2015); Lawrence Tanabose (2015-2017); Silent Tovosia (1918-).

Sources

2006-2010 Trans Pacific Union Executive Committee Minutes. “Recommendations of one Mission in the Solomons.” Meeting 02, Action 2.07, June 21, 2006. Trans Pacific Union Mission Archives, Tamavur, Fiji.

2018 Annual Statistical Report: 154th Report of the General Conference of Seventh-day Adventists for 2016 and 2017. Silver Spring, MD: General Conference of Seventh-day Adventists, 2018. Accessed April 19, 2019. http://documents.adventistarchives.org/Statistics/ASR/ASR2018.pdf

“ADM 10.05, Principles of Denominational Organization.” In South Pacific Division Working Policy. Wahroonga, New South Wales: South Pacific Division, 2018.

Allum, F. A. “Autumn Council 1923.” Australasian Record, November 12, 1923.

Allum, F. A. “The Annual Council, 1923.” Australasian Record, November 12, 1923.

“Appropriate action has been taken . . .” Australasian Record, July 1, 1963.

Barrett, A. R. “The Solomon Islands Training School.” The Missionary Leader, June 1924.

“Brother and Sister D. Nicholson...” Australasian Record, December 13, 1920.

“Brother and Sister Barrett...” Australasian Record, July 2, 1923.

“Four missionaries left our shores...” Australasian Record, April 12, 1915.

Frame, R. R. “Mission Field Reorganisation.” Australasian Record, April 24, 1972.

Fraser, A. M. “Adjustments in the Solomons and Papua-New Guinea Mission Territories.” Australasian Record, July 7, 1947.

Hart, C. A. “The Coral Sea Union Mission.” Australasian Record, April 10, 1950.

“In a letter just received...” Australasian Record, August 22, 1921.

Jones, G. F. “First Annual Council, Solomon Islands.” Australasian Record, February 25, 1918.

Jones, G. F. “The “Melanesia” in the Solomon Islands.” Australasian Record, November 5, 1917.

Jones, G. F. “Viru Mission, Solomon Islands.” Australasian Record, March 8, 1915.

Larsen, Bob. “Trans Pacific Union Mission.” Adventist Record, September 8, 2018.

Manners, Bruce. “Session Votes for Restructure.” Record, November 25, 2000.

Mitchell, A. R. “We Are Glad We came to the Mission Field.” Australasian Record, July 22, 1963.

Nicholson, D. “Solomon Islands.” Australasian Record, May 28, 1917.

Nicholson, L. “Solomon Islands.” Australasian Record, October 18, 1915.

Nicholson, L. “The Mission School in the Marovo Lagoon, Solomon Islands.” Australasian Record, January 24, 1916.

Ragoso, Kata. “The Arrival of G. F. Jones in the Solomon Islands.” Diary extract, n.d. Translated by Merle Hilly, Heath Oti, Eleanor Niva, and Wendell Timothy. South Pacific Division Heritage Centre, Avondale University College, Cooranbong, New South Wales, Australia. Box 1826, Folder 11.

Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook. Various years. https://www.adventistyearbook.org/.

Stewart, A. G. “Revisiting the Solomons.” Australasian Record, May 5, 1947.

Wicks, M. “Sewing Machines Wanted for the Solomon Islands.” Australasian Record, June 22, 1925.

“With their children . . .” Australasian Record, February 2, 1964.

“Writing from Telina, Solomon Islands...” Australasian Record, August 8, 1921.

Notes

  1. Bob Larsen, “Trans Pacific Union Mission,” Adventist Record, September 8, 2018, 4.

  2. Seventh-day Adventist Online Yearbook, “Solomon Islands Mission,” page 359, accessed April 19, 2019, http://documents.adventistarchives.org/Yearbooks/YB2017.pdf.

  3. Ibid.

  4. “ADM 10.05, Principles of Denominational Organization,” in South Pacific Division Working Policy (Wahroonga, New South Wales: South Pacific Division, 2018).

  5. Ibid.

  6. Ibid.

  7. 2018 Annual Statistical Report: 154th Report of the General Conference of Seventh-day Adventists for 2016 and 2017 (Silver Spring, MD: General Conference of Seventh-day Adventists), accessed April 19, 2019, http://documents.adventistarchives.org/Statistics/ASR/ASR2018.pdf.

  8. All data is derived from the “2017 Annual Statistical Report of the South Pacific Division Education Department to the General Conference,” unpublished report held in the files of the Education Director, South Pacific Division of the General Conference, Wahroonga, New South Wales, Australia.

  9. See Betikama Adventist College.

  10. See Kukudu Adventist College.

  11. Silent Tovosia, president Solomon Islands Mission, email to author, April 24, 2019.

  12. See Batuna Training School, Solomon Islands.

  13. M. Wicks, “Sewing Machines Wanted for the Solomon Islands,” Australasian Record, June 22, 1925, 2.

  14. “Betikama Central School,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, DC: Review and Herald Publishing Associatio, 1954), 242.

  15. John Oti, interview with Glynn Lock, Batuna, Solomon Islands, March 31, 2018; “Flash Point,” Australasian Record, January 28, 1980, 20.

  16. Kata Ragoso, “The Arrival of G. F. Jones in the Solomon Islands,” Diary extract, n.d. translated by Merle Hilly, Heath Oti, Eleanor Niva and Wendell Timothy, South Pacific Division Heritage Centre, Avondale University College, Cooranbong, New South Wales, Australia, Box 1826, Folder 11; see also Solomon Islands.

  17. G. F. Jones, “Viru Mission, Solomon Islands,” Australasian Record, March 8, 1915, 8.

  18. “Four missionaries left our shores...,” Australasian Record, April 12, 1915, 8; L. Nicholson, “Solomon Islands,” Australasian Record, October 18, 1915, 5.

  19. L. Nicholson, “The Mission School in the Marovo Lagoon, Solomon Islands,” Australasian Record, January 24, 1916, 4.

  20. G. F. Jones, “First Annual Council, Solomon Islands,” Australasian Record, February 25, 1918, 4.

  21. D. Nicholson, “Solomon Islands,” Australasian Record, May 28, 1917, 3-4.

  22. Ibid.

  23. G. F. Jones, “The “Melanesia” in the Solomon Islands,” Australasian Record, November 5, 1917, 3.

  24. “Brother and Sister D. Nicholson...,” Australasian Record, December 13, 1920, 8; “In a letter just received...,” Australasian Record, August 22, 1921, 8.

  25. Seventh-day Adventist Online Yearbook, “Solomon Islands Mission,” accessed January 15, 2019, http://documents.adventistarchives.org/Yearbooks/YB1920.pdf; compare with Seventh-day Adventist Online Yearbook, “Solomon Islands Mission,” accessed January 15, 2019, http://documents.adventistarchives.org/Yearbooks/YB1921.pdf.

  26. Alrick Jimuru, interview with Glynn Lock, Chea Village, Solomon Islands, March 1, 2018.

  27. “Writing from Telina, Solomon Islands...,” Australasian Record, August 8, 1921, 8.

  28. F. A. Allum, “The Annual Council, 1923,” Australasian Record, November 12, 1923, 2-6.

  29. “Brother and Sister Barrett...,” Australasian Record, July 2, 1923, 8; F. A. Allum, “Autumn Council 1923,” Australasian Record, November 12, 1923, 3.

  30. A. R. Barrett, “The Solomon Islands Training School,” The Missionary Leader, June 1924, 8.

  31. A. G. Stewart, “Revisiting the Solomons,” Australasian Record, May 5, 1947, 3.

  32. A. M. Fraser, “Adjustments in the Solomons and Papua-New Guinea Mission Territories,” Australasian Record, July 7, 1947, 3.

  33. C. A. Hart, “The Coral Sea Union Mission,” Australasian Record, April 10, 1950, 3.

  34. Seventh-day Adventist Online Yearbook, “Western Solomon Islands Mission,” page 89, accessed December 10, 2019, http://documents.adventistarchives.org/Yearbooks/YB1951.pdf.

  35. C. A. Hart, “The Coral Sea Union Mission,” Australasian Record, April 10, 1950, 3.

  36. Ibid.

  37. “Appropriate action has been taken . . . ,” Australasian Record, July 1, 1963, 8; A. R. Mitchell, “We Are Glad We came to the Mission Field,” Australasian Record, July 22, 1963, 6.

  38. Ibid.

  39. “With their children . . . ,” Australasian Record, February 2, 1964, 16.

  40. Seventh-day Adventist Online Yearbook, “Malaita Mission,” page 86, accessed April 24, 2019, http://documents.adventistarchives.org/Yearbooks/YB1965,66.pdf.

  41. 2006 - 2010 Trans Pacific Union Executive Committee Minutes, “Recommendations of one Mission in the Solomons,” Meeting 02, Action 2.07, June 21, 2006, Trans Pacific Union Mission Archives, Tamavur, Fiji.

  42. Ibid.

  43. Andrew Kingston, telephone interview with the author, December 13, 2019.

  44. Seventh-day Adventist Online Yearbook, “Coral Sea Union Mission,” page 78, accessed April 24, 2019, http://documents.adventistarchives.org/Yearbooks/YB1950.pdf.

  45. Seventh-day Adventist Online Yearbook, “Bismarck Solomons Union Mission,” page 83, accessed April 24, 2019, http://documents.adventistarchives.org/Yearbooks/YB1954.pdf.

  46. Seventh-day Adventist Online Yearbook, “Coral Sea Union Mission,” page 89, accessed April 24, 2019, http://documents.adventistarchives.org/Yearbooks/YB1954.pdf.

  47. Seventh-day Adventist Online Yearbook, “Bismarck Solomons Union Mission,” page 83, accessed April 24, 2019, http://documents.adventistarchives.org/Yearbooks/YB1954.pdf.

  48. R. R. Frame, “Mission Field Reorganisation,” Australasian Record, April 24, 1972, 1.

  49. Bruce Manners, “Session Votes for Restructure,” Record, November 25, 2000, 8-9.

  50. Ibid; Seventh-day Adventist Online Yearbook, “Trans-Pacific Union Mission,” accessed April 24, 2019, http://documents.adventistarchives.org/Yearbooks/YB2002.pdf.

  51. Personal knowledge of the author as the former president of the South Pacific Division.

×

Oliver, Barry. "Solomon Islands Mission." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. January 09, 2021. Accessed June 23, 2021. https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=9853.

Oliver, Barry. "Solomon Islands Mission." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. January 09, 2021. Date of access June 23, 2021, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=9853.

Oliver, Barry (2021, January 09). Solomon Islands Mission. Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. Retrieved June 23, 2021, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=9853.