North Caucasian Conference

By Jón Hjörleifur Stefánsson

×

Jón Hjörleifur Stefánsson, M.A., is a Ph.D. candidate, Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam

The North Caucasian Conference was a church unit that operated from 1912 to at least 1926.

Territory and Statistics1

Territory: Black Sea and Stavropol Governorates, and the Dagestan (1912–1919), Kuban, and Terek (1912–1919) Oblasts

Membership (1925): 1,340

Churches (1925): 44

Origin of Seventh-day Adventist Work in the Territory

Adventist mission work in the Russian Empire commenced in Crimea, South Ukraine, and the Caucasus in the mid-1880s. This led to the organization of the Southern Russian Conference in 1901, which became the East Russian Conference in 1906. For the origin of Adventist work in the territory of the North Caucasian Conference, see the articles on those church units and previous church units.

Organizational History

In 1911, another reorganizational step was taken to expand the mission in the Caucasus. At the end of that year, membership had grown to 996.2 A new mission, cut off from the conference, was organized in 1912 with the renamed North Caucasian Conference and the new South or Trans-Caucasian Mission.3 The North Caucasian Conference comprised the Black Sea and Stavropol Governorate, and the Dagestan, Kuban, and Terek Oblasts. No headquarter address was listed in the Yearbook. Initial officers were President J. Sprohge, Secretary G. Grigoriev, Treasurer P. Brandt, and executive committee members F. Koch, A. Schitnikov, J. Klimenko, and D. Wolf.4

After the first quarter membership was 778.5 The conference belonged to the Russian Union.6 In 1914 the conference was transferred to the East Russian Union.7 Due to World War I and the Russian Civil War, there were no reports from Russia in Zions-Wächter after the first quarter of 1914 or in the Yearbook from 1918 to 1921.

In 1920, the Dagestan and Terek Oblasts were removed from the North Caucasian Conference and the Central Caucasian Conference was organized. The address of the North Caucasian Conference was listed for the first time, at Novo-Moskovskaya ulica meshdu Stepnoi i Galizinskoi, Armavir, Kuban. Both church units among others became part of the Caspian Union Conference which was also organized in 1920.8

In 1924 the South Russian Union Conference was organized, and the North Caucasian Conference was transferred to it.9 In 1925, the address given was Post Box 310, Rostov-on-Don.10

After 1926 the conference is not found any longer in the Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook and information on the USSR fields is incomplete in the following few years, and is almost non-existent after 1930. The Kuban–Black Sea Conference was organized in 1924 and comprised the Black Sea and Kuban Oblasts11 (which merged into one Oblast). The Stavropol Governorate (a part of it) appears after a couple of years in the Central Caucasian Conference.12

List of Presidents

J. Sprohge, 1912–1917; church unit not listed, 1918–1921; none listed, 1922; H. K. Löbsack, 1923–1924; K. S. Shamkov, 1925–1926.

Sources

“Berichte der Russischen Union vom 1. Januar bis 31. März 1912.” Zions-Wächter, May 20, 1912.

Reiffschneider, R. A. “Kaukasus.” Zions-Wächter, March 4, 1912.

Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook. Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1905–1930.

Notes

  1. “North Caucasian Conference,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (1926), 128.

  2. “Berichte der Russischen Union vom 1. Oktober bis 31. Dezember 1911,” Zions-Wächter, Feb 19, 1912, 88.

  3. R. A. Reiffschneider, “Kaukasus,” Zions-Wächter, March 4, 1912, 111; “North Caucasian Conference” and “South Caucasian Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (1913), 111, 112.

  4. For territory, address, and officers, see “North Caucasian Conference,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (1913), 111.

  5. “Berichte der Russischen Union vom 1. Januar bis 31. März 1912,” Zions-Wächter, May 20, 1912, 214.

  6. “North Caucasian Conference,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (1913), 111.

  7. “North Caucasian Conference,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (1914), 110.

  8. For the 1920 organization and the address, see “Caspian Union Conference,” “North Caucasian Conference,” and “Central Caucasian Conference,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (1923), 107–108.

  9. “South Russian Union Conference,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (1925), 119.

  10. “North Caucasian Conference,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (1925), 119.

  11. “Cuban-Black Sea Conference,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (1927), 143.

  12. “Central Caucasian Conference,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (1929, 165.

×

Stefánsson, Jón Hjörleifur. "North Caucasian Conference." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. April 28, 2021. Accessed May 13, 2021. https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=9I9V.

Stefánsson, Jón Hjörleifur. "North Caucasian Conference." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. April 28, 2021. Date of access May 13, 2021, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=9I9V.

Stefánsson, Jón Hjörleifur (2021, April 28). North Caucasian Conference. Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. Retrieved May 13, 2021, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=9I9V.