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James W. Kent

Photo courtesy of Winston Kent.

Kent, James William (1890–1983)

By Shirley Tarburton

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Shirley Tarburton, M.Litt. (Distinction) (University of New England, Armidale, New South Wales, Australia) retired in 2008 after 40 years teaching church-school (mainly high school but including eight years at university). An Australian, she has taught in four mission fields, Australia, and New Zealand. She has authored five books and co-authored one on church history, biography and family history, as well as several magazine articles. She is married to Dr. Michael Tarburton with two adult children and four grandchildren.

 

First Published: January 29, 2020

James William Kent,1 a Seventh-day Adventist pastor and evangelist in Australia and New Zealand, pioneered inner-city evangelism.2 He was instrumental in raising up fourteen Adventist church congregations and baptizing about 2,000 converts,3 among whom fourteen men later became ordained ministers.4 In his eighties, Kent championed the rebuttal of the “new theology” promoted by Desmond Ford.5

Early Years

James William Kent was born March 12, 1890, at Canowindra in inland New South Wales.6 He was the youngest of the twelve children of Thomas Robert Kent (1843-1916) and his wife, Mary Ann Pound (1846-1891). On November 10, 1891, when Kent was just 20 months old, his mother died,7 and his seventeen-year-old sister, Catherine, helped his father raise him8 until she married Alfred Chatman six years later.9

His brothers and sisters were Herbert Edwin (1871-1950), Thomas Robert (1873-1891), Catherine Matilda (1874-1949), John Earnest (1876-1944), William Albert (1876-1877), Mary Ann (1878-1878), Albert William (1880-1925), Mary Annie Maria (1881-1953), Edgar E. (1883-1883), Annie May (Chatman, 1884-1959), and Eleanor ‘Linnie’ Eugena (Adams, 1887-1974).10

Following his mother’s death, Kent’s father moved the family to a farm near Eugowra in the Lachlan Valley.11 When Kent was five years old, a man on a bicycle rode into their farm with some religious books to sell.12 This was Phillip Ainslee Reekie (1845-1924), a pioneer Adventist book agent, who was canvassing the area in company with F. W. Caldwell.13 Thomas Kent bought a copy of The Great Controversy by Ellen White and, as a result of studying the book, three years later sought out an Adventist church in Sydney.14 There, he had the privilege of hearing Ellen White address the congregation.15 Thomas Kent was baptized on July 30, 1898, in the Ashfield Seventh-day Adventist church16 by Pastor William Lemuel Henry Baker.17 Returning to the farm and on fire with his newly-confirmed beliefs, he enthusiastically shared them with his family and neighbors, gathering a group of five families who worshipped together.18

The older Kent children joined their father in his belief and they formed a cohesive, spiritually-oriented community. From that time on, James Kent was surrounded by influences that encouraged him towards a life of spiritual service.19

Education

There was no school nearby, and the children of the farming community had to travel quite some distance (either on foot or by horse) to attend school in the town of Eugowra. It is likely Kent was among these school children. After an unsuccessful appeal for a public school to be provided close by, a church school was established in May 1904 and taught by Joseph Mills,20 a graduate of the Avondale School.21 However, Kent would not have benefited from this, as he was already fourteen years of age. Nevertheless, he and his father were inspired by what they learned of the Avondale School, and with hopes that James Kent would become a preacher, Thomas Kent sent his son to Avondale in 1905.22

James Kent was “rather wayward and inclined to be rebellious,”23 and, although he spent several years at Avondale, he left in 1910 without graduating24 after having a difference of opinion with the college administration.25

Career

In 1909, during college breaks, Kent had travelled to a number of country towns in New South Wales, selling the book Seer of Patmos.26 Between January and May, he canvassed in Scone,27 Quirindi,28 and Tamworth.29 So when he left college about September 1910, he occupied the rest of the year by selling the Great Controversy in Traralgon,30 Victoria, and the neighboring town of Sale,31 before moving on to Bairnsdale in January 1911.32 He had intended to enroll in law at Melbourne University,33 but he remembered his father’s desire for him to be a preacher. So, he continued in literature evangelism until October 1911,34 when to his surprise, 35 he was appointed tent-master36 assisting Joseph Steed with public evangelistic meetings following the Victorian Conference camp meeting. These tent meetings were held in several locations in Melbourne from November37 to May, 1912, then moved into a hall in St. Kilda for the winter.38 Meanwhile, Kent fell out with the Victorian Conference administration39 and in the spring was appointed to literature evangelism in Western Australia.40 However, Kent never moved and he continued selling books in Victoria from September 191241 until the camp meeting in February 1913. At that time, his canvassing license was upgraded to a missionary license42 and he commenced full-time work with an evangelistic team.

At the close of the camp on February 23, 1913, he joined R. C. Stewart’s evangelistic team in a tent mission effort in Burnley, a suburb of Melbourne.43 This series of meetings continued through autumn and winter with ten being baptized.44 The team, under John H. Woods then moved to West Richmond in November, resulting in nine joining the church.45 During this time, Woods, the main speaker, was called away to speak at camp meetings for several weeks. When consideration was given to who would preach in his absence, it was decided to “let the young fellow have a go.”46 Thus, Kent received his first opportunity to preach. On Woods’s return, he found the tent full, with a high proportion of educated people in attendance.47 So he chose not to step back into the pulpit, and mentored Kent through to the completion of the series.48 Many years later, Kent recalled that his first sermon was on how history demonstrated the fulfilment of Bible prophecy.49

Marriage and Family

When Kent visited the Victorian Conference office in Melbourne to submit his reports, he noticed an attractive young secretary who was in charge of the literature evangelists’ accounts.50 Her name was Winifred Lance Horley and she had been working there for five years. Their friendship grew, and they married on April 8, 1914, in her parents’ home in Oakleigh, Victoria, another suburb of Melbourne.51

Winnie Horley was the sixth of seven children born to George William Horley (1854-1941) and his wife, Winifred Anne Lance Hughes (1855-1949).52 Her brothers and sisters were Ena Hannah (Westerman, 1881-1974), Lance Charles George (1884-1963), Winifred Ann (1886-1886), Norman Lance (1888-1958), Raymond Lance (1890-1975), and Dorothy Lance (McMahon, 1895-1969).53 Winnie Horley was born July 10, 1893, in Coalville, Gippsland, Victoria, and was twelve years old when her parents became Seventh-day Adventists.54 At the age of fifteen, she commenced working at the Victorian Conference office, where her particular responsibility was keeping the financial record books. She continued to work there until her marriage.55 She was an intelligent woman with a quick wit and retained her active mind into her old age.56 She was also musical, playing the piano and organ in addition to singing.57

Eight children were born to James and Winnie Kent: James Winston (1915-2003),58 Lance Albert (1917-1997),59 Winifred Dorolyn (Kingston, 1919-2004),60 Cecily Kathena (Syme, 1921-2018),61 Herbert Grenville (1924-1992),62 John Adrian (1927-1966),63 George Lynden (1928-2010),64 and Marigold Annice (1934-2003).65

City Evangelism

After a brief honeymoon, the couple sailed for their new appointment– city evangelism in Brisbane.66 Kent received a ministerial license for the first time at the Queensland Conference session held in August 1914.67 At the beginning of 1915, he commenced a tent effort in the Brisbane suburb of Paddington. A visitor found the meeting tent crowded, and “dozens of people were sitting on the green slopes around the tent listening attentively to the speaker.”68 A church was raised up as a result, and a year later was housed in a new church building.69 Kent next ran a campaign in Wynnum, where eight people were baptized,70 followed by another campaign in Wilston, where twenty people were baptized,71 and then a second back in Paddington, resulting in over seventy baptisms by July 1916. Two more church companies organized.72

Kent became widely known for the clarity of his presentations of the gospel and his fame as a speaker spread. At least two attempts were made by other conferences to have him work for them,73 but Queensland managed to retain his services until the end of September 1916. During August and September, he rented the Lyceum Theatre, a capacious venue in central Brisbane, and amazed the church members by drawing an audience of five hundred for the first three weeks, and maintaining the level at around two hundred for the next three.74 At the conclusion of his presentation of the seventh-day Sabbath, a member of the audience moved a vote of thanks for the clear presentation and the audience burst into applause. An entirely unexpected response.75

During the Queensland Conference camp meeting, held September 21 to October 1, Kent preached at meetings for the young people, which were deemed “amongst the best and most helpful meetings of the camp.”76 However, the highlight came on September 30, when Kent was ordained to the gospel ministry.77 He was only 26 years old in an era when most ministers were at least in their mid-30s before they received ordination.

After the camp meeting, Kent and his family left for Melbourne to begin city evangelism there.78 They got as far as Sydney, where Kent was again a guest speaker at the New South Wales Conference camp meeting, October 12-22.79 He was then asked to take over a series of evangelistic meetings in Concord that had been started by D. N. Wall who had subsequently moved to America.80 By February 1917, it was reported that twenty-five people had accepted the truth of the seventh-day Sabbath81 and by April, thirty had been baptized in three baptisms.82 Kent completed that year with a tent effort in Stanmore, Sydney.83

By early 1918, the Kent family, which now included two little boys, was in Melbourne, and James Kent was leading out in an evangelistic campaign in Carlton.84 Capacity crowds were reported, with an overflow audience of over 150 listening to the presentations from outside the tent.85 He commenced a second series in June in the heart of Melbourne, with audiences of between 600 and 1300 in attendance.86 Just in case he had some spare time, he was also asked to visit the city businesses and canvas them for donations for the Appeal for Missions.87

While the inner-city campaign was in progress, and, in fact, growing in attendance,88 Kent initiated meetings during the midday meal break at several industrial sites, including James Kitchens & Sons, Dunlop Rubber Works, and the Newport Railway Workshops, which drew large attendances from the workers at these businesses.89 In addition, a Tuesday evening Bible study was held in the Melbourne city Health Food Café (in Little Collins Street) attended regularly by forty to seventy people.90 By November 1918, fifty people had been baptized,91 followed by a further thirty-one on February 2, 1919.92

At the time, the great influenza pandemic of 1918-1921 was sweeping the world and it struck Kent in 1919. He became dangerously ill and physicians held out little hope for his recovery. During the 1919 Week of Prayer, special prayer was offered for his healing, and his health improved remarkably. By May, he was declared out of danger.93 It took some time for him to return to full health, but in August he commenced another series of meetings, this time in Prahran, Melbourne.94 By November, he was able to baptize another group of converts, and started yet another series of meetings to run during the summer in the mission tent.95

In 1920, he held evangelistic meetings in Caulfield96 and Richmond.97 Early in 1921, his services were requested by the North New Zealand Conference;98 however, post-war travel difficulties still existed, so while the family waited for their move to be effected, Kent was asked to collect for the Appeal for Missions in Adelaide.99 The family, which now numbered five, finally sailed for Auckland at the end of July 1921.100

Two years were spent in the North Island, with a campaign held in the Auckland Town Hall that resulted in the baptism of about seventy people101 and the organization of a new Adventist church at Papatoetoe.102 The Kent family, now with four children, then moved to Christchurch, the capital of the South Island of New Zealand, and Kent commenced public meetings there in September 1923.103 By the beginning of February, about thirty-five people had become Sabbath-keepers as a result104 and subsequent baptisms added more.105 Mid-year, Kent opened an evangelistic series in Papanui, a suburb of Christchurch,106 and by August, 1924, a baptismal class of around twenty-five participants was being held.107

After eighteen months in Christchurch, the city of Dunedin, further south, became their field of ministry. Kent began his meetings on the second weekend of March 1925.108 Once the converts there were well established, Kent was asked to run meetings in Invercargill, the southern-most city in the country.109 After the first five months of 1926 were spent in Invercargill, the Kents moved to Timaru where meetings began on May 9.110 Here, also, large audiences attended, and a “good harvest” was expected.111

In October 1926, Kent was transferred back to the South New South Wales Conference112 in time to speak at the October 19-31 camp meeting.113 He soon began a series of concurrent evangelistic campaigns in Drummoyne (January),114 central Sydney (March),115 and mid-week lunch-time meetings in the vestibule of the Sydney Town Hall (April).116 Those in Drummoyne were poorly attended and closed after three months, but the city attendances numbered close to 1,000.117 Kent also commenced a new initiative that proved popular, with C. J. Griffin, one of his team members: conducting open-air meetings two nights a week in inner-city locations.118

In July 1927, J. W. Kent became one of the first, if not the first, Seventh-day Adventist preacher in Australia to present a series of lectures addressing the subject of evolution, which he conducted in the Astor Theatre in Pitt Street, central Sydney.119 During the next twelve months, he ran evangelistic meetings in Granville120 and Ashfield,121 both in Sydney, with twenty-five baptized in the first baptism after the Ashfield campaign.122 By this time, the Kent family had grown to five sons and two daughters. To provide a healthy environment and stable home life for the family, in 1927 they purchased a small farm at West Pennant Hills123 where recreation was obtained in the garden and orchard.124 This was “home” until they died, regardless of where they lived in the interim.

Leaving his family there, in 1929 Kent went to the rural city of Bathurst, New South Wales, where he opened a campaign in March.125 Here he met strong opposition from several ministers in the town, which opened a lively correspondence in the local newspapers. The Rev. R. C. Oakley of the Bathurst Methodist Church challenged him to a debate on the Sabbath, which, after consulting with the conference leaders,126 Kent accepted.127 The debate was held on May 27 and 29 before an audience swelled by the anticipation of a well-fought contest.128 As a result, the profile of the Adventist church was elevated and three surrounding districts were opened to evangelism.129 In December,1929, thirty converts were baptized there, and twenty-five were preparing for the next baptism.130 By October 1930, fifty-one converts had been baptized and a church building had been completed.131

On June 13, 1930, Kent had the joy of holdings a series of meetings at Cowra, 132 in the area where he had grown up. Although a small country town, an initial audience of 400 attended.133 However, once again, as interest grew, he was opposed by the local ministers through the newspapers.134 Canon Mirrington of the Anglican Church challenged him to a two-night debate, which was held on March 23 and 24, 1931.135 The three-and-a-half hour session drew so much interest that an admission fee was charged so that a larger venue could be booked, and any profit was donated to the local hospital.136 Kent clearly carried the argument and received hearty applause.137 Before he moved on to his next evangelistic appointment, thirty people were baptized in Cowra and another church was organized.138 The number meeting on Sabbaths grew to eighty by August 1931.139

Bondi Junction, a populous area of Sydney, was the location of Kent’s next evangelistic campaign.140 The attendance was great, but there were a few difficulties retaining a suitable venue for an extended period of time.141 In February 1932, Kent suffered a nervous breakdown and wondered whether he would ever preach again.142 After six months convalescence, in response to his prayer, the Lord encouraged him by leading him to read Jeremiah 30:16-17143 and by July 10, 1932, he was able to return to the pulpit.144 F. H. Letts, who had taken over during Kent’s illness, continued to support him and together they made a strong team.145

Kent became known as “the prince of preachers.”146 His remarkable skill with words held his audiences spell-bound.147 One evangelistic series followed another in the Sydney area. The Bondi Junction meetings produced twenty-seven converts by February 1933,148 with others added later. He commenced meetings at Auburn on February 12, 1933,149 which resulted in the baptism of forty-nine people on December 17, 1933, followed later by another twenty-eight.150 March 18, 1934, saw meetings open in Windsor and two satellite venues.151 Preaching was planned to commence in Hurlstone Park in August 1934,152 but moved to Dulwich Hill and Enfield two months later.153 This culminated in a baptism of twenty-seven people on September 28, 1935.154 His next meetings were in Gladesville where he began preaching in June 1935. By October, fifteen more were ready for baptism.155 Here, once again, Kent accepted the challenge of a debate with a Reverend Knox.156 Following his previous formula of advertising the debate and spreading it over two nights, an audience of over seven hundred was attracted.157 So much interest was aroused by Kent’s defense and the Reverend Knox’s admission that he had been “flogged,” that a noticeable increase in attendance at the evangelistic meetings followed.158

In March of 1936, these meetings were continued by other members of Kent’s team and he left Sydney as a delegate to the General Conference Session in San Francisco, California.159 He was away until August 22, 1936.160 Before the session, he undertook extensive travel through the Holy Land and Egypt,161 after which he attended some graduate classes in the summer session of the Advanced Bible School.162

A Move to Administration

Upon his return home, the Australasian Union Conference appointed Kent president of the North New South Wales Conference.163 He held this position from January 1937 until mid-1943, throughout most of World War II. During this time, there was steady growth in the conference.164 With his love of evangelism, not only did Kent support the pastors and evangelists in his conference, but he took every opportunity to preach at outreach meetings himself.165

Meanwhile, he encouraged each of his children to obtain a good education, and provided opportunity for them to do so.166 During this time, Winston, the Kent’s eldest son, graduated from medicine at Sydney University,167 their eldest daughter, Dorolyn, married a young evangelist,168 their second son, Lance, also attended university,169 and their second daughter, Cecily, commenced her church school teaching career.170

In July 1943, Kent was chosen to succeed L. C. Naden as the president of the large Western Australian Conference.171 One of Kent’s first actions after arrival was to purchase a new property at Mount Lawley (Perth), containing a very fine large building for the conference office, with room for further expansion and to build a hall.172 He also initiated the opening of a Tract Society Office (fore-runner of the Adventist Book Centres) in the central business district of Perth,173 which was soon popular and profitable.174

The year 1944 was marked with centennial celebrations commemorating the Great Disappointment of 1844 and in February, after the conference session, Kent and R. E. Hare ran an institute for ministers and laity,175 laying the foundation for a great evangelical drive held in the second half of the year.176 Three series of evangelistic meetings were run in Perth as well as an open-air effort by the young people and the Advent Band.177 These continued until the end of the year.178 Kent also had the pleasure of preaching at one of them.179

Resignation and “Out of the Work”

At the end of 1944, Kent resigned as president of the Western Australian Conference180 and his service record states that he was “out of the work” until January 1946.181 He had been deposed in response to a perceived misuse of funds. He returned to Pennant Hills, settled his children into school, and sold Adventist books to support his family.182

In September 1945, at the conference session, he was appointed to evangelical and bible work in South Australia for 1946.183 However, not long afterwards, the announcement was made, “Owing to some domestic reasons, Pastor J. W. Kent has found it difficult to respond to the call of the South Australian Conference for his services; and so this appointment has been rescinded, and Pastor Kent has now been invited to connect with the North New South Wales Conference for evangelistic work.”184 He did not want disrupt his children’s education again so soon.

Back to Public Evangelism

In January 1946, Kent and his team commenced a series of public meetings at The Entrance,185 a popular coastal holiday and retirement location about forty kilometers south of Avondale, New South Wales. Contrary to expectation, the meeting tent filled and overflowed.186 In November, eighteen people were baptized in the first of the resulting baptisms,187 and the following week a church of thirty-two members was organized.188 When Kent left there in February 1947, this number had grown to forty with a Sabbath school attendance of sixty.189

Adelaide, South Australia, had been calling for Kent’s expertise for some time, to run an evangelistic series there. It opened in the Adelaide Town Hall on March 23, 1947, with a capacity crowd of 1200, 190 and months later, retained an audience of up to 1000.191 At the same time, he was running Thursday night meetings at Gawler, which were also well attended.192 Twelve months later, eighty-three people had been baptized in Adelaide, and the Gawler meetings were still continuing.193 For the rest of 1948, Kent also conducted meetings in Murray Bridge, South Australia.194

President Again

During the Australasian Union Conference’s annual meetings in December 1948, Kent was appointed president of the South Australian Conference.195 He carried this responsibility until he retired.196 He retained an active interest in evangelism, making sure he obtained the best evangelists for South Australia that he could,197 and he enjoyed attending as many of George Burnside’s presentations as possible.198

During Kent’s time as president of South Australia, a campground was purchased for the conference,199 properties were obtained for several church congregations,200 and some new churches were built.201 Other signs of church growth, increasing membership and tithe, were reported.202

Retirement and The Last Battle

In February 1956 Kent reluctantly retired after forty-five years of service and having reached almost sixty-six years of age.203 He, his wife Winnie, and their youngest daughter, Marigold (who had Downs Syndrome), moved back to their home in Pennant Hills,204 Sydney, where he was once again able to enjoy the fruit of his prized orchard.205 He and his wife travelled extensively the next year, visiting two of their children who now lived overseas,206 in the United States and the United Kingdom.207 They went back again in 1966 when they attended the General Conference session in Detroit, Michigan, United States, 208 travelling widely throughout Europe209 and Iceland.

Kent continued to be in demand as a speaker and spoke at church functions210 as well as for secular organizations, such as Rotary,211 which presented him with their Seventy-fifth Rotary International Medallion to show their esteem.212 He conducted weddings213 and funerals,214 and also served as the president of the Seventh-day Adventist Retired Workers Association.215

In the early 1970s, Kent was approached by George Burnside, newly-retired division ministerial secretary and a convert of Kent’s fifty years previously.216 He was concerned that the recent ministerial graduates from Avondale College were promulgating teaching that differed from the message that he considered to be that of “foundational Adventism.” Together, they studied this “new” interpretation of the Adventist doctrines, comparing it with scripture, and investigated the extent of its spread. Alarmed, they contacted other senior ministers (both evangelists and administrators), some of whom were still in ministry, but most of whom were retired.217 These came to be known as the “Group” by their supporters and the “Concerned Brethren” by others.

They entered into dialogue with the administrative leaders at division headquarters in Wahroonga in an attempt to enlist their support to “rein in” the Avondale Theology Department, (the source of the divergent teaching) and, in particular, its head, Desmond Ford.218 They became frustrated that the church administration saw no need for intervention, so they decided to take the issue to the church members. Leaflets were written, mostly by Burnside, and printed for distribution, with Kent (who was chairman of the Group) covering most of the expenses.219 This activity dominated the last decade of his life. Kent never backed down from a fight 220 and he considered this to be the pre-eminent fight of his life. In his view, he was fighting for the survival of Adventist foundational Bible truth.221

Kent was such a forceful presenter of the Group’s arguments that he was blamed for causing division in churches, and was forbidden by the Greater Sydney Conference to preach in their churches any more.222 However, matters escalated and spread beyond Australasia when Ford went to work at Pacific Union College in California. It culminated in his dismissal after a meeting held at Glacier View, Colorado, in August, 1980.223

Death

Kent’s advanced age by this time mitigated against him deriving any consolation from this outcome. His son, Winston, states that “He kept on being upset to the end.”224

James and Winnie Kent, although frail with age, remained independent, living in the house that had been their haven on and off since 1927. Winnie Kent died there on July 14, 1982, ending sixty-eight years of marriage.225 James William Kent fell asleep in death almost ten months later. His obituary sums up this larger-than-life personality.

Pastor Kent, as befits a young man reared on a farm, was a man of wide interests, and exceptional abilities. He was a crack shot, a capable horseman, a keen fisherman, a fine cricketer, a good golfer, and one who could join his children in a "fierce" game of tennis. He was an avid reader of history, a superb storyteller, and an original thinker who encouraged others by wise administration and far-seeing judgment. As a public speaker he could so use words that his hearers, as if spellbound, were riveted to their seats. A convincing salesman, he devoted his talents, energies and intellect to spreading an unpopular gospel, that of the soon-return of the risen Christ, and the need to prepare for His last judgment.

He could be demanding, exacting, impatient and authoritarian, rebellious to authority and fiercely independent. But he had a warm, generous heart, would always help those in trouble, and especially went out of his way to help the underdog. Completely fearless of anyone or anything, he could be aggressive, persistent and volatile, but he soon cooled down after an outburst, and never bore a grudge.

In spite of his warlike, aggressive nature, he loved his God, and his church, and constantly studied His Word. He worked tirelessly in the service of God and of the church, striving as a God-fearing gospel warrior to point others to the kingdom of God, and to keep their hearts warm in His service, which he himself was striving manfully to reach by so doing.226

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Kent, J. W. “Old England.” Australasian Record, October 24, 1966.

Kent, J. W. “Old Friends, New Inspiration.” Australasian Record, September 2, 1957.

Kent, J. W. “Smith–Dawson.” Australasian Record, March 12, 1962.

Kent, J. W. “The Work is Onward.” Australasian Record, December 11, 1944.

“Kent, John Adrian.” Sydney Morning Herald, February 21, 1966, page unknown.

Kent, Winston. “A Special Ninetieth Birthday Celebration,” Australasian Record, May 5, 1980.

Kent, Winston. “James William Kent.” Australasian Record, July 9, 1983.

Kent, Winston. “Life-Sketch of Pastor J. W. Kent.” Australasian Record, July 9, 1983.

Kent, Winston. The Life and Times of Pastor J.W. Kent, 1890-1983. Melbourne, Victoria: Winston Kent, 1990.

“Kent.” Daily Telegraph, May 16, 1997, page unknown.

King, A. L. “Is Adventism Unscriptural, Unhistorical, and Illogical on the Themes of the Sabbath and Prophecy?” Australasian Record, June 1, 1931.

King, A. L. “Western Australia–Refreshing for Ministers and Laity.” Australasian Record, April 3, 1944.

Kingston, Andrew. “Kent, Marigold Annice.” Australian Record, January 17, 2004.

“Laurel Davis...” The Daily Telegraph, December 18, 1933.

“Lieut. Lance Kent...” Australasian Record, August 21, 1944.

Mary Ann Kent, NSW Deaths Index, No. 4771/1891.

McKibbon, David. “Kingston, Dorolyn.” Australasian Record, June 26, 2004.

Mills, J. “Church School Experiences at Eugowra.” Australasian Record, August 1, 1904.

Minchin, A. G. “South New Zealand.” Australasian Record, February 11, 1924.

“Missions in South New South Wales.” Australasian Record, August 31, 1931.

“Missions in South New South Wales.” Australasian Record, July 13, 1931.

“Missions in South New South Wales.” Australasian Record, May 25, 1931.

“Monthly Summary of Australasian Canvassing Work.” Australasian Record, March 1, 1909.

“Monthly Summary of Australasian Canvassing Work.” Australasian Record, April 26, 1909.

“Monthly Summary of Australasian Canvassing Work.” Australasian Record, June 7, 1909.

“Monthly Summary of Australasian Canvassing Work.” Australasian Record, December 5, 1910.

“Monthly Summary of Australasian Canvassing Work.” Australasian Record, January 2, 1911.

“Monthly Summary of Australasian Canvassing Work.” Australasian Record, March 6, 1911.

“Monthly Summary of Australasian Canvassing Work.” Australasian Record, December 4, 1911.

“Monthly Summary of Australasian Canvassing Work.” Australasian Record, November 4, 1912.

Morgan, C. D. “South Australia Makes Gains.” Australasian Record, May 30, 1955.

New South Wales’ Index to Births, Deaths and Marriages.

“News from Victoria.” Australasian Record, May 17, 1920.

“News Notes.” Australasian Record, June 17, 1940.

“Nominations, Appointments and Transfers.” Australasian Record, October 6, 1941.

“Notes from New South Wales.” Australasian Record, February 12, 1917.

“On April 15...” Australasian Record, May 14, 1917.

“On Sabbath afternoon...” Australasian Record, October 14, 1935.

“Open-air meetings...” Australasian Record, June 27, 1927.

“Our Heritage.” Australasian Record, May 11, 1985.

“Owning to some domestic...” Australasian Record, November 5, 1945.

Parker, C. H. “Snapshots from South N. S. W. Conference.” Australasian Record, July 22, 1929.

Parmenter, K. S. “Kent.” Australasian Record, October 2, 1982.

Parmenter, K. S. “Life Sketch of Winifred Lance Kent.” Australasian Record, October 2, 1982.

Pascoe, J. “Horley.” Australasian Record, August 18, 1941.

“Pastor J. W. Kent...” Australasian Record, April 3, 1944.

“Pastor J. W. Kent...” Australasian Record, February 27, 1933.

“Pastor J. W. Kent...” Australasian Record, January 27, 1930.

“Pastor J. W. Kent...” Australasian Record, July 25, 1921.

“Pastor J. W. Kent...” Australasian Record, May 1, 1944.

“Pastor J. W. Kent has returned...” Australasian Record, June 11, 1956.

Powrie, R. H. “Narrandera.” Australasian Record, March 26, 1934.

Powrie, Robert H. “Christchurch City Mission.” Australasian Record, July 21, 1924.

“Queensland Conference.” Australasian Record, September 21, 1914.

“Recent word...” Australasian Record, July 14, 1947.

Richardson, Harry G. “Rotarians Hear Archaeology Address.” Australasian Record, October 23, 1961.

Rollo, George W. “Kent, Herbert Grenville,” Australasian Record, August 29, 1992.

“Session Appointments.” Australasian Record, October 15, 1945.

Smith, J. L. “Melbourne City Mission.” Australasian Record, November 25, 1918.

Smith, J. L. “Victorian Notes.” Australasian Record, December 8, 1919.

“South Australia.” Australasian Record, August 21 1982.

Spicer, W. A. “Eight Kindly Years.” Australasian Record, January 8, 1940.

Steed, Ernest H. “Veterans Recall the Past.” January 11, 1965.

Steed, Joseph E. “Victoria.” Australasian Record, May 13, 1912.

Stephens, T. “Spreading the Gospel by the Seaside.” Australasian Record, October 28, 1946.

Stewart, A. G. “The South Australian 1953 Camp-meeting.” Australasian Record, April 20, 1953.

Stewart, G. G. and W. H. Hopkin. “Conference and Camp-Meeting.” Australasian Record, December 13, 1926.

Stewart, M. M. “Adelaide City Mission.” Australasian Record, July 26, 1948.

“Summary of Happenings, September 7,” Australasian Record, September 21, 1936.

“The Debate Bears Fruit.” Australasian Record, March 30, 1936.

“The delegation from…” Australasian Record, April 6, 1936.

“The following general...” Australasian Record, April 18, 1921.

“The Mission at Bondi...” Australasian Record, October 12, 1931.

“The Sunday night...” Australasian Record, August 1, 1927.

“The Sydney City Mission.” Australasian Record, April 25, 1927.

“The Queensland Camp-Meeting.” Australasian Record, October 16, 1916.

“Thirty-one persons...” Australasian Record, February 17, 1919.

“To succeed Pastor Naden...” Australasian Record, August 9, 1943.

Turner, W. G. “Conference Presidents Report on Evangelism.” Australasian Record, June 9, 1947.

“Victoria Tasmania Conference.” Australasian Record, March 24, 1913.

Victorian Births, Deaths and Marriages indexes.

“Victorian Conference.” Australasian Record, October 21, 1918.

Walker, R. I. “300 People Attend Dedication of Stirling Church.” Australasian Record, March 19, 1956.

“We have just bought...” Australasian Record, November 8, 1943.

Westerman, W. J. “Labourers Together with God.” Australasian Record, April 27, 1925.

Westerman, W. J. and A. S. Herbert. “South New Zealand, The Camp-Meeting.” Australasian Record, February 8, 1926.

Westerman, W. J. and A. G. Minchin. “Conference and Camp-Meeting.” Australasian Record, March 24, 1924.

Westerman, W. J. and A. G. Minchin. “South New Zealand.” Australasian Record, August 25, 1924.

“Where were the crowds going...” Australasian Record, April 7, 1947.

“With Our Missions.” Australasian Record, August 1, 1932.

Wolfe, E. P. “Port Lincoln Church Dedicated.” Australasian Record, January 10, 1955.

Woods, J. H. “Melbourne, Victoria.” Australasian Record, June 9, 1913.

Woods, J. H. “Melbourne.” Australasian Record, December 15, 1913.

Worker’s Service Record, James William Kent. South Pacific Division of the General Conference Archives.

“Writing on June 16...” Australasian Record, June 30, 1930.

Notes

  1. Winston Kent, “Life-Sketch of Pastor J. W. Kent,” Australasian Record, July 9, 1983, 13.

  2. “South Australia,” Australasian Record, August 21, 1982, 12.

  3. J. W. Kent, “Father–Who Bought a Book,” Australasian Record, August 17, 1970, 10-11.

  4. Winston Kent, “Life-Sketch of Pastor J. W. Kent.” Australasian Record, July 9, 1983, 13.

  5. Winston Kent, The Life and Times of Pastor J. W. Kent, 1890-1983 (Melbourne, Victoria: Winston Kent, 1990), 55.

  6. Ibid, 3.

  7. Mary Ann Kent, NSW Deaths Index, No. 4771/1891.

  8. Winston Kent, “Life-Sketch of Pastor J. W. Kent,” Australasian Record, July 9, 1983, 13.

  9. “Golden Wedding,” Australasian Record,” October 13, 1947, 5.

  10. New South Wales’ Index to Births, Deaths and Marriages.

  11. J. W. Kent, “Father–Who Bought a Book,” Australasian Record, August 17, 1970, 10-11.

  12. Ibid.

  13. “An article appeared...,” Australasian Record, November 15, 1903, 7; “How the Eugowra Company Received the Light,” Australasian Record, October 1, 1903, 7.

  14. J. W. Kent, “Father–Who Bought a Book,” Australasian Record, August 17, 1970, 10-11.

  15. Winston Kent, “A Special Ninetieth Birthday Celebration,” Australasian Record, May 5, 1980, 1.

  16. R. K. Brown, “A Book, A Man, and God,” Australasian Record, November 9, 1985, 1.

  17. J. W. Kent, “Kent,” Australasian Record, September 18, 1916, 7; A. G. Daniels, “Australasian Conference,” Australasian Record, January, February, 1898, 1-3.

  18. “Our Heritage,” Australasian Record, May 11, 1985, 1.

  19. J. W. Kent, “Kent,” Australasian Record, September 18, 1916, 7.

  20. “Brother Joseph Mills...,” Australasian Record, April 15, 1904, 7; J. Mills, “Church School Experiences at Eugowra,” Australasian Record, August 1, 1904, 5-6.

  21. “Avondale School,” Australasian Record, October 15, 1902, 8.

  22. Winston Kent, “Life-Sketch of Pastor J. W. Kent,” Australasian Record, July 9, 1983, 13.

  23. Ibid.

  24. Ibid.

  25. Winston Kent, The life and times of Pastor J.W. Kent, 1890-1983 (Melbourne, Victoria: Winston Kent, 1990), 4.

  26. “Monthly Summary of Australasian Canvassing Work,” Australasian Record, March 1, 1909, 6.

  27. Ibid.

  28. “Monthly Summary of Australasian Canvassing Work,” Australasian Record, April 26, 1909, 6.

  29. “Monthly Summary of Australasian Canvassing Work,” Australasian Record, June 7, 1909, 4.

  30. “Monthly Summary of Australasian Canvassing Work,” Australasian Record, December 5, 1910, 6.

  31. “Monthly Summary of Australasian Canvassing Work,” Australasian Record, January 2, 1911, 6.

  32. “Monthly Summary of Australasian Canvassing Work,” Australasian Record, March 6, 1911, 6.

  33. Winston Kent, The Life and Times of Pastor J. W. Kent, 1890-1983 (Melbourne, Victoria: Winston Kent, 1990), 4.

  34. “Monthly Summary of Australasian Canvassing Work,” Australasian Record, December 4, 1911, 5.

  35. Winston Kent, The Life and Times of Pastor J. W. Kent, 1890-1983 (Melbourne, Victoria: Winston Kent, 1990), 5.

  36. Winston Kent, “A Special Ninetieth Birthday Celebration,” Australasian Record, May 5, 1980, 1.

  37. J. W. Kent, “Middle Park, Melbourne,” Australasian Record, January 29, 1912, 4-5.

  38. Joseph E. Steed, “Victoria,” Australasian Record, May 13, 1912, 4.

  39. Winston Kent, The Life and Times of Pastor J. W. Kent, 1890-1983 (Melbourne, Victoria: Winston Kent, 1990), 4.

  40. “Distribution of Labour,” Australasian Record, September 16, 1912, 3.

  41. “Monthly Summary of Australasian Canvassing Work,” Australasian Record, November 4, 1912, 6.

  42. “Victoria Tasmania Conference,” Australasian Record, March 24, 1913, 5-6.

  43. J. H. Woods, “Melbourne, Victoria,” Australasian Record, June 9, 1913, 5-6.

  44. Ibid.

  45. J. H. Woods, “Melbourne,” Australasian Record, December 15, 1913, 3.

  46. Reg Brown, “A Great Worker for God,” Australasian Record, August 16, 1982, 12.

  47. Ibid.

  48. Winston Kent, “Life-Sketch of Pastor J. W. Kent,” Australasian Record, July 9, 1983, 13.

  49. Reg Brown, “A Great Worker for God,” Australasian Record, August 16, 1982, 12.

  50. Winston Kent, “A Special Ninetieth Birthday Celebration,” Australasian Record, May 5, 1980, 1; Winston Kent, The Life and Times of Pastor J. W. Kent, 1890-1983 (Melbourne, Victoria: Winston Kent, 1990), 7.

  51. “Brother J. W. Kent...,” Australasian Record, May 11, 1914, 8.

  52. Various records from Victorian Births, Deaths and Marriages indexes.

  53. Ibid.

  54. J. Pascoe, “Horley,” Australasian Record, August 18, 1941, 7.

  55. K. S. Parmenter, “Life-sketch of Winifred Lance Kent,” Australasian Record, October 2, 1982, 13.

  56. Stephanie Kent, e-mail message to author, May 26, 2019.

  57. R. I. Walker, “300 People Attend Dedication of Stirling Church,” Australasian Record, March 19, 1956, 4.

  58. Alfred Jorgensen, Anthony Kent, Malcolm MacMillan, “James Winston Kent obituary,” Australasian Record, September 27, 2003, 14.

  59. “Kent,” Daily Telegraph, May 16, 1997, page unknown.

  60. David McKibbon, “Kingston, Dorolyn,” Australasian Record, June 26, 2004, 16.

  61. Stephanie Kent, e-mail message to the author, December 19, 2018.

  62. George W. Rollo, “Kent, Herbert Grenville,” Australasian Record, August 29, 1992, 13.

  63. “Kent, John Adrian,” Sydney Morning Herald, February 21, 1966, page unknown.

  64. Grenville Kent, “Kent, George Lynden,” Australasian Record, March 5, 2011, 22.

  65. Andrew Kingston, “Kent, Marigold Annice,” Australian Record, January 17, 2004, 14.

  66. “Brother J. W. Kent...,” Australasian Record, May 11, 1914, 8.

  67. “Queensland Conference,” Australasian Record, September 21, 1914, 2-3.

  68. G. S. Fisher, “Our Health Work in Brisbane,” Australasian Record, March 1, 1915, 8.

  69. J. W. Kent, “City Work, Brisbane,” Australasian Record, August 7, 1916, 6-7.

  70. “The Queensland Camp-Meeting,” Australasian Record, October 16, 1916, 6-7.

  71. Ibid.

  72. J. W. Kent, “City Work, Brisbane,” Australasian Record, August 7, 1916, 6-7.

  73. “Distribution of Labour,” Australasian Record, July 5, 1915, 3; “Distribution of Labour,” Australasian Record, September 25, 1916, 5-6.

  74. “City Work in Brisbane, Queensland,” Australasian Record, September 25, 1916, 7.

  75. Ibid.

  76. “The Queensland Camp-Meeting,” Australasian Record, October 16, 1916, 6-7.

  77. Ibid.

  78. Ibid.

  79. E. H. Gates, “New South Wales Camp-Meeting,” Australasian Record, November 13, 1916, 5-6.

  80. “Notes from New South Wales,” Australasian Record, February 12, 1917, 8.

  81. Ibid.

  82. F. J. Butler, “The tent mission...,” Australasian Record, April 9, 1917, 5; “On April 15...,” Australasian Record, May 14, 1917, 8.

  83. J. M. Cole, F. J. Butler, “New South Wales Conference,” Australasian Record, December 3, 1917, 3-5.

  84. “Good reports have reached...,” Australasian Record, January 14, 1918, 8.

  85. Ibid.

  86. “Victorian Conference,” Australasian Record, October 21, 1918, 39.

  87. “Ingathering for Missions, Victoria,” Australasian Record, June 3, 1918, 4.

  88. J. L. Smith, “Melbourne City Mission,” Australasian Record, November 25, 1918, 4.

  89. Ibid.

  90. Ibid.

  91. Ibid.

  92. “Thirty-one persons...,” Australasian Record, February 17, 1919, 8.

  93. “Having received the word...,” Australasian Record, May 26, 1919, 8.

  94. J. L. Smith, “Victorian Notes,” Australasian Record, December 8, 1919, 6.

  95. Ibid.

  96. “News from Victoria,” Australasian Record, May 17, 1920, 5.

  97. “A series of meetings...,” Australasian Record, September 20, 1920, 8.

  98. “At the close...,” Australasian Record, March 21, 1921 8.

  99. “The following general...,” Australasian Record, April 18, 1921, 7.

  100. “Pastor J. W. Kent...,” Australasian Record, July 25, 1921, 8.

  101. “A Successful City Effort,” Australasian Record, November 20, 1922, 6.

  102. “Just prior to leaving...,” Australasian Record, September 10, 1923, 8.

  103. A. G. Minchin, “South New Zealand,” Australasian Record, February 11, 1924, 3.

  104. W. J. Westerman and A. G. Minchin, “Conference and Camp-Meeting,” Australasian Record, March 24, 1924, 5.

  105. Robert H. Powrie, “Christchurch City Mission,” Australasian Record, July 21, 1924, 5-6.

  106. Ibid.

  107. W. J. Westerman and A. G. Minchin, “South New Zealand,” Australasian Record, August 25, 1924, 5.

  108. W. J. Westerman, “Labourers Together with God,” Australasian Record, April 27, 1925, 8.

  109. W. J. Westerman and A. S, Herbert, “South New Zealand, The Camp-Meeting,” Australasian Record, February 8, 1926, 6.

  110. A. S. Herbert, “Notes of Progress,” Australasian Record, June 14, 1926, 4-5.

  111. Ibid.

  112. “Distribution of Labour,” Australasian Record, October 4, 1926, 32.

  113. G. G. Stewart, W. H. Hopkin, “Conference and Camp-Meeting,” Australasian Record, December 13, 1926, 4-5.

  114. Walter H. Hopkins, “Aggressive Work,” Australasian Record, February 7, 1927, 6.

  115. “A series of Sunday night meetings...,” Australasian Record, March 28, 1927, 8.

  116. Ibid.

  117. “The Sydney City Mission,” Australasian Record, April 25, 1927, 6.

  118. “Open-air meetings...,” Australasian Record, June 27, 1927, 8.

  119. “The Sunday night...,” Australasian Record, August 1, 1927, 8.

  120. “Distribution of labour,” Australasian Record, October 31, 1927, 8.

  121. “At the close...,” Australasian Record, August 13, 1928, 8.

  122. “As a result...,” Australasian Record, April 29, 1929, 8.

  123. K. S. Parmenter, “Life Sketch of Winifred Lance Kent,” Australasian Record, October 2, 1982, 13.

  124. Stephanie Kent, e-mail message to author, May 26, 2019.

  125. C. H. Parker, “Snapshots from South N. S. W. Conference,” Australasian Record, July 22, 1929, 5.

  126. Ibid.

  127. A. W. Anderson, “Was the Sabbath Abolished at the Cross?” Australasian Record, June 17, 1929, 3-4.

  128. Ibid.

  129. “Pastor James Kent...,” Australasian Record, July 22, 1929, 5.

  130. “Pastor J. W. Kent...,” Australasian Record, January 27, 1930, 8.

  131. “Baptism and Dedication Services, Bathurst,” W. H. Stevens, Australasian Record, November 10, 1930, 3.

  132. “Jottings from the Field,” Australasian Record, August 4, 1930, 7.

  133. “Writing on June 16...,” Australasian Record, June 30, 1930, 8.

  134. A. L. King, “Is Adventism Unscriptural, Unhistorical, and Illogical on the Themes of the Sabbath and Prophecy?” Australasian Record, June 1, 1931, 1-2.

  135. Ibid.

  136. “Cowra,” The Daily Telegraph, March 27, 1931, 12; A. L. King, “Is Adventism Unscriptural.”

  137. A. L. King, “Is Adventism Unscriptural, Unhistorical, and Illogical on the Themes of the Sabbath and Prophecy?” Australasian Record, June 8, 1931, 1-2.

  138. “Missions in South New South Wales,” Australasian Record, May 25, 1931, 4.

  139. “Missions in South New South Wales,” Australasian Record, August 31, 1931, 5.

  140. “Missions in South New South Wales,” Australasian Record, July 13, 1931, 6-7.

  141. “The Mission at Bondi...,” Australasian Record, October 12, 1931, 8.

  142. J. W. Kent, “Experiences of an Evangelist,” Australasian Record, October 30, 1933, 6-7.

  143. Ibid.

  144. “With Our Missions,” Australasian Record, August 1, 1932, 5-6.

  145. Ibid.

  146. ; E. A. Boehm, “Back to The Entrance,” Australasian Record, January 31, 1966, 9.

  147. J. W. Kent, “God’s Final Message,” Australasian Record, September 1, 1969, 10.

  148. “Pastor J. W. Kent...,” Australasian Record, February 27, 1933, 8.

  149. Ibid.

  150. “In a beautiful setting...,” Australasian Record, January 8, 1934, 8; “Laurel Davis...,” The Daily Telegraph, December 18, 1933, 18.

  151. R. E. Hare, “Review of the Field,” Australasian Record, April 16, 1934, 6; R. H. Powrie, “Narrandera,” Australasian Record, March 26, 1934, 5.

  152. R. E. Hare, “Around the Field,” Australasian Record, August 27, 1934, 6.

  153. “Distribution of Labour,” Australasian Record, October 29, 1934, 8.

  154. “On Sabbath afternoon…,” Australasian Record, October 14, 1935, 8.

  155. Ibid.

  156. “The Debate Bears Fruit,” Australasian Record, March 30, 1936, 6.

  157. Ellis Behrens, “Debate at Gladesville,” Australasian Record, October 28, 1935, 5.

  158. Ibid.

  159. “The delegation from...,” Australasian Record, April 6, 1936. 8.

  160. “Among the passengers arriving...,” Australasian Record, September 7, 1936. 8.

  161. “The delegation from...,” Australasian Record, April 6, 1936. 8; J. D. Anderson, “In the Holy Land,” Australasian Record, June 15, 1936, 8.

  162. “Following the General...,” Australasian Record, August 17, 1936, 8.

  163. “Summary of Happenings, September 7,” Australasian Record, September 21, 1936, 26-32.

  164. W. A. Spicer, “Eight Kindly Years,” Australasian Record, January 8, 1940, 1; J. W. Kent, “N. N. S. W. Conference,” Australasian Record, April 26, 1943, 4.

  165. “News Notes,” Australasian Record, June 17, 1940, 8.

  166. Winston Kent, “Life-Sketch of Pastor J. W. Kent,” Australasian Record, July 9, 1983, 13.

  167. “Brevities,” Australasian Record, January 20, 1941, 8.

  168. J. W. Kent, “Kingston–Kent,” Australasian Record, May 26, 1941, 6.

  169. “Lieut. Lance Kent...,” Australasian Record, August 21, 1944, 7.

  170. “Nominations, Appointments and Transfers,” Australasian Record, October 6, 1941, 8.

  171. “To succeed Pastor Naden...,” Australasian Record, August 9, 1943, 8.

  172. “We have just bought...,” Australasian Record, November 8, 1943, 8.

  173. “Pastor J. W. Kent...,” Australasian Record, April 3, 1944, 8.

  174. “Pastor J. W. Kent...,” Australasian Record, May 1, 1944, 8.

  175. A. L. King, “Western Australia–Refreshing for Ministers and Laity,” Australasian Record, April 3, 1944, 5.

  176. “Gleanings from the Field,” Australasian Record, July 17, 1944, 7.

  177. Ibid.

  178. J. W. Kent, “The Work is Onward,” Australasian Record, December 11, 1944, 5.

  179. “Hear J. W. Kent answer...,” The West Australian, October 28, 1944, 6.

  180. “Consequent upon resignation of “Pastor J. W. Kent...,” Australasian Record, January 22, 1945, 8.

  181. James William Kent, Worker’s Service Record, South Pacific Division of the General Conference Archives, folder: “Kent, James William,” document: “Worker’s Service Record.”

  182. Winston Kent, The life and times of Pastor J.W. Kent, 1890-1983, (Melbourne, Vic.: Winston Kent, 1990), 48-49.

  183. “Session Appointments,” Australasian Record, October 15, 1945, 5.

  184. “Owning to some domestic...,” Australasian Record, November 5, 1945, 8.

  185. T. Stephens, “Spreading the Gospel by the Seaside,” Australasian Record, October 28, 1946, 7.

  186. Ibid.

  187. Stuart P. Geddes, “First-Fruits at The Entrance,” Australasian Record, December 16, 1946, 3.

  188. Stuart P. Geddes, “Church Organized at The Entrance,” Australasian Record, February 3, 1947, 5.

  189. Stuart P. Geddes, “The Entrance Mission,” Australasian Record, March 31, 1947, 6.

  190. “Where were the crowds going...,” Australasian Record, April 7, 1947, 8.

  191. W. G. Turner, “Conference Presidents Report on Evangelism,” Australasian Record, June 9, 1947, 2.

  192. “Recent word...,” Australasian Record, July 14, 1947, 8.

  193. M. M. Stewart, “Adelaide City Mission,” Australasian Record, July 26, 1948, 4-5.

  194. Ibid.

  195. “Annual Meeting, Australasian Union Conference,” Australasian Record, January 10, 1949, 8.

  196. James William Kent, Worker’s Service Record, South Pacific Division of the General Conference Archives, folder: “Kent, James William,” document: “Worker’s Service Record.”

  197. J. W. Kent, “From a General Letter Written to the South Australian Field,” Australasian Record, June 12, 1950, 5.

  198. J. W. Kent, “Mission Notes from South Australia,” Australasian Record, July 24, 1950, 5-6.

  199. A. G. Stewart, “The South Australian 1953 Camp-meeting,” Australasian Record, April 20, 1953, 5-6.

  200. Ormond K. Anderson, “New Church Opened in Adelaide,” Australasian Record, June 5, 1967, 1.

  201. E. P. Wolfe, “Port Lincoln Church Dedicated,” Australasian Record, January 10, 1955, 6; R. I. Walker, “300 People Attend Dedication of Stirling Church,” Australasian Record, March 19, 1956, 4; C. D. Morgan, “South Australia Makes Gains,” Australasian Record, May 30, 1955, 7.

  202. C. D. Morgan, “South Australia Makes Gains,” Australasian Record, May 30, 1955, 7.

  203. James William Kent, Worker’s Service Record, South Pacific Division of the General Conference Archives, folder: “Kent, James William,” document: “Worker’s Service Record;” “Brevities, “Australasian Record, June 11, 1956, 16; Winston Kent, “Life-Sketch of Pastor J. W. Kent,” Australasian Record, July 9, 1983, 13.

  204. “Pastor J. W. Kent has returned..., “Australasian Record, June 11, 1956, 16.

  205. Stephanie Kent, e-mail message to the author, May 26, 2019.

  206. “Early in May...,” Australasian Record, June 10, 1957, 16.

  207. J. W. Kent, “Old Friends, New Inspiration,” Australasian Record, September 2, 1957, 10; J. W. Kent, “A Jaunt Through Ireland,” Australasian Record, January 20, 1958, 5-6.

  208. J. W. Kent, “Lasting Impressions of General Conference Session,” Australasian Record, September 19, 1966, 8.

  209. J. W. Kent, “Old England,” Australasian Record, October 24, 1966, 12; J. W. Kent, “Jottings on a Journey–Iceland,” Australasian Record, November 21, 1966, 10.

  210. R. D. Craig, “Happy Days at Lismore Camp,” Australasian Record, October 29, 1962, 4-5; E. A. Boehm, “Back to The Entrance,” Australasian Record, January 31, 1966, 9.

  211. R. K. Brown, “Making Friends in the Community,” Australasian Record, June 19, 1961, 3; Harry G. Richardson, “Rotarians Hear Archaeology Address,” Australasian Record, October 23, 1961, 4.

  212. Winston Kent, “A Special Ninetieth Birthday Celebration,” Australasian Record, May 3, 1980, 1.

  213. J. W. Kent, “Smith–Dawson,” Australasian Record, March 12, 1962, 12.

  214. Reuben E. Hare, “Watson,” Australasian Record, February 4, 1963, 15.

  215. Ernest H. Steed, “Veterans Recall the Past,” January 11, 1965, 2.

  216. Winston Kent, The Life and Times of Pastor J. W. Kent, 1890-1983 (Melbourne, Victoria: Winston Kent, 1990), 55.

  217. Ibid, 56.

  218. Ibid, 58.

  219. Ibid, 59.

  220. Ibid, 55.

  221. Ibid, 69-70.

  222. Ibid, 62.

  223. Ibid, 63.

  224. Ibid, 69.

  225. K. S. Parmenter, “Kent,” Australasian Record, October 2, 1982, 14.

  226. Winston Kent, “James William Kent,” Australasian Record, July 9, 1983, 13.

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Tarburton, Shirley. "Kent, James William (1890–1983)." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. January 29, 2020. Accessed February 26, 2024. https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=A7YK.

Tarburton, Shirley. "Kent, James William (1890–1983)." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. January 29, 2020. Date of access February 26, 2024, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=A7YK.

Tarburton, Shirley (2020, January 29). Kent, James William (1890–1983). Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. Retrieved February 26, 2024, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=A7YK.