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South Australian Conference office, Prospect, SA, Australia.

Photo courtesy of Joseph Maticic.

South Australian Conference

By Barry Oliver

×

Barry Oliver, Ph.D., retired in 2015 as president of the South Pacific Division of Seventh-day Adventists, Sydney, Australia. An Australian by birth Oliver has served the Church as a pastor, evangelist, college teacher, and administrator. In retirement, he is a conjoint associate professor at Avondale College of Higher Education. He has authored over 106 significant publications and 192 magazine articles. He is married to Julie with three adult sons and three grandchildren.

First Published: January 29, 2020

The South Australian Conference is a constituent of the Australian Union Conference. Its headquarters are located at 31 Prospect Road, Prospect, SA 5082, Australia. Its unincorporated activities are governed by a constitution that is based on the model conference constitution of the South Pacific Division of the General Conference of Seventh-day Adventists (SPD). Its real and intellectual property is held in trust by the Australasian Conference Association, Limited, an incorporated entity based at the headquarters office of the SPD in Wahroonga, NSW.1

Territory and Statistics

The conference executive committee has transferred most of its functions to two corporations to act as trustees for the conference: Seventh-day Adventist Church (South Australian Conference), Limited, which oversees the day-to-day operations of the conference itself and was registered on October 27, 2004;2 and Seventh-day Adventist Schools (South Australia), Limited, which oversees the operation of the education entities within the conference and was registered on October 27, 2004.3

The territory of the South Australian Conference is “South Australia.”4

In the 2017 Annual Statistical Report of the General Conference of Seventh-day Adventists, the South Australian Conference was listed as having 29 churches and seven companies. Church membership at the end of 2016 was 2,986, making it one of the smaller conferences by membership in Australia.5 The conference had 224 active employees. Its tithe receipts for 2016 totaled US$2,785,659. Its tithe and offerings per capita were US$946.22.6

Adelaide Hydropathic Institute

When the Australasian Medical Missionary and Benevolent Association board met in Cooranbong, NSW, March 1899, it was voted that Alfred and Emma Semmens transfer from the Summer Hill Sanitarium in Sydney and pioneer medical missionary work in Adelaide.7 A former auction mart fronting Victoria square in the heart of Adelaide was leased. With donations and volunteer labor from church members the building was renovated and readied for hydrotherapy treatments, opening in late July 1899. The facility included a waiting room, consulting room, 12 dressing rooms, eight massage rooms, two bath rooms, four hot and cold shower rooms, an electric bath room, a Swedish manual movement room, and one room for an overnight client.8

By 1905, after more than five years of operation, 16,711 paid treatments had been given, together with 1,548 free treatments.9 However, plans were already under way for a sanitarium in Wahroonga, and Semmens was transferred at the end of 1907 to be medical secretary for the Australasian Union Conference at Wahroonga, NSW.10 With the institute struggling financially, the South Australian Conference purchased land in order to build a sanitarium.

Adelaide Sanitarium

While the institute was still functional the South Australian Conference purchased land on Barker Road, Prospect, to the north of the city. Two cottages were built and fitted as a sanitarium with the understanding that if the venture proved to be a failure, the cottages would be sold as residences. The official opening was August 3, 1908, but a few patients had been admitted earlier.11 Within a year of the sanitarium opening the hydropathic institute was closed because of mounting debts. One third of the debt was transferred to the South Australian Conference, and the remainder shared between the other conferences within Australia.12

The South Australian Conference administered the institution with an appointed board.13 Assistant nurses from the Sydney Sanitarium were supplied until at least 1919,14 but it was not sustainable. William and Esther Clapp purchased the enterprise about 1920, and it became a successful nursing home. For some time it was still referred to as the Adelaide Sanitarium15 and Esther Clapp continued to be issued with a medical missionary licentiate from the South Australian Conference.16

Health Food Operations

A Sanitarium Health Food café was opened at 28 Waymouth Street, Adelaide, on February 24, 1908.17 In 1917 the café was moved to a site at 19 Grenfell Street and became a combined café and retail shop.18 However, the café section became a liability, with repeated heavy losses, and was closed by 1922.19 The retail business was later moved to 7a Rundle Street,20 and another attempt was eventually made to expand into café work, but by 1940 the effort was finally abandoned because of further losses.21

Manufacturing in Adelaide commenced on January 6, 1942, with the opening of a factory in Hackney to produce Weet Bix.22 The factory remained in operation until its closure in 2010.23

Schools

Prescott College. Formerly named Prospect School, Prescott College was officially opened in October 1906.24 The school was located at the back of the Prospect church, in the suburb of Prospect, and commenced with 22 students. Today (2018) it operates as a secondary school, with students from years 8 to 12. Year 7 will be added in 2019. It is situated on land adjacent to the Prospect church, and the address is 2 Koonga Avenue, Prospect, Adelaide, SA 5082.25

Prescott Primary Northern. Formerly known as Northern Districts Adventist Primary School, the school was officially opened in 1972.26 The school consisted of three rooms, and there was a total enrollment of 59 students. Currently the school ranges from kindergarten to year 7. The campus is located adjacent to the Para Vista church, and the address is 354 Wright Road, Para Vista, Adelaide, SA 5093.27

Prescott College Southern. Formerly called Noarlunga District Adventist Primary School, it was officially opened on February 27, 1977.28 It consisted of three classrooms, with an enrollment of 44 students. The college now enrolls students from kindergarten to year 12. It is located adjacent to the Morphett Vale church at 140 Pimpala Road, Morphett Vale, Adelaide, SA 5162.29

The following schools operated for periods of time before they were closed:30

Southern Districts Adventist School, Brighton. Operated from 1970 to 1982.

Kangarilla Adventist School. Opened in 1907 and closed in 1913.

Mount Gambier Adventist School. Opened in 1909. Closed in 1924; reopened in 1964 and remained until 1984.

Kensington Adventist School. Opened in 1913 and closed at least twice. Later it became known as the Eastern Districts Primary School before it finally closed in 1996.

Millicent Adventist School. Operated from 1920 to 1925 and again from 1948 to 1976.

Murray Bridge Adventist School. Operated from 1956 to 1974.

Campgrounds

Morphett Vale. The property at 140 Pimpala Road was purchased in 1967. Annual camp meetings were held at the site until 1993. The site is now in use as the schoolgrounds of Prescott College Southern.31

Ankara Youth Camp. A property at Walker Flat was obtained on leasehold in 1960 and subsequently purchased. It operates as a youth campsite.32

South End Youth Camp. This site was purchased in 196233 and sold in 2013.34

Nursing Homes and Retirement Villages

In 1968, 12 home units were built on the Morphett Vale campgrounds as homes for seniors.35 A hostel was added in 1974 and subsequently renamed Almond Grove Retirement Village. It operated until 2012, when it was sold.36

Origins of the Seventh-day Adventist Church in South Australia

The beginnings of the Seventh-day Adventist Church in South Australia are credited to John Corliss, an American evangelist who was a member of the first team of missionaries that came to Australia and established the Seventh-day Adventist Church in 1885 in Melbourne. In a letter written to Ellen White from Oakland, California, on April 22, 1886, S. N. Haskell suggested that it would be advantageous for J. O. Corliss to travel to Adelaide for a series of evangelistic meetings.37 Corliss arrived in Adelaide in August that year and first preached a series of meetings in the Norwood Town Hall, beginning on September 5. He had an initial baptism of 27 persons.38 This was followed by a series in a tent at Stepney, on the corner of George Street and Payneham Road.39 On October 19 a “heavy wind blew down the tent, tearing it badly.”40 Mrs. Corliss was able to find someone to mend it, and the meetings continued uninterrupted.41 By November 8, 1886, it was reported that “meetings have been held in Adelaide nine weeks, and as the result between forty and fifty have commenced the observance of the Sabbath, and have identified themselves with those who are looking for the soon coming of the King of kings. A large healthy Sabbath-school has been organized and the prospect is good for a strong church to be established.”42 By January 1887 the first church, a church of 34 members, was organized.43

Following the departure of Corliss, M. C. Israel visited the group and conducted further baptisms.44 The Bible Echo in July 1887 reported that “quite a number are keeping the Sabbath” in different suburbs of Adelaide.45 By August 1887 Israel reported another nine baptisms,46 and by August 1888 it was reported that there were 48 members.47

Soon after, William D. Curtis conducted a tent evangelistic crusade that resulted in a new church group being formed at Parkside. In 1890 the two organized churches, Norwood and Parkside, were united, with a membership of “about 100.”48 Meetings were held in a rented chapel on Young Street, Adelaide. Curtis lamented the fact that as yet there was no permanent place of worship.49

In 1892 Arthur G. Daniells held revival meetings in Adelaide in order to strengthen the church. In that same year Ellen White spent two months in Adelaide, hoping to improve her health by escaping the winters of Melbourne. She spoke fondly of her time in South Australia and was encouraged by the faith of the members.50

The first camp meeting was held at the Parkside Oval between October 8 and 18, 1896. Ellen white was present for the camp. On October 16 she wrote: “We are now in the midst of our camp meeting, and we have the best of the weather. There are about sixty tents on the ground. We had a large congregation on Sabbath, and the tent was full to overflowing on Sunday, a large congregation standing around the tent outside two or three deep.”51

Outside of Adelaide, the Adventist message gained a foothold in the town of Kadina. As a result of the colporteur work of Joseph Steed, a number of families in the area became convicted of the Adventist message.52 It was reported that “brethren Woods and Ballingall have been conducting a series of meetings in Kadina, and the Lord has signally blessed their labours.”53 On May 21, 1898, the first church outside metropolitan Adelaide was organised.54

Significant Events in the Organization of the South Australian Conference

After the first missionaries arrived from North America in 1885, membership of the Seventh-day Adventist Church grew in Australia, until, on the basis of the financial strength and the availability of local human resources, the Australian Conference was organized in September 1888.55 Attending the session were 22 lay delegates, representing the churches at Adelaide, Ballarat, Hobart, and Melbourne, and the company at Wychitella, along with four ministers as delegates at large. A constitution as used by all conferences was adopted, with some alterations. The elected officers were: president, G. C. Tenney; secretary, Stephen McCullagh; treasury, Echo Publishing House.56

The Australasian Union Conference was organized during the time of the Australian camp meeting, January 15–25, 1894.57 It composed District 7 of the General Conference districts, and included the conferences of Australia and New Zealand. The stated object of the union was “to unify and extend the work of the third angel's message, under the general direction of the General Conference, in the Australasian field.”58 It was anticipated that as the work expanded, other conferences would be organized.59

Arthur Daniells described the further steps taken to organize the conferences in Australia. He wrote: “At the beginning of 1894 it was felt that the Australian Conference had more territory than it could well manage, so the colonies of Queensland and West Australia were separated from the conference, and placed under the care of the union conference as mission fields. Near the close of 1895 another change was made. New South Wales was separated from the Australian Conference by the organization of the New South Wales Conference. At that time the name of the conference was changed from the Australian to the Central Australian Conference.60

On October 29, 1899, the Queensland Conference was organized,61 and on November 25, 1899, the South Australian Conference was organized.62 On January 1, 1900, Tasmania became a mission field under the care of the Australian Union Conference. What had been known as the Central Australian Conference was named the Victorian Conference,63 and it now comprised only the colony of Victoria.64

When the South Australian Conference was organized on November 25, 1899, the meeting was held in the Bible Christian Chapel, Young Street, Adelaide, at 7:30 p.m., with the president of the Australasian Union Conference, Arthur G. Daniells, chairing the meeting.65 A constitution was adopted, the first article reading: “This conference shall be known as the South Australian Conference of Seventh Day Adventists, and shall consist of the organized churches of that faith within the boundaries of the colony, and the Broken Hill district in New South Wales.” J. H. Woods, a minister from Victoria, was elected as the president, A. W. Semmens as vice president, J. Higgins as secretary and business agent, and Mrs. Higgins as treasurer.66 It was reported that “the annual tithe received is about 450 pounds. The Sabbath school and missionary offerings amount to about 50 pounds. There are eight canvassers in the colony, whose yearly sales amount to nearly 2,000 pounds.”67 The membership of the church at the time was 190.68

By 1904 the territory of the conference was listed as “the state of South Australia.”69 The Broken Hill district had been assimilated into the New South Wales Conference. As churches were established in the Northern Territory of Australia they were accepted into the sisterhood of churches of the South Australian Conference. Over time it was found that it was more economical for the North Queensland Conference to care for these churches, Darwin, Tennant Creek, and Alice Springs. So the South Australian Conference executive committee voted on December 19, 1983, to recommend to the conference session that the Northern Territory be transferred to North Queensland Conference.70 This became effective as of January 1, 1984.71 At that time the name of the North Queensland Conference was changed to the Northern Australia Conference.72

Some Significant Evangelistic Events in South Australia

1950: Pastor George Burnside conducted a citywide evangelistic program in the Adelaide Town Hall. He was assisted by Pastor Kranz and accompanied by a 52-voice choir. This event attracted large crowds.73 That year 178 people were baptized in the conference.74

1959: Pastor Ray Stanley conducted a similar citywide program also in the Adelaide Town Hall.75 That year 123 people were baptized.76

1978: Pastor Geoffrey Youlden also conducted a citywide program.77 In 1978, 242 people were baptized or joined the church by profession of faith, the highest in the history of the conference.78

2011: A South Australia-wide evangelistic outreach was conducted. It was coordinated by Gary Webster, who presented at Norwood Town Hall, along with other pastors and evangelists, who presented in multiple venues around the state.79 That year 95 people were baptized or joined the church by profession of faith.80

2014: Gary Kent conducted an evangelistic series in the Adelaide City Centre as part of the 2014 Year of Evangelism initiative.81

Mission and Strategic Plans of the South Australian Conference82

The mission statement of the South Australian Conference is to preach the gospel of a soon-coming Savior and to support South Australian Seventh-day Adventist churches by providing access to services, personnel, and finance and to best allocate these resources.

The South Australian Conference is fulfilling its mission by:

  • An emphasis on prayer and revival. The South Australian Conference acknowledges that without the power of the Holy Spirit, we can do nothing. To this end, the conference has organized regional meetings and camps with the theme of prayer and revival.

  • Vision 2020 adopted in 2016. It has set goals in the following four areas: spiritual, numerical, financial, and infrastructure.

  • Staffing for growth. The South Australian Conference is identifying the evangelistic opportunities of its schools, which have large number of students who are not from Seventh-day Adventist backgrounds and is intentionally staffing these areas with chaplains and pastors to reach out to the school communities.

Some recent successes that the conference has experienced include:

  • Growth in membership exceeding three thousand for the first time in thirty years.

  • The rapid increase in the enrollments of our three schools, doubling in the past ten years to a current enrolment of 1,300 students.

  • The impact of the work of ADRA. South Australia has the largest number of ADRA projects of any conference in Australia. Through its ADRA shops, emergency relief centers, food pantries, and community projects, many churches are able to connect effectively with their communities, resulting in baptisms.

Some remaining challenges faced by the conference are:

  • Financial stability. The need to increase the working capital and reserves for employee entitlements.

  • Limited assets. Aging infrastructure.

  • Static growth of the church membership.

  • Declining rural churches.

  • Secularism.

  • Maintaining an Adventist ethos in our schools.

List of Presidents

J. H. Woods (1899–1902); W. W. Woodford (1903–1905); E. S. Butz (1906–1909); J. M. Cole (1909–1911); M. Lukens (1911–1912); W. W. Fletcher (1913–1914); W. J. Westerman (1914–1916); L.D.A. Lemke (1916–1917); W. G. Turner (1917–1919); E. B. Rudge (1919–1921); W. H. Pascoe (1921–1923); L.D.A. Lemke (1923–1928); S. Watson (1928–1930); P. G. Foster (1930–1934); S. L. Patching (1934–1937); E. J. Johanson (1938–1941); W.M.R. Scragg (1942–1948); J. W. Kent (1949–1955); W. E. Rudge (1956–1959); C. D. Judd (1959–1965); F. T. Maberly (1965–1966); L. C. Coombe (1966–1969); W. A. Townend (1969–1977); R. E. Cobbin (1977–1980); C. Christian (1980–1986); M. R. Potts (1987–1993); N. Watts (1994–1997); D. K. Hosken (1998–2001); G. J. Hodgkin (2002–2010); A. J. Kingston (2011–2016); D. A. Butcher (2017– ).

Sources

“Actions Taken by the Union Conference Council.” Union Conference Record, October 4, 1909.

Adair, G. E. “Health Food Department.” Australasian Union Conference Bulletin, September 12, 1940.

“Adelaide Café.” Union Conference Record, March 16, 1908.

“Adelaide, South Australia.” The Bible Echo and Signs of the Times, July 1887.

“At the present writing . . .” The Bible Echo and Signs of the Times, December 1886.

“Australasian Union Conference.” Seventh-day Adventist Online Yearbook. Accessed July 17, 2018, http://documents.adventistarchives.org/Yearbooks/YB1908.pdf.

Burgess, A. C. A. C. Burgess to Elder Pierson. December 6, 1973. South Pacific Division Heritage Centre, Avondale College of Higher Education, Australia. Biographical Folder 2149.

Burnham, E. J. “The Adelaide Church.” The Bible Echo and Signs of the Times, August 1888.

“Cafés.” Seventh-day Adventist Online Yearbook. Accessed July 17, 2018. http://documents.adventistarchives.org/Yearbooks/YB1917.pdf.

“Cafés.” Seventh-day Adventist Online Yearbook. Accessed July 17, 2018. http://documents.adventistarchives.org/Yearbooks/YB1921.pdf.

“Cafés.” Seventh-day Adventist Online Yearbook, accessed July 17, 2018, http://documents.adventistarchives.org/Yearbooks/YB1925.pdf.

Camp, J. H. “Health Food Department.” Australasian Record, October 30, 1922.

Campbell, A. D. “170 Baptisms in Adelaide.” Australasian Record, March 19, 1979.

“Camptime in northern Queensland . . .” Australasian Record, May 12, 1984.

Curtis, Will D. “Adelaide, South Australia.” The Bible Echo and Signs of the Times, July 15, 1890.

Daniells, A. G. “Organization of the Queensland Conference.” Union Conference Record, December 1, 1899.

———. “Our People in Tasmania.” Union Conference Record, January 1, 1900.

Diary of Mrs. Corliss. October 17, 1886. Andrews University Heritage Center, Andrews University, Berrien Springs, Michigan.

“Elder M. C. Israel . . .” The Bible Echo and Signs of the Times, July 1887.

Foster, P. G. “Annual Conference.” Australasian Record, June 8, 1931.

Haskell, S. N. S. N. Haskell to Ellen G. White. April 22, 1886. Ellen G. White Research Center.

Israel, M. C. “Ballarat and Adelaide.” The Bible Echo and Signs of the Times, August 1887.

“Mission Notes from South Australia.” Australasian Record, July 24, 1950.

Morse, G. W. “Medical and Surgical Sanitarium, Summer Hill, NSW.” Union Conference Record, July 26, 1899.

“Nominations.” Australasian Record, November 11, 1918.

“Notes of Progress.” The Bible Echo and Signs of the Times, October 15, 1892.

“Nurse Carroll left the Sydney Sanitarium . . .” Australasian Record, May 26, 1919.

“Organization in Australia.” The Bible Echo and Signs of the Times, October 1888.

“Organization of the South Australian Conference.” Union Conference Record, January 1, 1900.

Parr, Robert, and Glyn Litster. What Hath God Wrought! Berkeley Vale, NSW: Sanitarium Health Food Company, n.d.

Pascoe, W. H. “A Visit to South Australia.” Australasian Record, January 18, 1932.

Robinson, A. T. “Among the Churches in South Australia.” The Bible Echo and Signs of the Times, June 6, 1898.

———. “The Work in Victoria.” Union Confernce Record, February 1, 1900.

Scragg, W.M.R. “South Australia.” Australasian Record, March 2, 1942.

Semmens, A. W. “Hydropathic Institute, Adelaide.” Union Conference Record, March 1, 1900.

———. “Report of Hydropathic Institute, Adelaide.” Union Conference Record, October 15, 1905.

Seventh-day Adventist Statistical Report, 1950. Accessed July 20, 2018. http://documents.adventistarchives.org/Statistics/ASR/ASR1950.pdf.

Seventh-day Adventist Statistical Report, 1960. Accessed July 20, 2018. http://documents.adventistarchives.org/Statistics/ASR/ASR1960.pdf.

Seventh-day Adventist Statistical Report, 1978. Accessed July 20, 2018. http://documents.adventistarchives.org/Statistics/ASR/ASR1978.pdf.

Seventh-day Adventist Statistical Report, 2014. Accessed July 20, 2018. http://documents.adventistarchives.org/Statistics/ASR/ASR2014.pdf.

Silver, D. J. “Bright Prospects for Biggest Soul-winning Year.” Australasian Record, September 21, 1959.

“South Australian Conference.” Seventh-day Adventist Online Yearbook. Accessed July 20, 2018. http://documents.adventistarchives.org/Yearbooks/YB1904.pdf.

“South Australian Conference.” Seventh-day Adventist Online Yearbook. Accessed July 17, 2018. http://documents.adventistarchives.org/Yearbooks/YB2016.pdf.

South Australian Conference Executive Committee minutes. May 29, 1905. South Australian Conference Archives.

South Australian Conference Executive Committee minutes. December 18, 1962. South Australian Conference Archives.

South Australian Conference Executive Committee minutes. March 4, 1973. Action 412/73. South Australian Conference Archives.

South Australian Conference Executive Committee minutes. February 8, 1976. Action 179/76. South Australian Conference Archives.

South Australian Conference Executive Committee minutes. December 19, 1983. Action 575/83. South Australian Conference Archives.

South Australian Conference Executive Committee minutes. October 24, 2004. Action 2004.7. South Australian Conference Archives.

South Australian Conference Executive Committee minutes. October 24, 2004. Action 2004.8. South Australian Conference Archives.

South Australian Conference Executive Committee minutes. August 14, 2012. Action 2012/60. South Australian Conference Archives.

South Australian Conference Executive Committee minutes. December 3, 2013. Action 2013/98. South Australian Conference Archives.

“The meetings being held in Norwood . . .” The Bible Echo and Signs of the Times, November 1886.

“The series of meetings that were being held . . .” The Bible Echo and Signs of the Times, January 1887.

Thrift, R. “Visiting in South Australia.” Australasian Record, May 10, 1942.

2017 Annual Statistical Report: 153rd Report of the General Conference of Seventh-day Adventists for 2015 and 2016. Accessed July 17, 2018. http://documents.adventistarchives.org/Statistics/ASR/ASR2017.pdf.

White, Ellen G. Ellen G. White to Sister Wessels and Children. October 16, 1896. Letter 112, 1896. Ellen G. White Estate Office.

Notes

  1. Much of the information contained in this article was compiled by Joseph Maticic, secretary of the South Australian Conference at the time of writing.

  2. South Australian Conference Executive Committee minutes, October 24, 2004, Action 2004.7, South Australian Conference Archives.

  3. South Australian Conference Executive Committee minutes, October 24, 2004, Action 2004.8, South Australian Conference Archives.

  4. “South Australian Conference,” Seventh-day Adventist Online Yearbook, accessed July 17, 2018, http://documents.adventistarchives.org/Yearbooks/YB2016.pdf.

  5. 2017 Annual Statistical Report: 153rd Report of the General Conference of Seventh-day Adventists for 2015 and 2016, accessed July 17, 2018, http://documents.adventistarchives.org/Statistics/ASR/ASR2017.pdf.

  6. Ibid.

  7. G. W. Morse, “Medical and Surgical Sanitarium, Summer Hill, NSW,” Union Conference Record, July 26, 1899, 15.

  8. A. W. Semmens, “Hydropathic Institute, Adelaide,” Union Conference Record, March 1, 1900, 3.

  9. A. W. Semmens, “Report of Hydropathic Institute, Adelaide,” Union Conference Record, October 15, 1905, 5.

  10. “Australasian Union Conference,” Seventh-day Adventist Online Yearbook, accessed July 17, 2018, http://documents.adventistarchives.org/Yearbooks/YB1908.pdf.

  11. Ibid.

  12. “Actions Taken by the Union Conference Council,” Union Conference Record, October 4, 1909, 2.

  13. “Nominations,” Australasian Record, November 11, 1918, 35.

  14. “Nurse Carroll left the Sydney Sanitarium . . . ,” Australasian Record, May 26, 1919, 8.

  15. W. H. Pascoe, “A Visit to South Australia,” Australasian Record, January 18, 1932, 6.

  16. P. G. Foster, “Annual Conference,” Australasian Record, June 8, 1931, 5.

  17. “Adelaide Café,” Union Conference Record, March 16, 1908, 8.

  18. “Cafés,” Seventh-day Adventist Online Yearbook, accessed July 17, 2018, http://documents.adventistarchives.org/Yearbooks/YB1917.pdf; “Cafés,” Seventh-day Adventist Online Yearbook, accessed July 17, 2018, http://documents.adventistarchives.org/Yearbooks/YB1921.pdf.

  19. J. H. Camp, “Health Food Department,” Australasian Record, October 30, 1922, 71, 72.

  20. “Cafés,” Seventh-day Adventist Online Yearbook, accessed July 17, 2018, http://documents.adventistarchives.org/Yearbooks/YB1925.pdf.

  21. G. E. Adair, “Health Food Department,” Australasian Union Conference Bulletin, September 12, 1940, 22, 23.

  22. W. M. R. Scragg, “South Australia,” Australasian Record, March 2, 1942, 4; R. Thrift, “Visiting in South Australia,” Australasian Record, May 10, 1942, 3; Robert Parr and Glyn Litster, What Hath God Wrought! (Berkeley Vale, NSW: Sanitarium Health Food Company, n.d.), 276.

  23. Joseph Maticic, secretary, South Australian Conference, email message to author, July 2, 2018.

  24. South Australian Conference Executive Committee minutes, May 29, 1905, South Australian Conference Archives.

  25. Joseph Maticic, secretary, South Australian Conference, email message to author, July 2, 2018.

  26. South Australian Conference Executive Committee minutes, March 4, 1973, Action 412/73, South Australian Conference Archives.

  27. Joseph Maticic, secretary, South Australian Conference, email message to author, July 2, 2018.

  28. South Australian Conference Executive Committee minutes, February 8, 1976, Action 179/76, South Australian Conference Archives.

  29. Joseph Maticic, secretary, South Australian Conference, email message to author, July 2, 2018.

  30. Ibid.

  31. Ibid.

  32. Ibid.

  33. South Australian Conference Executive Committee minutes, December 18, 1962, South Australian Conference archives.

  34. South Australian Conference Executive Committee minutes, December 3, 2013, Action 2013/98, South Australian Conference archives.

  35. Joseph Maticic, secretary, South Australian Conference, email message to author, July 2, 2018.

  36. South Australian Conference Executive Committee minutes, August 14, 2012, Action 2012/60, South Australian Conference Archives.

  37. S. N. Haskell, S. N. Haskell to Ellen G. White, April 22, 1886, Ellen G. White Research Center.

  38. “The meetings being held in Norwood . . . ,” The Bible Echo and Signs of the Times, November 1886, 176.

  39. Diary of Mrs. Corliss, October 17, 1886, Andrews University Heritage Center, Andrews University, Berrien Springs, Michigan.

  40. Ibid.

  41. Ibid.

  42. “At the present writing . . . ,” The Bible Echo and Signs of the Times, December 1886, 192.

  43. “The series of meetings that were being held . . . ,” The Bible Echo and Signs of the Times, January 1887, 16.

  44. “Elder M. C. Israel . . . ,” The Bible Echo and Signs of the Times, July 1887, 112.

  45. “Adelaide, South Australia,” The Bible Echo and Signs of the Times, July 1887, 107.

  46. M. C. Israel, “Ballarat and Adelaide,” The Bible Echo and Signs of the Times, August 1887, 128.

  47. E. J. Burnham, “The Adelaide Church,” The Bible Echo and Signs of the Times, August 1888, 124.

  48. Will D. Curtis, “Adelaide, South Australia,” The Bible Echo and Signs of the Times, July 15, 1890, 220.

  49. Ibid.

  50. “Notes of Progress,” The Bible Echo and Signs of the Times, October 15, 1892, 320.

  51. Ellen G. White, Ellen G. White to Sister Wessels and Children, October 16, 1896 letter 112, 1896, Ellen G. White Estate Office.

  52. A. C. Burgess, A. C. Burgess to Elder Pierson, December 6, 1973, South Pacific Division Heritage Centre, Avondale College of Higher Education, Australia, Biographical Folder 2149.

  53. A. T. Robinson, “Among the Churches in South Australia,” The Bible Echo and Signs of the Times, June 6, 1898, 181.

  54. Ibid.

  55. “Organization in Australia,” The Bible Echo and Signs of the Times, October 1888, 152

  56. Ibid.

  57. “Australasian Union Conference,” Seventh-day Adventist Online Yearbook, accessed July 19, 2018, http://documents.adventistarchives.org/Yearbooks/YB1894.pdf.

  58. Ibid.

  59. Ibid.

  60. A. G. Daniells, “Our People in Tasmania,” Union Conference Record, January 1, 1900, 13.

  61. A. G. Daniells, “Organization of the Queensland Conference,” Union Conference Record, December 1, 1899, 12, 13.

  62. A. T. Robinson, “The Work in Victoria,” Union Conference Record, February 1, 1900, 12.

  63. Ibid.

  64. Ibid.

  65. “Organization of the South Australian Conference,” Union Conference Record, January 1, 1900, 12.

  66. Ibid.

  67. Ibid.

  68. Ibid.

  69. “South Australian Conference,” Seventh-day Adventist Online Yearbook, accessed July 20, 2018, http://documents.adventistarchives.org/Yearbooks/YB1904.pdf.

  70. South Australian Conference executive minutes, December 19, 1983, Action 575/83, South Australian Conference Archives.

  71. Ibid.; “Camptime in northern Queensland . . . ,” Australasian Record, May 12, 1984, 16.

  72. Ibid.

  73. “Mission Notes from South Australia,” Australasian Record, July 24, 1950, 5.

  74. Seventh-day Adventist Statistical Report, 1950, accessed July 20, 2018, http://documents.adventistarchives.org/Statistics/ASR/ASR1950.pdf.

  75. D. J. Silver, “Bright Prospects for Biggest Soul-winning Year,” Australasian Record, September 21, 1959, 8.

  76. Seventh-day Adventist Statistical Report, 1960, accessed July 20, 2018, http://documents.adventistarchives.org/Statistics/ASR/ASR1960.pdf.

  77. A. D. Campbell, “170 Baptisms in Adelaide,” Australasian Record, March 19, 1979, 2.

  78. Seventh-day Adventist Statistical Report, 1978, accessed July 20, 2018, http://documents.adventistarchives.org/Statistics/ASR/ASR1978.pdf.

  79. Joseph Maticic, secretary, South Australian Conference, email message to author, July 2, 2018.

  80. Seventh-day Adventist Statistical Report, 2014, accessed July 20, 2018, http://documents.adventistarchives.org/Statistics/ASR/ASR2014.pdf.

  81. Joseph Maticic, secretary, South Australian Conference, email message to author, August 1, 2018.

  82. Supplied by Joseph Maticic, secretary, South Australian Conference, email message to author, July 2, 2018.

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Oliver, Barry. "South Australian Conference." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. January 29, 2020. Accessed April 17, 2024. https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=A857.

Oliver, Barry. "South Australian Conference." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. January 29, 2020. Date of access April 17, 2024, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=A857.

Oliver, Barry (2020, January 29). South Australian Conference. Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. Retrieved April 17, 2024, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=A857.