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Andrew and Emily Stewart, 1907

Photo courtesy of South Pacific Division Heritage Centre.

Stewart, Andrew Graham (1881–1975) and Emily Jean (Stephen) (1880–1953); later Vera Lucy (Posselt) (1908–1998)

By Colin Richardson

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Colin Richardson, M.Trop.Hlth. (University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia). Richardson retired in 2017 as pastor, South New South Wales Conference, Australia. A New Zealand-born Australian, Pastor Richardson served the church as nurse, teacher, and administrator in Cambodia, Singapore, Zaire, Rwanda, Somalia, Ethiopia, Guinea and Papua New Guinea, before serving 14 years as a pastor in Australia. In 2002 he founded Action on Smoking or Health (PNG). He is married to Merian, and has three adult sons.

First Published: July 23, 2020

Andrew Stewart was an early Australian Seventh-day Adventist (SDA) missionary to Fiji and New Hebrides (Vanuatu). He was a pastor, administrator, historian, writer, lecturer, and photographer who had considerable influence over the direction and growth of the SDA Church in the South Pacific.

Early Life (1881–1902)

Andrew Graham Stewart was born on November 16, 1881, at Wychitella, VIC,1 to Alexander Stewart (c. 1849–1940)2 and Mary (Graham) Stewart (1848–1912).3 Andrew was the sixth of seven children. His father was a farmer in rural Victoria, a person of some note in the community, being appointed in 1888 as deputy registrar of births and deaths for Wychitella’s south district.4

When Andrew was six, in September 1887, his uncle Andrew Graham, a new SDA from Ballarat, visited and brought some SDA tracts, which Alexander and Mary read. Convinced of what they read, they shared them with their neighbors. The need for more answers led to Mendel C. Israel coming, and studies led to a number being baptized, including Andrew’s parents.5

Alexander Stewart then worked part-time as a colporteur, while continuing with farming,6 and aided in opening SDA work in South Australia.7 In 1893 he visited Ellen G. White in Granville, Sydney, and she asked him as a farmer to evaluate the property at Cooranbong suggested for a training school. There was doubt about the quality of the soil. His testimony resulted in the purchase of the land on which what is now Avondale University College was established.8

Education and First Marriage 1903–1907

Andrew, as a teenager, had plans only to be a farmer. But when the preacher at the family’s former church failed to arrive one Sunday, Andrew was asked to step in. Nervously he did so, and people in the community recognized that his calling was far from the plow. The drought of 1902 led to his moving cattle to Ballarat. At the camp meeting in October that year, he learned of a work-study program at Avondale. This led to his enrolling in the missionary course in 1903. That same year he was baptized in Dora Creek, adjacent to the college.9 In November 1905, as part of an evangelistic team led by James L. McElhany, he worked as tentmaster at Lithgow, NSW, helping found a new church.10 In October 1906 he graduated from the missionary course at the Australasian Missionary College (Avondale).11

At his graduation John E. Fulton, union conference president, asked him if would like to “go to my old field of labor [Fiji] as a missionary.” Andrew was enthusiastic.12

His first assignment beginning in October 1906 was as assistant evangelist in the Melbourne region, VIC. Initially he worked in Richmond,13 and then from February 1907 in Northcote.14

At Avondale College he had met his future wife, Emily Jean Stephen (known as “Jean”). Jean was born on April 20, 1880,15 at Mount Somers, near Ashburton, in South New Zealand,16 to George Stephen (184517–190618) and Barbara (Porteous) Stephen (c. 1850–1936),19 one of their five children. Her parents had married in Scotland in 1874,20 and emigrated the next day to Canterbury, New Zealand,21 where they traveled by bullock wagon to take up a farm at Mount Somers. A colporteur sold them a copy of The Great Controversy. On reading it, they started keeping Sabbath, not knowing there were any other Sabbathkeepers in the world.22

Jean commenced study at Avondale in 1901, doing the preparatory department course, graduating in 1903.23 In 1904 she commenced a teacher’s course, then engaged in canvassing in Kiama, NSW, over the year end. In 1905 she took a year away from Avondale to teach school at Eugowra, NSW,24 before returning in 1906 to graduate.25 She was called to teach in Wellington, New Zealand, in 1907.26

Andrew and Jean were married by Stephen M. Cobb on October 20, 1907, in Wellington, New Zealand.27 Andrew and Jean never had any children. However, during their time in the New Hebrides, they took into their home, at Atchin island, a baby girl whose mother had died and who, according to custom, would have been buried alive with the mother. Naomi (c. 1916–1944)28 became their foster daughter. Naomi grew up in their home, accompanied them in their mission service in New Hebrides and Fiji, then returned with them to Australia, where she attended school.29 In 1930 she continued studies at the Wainibuka School,30 Fiji, and in 1936 she married a Fijian named Mosese Nasesi.31 Their two children were named Andrew Graham Stewart and Jean. Naomi died in Fiji in 1944 at the age of 28.32

First Mission Assignment: Fiji, 1907–1916

At the Australasian Union Conference (AUC) council held in Adelaide from August 29 to September 8, 1907, both were appointed separately to Fiji.33 Immediately after their wedding, their honeymoon was spent traveling to Fiji. They traveled from Wellington to New Plymouth by train, then by ship to Auckland, where they joined the steamer Hauroto.34 Arriving in Fiji, they were assigned to the Buresala training school to replace Septimus Carr, who was appointed to begin SDA work in Papua. After a week in Suva they continued on the same ship to Levuka, then by mission rowboat to Buresala.35

When they arrived, Buresala had 18 male students, a school room, but no dormitories. Their students knew no English, and the Stewarts spoke no Fijian. Their first need was to learn Fijian. Teachers were found. The Carrs stayed on for ten weeks to help them become oriented. Then they were on their own. Over the next three years they introduced a coeducational system,36 the first mission in Fiji to do so.37 On July 15, 1909, the new girls’ dormitory was dedicated, and young women moved in.38 A new men’s dormitory was started about that time, and was dedicated in February 1910, in time for the new school year. (Until then the men lived in local village accommodations.)39

At the annual Fijian Council meeting of the mission, June 10–15, 1908, Andrew was appointed secretary of the Fijian Mission, in addition to his duties as principal of the Buresala Training School.40 In this capacity he periodically traveled around Fiji, to support workers and hold meetings. At times this meant horseback travel.41 At the biennial session of the AUC of 1908, Andrew was appointed associate editor of Rarama, the church publication in Fiji.42

On the night of March 24, 1910, Fiji was hit by a hurricane. At Buresala the mission schooner Cina was badly damaged. Most of the Fijian housing was flattened, the church and school buildings were destroyed, and the farm lost most of its coconut, banana, and other trees and garden produce. Only the two missionary houses, the printing press, and the boys’ dormitory survived.43 By the time of the Fiji Annual Council in May-June 1910, the Fijians’ homes were being rebuilt, the Cina had been repaired, and action was taken to build more strongly in the future, including the new classroom building.44

It was at this council that the decision was taken to appoint Andrew as field worker throughout Fiji.45 His place as principal of the school was taken by George E. Marriott. Andrew and Jean remained at Buresala, which was the Fiji mission headquarters, but now Andrew’s role included visiting all around the missions in Fiji. Right after the council he embarked on a five-week itinerary to Vanua Levu, Taveuni, and the Lau Archipelago on the repaired Cina.46

On September 7 Andrew and Jean Stewart arrived in Sydney, Australia, on the Atua, to attend first the New South Wales Conference camp meeting,47 and then (October 23 to November 1) the AUC session in Warburton, VIC, as delegates.48 At this same session, on October 29, 1910, Andrew was ordained to the gospel ministry.49

Arriving back in Fiji on January 4, 1911,50 they were soon visiting the field workers again, using the new mission launch.51 At the Fiji Annual Council, it was voted that the Stewarts would relocate to Suva Vou, near the capital, Suva, where they arrived on June 14. Jean was appointed the Fiji Mission Sabbath school secretary.52 At the AUC meeting later in the year Andrew was appointed superintendent of the Fiji Mission.53 Over the next several years Jean also carried out the responsibilities of secretary and treasurer of the Fiji Mission, permitting Andrew to concentrate on general church and field work.54

Over the next four years Andrew traveled extensively throughout Fiji, holding meetings and encouraging church workers. On December 8–15, 1911, he organized the first Ministers’ Institute in the AUC, at Buresala, to further the training of mission workers. It was to become an annual event.55 In 1912, with the arrival of Mrs. Ellen Meyers, mission work for the Indian population began.56 At the end of July 1913 Jean’s sister Mary Stephen came to stay for a time.57

On November 14, 1913, Andrew and Jean, together with Edwin S. Butz, traveled on the Atua to Samoa. At the request of the AUC, they were to seek out land for a mission station. Arriving in Samoa, together with Thomas Howse, who was the missionary there, they traveled, mostly on foot, around both the islands of Upolu and Savaii, taking two and a half weeks, before deciding on property 14 miles from Apia, the capital.58 From there, they traveled, again on the Atua, to Vava’u, Tonga, where they spent two weeks with Ethelbert E. Thorpe and George G. Stewart (Andrew’s brother), consulting on church work, and seeking land for a school.59 Andrew and Jean then returned to Fiji.

On August 6, 1914, Andrew and Jean arrived in Sydney on the Tofua, to attend the AUC session,60 followed by a furlough. At this session in his report, Andrew requested a deep sea-going vessel of eight to ten tons to facilitate the island work.61 This was later voted by the session, with the Sabbath school offerings of the second quarter 1915 to be used for this purpose.62 Initially it was intended to build such a vessel in Fiji, but when a suitable yawl came available in Sydney for a better price, it was purchased, and shipped to Fiji on the Levuka on May 13, 1915.63 This ship was named Cina Vou (“New Lamp”).64

On October 10 Andrew and Jean sailed for New Zealand on the Marama.65 They visited Jean’s family in the South Island, and spoke at the Oroua training school, and at churches all over New Zealand. Andrew, an avid photographer, presented stereopticon lectures of the work in Fiji,66 a practice he continued for the rest of his life whenever he spoke on mission work (he also used the “magic lantern” extensively on his visits around Fiji).67 They returned to Fiji in mid-January 1915. Almost as soon as they returned, a Teachers’ Institute was convened at Buresala, with Andrew leading out, but it was interrupted by a hurricane, which caused much damage.68

At the AUC council meeting held at Warburton, WA, from December 31, 1915, to January 10, 1916, the Fiji Mission was organized into the Fiji Conference, and Calvin H. Parker was transferred from New Hebrides (Vanuatu) as president. Andrew Stewart was moved to New Hebrides to replace him as mission leader.69 The church work in New Hebrides had begun only three years earlier, on the tiny island of Atchin (0.29 square miles [0.75 square kilometers]), off the northeast coast of Malekula. At this time there were only two missionaries in the country, the Calvin H. Parker and the Norman Wiles families. In addition to Atchin, mission work had also commenced at a couple of other sites on Malekula.70

Second Mission Assignment: New Hebrides (Vanuatu), 1916–1923

The Stewarts arrived in Sydney from Fiji on March 7, 1916,71 and departed on board Makambo for New Hebrides on April 6,72 via Lord Howe Island and Norfolk Island, where they spent a few days. They arrived in Vila, the capital, on April 16 and met with the British resident commissioner73 and the police commissioner. The latter informed them that the Atchinese were the worst troublemakers in the group!74 Continuing northward, they arrived at Atchin late on April 29, 1916.75 Their welcome was not positive. The Atchinese men greeting them were armed and sullen. The women appeared “spiritless, cowed, dirty, and diseased.”76

In the month that followed, C. H. Parker took Andrew around the areas on Malekula, where there was church work to familiarize him with the area, including the areas of contact with the Big Nambus people, and visiting Norman and Alma Wiles, who had moved to Matanavat mission three days before the Stewarts’ arrival. The Parkers left on May 23.77

The mission headquarters on Atchin had some 12 acres (4.8 hectares), a mission house, a church, and a small schoolhouse. There was also a mission launch (Eran),78 a boatshed, and a few other buildings.79 Their first task was to learn the Atchinese language. Jean Stewart engaged in medical work, teaching, and missionary work for the women and children.80

The work was often discouraging, as people often seemed to relapse into old ways.81 As late as 1918 Griffiths F. Jones reported to the union conference session, “Our mission work in the New Hebrides is about seven years old, and has experienced a stubborn resistance to the gospel. . . . The island of Atchin, where our first mission is located, is still a rampart of heathenism.”82 At one time Andrew had to act as peace broker between two villages to avert tribal warfare, culminating in a “peace tree” being planted.83 One major obstacle was the cultural imperative that men and women did not use the same doors, sit on the same benches, or mingle in public. Worship services attended by men were not attended by women. Men might come to church, so Jean would meet with women and children in the open. Andrew used his own money to spearhead the construction of a new church in the center of Atchin. It had two doors leading in, and another two leading out. The seating was distinctly two-sided. As the building progressed, the islanders began to become interested. Men and women helped on different tasks. When it was dedicated on December 11, 1920,84 the church was full—men and women entering and sitting separately. It was the breakthrough that was needed.85

On Malekula, missionary journeys could be hazardous. Cannibalism still occurred, paths had traps on them,86 tribal warfare was common, and misunderstandings could have serious consequences. At times the work had to cease by order of the government because of tribal conflict.87 Eventually the decision was taken to move the Matanavat mission house to Big Nambus country, and the Norman Wiles family moved there in late 1919,88 where Norman died just a few months later, on May 5, 1920.89 With no one to replace them, the mission premises deteriorated and were looted.90 By 1923 the work had not yet recommenced, though there were indications of interest by the inhabitants.91

However, over the seven years that the Stewarts served in New Hebrides, there was considerable progress. New missionaries arrived. The Ross James family arrived in January 1918. A few months later Jope Laweloa and his family arrived from Fiji.92 In early 1921 the Donald Nicholsons arrived from the Solomon Islands.93 New work was begun on other islands. A new mission was opened on Santo, at Big Bay, in 1919, with the Ross James family locating there.94 In 1923 four people there were baptized.95 From Ambrym several young men came to Atchin to study and took the gospel back to their island.96 By 1923 there were 70 people in Ambrym meeting on Sabbath.97

In early 1922 the Stewarts were granted furlough, to include his attendance at the AUC session, at which he gave a report.98 Jean took the opportunity to visit her family in New Zealand.99 On November 9 they boarded the Pacifique to return to the New Hebrides.100 On arrival there was time only for a visit around the mission stations before there was a change of plans. Because of personnel changes, the AUC voted to appoint Andrew back to Fiji as superintendent of the Fiji Mission.101

Third Mission Assignment: Fiji, 1923–1926

In March 1923 the family sailed from New Hebrides to Sydney102 to connect with the Makura leaving for Fiji on March 29.103 For the Stewarts it was like coming home. During the next three years they oversaw the reestablishment and extension of the Navuso (Wainibuka) school,104 and ran annual Ministerial/Workers’ institutes.105 As usual, Andrew itinerated widely, to Vanua Levu, Kadavu, the Lau group, around Viti Levu, and Qamea.106

In 1924 Andrew attended the AUC annual council, arriving in Sydney on August 24,107 departing again for Fiji on September 18.108 Soon after his return, at the request of the AUC Annual Council, he and Edmund B. Rudge departed Suva on the Tofua on October 17 to visit Samoa and Tonga,109 and were away for five weeks.110

However, Jean’s continuing health problems, particularly malaria (contracted in the New Hebrides),111 meant they needed to return to Australia. While Andrew attended the AUC Annual Council in August 1925,112 Jean visited her family in New Zealand, and in January spoke at the South New Zealand Conference camp meeting.113 On September 24 Andrew departed Sydney for Fiji on the Niagara.114 In the January 27 to February 2, 1926, AUC executive committee, it was voted, owing to Mrs. Stewart’s continuing ill health, to appoint Andrew to serve as president of the West Australian Conference.115 Andrew left Fiji in early 1926 on the Niagara, meeting Jean in Auckland and arriving in Sydney on March 6, before proceeding to Western Australia a week later.116

Australasian Union Conference [South Pacific Division] Vice President, 1926–1941

However, the Stewarts were in Western Australia only a few months before the AUC in its annual meetings appointed him AUC vice president for the Island Mission Field.117 After the meetings he returned to Western Australia until his replacement could arrive. Andrew and Jean returned to Sydney to take up the new responsibility on November 2, 1926.118 At the AUC meetings of 1932 he was appointed the additional responsibility of field secretary of the AUC Sabbath School Department.119 Ten years later, at the 1936 meetings, the vice presidency was divided between two persons. Andrew was assigned responsibility for Papua New Guinea, Fiji, Samoa, Tonga, Cook Islands, and Eastern (French) Polynesia.120

As vice president for the island fields (and later as general field secretary), Andrew traveled extensively. During the 15-year period from November 1926 to February 1941, Andrew visited Lord Howe Island, Norfolk Island, New Hebrides (Vanuatu), the territory of Papua, the New Guinea highlands (Papua New Guinea), and the Cook Islands four times each; the Solomon Islands, Tonga, and New Caledonia three times each; American Samoa once; the Society Islands (French Polynesia) and Monamona Aboriginal Mission twice each; Western Samoa (Samoa) six times; and Fiji and the Bismarck Archipelago (Papua New Guinea) eight times each.121 Almost all of this was by ship. These itineraries would take from three to ten weeks at a time. He attended mission annual meetings and camp meetings, held workers’ training programs, and visited and encouraged missionaries, both national and expatriate. He preached wherever he went, and when in Fiji or the New Hebrides, he spoke in the vernacular, which he had mastered during his years of mission service. In the field he would travel by mission boats, local shipping, by horse, on foot, and, on rare occasions, by plane.122 He was never content to remain in mission headquarters, but traveled to the remotest parts of the mission fields. And everywhere he went, he took photos, and on some occasions, motion pictures (movies).

Some notable incidents during these travels are worth mentioning. In 1929 he was instrumental in obtaining a site for the mission at Matupit in New Britain, the first SDA mission in the mandated territory of New Guinea (Papua New Guinea).123 During his 1930 visit to Fiji, he was caught at sea in a hurricane, and was on the mission ship Loloma when it was run aground. It was during this storm that missionary Fred Lang was lost at sea. Later during this trip he helped select the property for the construction of a new school at Vatuvonu on the island of Vanua Levu.124 In Papua in 1932 he aided in the choice of the site for a new mission at Mirigeda, where a training school was to be established.125 In 1933 Andrew and Dr. Thomas A. Sherwin were sent as a matter of urgency to Rabaul (New Guinea) to respond to accusations and negative reports on the impact of our mission on the health of peoples in newly entered Mussau and Emira islands. They were able to demonstrate that contrary to the reports, the mission’s influence was extremely positive, that islanders’ health had improved dramatically, and so good rapport was reestablished with the governmental authorities.126 In his 1935 visit to New Guinea he sailed on the Veilomani, in a visit to Manus and the Admiralty Islands. This was a new region for SDA mission work. Missionaries, including Solomon Islanders Salau and Oti, and some men from Mussau, were placed on a number of islands to begin new missions.127 The very day he arrived in Rabaul at the Matupit mission in 1937, there began a series of earthquakes and major volcanic eruptions that lasted several days.128

In addition to his administrative work, he traveled and spoke widely in Australia and New Zealand. He was a frequent representative of the AUC at camp meetings, speaking on average at five conference camp meetings and/or sessions per year. He also undertook tours of churches, particularly when for some reason there was no camp meeting that year. He was a popular speaker at graduations and Weeks of Prayer meetings at Avondale, Longburn, and Carmel colleges, and at the Sydney Sanitarium (Sydney Adventist Hospital) School of Nursing.129 Andrew and Jean also attended the General Conference session in San Francisco, California, in 1930.130

In special meetings of the AUC executive committee, in May 1940, Andrew’s role was changed to general field secretary, and he was also appointed secretary for the Sabbath School Department. However, at the AUC session in September 1940, he resigned the Sabbath School appointment and, in response to urgent need, volunteered to fill the position of principal of the new Fulton College in Fiji. He was still to retain his role as field secretary during this period.131

Fourth Mission Assignment: Fiji, 1941–1943

The Stewarts sailed for Fiji in February 1941, amid wartime limitations.132 Shortly after moving into their new home at Fulton College, a hurricane struck, and stove in one wall of their house, damaging a lot of their possessions. The Fijian girls’ dormitory was seriously damaged, and the Indian girls’ dormitory, still under construction, was destroyed, as was a Fijian worker’s house.133 However, on April 28, 1941, the Fulton school was officially opened, with 130 primary students, 56 advanced school students, and six teacher trainees.134 The war impacted shipping, and mail was often delayed for months, even though Fiji was not attacked. Some women staff were evacuated.135 Despite restrictions, Fulton College continued “in full swing.”136 By May 1942, with the departure of the mission superintendent, Andrew found himself acting mission superintendent, editor of the Rarama magazine, supervising the Sabbath school lesson quarterlies in Fijian, as well as teaching and directing Fulton College. The college expected to have 12 candidates for the government teacher examinations at year-end.137 At times SDA boys among the American armed forces visited Fulton.138 Andrew was also able to carry out field visits around the main island Viti Levu.139 In 1943 Fulton reopened with about 180 students.140

In May 1943 the Stewarts’ time at Fulton College came to an end, and they traveled to New Zealand via Tonga. In Tonga, where there was no foreign missionary presence because of the war, Andrew, as AUC field secretary, was able to hold meetings and a mission council, and encourage the national leadership.141 In New Zealand their visit coincided with the AUC’s fundraising drive to replace mission ships lost because of the war. Andrew and Jean were tasked with promoting this throughout the North and South New Zealand conferences.142 After carrying out this assignment, they arrived in Sydney by air on July 2, 1943.143

Australasian Union Conference Representative 1943–1955

Between 1943 and 1948 Andrew continued his work as field secretary, based in Sydney. Following this period his traveling was reduced, with other duties assigned, including editor of three church papers (see below), and the writing of several books. He visited each of the mission fields at least once, and all Australian and New Zealand conference camp meetings/sessions, most of them three or more times.144

In 1945 the AUC quadrennial session appointed him the AUC Sabbath School secretary,145 a post he held until 1949.146

The General Conference invited the Stewarts to visit the United States in their summer season of 1949, to be a speaker at the camp meetings all over the country, together with an island missionary of his choice. He chose Robert Salau, a veteran missionary from the Solomon Islands.147 The Australasian Inter-Union Conference (AIUC, successor to the AUC) approved the plan, including a visit to Britain and Europe en route.148 The Stewarts and Salau sailed from Sydney on the Georgic on February 22, via Perth and Aden.149 They arrived in Liverpool, England, on the twenty-ninth day after departure (March 23).150 Over the next six weeks Andrew spoke at Newbold College, and at churches and public meetings throughout England, Scotland, Wales, and Ireland, using, as always, his photographic slides to illustrate mission work in the South Pacific.151

After a further couple of weeks visiting churches in France and Switzerland,152 they sailed for the United States on May 17,153 arriving in New York on May 24, to be met by a media storm. The attraction was Robert Salau. There were TV appearances, newspapers and radio interviews.154 Roy Allen Anderson wrote to his father, Albert W. Anderson, “There has been nothing like it in the history of our church. The name of Seventh-day Adventist missions has become almost a byword in this great metropolis, and from New York has spread to all parts of the country.”155 During the war thousands of American soldiers had served in Manus, and some had met Salau. Some of them renewed acquaintance.

During the next 16 weeks the Stewarts and Salau crisscrossed America. They addressed the youth congress in the Hollywood Bowl, attended by some 12,000 young people.156 They spoke in churches and camp meetings in Michigan, New Hampshire, New York, Massachusetts, California, Missouri, Illinois, Indiana, Minnesota, Ohio, Washington, D.C., Maryland, Nebraska, Washington, and Oregon.157 In many places they also were interviewed on radio broadcasts. The Stewarts left America for Fiji on September 15, to spend 12 days there,158 and arrived in Sydney on September 28, 1949.159

On August 15, 1953, Emily Jean Stewart died. She was buried in the Field of Mars Cemetery in Sydney, Australia.160

In late 1953 the AIUC approved a request from the Far Eastern Division for Andrew Stewart to visit their field.161 He was to visit “some of the union missions . . . holding meetings and passing on experiences gained over many years in our South Sea Island mission work.”162 On December 26, 1953, Andrew sailed on the Neptunia from Sydney for Djakarta (Jakarta), Indonesia, via Perth. He arrived in Djakarta, Java, on Saturday, January 9, and the next seven weeks were spent in Java,163 Sumatra,164 and Celebes (Sulawesi), in Indonesia.165 This was followed by a few weeks in Singapore and Malaya (Malaysia),166 a week in Thailand,167 and two weeks in Borneo (Sabah and Sarawak, Malaysia).168 By the time he returned to Sydney on April 12, 1954,169 he had spoken to thousands, and given more than one hundred public addresses.170

Remarriage, Retirement, and Later Years

On October 19, 1954, in Perth, WA, Andrew Stewart married Vera Lucy Posselt,171 with William J. Richards as the presiding minister. Vera was born on February 11, 1908, in Norwood, SA, to Gustavus Posselt (c. 1878–1936)172 and Annie May (Walden Dixon) Posselt (c. 1878–1957),173 and died on June 4, 1998, at Wyong, NSW.174 At age 19 Vera worked as a colporteur (selling SDA books).175 She attended West Australia Missionary School (Carmel College) before studying nursing at the Sydney Sanitarium (Sydney Adventist Hospital).176 She graduated from the nursing course on March 29, 1932.177

Andrew Graham Stewart retired officially on August 31, 1955.178 At a ceremony held on August 30, division officers expressed their tributes to his 49 years of service.179 In retirement he served as senior elder of the Wahroonga church, where he was a member.180

On July 24, 1958, Andrew and Vera began a three-month visit181 to Fiji, New Hebrides, and New Zealand. For Andrew it was a return to his beloved mission field; for Vera, a new experience. Beginning with two weeks in New Zealand, including an address to students at Longburn College,182 they took ship for Suva, Fiji. For several weeks they traveled throughout Fiji, visiting scenes of Andrew’s service in years past: Suva, Vatuvonu, Colo, Naqia, among others, and Fulton College. Everywhere they went Andrew preached; everywhere former students and converts met and welcomed them.183 At the New Hebrides it was a similar pattern: visits to Atchin and Aore, and the opportunity to speak and to meet old friends.184

For several years Andrew’s eyesight had been deteriorating because of glaucoma and cataracts. Some surgery had helped, but following the last operation, complications set in, and his right eye had to be removed in December 1960. This left him unable to read, or to recognize people at a distance, but with just sufficient sight to move about.185

He continued visiting and speaking at camp meetings,186 served as a volunteer chaplain at the Sydney Sanitarium and Hospital (Sydney Adventist Hospital),187 and continued to participate in the annual Appeal for Mission—except that now he solicited funds by correspondence with donors.188

In 1964 the first mission plane in the Australasian Division (formerly AIUC) was named in his honor. Registered as VH-SDA, the Andrew Stewart was dedicated on June 27 at Bankstown Airport, Sydney, and Andrew was invited to offer the dedicatory prayer.189 Destined for Papua New Guinea, the Andrew Stewart, under pilot Len Barnard,190 gave nine of years service before being retired to Australia, where it was bought by the North New South Wales Conference for use in ministry to remote parts of the conference. In 1973 Len Barnard took Andrew and Vera for his first flight in his namesake.191

Andrew and Vera visited Fiji twice more during his retirement, for eight to nine weeks in 1966,192 and again in 1969 for the anniversary of Fulton College.193

Andrew Graham Stewart died on March 10, 1975, following a heart attack while en route to Newcastle Hospital by ambulance.194 The life sketch at his funeral on March 12 was given by Australasian Division president Robert R. Frame.195

Writer, Editor, and Passion for Missions

Andrew Stewart was a prolific writer. He published three books, Trophies From Cannibal Isles,196 In Letters of Gold,197 and Seventh-day Adventism, A Dialogue: The Other Side of the Question.198 He also wrote an unpublished history of the SDA Church in the South Pacific.199 He had hundreds of articles, letters, and sermons published in the Australasian Record, the Appeal for Mission pamphlets, and The Missionary Leader. Often he wrote readings for the Week of Prayer.200

He was editor of the Australasian Record from August 1943201 to December 1954.202 He was also editor of The Missionary Leader from August 1943203 until February 1950.204 In November 1944 he was appointed editor of Signs of the Times (Australian),205 an office he held until October 1947.206 During his years in Fiji he was also editor for the Fijian language paper Rarama.

His constant theme was missions. Wherever he spoke, his theme was mission for Christ—mission service opportunities, mission needs, fundraising for missions, accounts of the advancement of Christ’s message in the island fields, historical perspectives of mission work, personal experiences in mission service and in visiting mission lands, and the stories of those who live there. Whenever he spoke, he commonly used photographic slides in “lantern lectures,” and sometimes movies he had made.207 The vast majority of his articles in church papers were promoting and reporting on missions and mission visits. Two of his published books had the same theme. Even though In Letters of Gold is partly autobiographical, most of the book concerns others’ experiences.

He was an enthusiastic campaigner and advocate for the annual Appeal for Missions door-knock appeal. He often contributed articles to the Appeal for Missions brochure.208 He toured churches in Australia and New Zealand, promoting the Appeal. He set the example by collecting donations himself. It is little wonder that he was given the nickname of “Mr. Missionary.”209

Contribution

Andrew Graham Stewart has been called the greatest exponent of mission in the South Pacific Division (formerly Australasian Division) in the twentieth century. In addition to both pioneering and ongoing mission work in the islands over 22 years, and frequent visits there during his time of leadership at the division headquarters, he used every opportunity to promote the mission of the church in the islands of the Pacific. He used every medium he could, writing for church papers, preaching, “lantern lectures,” homemade movies, interviews with secular newspapers and radio broadcasters, even television on a few occasions. He spoke in churches, at camp meetings, schools and colleges, and in public gatherings all over Australia and New Zealand, in the islands, and even in Britain and the United States. In church committees and convention meetings he continually promoted the needs of the island fields. He took an active part in fundraising, including promoting the Appeal for Missions.

In the process he inspired countless young people to follow in his footsteps, to serve in overseas mission. His name in the South Pacific Division is synonymous with mission, to which he gave his whole life.

Sources

“A Happy Event.” Australasian Record, April 18, 1932.

“A Post Card . . .” Australasian Record, February 13, 1911.

“A Visit to Fulton School.” Australasian Record, October 12, 1942.

“Administration of Island Field.” Australasian Record, October 12, 1936.

“After eight and . . .” Australasian Record, March 20, 1916.

“After the Council . . .” Australasian Record, October 6, 1924.

Andrew Graham Stewart Biographical Records. South Pacific Division of the General Conference Archives. Folder: “Stewart, Andrew Graham.” Document: “Biographical Information Blank.”

Andrew Graham Stewart Sustentation Records. South Pacific Division of the General Conference Archives. Folder: “Stewart, Andrew Graham.” Document: “Sustentation Records of Stewart, Andrew Graham.”

“Annual Council Australasian Inter-Union Conference.” Australasian Record, January 16, 1950.

“Appointments and Transfers, 1947 Annual Meeting.” Australasian Record, October 20, 1947.

“Appreciation.” Australasian Record, March 8, 1954.

“As Pastor A. W. . . .” Australasian Record, January 15, 1923.

“Ashburton Girl Returns After Long Period.” Australasian Record, November 3, 1952. Reprinted from the Ashburton Guardian (New Zealand).

“At the invitation . . .” Australasian Record, September 18, 1967.

Australasian Missionary College. Personal academic record of Andrew G. Stewart.

Australasian Missionary College. Personal academic record of Jean Stephens [sic].

Barnard, L. H. “Safest Pilots in New Guinea.” Australasian Record, November 9, 1964.

Blunden, H. M. “In the New Hebrides, No. 3.” Australasian Record, December 26, 1921.

Bradley, I., L. Coombe, and L. Thrift, “Vera Lucy Stewart.” Australasian Record, July 4, 1998.

“Brother and Sister D. . . .” Australasian Record, December 13, 1920.

“Brother Andrew Stewart . . .” Union Conference Record, November 18, 1907.

Butler, Allan. “Progress in Fiji.” Union Conference Record, February 28, 1910.

“By the S.S. Makura . . .” Australasian Record, April 9, 1923.

Campbell, A. J. “Earthquakes and Volcanoes.” Australasian Record, June 28, 1937.

Chaney, Bertha S. “Closing Days of the Avondale School.” Union Conference Record, October 13, 1903.

Coombe, L. C. “Andrew Graham Stewart.” Australasian Record, April 7, 1975.

“Distribution of Labour.” Australasian Record, October 2, 1911.

“Distribution of Labour.” Australasian Record, September 12, 1932.

“England.” Australasian Record, April 24, 1949.

“Following the announcement . . .” Australasian Record, August 29, 1955.

“For several years . . .” Australasian Record, January 16, 1960.

Forbes, A. H. “Notes From Headquarters.” Australasian Record, October 19, 1942.

———. “Sydney Sanitarium and Hospital Staff Changes.” Australasian Record, September 16, 1963.

Frame, R. R. “Life Sketch of Pastor A. G. Stewart.” Australasian Record, April 21, 1975.

Fraser, A. M. “Union Conference Annual Meeting.” Australasian Record, December 11, 1944.

“From Neiafu, Vava’u . . .” Australasian Record, March 2, 1914.

Fulton, J. E. “A Visit to America and Return.” Australasian Record, October 15, 1923.

———. “Our Work in Fiji.” Union Conference Record, June 13, 1910.

“Fulton Missionary School.” Australasian Record, July 27, 1942.

Gates, E. H. “Experiences in Fiji.” Australasian Record, July 10, 1911.

Genealogy SA. “Birth Registrations, Posselt, Vera Lucy.” Genealogy SA (online), Book/Page 797/483.

“George Stephen, 25 Sep 1845.” Family Search (online). Scotland Births and Baptisms, 1564–1950 database, citing ARBROATH, ANGUS, SCOTLAND, index based upon data collected by the Genealogical Society of Utah, Salt Lake City. FHL microfilm 993,332.

“Going Again.” Australasian Record, September 1, 1958.

“Government Gazette.” Kerang Times and Swan Hill Gazette (Victoria), October 23, 1888. National Library of Australia (online).

Government of New South Wales. Death Certificate 8724/1940 (1940), Alexander Stewart. Registry of Births, Deaths, and Marriages.

Hare, Reuben E. “At Rest.” Australasian Record, September 7, 1953.

———. “Life Sketch—Mrs. A. G. Stewart.” Australasian Record, September 7, 1953.

Hindson, Anna L. “South New Zealand: The Camp Meeting.” Australasian Record, February 8, 1926.

“Hundreds of delegates . . .” Australasian Record, May 13, 1963.

“In a recent . . .” Australasian Record, February 1, 1915.

“In answer to . . .” Australasian Record, February 11, 1963.

“In Honour of Pastor A. G. Stewart.” Australasian Record, September 26, 1955.

“In order to . . .” Australasian Record, May 28, 1934.

“In response to . . .” Australasian Record, January 24, 1954.

“Interesting Results of Pastor Salau’s Visit to America.” Australasian Record, July 4, 1949.

“Introducing the New Editor.” Australasian Record, August 16, 1943.

Israel, M. C. “Wychitella.” Bible Echo and Signs of the Times, December 1, 1887.

“It has been . . .” Australasian Record, August 10, 1925.

“It is with . . .” Australasian Record, June 6, 1966.

James, J. R. “Atchin, New Hebrides.” Australasian Record, March 17, 1919.

———. “Big Bay, Santo, New Hebrides.” Australasian Record, December 22, 1919.

Jones, G. F. “The Melanesian Mission.” Australasian Record, October 21, 1918.

Martin, H. R. “Home Again in Fiji.” Australasian Record, March 22, 1926.

“Mary Graham, 1848–1912.” Family Search (online). © 2020, Intellectual Reserve, Inc.

Meyers, Cecil K. “A Missionary Fallen.” Australasian Record, June 14, 1920.

Meyers, Ellen. “Amongst the Indians at Samabula, Fiji.” Australasian Record, September 14, 1914.

Mills, J. “Closing Exercises of the Avondale School.” Union Conference Record, October 21, 1906.

“Mission Vessels Replacement Fund.” Australasian Record, May 24, 1943.

“Monthly Summary of Australasian Canvassing Work.” Union Conference Record, February 1, 1905.

“More About the Hurricane in Fiji.” Australasian Record, April 7, 1941.

Mote, F. A. “Home Missions and Sabbath School Departments, Australasian Inter-Union Conference.” Australasian Record, January 31, 1949.

Munson, R. W. “The Tent Effort at Lithgow, New South Wales.” Union Conference Record, January 1, 1906.

“Naomi’s Wedding.” Australasian Record, September 13, 1937. Reprinted from the Auckland Star (New Zealand), July 28, 1937.

New Zealand. “Birth Certificate 1881/19017 (1881). Emily Jean Stephen.” New Zealand Government Internal Affairs, Office of Births, Deaths, and Marriages.

“New Zealand, Archives New Zealand, Passenger Lists, 1839–1973.” Family Search (online). Database with images, Canterbury > 1874 > Canterbury > image 38 of 49; Archives New Zealand, Wellington. https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:S3HT-DT3Q-3D8?cc=1609792&wc=MP7V-SPD%3A119046201%2C119037202%2C119237701.

“Nominations.” Union Conference Record, September 21, 1908.

“Notes and Personals.” Union Conference Record, February 1, 1905.

“Notes From Fiji.” Australasian Record, June 15, 1942.

Olsen, O. A., and E. M. Graham. “Action Taken by the Union Conference Council.” Union Conference Record, September 30, 1907.

“On December 26 . . .” Australasian Record, February 2, 1954.

“On March 16 . . .” Australasian Record, March 27, 1933.

“On November 2 . . .” Australasian Record, November 22, 1926.

“On Wednesday, September . . .” Union Conference Record, September 19, 1910.

“Ordination Service.” Union Conference Record, November 7, 1910.

“Our first workers . . .” Australasian Record, August 17, 1914.

“Our numerous readers . . .” Australasian Record, April 10, 1944.

Palmer, C. S. “Annie May Posselt.” Australasian Record, May 20, 1957.

Parker, C. H. “Atchin, New Hebrides.” Australasian Record, June 19, 1916.

———. “Closing Labours in the New Hebrides.” Australasian Record, June 26, 1916.

Parker, C. H. and A. G. Stewart. “The Fijian Council.” Union Conference Record, August 3, 1908.

“Pastor A. G. Stewart . . .” Australasian Record, April 17, 1916.

“Pastor A. G. Stewart . . .” Australasian Record, August 18, 1924.

“Pastor A. G. Stewart . . .” Australasian Record, June 22, 1942.

“Pastor A. G. Stewart . . .” Australasian Record, March 12, 1923.

“Pastor A. G. Stewart . . .” Australasian Record, October 5, 1925.

“Pastor A. G. Stewart . . .” Australasian Record, October 19, 1914.

“Pastor A. G. Stewart . . .” Australasian Record, October 25, 1926.

“Pastor and Mrs. . . .” Australasian Record, July 19, 1943.

“Pastor and Mrs. . . .” Australasian Record, June 5, 1949.

“Pastor and Mrs. . . .” Australasian Record, June 6, 1966.

“Pastor and Mrs. . . .” Australasian Record, October 17, 1949.

“Pastor and Mrs. . . .” Australasian Record, September 8, 1969.

“Pastor Woods and . . .” Union Conference Record, November 19, 1906.

Piper, A. H. “The Australasian Delegation to the General Conference.” Australasian Record, May 19, 1930.

Piper, H. E. “G. Stephen.” Union Conference Record, September 3, 1906.

“Plane Has Missionary Attitude.” Australasian Record, October 29, 1973. Reprinted from Lake Macquarie Herald (Newcastle, NSW).

“Plans and Recommendations.” Australasian Record, October 12, 1914.

Prettyman, C. H. “Auxiliary Vessel for Fiji.” Australasian Record, June 7, 1915.

“Publishing and Canvassing.” Australasian Record, July 4, 1927.

Radley, Rose-Marie. Captain Jack Radley and the Heyday of the Fleet. Warburton, VIC: Signs Publishing, 2018.

“Recommendations of the Union Conference Council Held at Warburton, Victoria, December 31, 1915 to January 10, 1916.” Australasian Record, January 31, 1916.

“Report of the Australasian Union Conference.” Union Conference Record, November 7, 1910.

Richards, W. J. “Stewart-Posselt.” In “Weddings.” Australasian Record, November 22, 1954.

Richardson, Colin T. “The Itineraries of Pr. A. G. Stewart 1927–1955, With Sources.” Cooranbong, NSW: Adventist Heritage Centre. Folder: “The Itineraries of Pr. A. G. Stewart—1927–1955.”

Rogers, Viola M. “Your Friends, the Editors.” Australasian Record, July 11, 1955.

Rudge, E. B. “An Unusual Experience.” Australasian Record, January 19, 1925.

———. “Australasian Union Conference President’s Report, Session 1941.” Australasian Record, September 10, 1940.

Salau, R. “Pastor Salau Writes.” Australasian Record, June 5, 1949.

Schofield, A. “Visit of a Veteran.” Australasian Record, June 1, 1936.

“Scotland.” Australasian Record, April 24, 1949.

“Scotland Births and Baptisms, 1564–1950.” Database, FamilySearch: February 10, 2018, George Stephen, September 25, 1845, citing ARBROATH, ANGUS, SCOTLAND, reference, index based upon data collected by the Genealogical Society of Utah, Salt Lake City; FHL microfilm 993,332, https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:XBCC-3DZ.

Scragg, W. “Gustavus Posselt.” Australasian Record, November 9, 1936.

“Session Appointments.” Australasian Record, October 15, 1945.

Sherwin, T.  A. “A Medical Visit to New Guinea.” Australasian Record, May 22, 1933.

“Sister A. G. Stewart . . .” Australasian Record, February 20, 1922.

Smith, W. J. “Barbara Stephen.” Australasian Record, October 5, 1936.

Stewart, A. G. “A Hurricane in Fiji.” Union Conference Record, May 2, 1910.

———. “A Mission Wedding in Fiji.” Australasian Record, September 13, 1937.

———. “A New Group Entered With the Message–Part 1.” Australasian Record, June 3, 1935.

———. “A New Group Entered With the Message—Part 3.” Australasian Record, June 17, 1935.

———. “A New Group Entered With the Message–Part 2.” Australasian Record, June 10, 1935.

———. “A Newsy Letter.” Australasian Record, October 19, 1942.

———. “A Relic of Cannibalism. Ratu Peni of Nadrau, Fiji.” An Appeal for Missions. Foreign Mission Board of Seventh-day Adventists, 1926.

———. “A Trip to Lau, Fiji.” Union Conference Record, August 29, 1910.

———. “A Workers’ Institute, Fiji.” Australasian Record, January 15, 1912.

———. “After More Than Half a Century.” Australasian Record, September 22, 1958.

———. “Amidst Volcanic Fires.” Australasian Record, June 28, 1937.

———. “Another Workers’ Institute, Fiji.” Australasian Record, January 20, 1913.

———. “Back in the Islands of Our Adoption.” Australasian Record, September 29, 1958.

———. “Brethren, Pray for Us.” Australasian Record, June 26, 1916.

———. “Building on a Firm Foundation.” Australasian Record, October 20, 1958.

———. “Central Polynesia.” Australasian Record, January 26, 1914.

———. “Central Polynesian Mission.” Australasian Record, September 28, 1914.

———. “Cup of Joy Running Over.” Australasian Record, October 6, 1958.

———. “En Route to the New Hebrides.” Australasian Record, June 5, 1916.

———. “Fiji.” Australasian Record, June 16, 1924.

———. “Following the Blueprint.” Unpublished manuscript. Cooranbong, NSW: Adventist Heritage Centre.

———. “France and Switzerland.” Australasian Record, June 20, 1949.

———. “From Fremantle to Aden.” Australasian Record, April 11, 1949.

———. “From the Heart of the United States.” Australasian Record, August 29, 1949.

———. “From Union College Campus, Nebraska.” Australasian Record, September 19, 1949.

———. “Full Schools in Fiji.” Australasian Record, April 12, 1943.

———. “Going Again.” Australasian Record, September 15, 1958.

———. “Going Again.” Australasian Record, September 1, 1958.

———. “Good News From the Fulton Missionary School, Fiji.” Australasian Record, June 16, 1941.

———. “Heathen Customs.” An Appeal for Missions, 1919.

———. “Heathen or Christian?” Australasian Record, November 13, 1916.

———. “Home Again in the Islands.” Australasian Record, January 29, 1923.

———. “In Inland Fiji.” Australasian Record, July 13, 1925.

———. “In Memory of John Edwin Fulton.” Australasian Record, October 6, 1969.

———. “In the Heart of England.” Australasian Record, May 2, 1949.

———. “Into All the World.” Australasian Record, May 29, 1939.

———. “Items From Fiji.” Australasian Record, June 1, 1925.

———. “Lecture Tour of the Large Industrial Centres of England.” Australasian Record, May 16, 1949.

———. “Letter From the General Conference.” Australasian Record, July 21, 1930.

———. “Ministerial Institute, Fiji.” Australasian Record, February 23, 1925.

———. “On Furlough in New Zealand.” Australasian Record, January 11, 1915.

———. “On the Trail of the Pioneers.” Australasian Record, August 8, 1949.

———. “Open Doors in the Mission Field.” An Appeal for Missions, 1934.

———. “Opening a New Mission Field in the Territory of New Guinea.” Australasian Record, July 8, 1929.

———. “Our Busy Program Ends.” Australasian Record, October 10, 1949.

———. “Our Indian Work in Fiji.” Australasian Record, December 16, 1912.

———. “Our Largest Audience So Far.” Australasian Record, July 4, 1949.

———. “Our Most Eventful Week.” Australasian Record, June 5, 1949.

———. “Our Work in the New Hebrides.” Australasian Record, December 22, 1919.

———. “Pacific Union Youth Congress.” Australasian Record, July 18, 1949.

———. “Providences in the Pacific.” Australasian Record, May 11, 1931.

———. “Retracing His Steps.” Australasian Record, July 25, 1966.

———. “Scene 1–As We Were.” Australasian Record, November 24, 1958.

———. “Scene 2–As They Are Now.” Australasian Record, December 1, 1958.

———. “Starting on Our Long Voyage.” Australasian Record, March 28, 1949.

———. “Successful Institute in Fiji.” Australasian Record, January 21, 1924.

———. “The Chickens Are Hatching.” Australasian Record, March 26, 1923.

———. “The Dedication of the Girls’ Home, Fiji.” Union Conference Record, August 23, 1909.

———. “The Editor’s Safari.” Australasian Record, April 19, 1954.

———. “The Editor’s Safari.” Australasian Record, April 12, 1954.

———. “The Editor’s Safari. A Week in Old Siam.” Australasian Record, April 26, 1954.

———. “The Editor’s Safari. Being Initiated.” Australasian Record, March 1, 1954.

———. “The Editor’s Safari. Compassion on the Multitude.” Australasian Record, March 29, 1954.

———. “The Editor’s Safari. In Beautiful Bandung.” Australasian Record, March 15, 1954.

———. “The Editor’s Safari. Djakarta, Java.” Australasian Record, February 22, 1954.

———. “The Editor’s Safari. Java—Its Charm, Contrasts, Culture, and Change.” Australasian Record, March 8, 1954.

———. “The Editor’s Safari. Two Impressive Monuments.” Australasian Record, March 22, 1954.

———. “The Editor’s Safari Ends.” Australasian Record, May 5, 1954.

———. “The Fijian Annual Council.” Union Conference Record, July 4, 1910.

———. “The Great Gospel Commission Still the Grandest Enterprise of Human Endeavour.” An Appeal for Missions, 1939.

———. “The Malekulan Front.” Australasian Record, May 6, 1918.

———. “The New Hebrides.” Australasian Record, October 30, 1922.

———. “The Transforming Power of the Gospel.” An Appeal for Missions. Foreign Mission Board of Seventh-day Adventists, 1933.

———. “The Work in Colo, Fiji.” Union Conference Record, January 24, 1910.

———. “Through the Red Sea.” Australasian Record, April 24, 1949.

———. “Two Interesting Trips in Fiji.” Australasian Record, May 24, 1915.

———. “Visit to Fiji.” Australasian Record, January 5, 1931.

———. “Visit to Papua.” Australasian Record, June 6, 1932.

———. “Visit to the Tongan Field.” Australasian Record, January 5, 1925.

———. “Visiting the Territory of New Guinea.” Australasian Record, May 8, 1933.

———. “Winning Out in the New Hebrides.” An Appeal for Missions. Foreign Mission Board of Seventh-day Adventists, 1928.

———. “Workers’ Institute, Fiji.” Australasian Record, March 15, 1926.

Stewart, A. G. & E. J. “Back in Fiji.” Australasian Record, March 17, 1941.

———. “Back in Fiji.” Australasian Record, March 6, 1911.

Stewart, A. G., and P. Glockler, “The Fijian Annual Council.” Australasian Record, July 9, 1923.

Stewart, A. G., compiler. “First Fifty Years of the Adventist Church Under the Southern Cross, 1885–1935.” Unpublished manuscript. Cooranbong, NSW: Adventist Heritage Centre, 1955.

Stewart, Andrew G. In Letters of Gold. Heroism for God in the South Seas. Mountain View, California: Pacific Press Publishing Association, 1973.

Stewart, Andrew G. (“A.S.”). Seventh-day Adventism, A Dialogue: The Other Side of the Question. Warburton, VIC: Signs Publishing Company Limited. Cooranbong, NSW: Adventist Heritage Centre.

———. Trophies From Cannibal Isles. Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1956.

Stewart, E. J. “News From Atchin, New Hebrides.” Australasian Record, February 21, 1921.

Stewart, G. G. “Alexander Stewart.” Australasian Record, June 3, 1940.

———. “Tonga, Friendly Islands.” Australasian Record, January 12, 1914.

Stewart, Mrs. (Jean). “Amidst Dangers Seen and Unseen.” Australasian Record, October 16, 1916.

———. “Atchin, New Hebrides.” Australasian Record, August 7, 1916.

Stratford, S. V. “The Editor Goes Abroad.” Australasian Record, February 28, 1949.

“Success stories are . . .” Australasian Record, March 10, 1969.

“The Conference in Progress.” Australasian Record, September 27, 1926.

“The day on . . .” Australasian Record, April 12, 1954.

“The Editor Abroad.” Australasian Record, June 20, 1949.

“The following twelve . . .” Australasian Record, January 4, 1932.

“The French steamer . . .” Australasian Record, November 20, 1922.

“The Missionary Trio on Tour in the United States.” Australasian Record, August 22, 1949.

“To view once . . .” Australasian Record, August 18, 1958.

Turner, Bessie C. “A Family of Leaders.” Australasian Record, June 27, 1935.

Turner, W. G. “Recent Actions of the Union Conference Committee.” Australasian Record, February 15, 1926.

“Volcanic Eruptions at Rabaul.” Australasian Record, June 14, 1937.

Watson, C. H. “Appointment of Pastor A. G. Stewart to Fiji.” Australasian Record, January 27, 1941.

———. “Union conference Council.” Australasian Record, January 31, 1916.

Were, Eric. “Balus Belong Seven-day He Come.” Australasian Record, July 20, 1964.

“What the West Australian Missionary School Meant to Me.” Australasian Record, March 18, 1929.

White, Mabel V. “How We Travelled to the Fiji Council Meeting.” Australasian Record, September 29, 1913.

Woods, J. H., C. P. Michaels, and Andrew Stewart. “Northcote, Melbourne.” Union Conference Record, June 10, 1907.

“Writing from Auckland . . .” Australasian Record, May 10, 1943.

Notes

  1. Andrew Graham Stewart Biographical Records, South Pacific Division of the General Conference Archives (Folder: “Stewart, Andrew Graham”; Document: “Biographical Information Blank”).

  2. G. G. Stewart, “Alexander Stewart,” Australasian Record, June 3, 1940, 7; Government of New South Wales, Death Certificate 8724/1940 (1940), Alexander Stewart, Registry of Births, Deaths, and Marriages.

  3. “Mary Graham 1848–1912,” Family Search, © 2020, Intellectual Reserve, Inc., accessed February 19, 2020, https://www.familysearch.org/tree/person/details/G9RB-7V5.

  4. “Government Gazette,” Kerang Times and Swan Hill Gazette (Victoria), October 23, 1888, 2, National Library of Australia, accessed February 26, 2020, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article65614182.

  5. Andrew G. Stewart, In Letters of Gold. Heroism for God in the South Seas (Mountain View, California: Pacific Press Publishing Association, 1973), 7–10; M. C. Israel, “Wychitella,” Bible Echo and Signs of the Times, December 1, 1887, 106, 107.

  6. Andrew G. Stewart, In Letters of Gold, 11.

  7. G. G. Stewart, “Alexander Stewart.”

  8. R. R. Frame, “Life Sketch of Pastor A. G. Stewart,” Australasian Record, April 21, 1975, 2; Andrew G. Stewart, In Letters of Gold, 12.

  9. Andrew G. Stewart, In Letters of Gold, 16–21.

  10. R. W. Munson, “The Tent Effort at Lithgow, New South Wales,” Union Conference Record, January 1, 1906, 2, 3.

  11. Andrew G. Stewart, In Letters of Gold, 26; Australasian Missionary College, personal academic record of Andrew G. Stewart; J. Mills, “Closing Exercises of the Avondale School,” Union Conference Record, October 21, 1906, 6.

  12. A. G. Stewart, “In Memory of John Edwin Fulton,” Australasian Record, October 6, 1969, 8.

  13. “Pastor Woods and . . . ,” Union Conference Record, November 19, 1906, 7.

  14. J. H. Woods, C. P. Michaels, and Andrew Stewart, “Northcote, Melbourne,” Union Conference Record, June 10, 1907, 3.

  15. New Zealand, Birth Certificate 1881/19017 (1881), Emily Jean Stephen, New Zealand Government Internal Affairs, Office of Births, Deaths, and Marriages.

  16. Reuben E. Hare, “Life Sketch—Mrs. A. G. Stewart,” Australasian Record, September 7, 1953, 14.

  17. “Scotland Births and Baptisms, 1564–1950,” database, FamilySearch: February 10, 2018, George Stephen, September 25, 1845, citing ARBROATH, ANGUS, SCOTLAND, reference, index based upon data collected by the Genealogical Society of Utah, Salt Lake City; FHL microfilm 993,332, https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:XBCC-3DZ .

  18. H. E. Piper, “G. Stephen,” Union Conference Record, September 3, 1906, 8.

  19. W. J. Smith, “Barbara Stephen,” Australasian Record, October 5, 1936, 15.

  20. “Scotland Marriages, 1561–1910,” database, FamilySearch: February 10, 2018, George Stephen and Barbara Porteous, June 3, 1874, citing Falkirk, Stirling, Scotland, index based upon data collected by the Genealogical Society of Utah, Salt Lake City; FHL microfilm 6,035,516, https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:XY7C-S9V.

  21. “New Zealand, Archives New Zealand, Passenger Lists, 1839–1973,” database with images, FamilySearch: May 21, 2014, Canterbury > 1874 > Canterbury > image 38 of 49; Archives New Zealand, Wellington,

    https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:S3HT-DT3Q-3D8?cc=1609792&wc=MP7V-SPD%3A119046201%2C119037202%2C119237701.

  22. Smith, 15.

  23. Bertha S. Chaney, “Closing Days of the Avondale School,” Union Conference Record, October 13, 1903, 5.

  24. “Monthly Summary of Australasian Canvassing Work,” Union Conference Record, February 1, 1905, 4; “Notes and Personals,”Union Conference Record, February 1, 1905, 7.

  25. Mills; Australasian Missionary College, personal academic record of Jean Stephens [sic].

  26. Andrew G. Stewart, In Letters of Gold, 26.

  27. “Brother Andrew Stewart . . . ,” Union Conference Record, November 18, 1907, 7.

  28. “Our numerous readers . . . ,” Australasian Record, April 10, 1944, 8.

  29. Andrew G. Stewart, In Letters of Gold, 53–60.

  30. “In order to . . . ,” Australasian Record, May 28, 1934, 8.

  31. A. G. Stewart, “A Mission Wedding in Fiji,” Australasian Record, September 13, 1937, 3; “Naomi’s Wedding.” Australasian Record, September 13, 1937, 3, 4, reprinted from the Auckland Star (New Zealand, July 28, 1937). (The name of her husband is given as Mosese Magese in In Letters of Gold, 58, written many years later.)

  32. “Our numerous readers . . . .”

  33. O. A. Olsen and E. M. Graham, “Action Taken by the Union Conference Council,” Union Conference Record, September 30, 1907, 15.

  34. “Ashburton Girl Returns After Long Period,” Australasian Record, November 3, 1952, 8, reprinted from the Ashburton Guardian (New Zealand); “Going Again,” Australasian Record, September 1, 1958, 5, 6.

  35. Andrew G. Stewart, In Letters of Gold, 27, 33.

  36. A. G. Stewart, “In Memory of John Edwin Fulton.”

  37. A. G. Stewart, “Following the Blueprint,” unpublished manuscript (Cooranbong, NSW: Adventist Heritage Centre).

  38. A. G. Stewart, “The Dedication of the Girls’ Home, Fiji,” Union Conference Record, August 23, 1909, 3.

  39. Allan Butler, “Progress in Fiji,” Union Conference Record, February 28, 1910, 4.

  40. C. H. Parker and A. G. Stewart, “The Fijian Council,” Union Conference Record, August 3, 1908, 2, 3.

  41. A. G. Stewart, “The Work in Colo, Fiji,” Union Conference Record, January 24, 1910, 4.

  42. “Nominations,” Union Conference Record, September 21, 1908, 41, 42.

  43. A. G. Stewart, “A Hurricane in Fiji,” Union Conference Record, May 2, 1910, 2, 3.

  44. J. E. Fulton, “Our Work in Fiji,” Union Conference Record, June 13, 1910, 2, 3; A. G. Stewart, “The Fijian Annual Council,” Union Conference Record, July 4, 1910, 2.

  45. A. G. Stewart, “The Fijian Annual Council.”

  46. A. G. Stewart, “A Trip to Lau, Fiji,” Union Conference Record, August 29, 1910, 3, 4.

  47. “On Wednesday, September . . . ,” Union Conference Record, September 19, 1910, 8.

  48. “Report of the Australasian Union Conference,” Union Conference Record, November 7, 1910, 60.

  49. “Ordination Service,” Union Conference Record, November 7, 1910, 77; Andrew G. Stewart, In Letters of Gold, 45 (in this work he says it was in November, which is the date of the above Record; service record says October 29, which agrees with the article in Record).

  50. “A Post Card . . . ,” Australasian Record, February 13, 1911, 8.

  51. A. G. and E. J. Stewart, “Back in Fiji,” Australasian Record, March 6, 1911, 4.

  52. E. H. Gates, “Experiences in Fiji,” Australasian Record, July 10, 1911, 4.

  53. “Distribution of Labour,” Australasian Record, October 2, 1911, 5.

  54. A. G. Stewart, “Central Polynesian Mission,” Australasian Record, September 28, 1914, 40.

  55. A. G. Stewart, “A Workers’ Institute, Fiji,” Australasian Record, January 15, 1912, 4; A. G. Stewart, “Another Workers’ Institute, Fiji,” Australasian Record, January 20, 1913, 8.

  56. A. G. Stewart, “Our Indian Work in Fiji,” Australasian Record, December 16, 1912, 3; Ellen Meyers, “Amongst the Indians at Samabula, Fiji,” Australasian Record, September 14, 1914, 2.

  57. Mabel V. White, “How We Travelled to the Fiji Council Meeting,” Australasian Record, September 29, 1913, 2, 3.

  58. A. G. Stewart, “Central Polynesia,” Australasian Record, January 26, 1914, 2.

  59. Ibid.; “From Neiafu, Vava’u . . . ,” Australasian Record, March 2, 1914, 8; G. G. Stewart, “Tonga, Friendly Islands,” Australasian Record, January 12, 1914, 5.

  60. “Our first workers . . . ,” Australasian Record, August 17, 1914, 8.

  61. A. G. Stewart, “Central Polynesian Mission,” 41.

  62. “Plans and Recommendations,” Australasian Record, October 12, 1914, 14.

  63. C. H. Prettyman, “Auxiliary Vessel for Fiji,” Australasian Record, June 7, 1915, 8.

  64. Rose-Marie Radley, Captain Jack Radley and the Heyday of the Fleet (Warburton, VIC: Signs Publishing, 2018), 29.

  65. “Pastor A. G. Stewart . . . ,” Australasian Record, October 19, 1914, 8.

  66. A. G. Stewart, “On Furlough in New Zealand,” Australasian Record, January 11, 1915, 3.

  67. A. G. Stewart, “Two Interesting Trips in Fiji,” Australasian Record, May 24, 1915, 5.

  68. “In a recent . . . ,” Australasian Record, February 1, 1915, 8.

  69. “Recommendations of the Union Conference Council Held at Warburton, Victoria, December 31, 1915, to January 10, 1916,” Australasian Record, January 31, 1916, 5, 6; also C. H. Watson, “Union Conference Council,” Australasian Record, January 31, 1916, 6, 7.

  70. C. H. Parker, “Atchin, New Hebrides,” Australasian Record, June 19, 1916, 2, 3.

  71. “After eight and . . . ,” Australasian Record, March 20, 1916, 8.

  72. “Pastor A. G. Stewart . . . ,” Australasian Record, April 17, 1916, 8.

  73. A. G. Stewart, “En Route to the New Hebrides,” Australasian Record, June 5, 1916, 4.

  74. Andrew G. Stewart, In Letters of Gold, 51.

  75. C. H. Parker, “Closing Labours in the New Hebrides,” Australasian Record, June 26, 1916, 2, 3.

  76. Andrew G. Stewart, In Letters of Gold, 51, 52.

  77. Parker, “Closing Labours in the New Hebrides.”

  78. Radley, 21.

  79. A. G. Stewart, “Brethren, Pray for Us,” Australasian Record, June 26, 1916, 3.

  80. Mrs. (Jean) Stewart, “Atchin, New Hebrides,” Australasian Record, August 7, 1916, 2, 3.

  81. A. G. Stewart, “Heathen or Christian?” Australasian Record, November 13, 1916, 3, 4 .

  82. G. F. Jones, “The Melanesian Mission,” Australasian Record, October 21, 1918, 54.

  83. Andrew G. Stewart, In Letters of Gold, 72–77.

  84. E. J. Stewart, “News From Atchin, New Hebrides,” Australasian Record, February 21, 1921, 9, 10.

  85. Andrew G. Stewart, In Letters of Gold, 78–81.

  86. Mrs. (Jean) Stewart, “Amidst Dangers Seen and Unseen,” Australasian Record, October 16, 1916, 3.

  87. A. G. Stewart, “Our Work in the New Hebrides,” Australasian Record, December 22, 1919, 2, 3.

  88. A. G. Stewart, “The New Hebrides,” Australasian Record, October 30, 1922, 99.

  89. Cecil K. Meyers, “A Missionary Fallen,” Australasian Record, June 14, 1920, 7.

  90. H. M. Blunden, “In the New Hebrides, No. 3,” Australasian Record, December 26, 1921, 3.

  91. A. G. Stewart, “Home Again in the Islands,” Australasian Record, January 29, 1923, 5.

  92. A. G. Stewart, “The Malekulan Front,” Australasian Record, May 6, 1918, 2.

  93. “Brother and Sister D. . . . ,” Australasian Record, December 13, 1920, 8.

  94. J. R. James, “Big Bay, Santo, New Hebrides,” Australasian Record, December 22, 1919, 3.

  95. A. G. Stewart, “The Chickens Are Hatching,” Australasian Record, March 26, 1923, 6.

  96. J. R. James, “Atchin, New Hebrides,” Australasian Record, March 17, 1919, 4.

  97. A. G. Stewart, “The Chickens Are Hatching.”

  98. A. G. Stewart, “The New Hebrides,” 99, 100.

  99. “Sister A. G. Stewart . . . ,” Australasian Record, February 20, 1922, 8.

  100. “The French steamer . . . ,” Australasian Record, November 20, 1922, 8.

  101. “As Pastor A. W. . . . ,” Australasian Record, January 15, 1923, 8.

  102. “Pastor A. G. Stewart . . . ,” Australasian Record, March 12, 1923, 8.

  103. “By the S.S. Makura . . . ,” Australasian Record, April 9, 1923, 8.

  104. A. G. Stewart and P. Glockler, “The Fijian Annual Council,” Australasian Record, July 9, 1923, 3.

  105. A. G. Stewart, “Successful Institute in Fiji,” Australasian Record, January 21, 1924, 3; A. G. Stewart, “Ministerial Institute, Fiji,” Australasian Record, February 23, 1925, 2; A. G. Stewart, “Workers’ Institute, Fiji,” Australasian Record, March 15, 1926, 3.

  106. A. G. Stewart, “Fiji,” Australasian Record, June 16, 1924, 2; A. G. Stewart, “Items From Fiji,” Australasian Record, June 1, 1925, 2, 3; A. G. Stewart, “In Inland Fiji,” Australasian Record, July 13, 1925, 3, 4.

  107. “Pastor A. G. Stewart . . . ,” Australasian Record, August 18, 1924, 8.

  108. “After the Council . . . ,” Australasian Record, October 6, 1924, 8.

  109. E. B. Rudge, “An Unusual Experience,” Australasian Record, January 19, 1925, 4.

  110. A. G. Stewart, “Visit to the Tongan Field,” Australasian Record, January 5, 1925, 3, 4.

  111. J. E. Fulton, “A Visit to America and Return,” Australasian Record, October 15, 1923, 2.

  112. “It has been . . . ,” Australasian Record, August 10, 1925, 8.

  113. Anna L. Hindson, “South New Zealand: The Camp Meeting,” Australasian Record, February 8, 1926, 6.

  114. “Pastor A. G. Stewart . . . ,” Australasian Record, October 5, 1925, 8.

  115. W. G. Turner, “Recent Actions of the Union Conference Committee,” Australasian Record, February 15, 1926, 7.

  116. H. R. Martin, “Home Again in Fiji,” Australasian Record, March 22, 1926, 2, 8.

  117. “The Conference in Progress,” Australasian Record, September 27, 1926, 16.

  118. “Pastor A. G. Stewart . . . ,” Australasian Record, October 25, 1926, 8; “On November 2 . . . ,” Australasian Record, November 22, 1926, 8.

  119. “Distribution of Labour,” Australasian Record, September 12, 1932, 5.

  120. “Administration of Island Field,” Australasian Record, October 12, 1936, 8.

  121. Colin T. Richardson, “The Itineraries of Pr. A. G. Stewart, 1927–1955, With Sources” (Cooranbong, NSW: Adventist Heritage Centre) (Folder: “The Itineraries of Pr. A. G. Stewart—1927–1955”).

  122. Ibid. See the many sourced articles in this document for details.

  123. A. G. Stewart, “Opening a New Mission Field in the Territory of New Guinea,” Australasian Record, July 8, 1929, 3, 4.

  124. A. G. Stewart, “Visit to Fiji,” Australasian Record, January 5, 1931, 3.

  125. A. G. Stewart, “Visit to Papua,” Australasian Record, June 6, 1932, 8.

  126. “On March 16 . . . ,” Australasian Record, March 27, 1933, 8; A. G. Stewart, “Visiting the Territory of New Guinea,” Australasian Record, May 8, 1933, 1, 2; T. A. Sherwin, “A Medical Visit to New Guinea,” Australasian Record, May 22, 1933, 2, 3.

  127. A. G. Stewart, “A New Group Entered With the Message—Part 1,” Australasian Record, June 3, 1935, 4; A. G. Stewart, “A New Group Entered with the Message—Part 2,” Australasian Record, June 10, 1935, 2; A. G. Stewart, “A New Group Entered With the Message—Part 3,” Australasian Record, June 17, 1935, 3.

  128. “Volcanic Eruptions at Rabaul,” Australasian Record, June 14, 1937, 8; A. G. Stewart, “Amidst Volcanic Fires,” Australasian Record, June 28, 1937, 2; A. J. Campbell, “Earthquakes and Volcanoes,” Australasian Record, June 28, 1937, 3; Andrew G. Stewart, In Letters of Gold, 102–105.

  129. Richardson.

  130. A. H. Piper, “The Australasian Delegation to the General Conference,” Australasian Record, , May 19, 1930, 8; A. G. Stewart, “Letter From the General Conference,” Australasian Record, July 21, 1930, 3, 4.

  131. E. B. Rudge, “Australasian Union Conference President’s Report, Session 1941,” Australasian Record, September 10, 1940, 7; C. H. Watson, “Appointment of Pastor A. G. Stewart to Fiji,” Australasian Record, January 27, 1941, 8.

  132. A. G. and E. J. Stewart, “Back in Fiji,” Australasian Record, March 17, 1941, 4.

  133. “More about the Hurricane in Fiji,” Australasian Record, April 7, 1941, 8.

  134. A. G. Stewart, “Good News From the Fulton Missionary School, Fiji,” Australasian Record, June 16, 1941, 3, 4.

  135. “Notes From Fiji,” Australasian Record, June 15, 1942, 8.

  136. “Pastor A. G. Stewart . . . ,” Australasian Record, June 22, 1942, 8.

  137. “Fulton Missionary School,” Australasian Record, July 27, 1942, 8.

  138. “A Visit to Fulton School,” Australasian Record, October 12, 1942, 5.

  139. Ibid.; A. H. Forbes, “Notes From Headquarters,” Australasian Record, October 19, 1942, 3; A. G. Stewart, “A Newsy Letter,” Australasian Record, October 19, 1942, 3, 4.

  140. A. G. Stewart, “Full Schools in Fiji,” Australasian Record, April 12, 1943, 8.

  141. “Writing From Auckland . . . ,” Australasian Record, May 10, 1943, 8.

  142. “Mission Vessels Replacement Fund,” Australasian Record, May 24, 1943, 8.

  143. “Pastor and Mrs. . . . ,” Australasian Record, July 19, 1943, 8.

  144. Richardson.

  145. “Session Appointments,” Australasian Record, October 15, 1945, 5.

  146. F. A. Mote, “Home Missions and Sabbath School Departments, Australasian Inter-Union Conference,” Australasian Record, January 31, 1949, 5.

  147. Andrew G. Stewart, In Letters of Gold, 107–118.

  148. S. V. Stratford, “The Editor Goes Abroad,” Australasian Record, February 28, 1949, 3.

  149. Ibid.; A. G. Stewart, “Starting on Our Long Voyage,” Australasian Record, March 28, 1949, 5 (note: Stewart gives the date of departure as March 23, but since in the next article he arrives in Aden on March 12, clearly Stratford’s date of February 22 is more accurate; Stewart’s may be a typo); A. G. Stewart, “From Fremantle to Aden,” Australasian Record, April 11, 1949, 8.

  150. A. G. Stewart, “Through the Red Sea,” Australasian Record, April 24, 1949, 6.

  151. Ibid.; “England,” Australasian Record, April 24, 1949, 3; “Scotland,” Australasian Record, April 24, 1949, 3; A. G. Stewart, “In the Heart of England,” Australasian Record, May 2, 1949, 2; A. G. Stewart, “Lecture Tour of the Large Industrial Centres of England,” Australasian Record, May 16, 1949, 2; A. G. Stewart, “Our Most Eventful Week,” Australasian Record, June 5, 1949, 2; R. Salau, “Pastor Salau Writes,” June 5, 1949, 2; “The Editor Abroad,” Australasian Record, June 20, 1949, 8.

  152. A. G. Stewart, “France and Switzerland,” Australasian Record, June 20, 1949, 4, 5.

  153. “Pastor and Mrs. . . . ,” Australasian Record, June 5, 1949, 8.

  154. “The Editor Abroad”; A. G. Stewart, “Our Largest Audience So Far,” Australasian Record, July 4, 1949, 2, 3.

  155. “Interesting Results of Pastor Salau’s Visit to America,” Australasian Record, July 4, 1949, 3.

  156. A. G. Stewart, “Pacific Union Youth Congress,” Australasian Record, July 18, 1949, 2.

  157. A. G. Stewart, “Our Largest Audience So Far”; A.G. Stewart, “On the Trail of the Pioneers,” Australasian Record, August 8, 1949, 3; “The Missionary Trio on Tour in the United States,” Australasian Record, August 22, 1949, 2, 6; A. G. Stewart, “From the Heart of the United States,” Australasian Record, August 29, 1949, 2; A. G. Stewart, “From Union College Campus, Nebraska,” Australasian Record, September 19, 1949, 2; A. G. Stewart, “Our Busy Program Ends,” Australasian Record, October 10, 1949, 2, 3.

  158. “The Missionary Trio on Tour in the United States,” Australasian Record, August 22, 1949, 2.

  159. “Pastor and Mrs. . . . ,” Australasian Record, October 17, 1949, 8.

  160. Reuben E. Hare, “At Rest,” Australasian Record, September 7, 1953, 14; Hare, “Life Sketch: Mrs. A. G. Stewart.”

  161. “In response to . . . ,” Australasian Record, January 24, 1954, 16.

  162. “On December 26 . . . ,” Australasian Record, February 2, 1954, 8; Andrew G. Stewart, In Letters of Gold, 119–122.

  163. A. G. Stewart, “The Editor’s Safari. Djakarta, Java,” Australasian Record, February 22, 1954, 3; A. G. Stewart, “The Editor’s Safari. Being Initiated,” Australasian Record, March 1, 1954, 8; A. G. Stewart, “The Editor’s Safari. Java—Its Charm, Contrasts, Culture, and Change,” Australasian Record, March 8, 1954, 4; “Appreciation,” Australasian Record, March 8, 1954, 6; A. G. Stewart, “The Editor’s Safari. In Beautiful Bandung,” Australasian Record, March 15, 1954, 5, 6.

  164. A. G. Stewart, “The Editor’s Safari. Two Impressive Monuments,” Australasian Record, March 22, 1954, 4, 5.

  165. A. G. Stewart, “The Editor’s Safari. Compassion on the Multitude,” Australasian Record, March 29, 1954, 5.

  166. A. G. Stewart, “The Editor’s Safari,” Australasian Record, April 12, 1954, 5; A. G. Stewart, “The Editor’s Safari,” Australasian Record, April 19, 1954, 4.

  167. A. G. Stewart, “The Editor’s Safari. A Week in Old Siam,” Australasian Record, April 26, 1954, 8.

  168. A. G. Stewart, “The Editor’s Safari Ends,” Australasian Record, May 5, 1954, 6.

  169. “The day on . . . ,” Australasian Record, April 12, 1954, 8.

  170. A. G. Stewart, “The Editor’s Safari Ends.”

  171. W. J. Richards, “Stewart-Posselt,” in “Weddings,” Australasian Record, November 22, 1954, 7.

  172. W. Scragg, “Gustavus Posselt,” Australasian Record, November 9, 1936, 7

  173. C. S. Palmer, “Annie May Posselt,” Australasian Record, May 20, 1957, 7.

  174. I. Bradley, L. Coombe, and L. Thrift, “Vera Lucy Stewart,” Australasian Record, July 4, 1998, 14, 15; Genealogy SA, “Birth Registrations, Posselt, Vera Lucy,” Book/Page 797/483, accessed February 21, 2020, https://www.genealogysa.org.au/index.php?option=com_gsa&view=gsa&layout=essearch&collection_id=birth&page_no=1&Surname=Posselt&GivenName=Vera&year_from=1908&accuracy=.

  175. “Publishing and Canvassing,” Australasian Record, July 4, 1927, 6.

  176. “What the West Australian Missionary School Meant to Me,” Australasian Record, March 18, 1929, 5.

  177. “A Happy Event,” Australasian Record, April 18, 1932, 3, 4; “The following twelve . . . ,” Australasian Record, January 4, 1932, 8.

  178. “Following the announcement . . . ,” Australasian Record, August 29, 1955, 8.

  179. “In Honour of Pastor A. G. Stewart,” Australasian Record, September 26, 1955, 8; A. G. Stewart, compiler, “First Fifty Years of the Adventist Church Under the Southern Cross, 1885–1935” (unpublished manuscript) (Cooranbong, NSW: Adventist Heritage Centre, 1955). Note: there is some disagreement as to when Stewart retired. His official service record is missing. His sustentation record (South Pacific Division, Sustentation Record of Stewart, Andrew Graham) indicates his sustentation payments commenced on January 1, 1950. Normally this would suggest he retired December 31, 1949. However, it is also plain from the documents in Australasian Record that he continued working. The Record endnoted above indicates that the Australasian Division officially noted his retirement as August 31, 1955. He himself so considered it, as he noted it on his manuscript title page of First Fifty Years. The author of this article has taken the official date as valid, and suggests that Stewart may have offered to take reduced income (sustentation) from 1950, while continuing to serve, to save the church money. Or, as R. R. Frame said, in his life sketch (“Life Sketch of Pastor A. G. Stewart,” Australasian Record, April 21, 1975, 1, 2), he may have taken partial retirement. It is a fact that from 1955 onwards, Stewart’s presence in church papers is much reduced.

  180. “Following the announcement . . . .”

  181. “To view once . . . ,” Australasian Record, August 18, 1958, 16.

  182. A. G. Stewart, “Going Again,” Australasian Record, September 1, 1958, 5, 6; A. G. Stewart, “Going Again,” Australasian Record, September 15, 1958, 2.

  183. A. G. Stewart, “After More Than Half a Century,” Australasian Record, September 22, 1958, 2; A. G. Stewart, “Back in the Islands of Our Adoption,” Australasian Record, September 29, 1958, 2; A. G. Stewart, “Cup of Joy Running Over,” Australasian Record, October 6, 1958, 2, 3; A. G. Stewart, “Building on a Firm Foundation,” Australasian Record, October 20, 1958, 3, 4.

  184. A. G. Stewart, “Scene 1—As We Were,” Australasian Record, November 24, 1958, 6; A. G. Stewart, “Scene 2—As They Are Now,” Australasian Record, December 1, 1958, 3.

  185. “For several years . . . ,” Australasian Record, January 16, 1960, 16.

  186. “Hundreds of delegates . . . ,” Australasian Record, May 13, 1963, 16; “At the invitation . . . ,” Australasian Record, September 18, 1967, 8.

  187. A. H. Forbes, “Sydney Sanitarium and Hospital Staff Changes,” Australasian Record, September 16, 1963, 4, 5.

  188. “In answer to . . . ,” Australasian Record, February 11, 1963, 8; “Success stories are . . . ,” Australasian Record, March 10, 1969, 16.

  189. Eric Were, “Balus Belong Seven-day He Come,” Australasian Record, July 20, 1964, 1, 2.

  190. L. H. Barnard, “Safest Pilots in New Guinea,” Australasian Record, November 9, 1964, 9.

  191. “Plane Has Missionary Attitude,” Australasian Record, October 29, 1973, 5, reprinted from Lake Macquarie Herald (Newcastle, NSW).

  192. “It is with . . . ,”Australasian Record, June 6, 1966, 16; “Pastor and Mrs. .  .  . ,” Australasian Record, June 6, 1966, 16; A. G. Stewart, “Retracing His Steps,” Australasian Record, July 25, 1966, 3, 4.

  193. “Pastor and Mrs. . . . ,” Australasian Record, September 8, 1969, 16.

  194. L. C. Coombe, “Andrew Graham Stewart,” Australasian Record, April 7, 1975, 15.

  195. Frame, 1, 2.

  196. Andrew G. Stewart, Trophies From Cannibal Isles (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1956).

  197. Andrew G. Stewart, In Letters of Gold.

  198. Andrew G. Stewart (“A.S.”), Seventh-day Adventism, A Dialogue: The Other Side of the Question (Warburton, VIC: Signs Publishing Company Limited); (Cooranbong, NSW: Adventist Heritage Centre).

  199. A. G. Stewart, compiler, “First Fifty Years of the Adventist Church Under the Southern Cross, 1885–1935.”

  200. A. G. Stewart, “Providences in the Pacific,” Australasian Record, May 11, 1931, 15–18; A. G. Stewart, “Into All the World,” Australasian Record, May 29, 1939, 10–13 (two examples of Week of Prayer readings).

  201. “Introducing the New Editor,” Australasian Record, August 16, 1943, 8.

  202. Viola M. Rogers, “Your Friends, the Editors,” Australasian Record, July 11, 1955, 12.

  203. “Introducing the New Editor.”

  204. “Annual Council Australasian Inter-Union Conference,” Australasian Record, January 16, 1950, 2. (Note: this reference indicates R. Hare appointed editor of The Missionary Leader without stating when the change happens. A. G. Stewart appears as editor on the masthead for the last time on the February 1950 issue.)

  205. A. M. Fraser, “Union Conference Annual Meeting,” Australasian Record, December 11, 1944, 4.

  206. “Appointments and Transfers, 1947 Annual Meeting,” Australasian Record, October 20, 1947, 8.

  207. A. Schofield, “Visit of a Veteran,” Australasian Record, June 1, 1936, 5 (just one example among many).

  208. A. G. Stewart, “Heathen Customs,” An Appeal for Missions (1919), 14, 15; A. G. Stewart, “A Relic of Cannibalism. Ratu Peni of Nadrau, Fiji,” An Appeal for Missions (Foreign Mission Board of Seventh-day Adventists, 1926), 8; A. G. Stewart, “Winning Out in the New Hebrides,” An Appeal for Missions (Foreign Mission Board of Seventh-day Adventists, 1928), 8; A. G. Stewart, “The Transforming Power of the Gospel,” An Appeal for Missions (Foreign Mission Board of Seventh-day Adventists, 1933), 1, 2; A. G. Stewart, “Open Doors in the Mission Field,” An Appeal for Missions (1934), 1; A. G. Stewart, “The Great Gospel Commission Still the Grandest Enterprise of Human Endeavour,” An Appeal for Missions (1939), 1–4 (some examples).

  209. Frame, 2.

×

Richardson, Colin. "Stewart, Andrew Graham (1881–1975) and Emily Jean (Stephen) (1880–1953); later Vera Lucy (Posselt) (1908–1998)." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. July 23, 2020. Accessed December 01, 2022. https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=985P.

Richardson, Colin. "Stewart, Andrew Graham (1881–1975) and Emily Jean (Stephen) (1880–1953); later Vera Lucy (Posselt) (1908–1998)." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. July 23, 2020. Date of access December 01, 2022, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=985P.

Richardson, Colin (2020, July 23). Stewart, Andrew Graham (1881–1975) and Emily Jean (Stephen) (1880–1953); later Vera Lucy (Posselt) (1908–1998). Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. Retrieved December 01, 2022, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=985P.