Stauffer, Augustus Baer (1859–1926)

By The Brazilian White Center – UNASP, and Márcio D. Costa

×

The Brazilian White Center – UNASP is a team of teachers and students at the Brazilian Ellen G. White Research Center – UNASP at the Brazilian Adventist University, Campus Engenheiro, Coelho, SP. The team was supervised by Drs. Adolfo Semo Suárez, Renato Stencel, and Carlos Flávio Teixeira. Bruno Sales Gomes Ferreira provided technical support. The following names are of team members: Adriane Ferrari Silva, Álan Gracioto Alexandre, Allen Jair Urcia Santa Cruz, Camila Chede Amaral Lucena, Camilla Rodrigues Seixas, Daniel Fernandes Teodoro, Danillo Alfredo Rios Junior, Danilo Fauster de Souza, Débora Arana Mayer, Elvis Eli Martins Filho, Felipe Cardoso do Nascimento, Fernanda Nascimento Oliveira, Gabriel Pilon Galvani, Giovana de Castro Vaz, Guilherme Cardoso Ricardo Martins, Gustavo Costa Vieira Novaes, Ingrid Sthéfane Santos Andrade, Isabela Pimenta Gravina, Ivo Ribeiro de Carvalho, Jhoseyr Davison Voos dos Santos, João Lucas Moraes Pereira, Kalline Meira Rocha Santos, Larissa Menegazzo Nunes, Letícia Miola Figueiredo, Luan Alves Cota Mól, Lucas Almeida dos Santos, Lucas Arteaga Aquino, Lucas Dias de Melo, Matheus Brabo Peres, Mayla Magaieski Graepp, Milena Guimarães Silva, Natália Padilha Corrêa, Rafaela Lima Gouvêa, Rogel Maio Nogueira Tavares Filho, Ryan Matheus do Ouro Medeiros, Samara Souza Santos, Sergio Henrique Micael Santos, Suelen Alves de Almeida, Talita Paim Veloso de Castro, Thais Cristina Benedetti, Thaís Caroline de Almeida Lima, Vanessa Stehling Belgd, Victor Alves Pereira, Vinicios Fernandes Alencar, Vinícius Pereira Nascimento, Vitória Regina Boita da Silva, William Edward Timm, Julio Cesar Ribeiro, Ellen Deó Bortolotte, Maria Júlia dos Santos Galvani, Giovana Souto Pereira, Victor Hugo Vaz Storch, and Dinely Luana Pereira.

 

 

Márcio D. Costa, Ph.D. (Andrews University), is a professor of Church History and Systematic Theology at the Theological Seminary in the Paraná Adventist College, Brazil.   

First Published: January 29, 2020

Born August 28, 1859 to a traditional Mennonite immigrant family in Bercks County Pennsylvania, Augustus B. Stauffer became involved in the colporteuring ministry in his early 30s.1 His ministry is closely related to the establishment of the Seventh-day Adventist Church in South America, particularly in Brazil. He was part of the first group of canvassers sent by the church in that territory. Among them, he was the first one to work in Brazil. His knowledge of German helped him evangelize the first Brazilian Seventh-day Adventists.

On November 3 and 6, 1889, the Adventist General Conference voted the creation of the Foreign Mission Board. In January 1890, the project to reach South America’s missionary field was discussed for the first time. But the project began effectively in July 1891, when Elwin Winthrop Snyder, responsible for the canvassing department of Pennsylvania,2 Clair A. Nowlen,3 of the North Pacific Conference, and Augustus B. Stauffer, experienced canvasser in Pennsylvania, were called to serve as self-supporting canvassers in Argentina.4 On October 30, 1891, the three canvassers sailed out of New York City. Six weeks later they landed in Montevideo, Uruguay.5

Although their first purpose was entering the Argentina field, which was separated from Montevideo only by the Plata River, the canvassers considered the possibility of starting their missionary work in Uruguay. However, the country was passing through a serious financial crisis. Food prices were high, as well as the taxes on imported literature, which could only be sold by authorized people. Besides, they didn’t speak Spanish, which restricted their range of activity to German and English speakers. Most of the English-speaking population had left the town due to the financial crisis. One day they crossed the Plata River towards Buenos Aires, Argentina, taking with them only some book boxes and little more than sixteen dollars. In Buenos Aires there were about 5000 English speakers, in addition to German, Scandinavian and French immigrants.6

From this point on, Stauffer’s missionary efforts were more independent. In January 1892 he left his companions in the capital and went north to the region of Santa Fé to work in German speaking communities.7 In Esperanza, he met four men of other denominations who, only by studying the Bible, had concluded that the seventh day is the biblical Sabbath and were observing it with their families.8 In Sán Cristóbal, two families embraced the Adventist message, where later a church was organized.9

In Crespo city, at Entre Rios province, Stauffer worked among the group that already had a first contact with the Adventist doctrines through Jorge Riffel. Riffel was a Swiss farmer who became Adventist while living in Kansas, United States. After his conversion, he moved to Argentina by his own initiative with a missionary purpose. Stauffer evangelized a group of eight families.10 On September 9, 1894, the Crespo group, already with 36 members, was organized into the first Seventh-day Adventist church of the South American Division territory by Pastor Frank Westphal.11

An important fruit of the work of these missionary canvassers was the conversion of Lionel Brooking, a young English man. He came to know the Adventist message by reading publications in 1892, and became the first Adventist canvasser in South America. Brooking’s fluency in Spanish and French enabled him to reach people other canvassers could not. He began working in the Santa Fé province with Stauffer. While Brooking canvassed to the French immigrants of Waldense faith, Stauffer worked among the Germans.12

After four months serving in Argentine territory, Snyder, Nowlen and Stauffer sold about 200 books. Stauffer concentrated his efforts in the northeast part of that country as well as in the south of Uruguay, where he canvassed in a Swiss colony, resulting in the conversion of one family. Later, the interest was developed by pastor Frank Westphal’s work, resulting in the organization of a church.13

In May 1893 Stauffer went to Brazil at the request of the General Conference. He arrived at the Santos port, in São Paulo state, becoming the first Adventist missionary to work in the Brazilian territory.14 His first missionary efforts were in the São Paulo state, where he canvassed in Rio Claro, Indaiatuba, Piracicaba, and other surrounding cities. Afterward, he canvassed successively in Rio de Janeiro, Rio Grande do Sul and Espírito Santo states.15

Though there was not yet any Adventist literature in Portuguese, Brazil offered a great opportunity for missionary work among German speakers, since, according to Stauffer, there were about 200,000 immigrants in the country, most of them living in the southern states.16 Stauffer traveled frequently through many states of the southern and southeast regions of Brazil.17

Around November 1894, Stauffer discovered in Espírito Santo state a large German colony with about 12,000 inhabitants, located in the Santa Leopoldina city, at the region of Santa Maria de Jetibá. There he sold the book The Great Controversy. Stauffer strived tirelessly over about six months to attend interested people, having become ill from overwork. Staufer soon saw the baptism of the first group of converts, on December 14, 1895, in a ceremony officiated by Pastor Huldreich Graf. Among them was Guilherme Storch, father of the future evangelist pastor Gustavo Storch.18

In March 1895 the first Adventist missionary to South America, Frank Westphal, arrived in Brazil after six months in Argentina and Uruguay. In March, he met in Rio de Janeiro with Stauffer, who, due to his illness, had left Espírito Santo to accompany Westphal on his trip over the São Paulo state.

They first went to the city of Piracicaba to meet and baptize Guilherme Stein Jr., who became the first Adventist to be baptized in Brazil.19 Stein came to know the Adventist message through The Great Controversy, possibly sold in 1893 by Stauffer and Bachmeyer to Margarida Krähenbühl, his wife’s grandmother.20 Of German origin, Bachmeyer became Adventist in Brazil through Snyder’s influence and was taught in the canvassing work by Stauffer.21 After Stein’s baptism, Stauffer also accompanied Westphal to Indaiatuba, Rio Claro and Dois Córregos.22

In 1896 Stauffer canvassed in Paraná state. That January he presented the Adventist message to the family of Oscar and Ana Otto in the city of Curitiba. They acquired one volume of The Story of Jesus translated to German. Later, the couple became the first Adventists on record in Paraná state.23

In 1897 Stauffer returned to Rio Grande do Sul state together with Pastor Huldreich Graf, working in Porto Alegre, Ijuí, São Pedro, Taquari, Santa Cruz e Nova Petrópolis cities.24 Stauffer and Graf presented the Adventist message to the Preuss family, in Taquari. In the same year, Germano Preuss and his wife were baptized, becoming one of the first Adventists of Rio Grande do Sul.25 Also fruit of Stauffer’s work was the conversion of the Neumann family, in Santa Catarina state.26

As Stauffer and Graf passed through Santa Catarina, in a city close to Brusque, they faced opposition from believers of other denominations. After organizing a new church, they were surrounded, together with Adventist church members, by a furious mob armed with clubs, who accused them of preaching false doctrines. One of the accusers, father of two women interested in the Adventist message, hit Stauffer on the head with a club, leaving him unconscious in the ground. Church members rolled him up in a blanket and took him to the house of friends, where he stayed, recovering. He was unable to walk for many days.

Three weeks after the incident, officials entered the house in order to take him to the station for questioning. Being forced to stand up, Stauffer fell on the ground. After he recovered, he gave his version of the story using the Bible and exhorting those present with lessons from scripture. It is said that the assailant confessed his guilt and was converted, but one of the others responsible for the attack gave a false testimony and lost his voice in the middle of his speech, becoming mute.27

Around 1898, Stauffer was called to work with W. H. Thurston as administrator of the book depository, responsible for the management of sales and training of new canvassers.28 In 1900 he accepted a call to be treasurer of the Brazil Mission, with headquarters in Rio de Janeiro.29 He was also responsible for the agriculture department of the Brusque Adventist school, in Santa Catarina, which started a missionary class by John Lipke.30

In 1902 the Brazil Mission became a conference, and Stauffer continued serving as secretary-treasurer.31 He was reelected for the same function in 1904, in the Brazilian conference’s second administrative session.32 At this time, part of his house, located in Rio de Janeiro, was used as a storehouse for denominational books. He served as secretary-treasurer of the Brazil Conference until 1905.33

When the São Paulo Mission was established in 1906, Stauffer moved to São Paulo, where he dedicated to the canvassing work throughout the state.34 That year he decided to start a new missionary method. For the good of his children’s education, and desiring to evangelize a new region of the country, he established as a farmer in the city of Avaré, in the countryside of São Paulo, where, according to Stauffer, there were no Protestant churches. Besides canvassing, his missionary effort consisted in becoming friends with the inhabitants and teaching them cultivation techniques. In 1907 Stauffer wrote to the Adventist Review challenging North American farmers to go to Brazil as missionaries.35

Stauffer remained in Avaré until 1907,36 when he accepted a call to be the new secretary-treasurer of the Paraná-Santa Catarina Conference.37 In January 1910, after conference split into two, Stauffer was elected secretary-treasurer of the Paraná Conference.38 He again suffered violent opposition to his missionary work. It is reported that while he was preaching in the house of an interested person, a man abruptly entered the room and struck his head with a knife, injuring him severely.39 Stauffer served as treasurer of the Paraná-Santa Catarina Conference until 1912.40

In mid 1912 Stauffer retired to a famer life in Erechin in Rio Grande do Sul, occasionally colporteuring but still involved with the church.41 Later in 1918 Stauffer moved to Chaco Argentina and lived there involved with farming and missionary work until his death in June 25, 1926. The commitment and effort shown by Augustus B. Stauffer was of fundamental relevance to the progress of the Adventist message in Brazil. The results transcend more than a century of history and can be noticed today by the fact that the Seventh-Day Adventist Church is solidly established in South America.

Sources

Brooking, Lionel. “In the South American Canvassing Field.” ARH, March 21, 1893.

Chadwick, L. C... “República Argentina.” ARH, October 18, 1892.

Chadwick, L. C. “Selecting Laborers.” The Home Missionary, vol. 3, no. 7, July 1891.

Cavalcanti, Diogo. “Há mais de um século: Casa Publicadora Brasileira celebra 110 anos de história com os olhos no futuro.” Revista Adventista, ano 105, July, 2010.

“Colportagem.” Revista Adventista, vol. 2, no. 4, October, 1907.

“Conferências do Rio Claro.” Revista Adventista, vol. 3, no. 7, July, 1908.

“Editorial Notes.” ARH, August 14, 1894.

“Elwin Winthrop Snyder.” ARH, April 24, 1919.

Greenleaf, Floyd. Terra de esperança: o crescimento da Igreja Adventista na América do Sul. Tatuí, SP: Casa Publicadora Brasileira, 2011.

Gross, R. “Centenário da Educação Adventista no Brasil.” Revista Adventista, ano 92, Janeiro, 1996.

Hoelzle, Emílio. “Missão Paulista.” Revista Adventista, vol. 1, no. 4, October, 1906.

Hoezle, Emílio. “Missão Paulista.” Revista Adventista, vol. 2, no. 1, Janeiro, 1907.

Hoezle, Emílio. “Missão Paulista.” Revista Adventista, vol. 2, no. 3, July, 1907.

Hoezle, Emílio. “Missão Paulista.” Revista Adventista, vol 03, no. 2, February, 1908.

“Hulda Martha Neumann.” Revista Adventista, ano 84, no. 9, September, 1988.

Meyers, E. H.. “Recapitulação dos Começos na América do Sul—N°. 3: O Primeiro Colportor.” Revista Adventista, vol. 24, no. 1, Janeiro, 1929.

McCarthy, John. “Argentine Republic.” ARH, July 6, 1897.

Moon, Allen. “Our Foreign Work.” ARH, November 8, 1898.

Nielsen, N. “The South American Division.” ARH, December 29, 1938.

“Nowlen.” North Pacific Union Gleaner, July 17, 1961.

Plenc, Daniel Oscar. Misioneros en Sudamérica. Florida Oeste, BA: Casa Editorea Sudamericana, 2008.

Preuss, Leopoldo. “Era Iminente a Volta de Cristo em 1895?” Revista Adventista, ano 65, no. 12, December, 1970.

Preuss, Leopoldo. “O Começo da Mensagem no Brasil.” Revista Adventista, ano 58, no. 4, April, 1963.

Preuss, Leopoldo. “Os Primeiros Tempos de Nossa Obra de Publicações no Brasil.” Revista Adventista, ano 63, no. 5, May, 1968.

Preuss, Leopoldo. “Quarenta e Oito Anos Depois.” Revista Adventista, ano 47, no. 10, October, 1952.

Snyder, E. W. “The Work in Argentina.” The General Conference Bulletin, vol. 1, no. 19, Março 04, 1895.

Snyder, E. W., Nowlen, C. A. “Wok in South America.” The Home Missionary, vol. 4, no. 4, April 1892.

Snyder, E. W.. “Pioneer Canvassing in South America.” The Missionary Magazine, vol. 11, no. 11, November, 1899.

Snyder, E. W.. “Experiences and progress in Brazil.” ARH, October 24, 1893.

Spies, F. W. “Brazil.” ARH, December 28, 1897.

Spies, F. W. “Brazil Conference.” ARH, August 24, 1904.

Spies, F. W. “Brazil.” ARH, April 15, 1909.

Spies, F. W. “Conditions in Brazil.” ARH, April 19, 1906.

Spies, F. W. “Elder Graf, who has been following...” The Missionary Magazine, vol. 10, no. 1, Janeiro, 1898.

Spies, F. W. “Notes from Brazil.” ARH, September 18, 1900.

Spies, F. W. “Organization of the Brazil Conference.” ARH, October 21, 1902.

Stauffer, A. B. “Southern Brazil.” The Home Missionary, vol. 4, no. 7, July 1892.

Stauffer, A. B. “Brazil.” ARH, November 27, 1894.

Stauffer, A.B. “Brazil.” ARH, July 20, 1897.

Stauffer, A.B. “Brazil.” ARH, April 26, 1898.

Stauffer, A.B. “Report From Brazil.” ARH, February 20, 1894.

Stauffer, A.B. “Brazil.” ARH, December 03, 1901.

Stauffer, A.B. “Brazil.” ARH, June 16, 1903.

Stauffer, A.B. “Brazil.” ARH, January 19, 1907.

Stauffer, A.B. – Brazil, One Hundred and Thirty -Ninth Meeting,” General Conference Committee Minutes, November 25, 1906.

Trezza, C. A.. “Página Impressa no Brasil.” Revista Adventista, year 61, May, 1966.

Waldvogel, Luiz. “Dias dos Humildes Começos.” Revista Adventista, year 66, no. 12, December, 1971.

Webster, F.C. “A História da Escola Sabatina no Brasil.” Revista Adventista, year 46, no. 1, Janeiro, 1952.

Westphal, J. W. “Another Conference in South America.” ARH, March 31, 1910.

Westphal, F. H. “Argentine Republic.” ARH, October 30, 1894.

Westphal, J. W. “Beginning of Our Work in South America.” ARH, September 18, 1924.

Westphal, F. H. “Early Incidents of the Work in South America.” ARH, October 30, 1924.

Westphal, F. H. “From England to South America.” ARH, December 15, 1904.

Westphal, J. W. “General Meeting in the Sao Paulo (Brazil) Mission.” ARH, July 16, 1908.

Westphal, J. W. “History of the Message in Uruguay.” ARH, July 24, 1919.

Westphal, J. W. “Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.” ARH, November 19, 1914.

Westphal, F. H. “South America – Brazil.” ARH, July 16, 1895.

Notes

  1. Márcio Donizeti da Costa, Augusto Baer Stauffer: O Missionário Adventista no Brasil (Ivatuba, PR: IAP Editora, publishing process in 2019).

  2. “Elwin Winthrop Snyder,” ARH, April 24, 1919, 21; L. C. Chadwick, “Selecting Laborers,” The Home Missionary, vol. 3, no. 7, July 1891, 162.

  3. “Nowlen,” North Pacific Union Gleaner, July 17, 1961, 5; L. C. Chadwick, “Selecting Laborers,” The Home Missionary, vol. 3, no. 7, July 1891, 162.

  4. L.C. Chadwick, “Selecting Laborers,” The Home Missionary, vol. 3, no. 7, July, 1891, 162; E.W. Snyder, “The Work in Argentina,” The General Conference Bulletin, vol. 1, no. 19, March 4, 1895, 461; “Other Fields,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herals Publishing Association, 1892), 75.

  5. E. W. Snyder, “South America,” The Home Missionary, vol. 4, no. 2, February, 1892, 46; E. W. Snyder, “Pioneer Canvassing in South America,” The Missionary Magazine, vol. 11, no. 11, November, 1899, 493.

  6. E. W. Snyder “The Work in Argentina,” The General Conference Bulletin, vol. 1, no. 19, March 4, 1895, 461; Snyder, “South America,” The Home Missionary, vol. 4, no. 2, February, 1892, 46; E. W. Snyder, “Pioneer Canvassing in South America,” The Missionary Magazine, vol. 11, no. 11, November, 1899, 493; Osvaldino Bonfim, “Colportagem Comemora 100 Anos na América do Sul,” Revista Adventista, no. 88, no. 4, April, 1992, 08.

  7. E. W. Snyder, “The Work in Argentina,” The General Conference Bulletin, vol. 1, no. 19, March 4, 1895, 461; Chadwick, L. C., “República Argentina,” ARH, October 18, 1892, 651; Brooking, Lionel, “In the South American Canvassing Field,” ARH, March 21, 1893, 182; Snyder, E. W. e C. A. Nowlen, “Wok in South America,” The Home Missionary, vol. 4, no. 4, April, 1892, 91.

  8. E. W. Snyder, C. A. Nowlen, “Work in South America,” The Home Missionary, vol. 4, no. 4, April, 1892, 91; A. B. Stauffer, “Southern Brazil,” The Home Missionary, vol. 4, no. 7, July, 1892, 154.

  9. Osvaldino Bonfim, “Colportagem Comemora 100 Anos na América do Sul,” Revista Adventista, vol. 88, no. 4, April, 1992, 08; e Meyers, E. H., “Recapitulação dos Começos na América do Sul—N° 3: O Primeiro Colportor,” Revista Adventista, vol. 24, no. 1, Janeiro, 1929, 3.

  10. John McCarthy, “Argentine Republic,” ARH, July 6, 10; e Daniel Oscar Plenc, Misioneros en Sudamérica (Florida Oeste, BA: Casa Editorea Sudamericana, 2008), 14-17.

  11. Daniel Oscar Plenc, Misioneros en Sudamérica (Florida Oeste, BA: Casa Editorea Sudamericana, 2008), 17; Francisco H. Westphal, Pionero en Sudamérica (Libertador San Martín, ER: Centro de Investigación White, 1997), 7; “Primeira igreja sul-americana comemora centenário,” Revista Adventista, vol. 90, no. 12, December, 1994, 28; F.H. Westphal, “Argentine Republic,” The Advent Review and Sabbath Herald, vol. 71, no. 43, October 30, 1894, 6; Floyd Greenleaf, Terra de esperança: o crescimento da Igreja Adventista na América do Sul (Tatuí, SP: Casa Publicadora Brasileira, 2011), 30-31.

  12. N. P. Nielsen, “The South American Division,” ARH, December 29, 1938, 23-24; E.H. Meyers, “Recapitulação dos Começos na América do Sul—N°. 3: O Primeiro Colportor,” Revista Adventista, vol. 24, no. 1, Janeiro, 1929, 3; Brooking, Lionel, “In the South American Canvassing Field,” ARH, vol. 70, no. 12, March 21, 1893, 182; “Pioneer Canvassing in South America,” The Missionary Magazine, vol. 11, no. 11, November, 1899, 493; Snyder, “Extracts from Correspondence,” The Home Missionary, vol. 5, no. 6, July, 1893, 134.

  13. J. W. Westphal, “History of the Message in Uruguay,” ARH, July 24, 1919, 14.

  14. S. M. Oliveira, “E por Falar em Pioneiros...” Revista Adventista, ano 66, October, 1971, 15; W.H. Thurston, “Seventh Meeting, Sunday, April 7, 3 p.m,” General Conference Bulletin, vol. 4, no. 5, April 8, 1901, 121; A.B. Stauffer, “Brazil,” ARH, July 20, 1897, 457; Wilson Sarli, “Para Deus Não Há Nuvens Negras,” Revista Adventista, no. 3, no. 89, March, 1993, 10; Wilson Sarli, “Continuação do Capítulo Onze de Hebreus,” Revista Adventista, vol. 76, no. 11, November, 1981, 45.

  15. Tércio Sarli, “Congresso Comemora Primeiro Batismo Adventista no Brasil,” Revista Adventista, vol. 84, no. 12, December, 1988, 22-23.

  16. A. B. Stauffer, “Report From Brazil,” ARH, February 20, 1894, 4.

  17. C. A. Trezza, “Página Impressa no Brasil,” Revista Adventista, vol. 61, May, 1966, 51; “Editorial Notes,” ARH, August 14, 1894, 16.

  18. Rubens S. Lessa, “Igreja capixaba comemora centenário,” Revista Adventista, vol. 92, Janeiro, 1996, 18; Thurston, W. H., “Brazil,” ARH, vol. 72, no. 15, August 19, 1895, 523; Stauffer, A. B., “Brazil,” ARH, November 27, 1894, 742; Sarli, Wilson, “Continuação do Capítulo Onze de Hebreus,” Revista Adventista, vol. 76, no. 11, November, 1981, 45; Thurston, W. H., “Brazil,” ARH, April 9, 1895, 11-12; Gustavo S. Storch, Venturas e Aventuras de um Pioneiro. (Santo André, SP: Casa Publicadora Brasileira, 1982), 16-17.

  19. F. H. Westphal, Pionero en Sudamérica (Libertador San Martín, ER: Centro de Investigación White, 1997), 20-21; Webster, F. C., “A História da Escola Sabatina no Brasil,” Revista Adventista, vol. 46, no. 1, Janeiro, 1952, 3-4; F. H. Westphal, “South America – Brazil,” ARH, July 16, 1895, 459; F. H. Westphal, “Early Incidents of the Work in South America,” ARH, October 30, 1924, 19.

  20. F. H. Westphal, Pionero en Sudamérica (Libertador San Martín, ER: Centro de Investigación White, 1997), 20-21; Lessa, R., “Festejados cem anos do primeiro batismo realizado no Brasil,” Revista Adventista, ano 91, November, 1995, 17.

  21. E. W. Snyder, “Experiences and progress in Brazil,” ARH, October 24, 1893, 5; Floyd Greenleaf, Terra de esperança: o crescimento da Igreja Adventista na América do Sul (Tatuí, SP: Casa Publicadora Brasileira, 2011), 33.

  22. F. H. Westphal, Pionero en Sudamérica (Libertador San Martín, ER: Centro de Investigación White, 1997), 20-21; R. Lessa, “Festejados cem anos do primeiro batismo realizado no Brasil,” Revista Adventista, no. 91, November, 1995, 17.

  23. R. Gross, “Centenário da Educação Adventista no Brasil,” Revista Adventista, no. 92, Janeiro, 1996, 10.

  24. F. W. Spies, “Brazil,” ARH, December 28, 1897, 11; A. B. Stauffer, “Brazil,” ARH, April 26, 1898, 272.

  25. Leopoldo Preuss, Leopoldo, “Era Iminente a Volta de Cristo em 1895?” Revista Adventista, vol.. 65, no. 12, December, 1970, 21; Leopoldo Preuss, “O Começo da Mensagem no Brasil,” Revista Adventista, vol. 58, no. 4, April, 1963, 26; Leopoldo Preuss “Quarenta e Oito Anos Depois,” Revista Adventista, vol. 47, no. 10, October, 1952, 9; Luiz Waldvogel, “Dias dos Humildes Começos,” Revista Adventista, vol. 66, no. 12, December, 1971, 24; Leopoldo Preuss, “Os Primeiros Tempos de Nossa Obra de Publicações no Brasil,” Revista Adventista, vol. 63, no. 5, May, 1968, 28; A. B. Stauffer, “Brazil,” ARH, April 26, 1898, 272.

  26. “Hulda Martha Neumann,” Revista Adventista, vol. 84, no. 9, September, 1988, 35.

  27. Diogo Cavalcanti, , “Há mais de um século: Casa Publicadora Brasileira celebra 110 anos de história com os olhos no futuro,” Revista Adventista, ano 105, July, 2010, 6; W. H. Thurston, “Seventh Meeting, Sunday, April 7, 3 p.m,” General Conference Bulletin, vol. 4, no. 5, April 8, 1901, 123; J. W. Westphal, “Beginning of Our Work in South America,” ARH, September 18, 1924, 21; F. W. Spies, “Elder Graf, who has been following...” The Missionary Magazine, vol. 10, no. 1, Janeiro, 1898, 32.

  28. Allen Moon, “Our Foreign Work,” ARH, November 8, 1898, 8-9.

  29. W. H. Thurston, “Brazil,” The Missionary Magazine, vol. 12, no. 8, August 1900, 368; A. B. Stauffer, “Brazil,” ARH, December 03, 1901, 787.

  30. F. W. Spies, “Notes from Brazil,” ARH, September 18, 1900, 604.

  31. F. W. Spies, “Organization of the Brazil Conference,” ARH, October 21, 1902, 17.

  32. F. W. Spies, “Brazil Conference,” ARH, August 24, 1904, 13; “Brazilian Conference,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1905), 82.

  33. F. H. Westphal, “From England to South America,” ARH, December 15, 1904, 15; “Pages to Brazil- Thirty-Ninth Meeting,” General Conference Committee Minutes, September 28, 1905, 62; A. B. Stauffer, “Brazil,” ARH, June 16, 1903, 18.

  34. F. W. Spies, “Conditions in Brazil,” ARH, April 19, 1906, 15; “Sao Paulo Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1907), 97; J. W. Wetphal, “General Meeting in the Sao Paulo (Brazil) Mission,” ARH, July 16, 1908, 17; Emílio Hoelzle, “Missão Paulista,” Revista Adventista, vol. 1, no. 4, October, 1906, 3.

  35. W. A. S., “In Newer Brazilian Fields,” ARH, April 19, 1906, 5; Stauffer, A. B., “Brazil,” ARH, January 19, 1907, 18-19; “A. B. Stauffer – Brazil, One Hundred and Thirty -Ninth Meeting,” General Conference Committee Minutes, November 25, 1906, 230.

  36. Emílio Hoezle, “Missão Paulista,” Revista Adventista, vol. 2, no. 1, Janeiro, 1907, 2; Emílio Hoezle, “Missão Paulista,” Revista Adventista, vol. 2, no. 3, July, 1907, 1; “Colportagem,” Revista Adventista, vol. 2, no. 4, October, 1907, 2; Emílio Hoezle, “Missão Paulista,” Revista Adventista, vol 03, no. 2, February, 1908, 7; “Conferências do Rio Claro,” Revista Adventista, vol. 3, no. 7, July, 1908, 2.

  37. F. W. Spies, “Brazil,” ARH, April 15, 1909, 14; “Santa Catharina and Parana Conference,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: ARH Publishing Association, 1910), 126.

  38. J. W. Westphal, “Another Conference in South America,” ARH, March 31, 1910, 13.

  39. S. M. Oliveira, “Permanecendo na Obra, a Despeito das Dificuldades,” Revista Adventista, ano 41, no. 6, June, 1946, 24.

  40. “Relatório dos Dízimos e Ofertas da Conferência St. Catharina-Paraná,” Revista Adventista, vol. 4, no. 9, September, 1909, 08; “Relatório da Conferência Paranaense,” Revista Adventista, vol. 5, no. 10, October, 1910, 08; “Relatório da Conferência Paranaense,” Revista Adventista, vol. 6, no. 9-10, September/October, 1911, 15; “Relatório da Conferência Paranaense,” Revista Adventista, vol. 7, no. 8, August, 1912, 8.

×

UNASP, The Brazilian White Center –, Márcio D. Costa. "Stauffer, Augustus Baer (1859–1926)." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. January 29, 2020. Accessed September 29, 2022. https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=9GPQ.

UNASP, The Brazilian White Center –, Márcio D. Costa. "Stauffer, Augustus Baer (1859–1926)." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. January 29, 2020. Date of access September 29, 2022, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=9GPQ.

UNASP, The Brazilian White Center –, Márcio D. Costa (2020, January 29). Stauffer, Augustus Baer (1859–1926). Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. Retrieved September 29, 2022, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=9GPQ.