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Florence and Edwin Butz with daughter Alma.

Photo courtesy of the General Conference of Seventh-day Adventists Archives.

Butz, Edwin Sebastian (1864–1956) and Florence Martha (Davis) (1868–1957)

By Shirley Tarburton

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Shirley Tarburton, M.Litt. (Distinction) (University of New England, Armidale, New South Wales, Australia) retired in 2008 after 40 years teaching church-school (mainly high school but including eight years at university). An Australian, she has taught in four mission fields, Australia, and New Zealand. She has authored five books and co-authored one on church history, biography and family history, as well as several magazine articles. She is married to Dr. Michael Tarburton with two adult children and four grandchildren.

 

First Published: March 15, 2021

Edwin Sebastian Butz was an American Seventh-day Adventist minister who sailed on the Pitcairn as an early missionary to Pitcairn Island. He pioneered the Adventist work in Tonga. After arriving in 1895, he spent most of the rest of his life in the western South Pacific region, serving as missionary, superintendent, conference president, teacher, and pastor in the islands, New Zealand, and Australia.1 He remained in active service for the Church until he was eighty-nine years of age, the oldest known active Adventist pastor in the South Pacific Division. He served for at least sixty-three years, fifty-three of those as an ordained minister.

Birth and Early Life

Butz was born on September 2, 1864, in Maroa, Macon County, Illinois in the United States.2 His parents were Bernard Butz and Katherine née Wise,3 both of German ancestry.4 About the time of Butz’s birth, his father died5 while serving the in the Union Army during the Civil War.6 Butz was subsequently raised by his mother’s parents, George and Margarett Wise, on their farm in Macon County.7 There is no further mention of his mother or any record of brothers or sisters.

In later life, Butz referred to his attendance at a university where “many ’ologies” were taught, but spiritual or practical matters were neglected.8 This was before he became an Adventist.9

Joining the Adventist Church

Butz joined the Seventh-day Adventist Church in 188710 and by October 1889 was working for the Illinois Conference when he was appointed to the camp meeting committee.11 He attended Battle Creek College at some time in the intervening period, possibly during 1888-1889.12 By 1890 he was working in California, and attended the dedication of the Pitcairn mission ship in Oakland, California on September 25,13 soon after his 26th birthday.

Marriage and Family

On June 2, 1892, Butz married Florence Davis at the sanitarium in Saint Helena, California.14 The marriage was conducted by John Fulton, the manager of the Saint Helena Sanitarium where she was working.15 Born January 4, 1868, at West Union, Fayette County, Iowa,16 Florence Martha Davis had been nurtured in the Adventist faith17 by her parents, Lewis H. Davis (1837-1906)18 and Minerva Davis, née Van Dorn (1841-1874).19 In 1862, two years prior to her marriage to Florence’s father, Minerva was converted through the ministry of M. E. Cornell and lived a vibrant Christian life until it was cut short by consumption when her daughter was only six.20 The West Union Seventh-day Adventist church was also the home church of Arthur Grosvernor Daniells’ family, (he was ten years older than Florence) and to Florence they were like members of her extended family.21

Florence Davis decided at a young age to become a nurse and was the first nurse to graduate from the Saint Helena Sanitarium in California in 1892.22 For some time, she was in charge of the ladies’ treatment rooms.23

Edwin and Florence Butz had two children. Edna Fern was born about March 1893 and died on January 28, 1895,24 while her parents were preparing to leave for a missionary appointment. Alma Bernice was born September 23, 1894, and died March 31, 1980.25 In 1914, Alma married Australian missionary, Norman Bruce Julius Wiles (1892-1920)26 and together they spent six years pioneering the Adventist work on the island of Malekula in the New Hebrides (now Vanuatu).27 Their work was cut short by Wiles’ untimely death from blackwater fever, but Alma Wiles spent the rest of her life in ministry, much of it in the mission field.28

Mission Service

At the General Conference meeting held early in 1895, the Butzes were appointed to join the J. M. Cole family as missionaries to Fiji.29 Edwin Butz was given a ministerial license30 and they were scheduled to sail on the Pitcairn in April 1895.31

The missionary party left San Francisco on May 1, 1895, reaching Pitcairn Island, the first port of call, after thirty-six days.32 Due to illness, the missionary who had been appointed to Pitcairn did not sail, so Edwin Butz was asked to take his place, and the family disembarked on June 5. They joined Hattie Andre who had been on the island as teacher, and both Edwin and Florence Butz were involved with her school. Florence Butz supervised the boys’ dormitory and also taught cooking and home nursing to their mothers. Edwin Butz taught night classes for those not in the dormitories.33

Twelve months later, the Pitcairn returned with teachers to relieve Andre and the Butz family. They anticipated proceeding to their appointment in Fiji, but this place had been filled in the meantime by John Fulton, so they were taken to Tonga to assist the Hilliards who had arrived there in 1895.34 They, along with Sarah and Maria Young of Pitcairn, arrived September 29, 1896, after visiting many other islands on the way.35

The Adventist missionaries found it very difficult to interest the Tongans in spiritual things because the islanders had been warned by their ministers to shun them. However, Mrs. Hilliard was gaining acceptance through a school she operated.36 Florence Butz assisted with the school, and the entire mission team offered acts of kindness that gradually gained them acceptance. The Hilliards left in October 1899,37 leaving the Butzes to assume the responsibilities they had carried. While Edwin Butz dedicated his time to learning the language, Florence Butz offered her nursing skills, which were soon in high demand and broke down many barriers.38 They rejoiced when Edwin Butz baptized the first Tongan convert, Charles Edwards, on December 10, 1899.39

Ordination

In 1901, the Butz family returned to the United States where Edwin Butz gave a report at the General Conference session held at Battle Creek in April.40 Ellen G. White was also one of the speakers. At this session, Butz was ordained to the gospel ministry.41 For the remainder of their furlough, he was appointed the state canvassing agent of Illinois for the Lake Union Conference.42 During this time of reduced stress, some health problems arising from the previous five years in the tropics became evident. Butz was admitted to the Battle Creek Sanitarium in order to restore his health for their return to Tonga.43

Return to Tonga

On their return in mid-1903, Edwin and Florence Butz entered upon their work with renewed zest and energy.44 Edwin Butz concentrated on learning the Tongan language,45 and by the new year he was holding services in Tongan.46 This was followed by the printing of some tracts in Tongan and a wider acceptance of the message they were sharing.47 As the number of believers grew, Butz built a church in which they could meet. It served the congregation for many years.48 Ten years after their arrival in Tonga, the Butzes’ replacement, the Thorpes, arrived. After helping the Thorpes to settle, the Butz family left Tonga on December 27, 1905,49 arriving in Sydney the following week.50

Administration in South Australia and Tasmania

Once again, their health had suffered and they required some time in Sydney before proceeding to their new place of service, South Australia.51 Butz was initially asked to run a tent mission (evangelistic program) at the regional center of Crystal Brook.52 The Adventist work in South Australia was languishing at the time as the conference president had left for the United States the previous year and had not been replaced.53 At a conference meeting held in April 1906, Butz was elected to be the South Australian Conference president.54 He was long remembered for the organization that he brought to the conference.55

Florence Butz was always happy to be involved wherever she could contribute and was elected vice president of the Young People’s Society.56 Later, the responsibility of conference Sabbath School secretary was added.57 Unfortunately, Edwin Butz’s health had suffered more than had been realized while in Tonga, and from about October until January 1907 he was seriously ill.58 He kept in touch by letter59 and early in January was able to start attending meetings,60 preaching once again two weeks later.61 He was re-elected president at the camp meeting in March,62 and felt well enough afterwards to plan a visitation program around the churches.63

As his stamina returned, Butz increased his workload. Over the summer of December 1907-January 1908, Butz and Robert Hare ran tent meetings in Goodwood, a suburb of Adelaide.64 The following year, he was engaged to attend the Western Australian Conference camp meeting in Perth, travelling to the west coast of the continent for the first time.65 Later, at meetings in Sydney in 1909, Butz was appointed as one of the two vice presidents of the large Victoria-Tasmania Conference, with specific responsibility for Tasmania.66 He accompanied J. E. Fulton and L. D. A. Lemke to Victoria and Tasmania67 for consultations, and when the details were organized, the Butz family relocated to Launceston, Tasmania in November.68 South Australia was sorry to lose him as he had been appreciated there.69 Before the end of the year, Butz had commenced an evangelistic series in a tent in Invermay, Launceston.70

At the conference camp meeting held in Melbourne in February 1910 which the Butz family attended, Florence Butz was appointed sub-treasurer for Tasmania.71 It was expected that church workers’ wives would take positions, but salaries were usually not offered. At the Tasmanian general meeting held in March, Florence Butz helped run the Young People’s meetings.72

His health restored, Edwin Butz’s natural energy returned and he kept up a punishing schedule of visitation and meetings all over the state of Tasmania. He was completely reliant on public transportation or the assistance of church members to meet all his appointments.73

New South Wales

In November 1910, Butz was transferred to the New South Wales Conference.74 Before he left Tasmania, a general camp meeting was held. Butz worked so hard pitching camp and making sure everything was in order, that he became ill again and missed most of the camp meeting.75 The family left for New South Wales immediately afterwards where Edwin Butz and two other evangelists commenced planning for a tent mission in Goulburn,76 about 150 kilometers south of Sydney. They reported that they were “making headway” the following month.77

By April 1911, Alma Butz, now sixteen, was attending the Seventh-day Adventist college at Avondale, Cooranbong, about 100 kilometers north of Sydney.78 During the ensuing year, Edwin Butz visited Merewether, north of Avondale near Newcastle, with a team that conducted Bible studies with interested people.79 The New South Wales camp meeting had been held in the area, arousing much interest and Butz assisted the conference president, Pastor Woods, in baptizing twenty-eight at the camp’s conclusion. At this time, the Butz family was living in Cooranbong.80

Island Itineraries

On September 1, 1912, Butz was sent to Lord Howe Island, between New South Wales and North New Zealand, to conduct a baptism and organize the believers into a church.81 After baptizing four new members and establishing the church, he sailed, early in March 1913, for the New Hebrides (now Vanuatu)82 to assist in the selection of a property for the mission.83 Together, he, C. H. Parker, and H. Carr obtained property for the mission on the islands of Atchin and Malekula84 (where, six years later, Butz’s missionary daughter, Alma, would bury her husband).85 On the way there, he was able to spend a short time on Norfolk Island where the Pitcairn Island descendants were excited to hear all he could tell them about his time on that island years before.86 He was away ten months altogether before returning to New South Wales on June 21, 1913.87

Butz’s trip was so profitable that he was asked to go again in October, this time to Fiji.88 In the meantime, he spent time preparing and presenting materials supporting temperance.89 This was appreciated so much that a Methodist temperance worker even asked for copies that he could use in his own work.90 Butz sailed for Fiji on October 23.91 Upon arrival, all on the ship were quarantined, which curtailed the time Butz had expected to spend visiting the mission stations. However, he made the most of the opportunity by doing missionary work among those quarantined with him and taking a Sunday service for them.92 Upon his release, Butz visited the Indian mission being run by Mrs. Meyers near Suva, and the Buresala Training School on the island of Ovalau93 before leaving for Samoa, accompanied by Pastor and Mrs. A. G. Stewart.94

The task in Samoa was to assist in the procurement of a permanent site for the mission.95 After “having walked almost entirely around the islands of Upolu and Savaii, a distance of about two hundred and fifty miles,”96 an ideal site, called Vailoa, was obtained. The highlight of the visit was a baptism of four individuals.97

Butz and the Stewarts then sailed to Tonga where their first port, Vavau, was reached on December 27, 1913.98 They stayed with Mr. and Mrs. E. E. Thorpe, the Adventist missionaries there, for two weeks and celebrated with them the Ordinances of the Lord’s House that the Thorpes had not been able to participate in for three years.99 They then sailed on to Nuku’alofa where they were welcomed by Pastor Stewart’s brother, George Stewart.100 Here they had a similar task—to secure some permanent land for the expansion of the mission. With the assistance of people Butz had known when working in Nuku’alofa years before, they were successful.101 While the Stewarts returned to Fiji,102 Butz remained with the missionaries in Tonga another month.103 He then returned to Fiji where for a further month he assisted A. G. Stewart run a series of meetings in Suva for the European population.104 After being away for five months, he arrived back in Sydney on April 16.105

On his return to Australia, Butz was appointed camp meeting superintendent of the up-coming event which would incorporate the Australasian Union Conference session.106 He was kept busy with the physical arrangements for the camp during the next few months.107

Queensland

At the session meetings, which were held during September 14 to 27, Butz was appointed the president of the Queensland Conference.108 At the same meeting, Alma’s fiancé, Norman Wiles, was appointed to work in the New Hebrides.109 Edwin and Florence Butz moved to Brisbane, arriving by December 1914110 and Alma began planning a wedding. She and Wiles travelled up to her parents in Queensland and were married there December 24, 1914.111

In June, Florence Butz was asked to become the secretary of the Sabbath School and Young People’s departments for the Queensland Conference.112 The Queensland Conference covered a huge area and about June 1915,113 after visiting the churches around Brisbane,114 Edwin Butz sailed 1600 kilometers north to Cairns.115 Here he baptized four new members,116 then travelled west to inspect the Monamona Seventh-day Adventist Mission for Aboriginal Australians.117 He was undaunted when he arrived too late to get a ride to the mission, but travelled by train, then walked the last thirteen kilometers in the tropical heat in order to prevent any further delay to the scheduled consultation which included C. H. Watson118 from church headquarters in Sydney.119

At the Queensland Conference session held in conjunction with the camp meeting in September 1915, Butz was re-elected president for the next year.120 However, in March 1916 he was asked by the New South Wales Conference to return there121 to take over the work of C. A. Paap, who had been called to South Africa.122 Paap had been conducting evangelistic meetings in northern inland areas of New South Wales.123 Before Edwin Butz took up this work, both he and his wife spent time at the Sydney Sanitarium where Florence underwent an operation.124 Afterward they proceeded to Gunnedah to run an evangelistic series.125

New South Wales

Edwin Butz had the oversight of a large area which encompassed six population centers.126 After baptizing seven at Gunnedah, the Butzes moved to Curlewis for a while, leaving a Bible worker to continue Bible studies with other interested people.127 Two months later, following another baptism, a church of ten people was organized at Gunnedah, and the Butzes then moved to Quirindi to study with people there.128 This was followed by another move to conduct Bible studies in Tamworth.129 These frequent moves were necessary at a time when motor transport was still uncommon, and many Adventist ministers lived a gypsy-like existence.

At the annual session of the New South Wales Conference held in October 1917, Butz was elected vice president of the New South Wales Conference,130 and the Butzes moved back to Sydney where he had oversight of all the Adventist churches located in that city.131 He was soon involved in a busy round of visiting,132 baptisms,133 meetings,134 and other conference responsibilities.135 The conference president, J. M. Cole, publicly thanked Butz for his assistance and paid tribute to his willing, congenial spirit.136

Western Australia

Butz’s next appointment was the presidency of the Western Australian Conference.137 The Butzes arrived there on November 22, 1918,138 taking the opportunity to visit church members in the towns they passed through on their way to Perth.139 The vast distances in this largest of conferences by land area did not prevent Edwin Butz from travelling widely and a few months later he organized a church of twenty-one members in Boulder,140 a distance of about six hundred kilometers from Perth.

Some of the highlights of the next almost three years spent in Western Australia were the opening of a new conference office in 1919141 and a health food factory in 1921;142 a series of weekly health talks taken in the Perth church143 followed by a baptism of thirty in 1919;144 the dedication of a new church building at Karragullen,145 and the organization of a church of twenty-four at Cottesloe.146 In 1920 he reported that there had been fifty-nine baptized, raising the conference membership to 721.147

Avondale

In August 1921, at the Australasian Union Conference council in Wahroonga, New South Wales, Butz was asked to transfer to the Australian Missionary College at Avondale as preceptor (dean) of the young men, as well as to teach.148 He was also appointed a delegate to the next General Conference in the United States.149 They departed Perth on September 10, and commenced work at Avondale on September 22.150

Butz served at Avondale for just over four years, teaching Bible, physiology, and home nursing151 as well as carrying out pastoral duties152 along with his preceptorship.153 The Butzes were sent off with much affection at the beginning of 1926 as they headed to the General Conference session.154 They had been due furlough four years previously,155 but had deferred it to coincide with the General Conference session, thus saving the Australasian Union Conference the cost of two fares.

A Year Back Home

Edwin and Florence Butz joined a large group sailing for San Francisco on March 25 and arrived April 16.156 The General Conference met in May and Butz served on one of the committees.157 He and his wife thoroughly enjoyed themselves, being blessed by the meetings and friendships renewed.158 They travelled widely during their furlough and returned to Australia March 5, 1927.159

Further Appointments

Upon their return to Avondale, Butz was made farm manager and assigned some teaching.160 It was not long before he was including pastoral work and conducting a baptism of ten students.161 At the end of the year, he was transferred to the North New Zealand Conference and spent thirteen months in pastoral work in Wellington.162

In January 1929, the Butzes were asked to return to Pitcairn Island for a few months.163 Edwin Butz was now sixty-five years of age and had contended with some health issues,164 but he cheerfully accepted the challenge.165 The few months expanded to nine,166 but during that time they brought great blessing to the island.167 There was a spiritual revival and on September 3 Butz baptized twenty-five of the islanders.168

They left Pitcairn Island on October 24, 1929, and returned to pastoral ministry in Wellington169 for two months, then were appointed to the New Zealand Missionary School at the beginning of the 1930 academic year where Butz was to teach Bible.170 The following year he was appointed to pastoral work in the cities of Hastings and Gisborne.171 Before he could leave the New Zealand Missionary School for this appointment, a massive earthquake followed by a raging fire, devastated the Hastings and Napier area.172 The Butzes went there as soon as they could and became fully involved in the relief efforts,173 even helping to search for victims.174 Their territory was adjusted to include Napier, and he was delighted when Napier’s new church was dedicated just a year after the earthquake.175 Butz baptized six new members in its new font, and also baptized another six in Hastings,176 while others were studying in preparationn for baptism.177 These studies brought further baptisms during 1932, two in Hastings and two in Napier.178

At the conference camp meeting at the beginning of 1933, Butz was transferred to Auckland for pastoral work.179 Before he left, members of the Hastings-Napier district paid warm tribute to his care, encouragement, and faithful ministry, which he climaxed with another baptism of seven young people.180

In Auckland, Edwin and Florence Butz were kept busy visiting and conducting Bible studies181 for eighteen months, then in June 1934 they were transferred to South Australia for pastoral work.182 They took up residence in Prospect, Adelaide, and at the next South Australian Conference session, Butz was made religious liberty secretary.183 He had just turned seventy.

Despite his advanced age, Butz spent five and a half years in Adelaide as pastor at the Prospect and, later, Adelaide City churches. He participated in historic events such as the dedication of the Prospect Seventh-day Adventist Central School184 and the Adelaide City church.185 He became a favored choice to conduct funerals186 and had his parish extended to include “caring for the flock in the metropolitan area.”187

Their next move was to Victoria, where Butz was appointed to the gold-mining city of Ballarat in January 1940.188 It was now fifty years since he had started working for the church, and his forty-fifth year since coming to work in the South Pacific. He pastored in Ballarat for two years, attending the Australasian Union Conference session, which met in September 1940, where he brought joy and encouragement to many.189 Giving no sign of accepting retirement, at the 1942 Victorian Conference session he accepted an appointment to Geelong190 where he and Florence were celebrated with congratulations from across Australia on the occasion of their Golden Wedding Anniversary.191 The couple soon endeared themselves to the church family there.192

Final Years and Death

A few months after his eightieth birthday, in January 1945, Butz was transferred to the Melbourne metropolitan area. Here, he accepted the first concession that he had made to his age. He was appointed to general pastoral duties as a member of a team of seven.193 He began to suffer more frequent health issues, experiencing an accident in March 1946194 followed by a period of illness,195 and then a prolonged attack of shingles.196

By 1947, he had been adopted as the church pastor for the Oakleigh church and worked hard at fund-raising for the building of a church and school there.197 In 1950 Florence’s waning health necessitated care, so Alma retired from her missionary position to come to live with her parents and provide the help needed.198 Her father continued conducting funerals,199 participated in an ordination,200 and even took part in a marriage ceremony.201 He and Florence celebrated their own Diamond Wedding Anniversary, which was reported in the Melbourne Age newspaper.202

On September 27, 1952, Florence Butz had her own moment of fame, being honored as the longest-attending Sabbath School member in Australia.203 Edwin Butz’s last reported public act was the laying of the commemoration stone at the completion of the Oakleigh church building, on October 5, 1952.204 He remained interested in the progress of the church work and now and then shared a reminiscence or message with the readers of the church papers.205

In 1955, both Edwin and Florence Butz spent some weeks in the Warburton Adventist Sanitarium,206 but during 1956 Edwin Butz’s health rapidly declined.207 In early July 1956, he fell and broke his hip. He died on July 19, just six weeks before his ninety-second birthday, and was buried the next day at the Springvale Cemetery.208

Florence Butz died eight months later in the Warburton Sanitarium, on March 20, 1957.209 They were both much loved and during their ministry touched thousands of lives. In their humility they unquestioningly accepted positions which others may have considered to be a demotion, always putting their whole energy into whatever they were asked to do and uncomplainingly uprooting themselves time after time, when they might have seemed to be just settling into a task. Their lives were spent far from their native land, looking “for the city which has foundations, whose builder and maker is God.”210

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Litster, W. R. “Distribution of Labour in Victoria.” Australasian Record, June 3, 1946.

Litster, W. R. “Victorian Conference Session.” Australasian Record, February 12, 1945.

“Lord Howe Island.” Australasian Record, April 7, 1913.

Mancy, J. “Dedication of New Health Food Factory.” Australasian Record, April 18, 1921.

Mason, Thelma. “Our Teachers.” Australasian Record, March 17, 1924.

“A member and worker...” Australasian Record, October 13, 1913.

Meyers, Cecil K. “A Missionary Fallen.” Australasian Record, June 14, 1920.

Montgomery, O. and C. K. Meyers. “Proceedings of the General Conference.” ARH, May 30, 1926.

“Mrs. Ada M. Christian of Pitcairn...” Australasian Record, October 28, 1929.

“Mrs. E. S. Butz writes...” Australasian Record, July 29, 1935.

“New South Wales Camp-Meeting.” Australasian Record, October 30, 1911.

“New South Wales Conference.” Australasian Record, December 3, 1917.

New York Passenger List, SS Makura, 1926

“News Notes from Avondale.” Australasian Record, October 17, 1927.

“Notes from North New Zealand.” Australasian Record, July 25, 1932.

Olsen, O. A. “Recent Labours.” Australasian Record, May 17, 1909.

Olsen, O. A. “South Australian Conference.” Australasian Record, May 14, 1906.

“On his arrival...” Australasian Record, December 8. 1913.

“On July 10, Pastor C. H. Watson . . .” Australasian Record, July 19, 1915.

Paap, C. A. “Manilla Mission.” Australasian Record, October 4, 1915.

Parker, C. H. “Mission Property.” Australasian Record, September 28, 1914.

Parker, C. H. “Tasmanian Camp-Meeting.” Australasian Record, January 2, 1911.

Parker, C. H. “Tasmanian General Meeting.” Australasian Record, April 4, 1910.

Pascoe, J. “Victoria.” Australasian Record, March 2, 1942.

“Pastor and Mrs E. S. Butz . ..” Australasian Record, October 17, 1955.

“Pastor and Mrs. E. S. Butz...” Australasian Record, March 28, 1927.

“Pastor Butz...” Australasian Record, August 18, 1919.

“Pastor Butz...” Australasian Record, July 10, 1916.

“Pastor Butz and family...” Australasian Record, November 29, 1909.

“Pastor Butz and wife...” Australasian Record, October 3, 1921.

“Pastor Butz is starting...” Australasian Record, December 20, 1909.

“Pastor Butz planned . . .” Australasian Record, April 28 1907.

“Pastor Butz reached Suva...” Australasian Record, March 30, 1914.

“Pastor Butz returned...” Australasian Record, July 7, 1913.

“Pastor E. S. Butz...” Australasian Record, February 10, 1930.

“Pastor E. S. Butz...” Australasian Record, November 7, 1932.

“Pastor E. S. Butz...” Australasian Record, September 2, 1912.

“Pastor E. S. Butz arrived...” Australasian Record, May 4, 1914.

“Pastor E. S. Butz...” Australasian Record, February 15, 1932.

“Pastor E. S. Butz...” Australasian Record, July 30, 1917.

“Pastor H. E. Piper...” Australasian Record, April 24. 1916.

“Pastors Butz and Paap...” Australasian Record, October 30, 1911.

“Pastors Fulton and Butz...” Australasian Record, October 4, 1909.

Patching, S. L. “Dedication of Prospect Central School.” Australasian Record, June 1, 1936.

“Personal.” Australasian Record, May 21, 1956.

Piper, A. H. “The North New Zealand Camp.” Australasian Record, February 13, 1933.

Piper, H. E. “Evangelistic Missions in North New Zealand.” Australasian Record, June 12, 1933.

Piper, H. E. “Notes from Victoria.” Australasian Record, September 13, 1943.

Piper, H. E. “Our Evangelistic Missions.” Australasian Record, December 4, 1933.

Randle, George A. “Young People’s Society, Kensington, South Australia.” Australasian Record, October 21. 1906.

“Regular Readers for 57 Years.” Australasian Record, July 11, 1955.

“Report of the Australasian Union Conference.” Australasian Record, October 12, 1914.

“Retreat Items.” Pacific Health Journal and Temperance Advocate, September 1892.

Schowe, “C. H. Education Department.” Australasian Record, April 25, 1927.

Sheffield, J. Allday. “Hastings, New Zealand.” Australasian Record, March 20, 1933.

“Sister Dexter...” Australasian Record, December 15, 1913.

“Sister Ferris of Norfolk...” Australasian Record, April 7, 1913.

Smith, Noel H. J. “Commemoration Stone Laid at Oakleigh.” Australasian Record, December 1, 1952.

“Soldiers and Sailors Database.” United States National Park Service. 2015. Accessed February 25, 2020. https://www.nps.gov/civilwar/soldiers-and-sailors-database.htm.

“South Australian Conference and Camp-Meeting.” Australasian Record, April 29, 1935.

Stewart, A. G. “Obituary, Wiles.” Australasian Record, August 9, 1920.

Stewart, G. G. “Tonga, Friendly Isles.” Australasian Record, January 12, 1914.

“The Australasian Missionary College . . .” Australasian Record, February 11, 1918.

“The company sailing . . .” ARH, April 16, 1895.

“The friends of Pastor . . .” Australasian Record, March 22.

“The General Conference.” ARH, March 5, 1895.

“The General Conference.” ARH, March 12, 1895.

“The Lake Union Conference Council.” ARH, August 20, 1901.

“Their Friends Did Not Forget.” Australasian Record, July 14, 1952.

“Thirty-Seventh Annual Session, South Australia.” Australasian Record, April 25, 1938.

Turner, W. G. “The New Zealand Earthquake.” Australasian Record, February 16, 1931.

Turner, W. G. “West Australian Camp Meeting.” Australasian Record, May 2, 1921.

“Union Conference Appointments.” Australasian Record, February 25, 1929.

United States Passport Applications, 1795-1925. Digital images. FamilySearch.org. Accessed February 20, 2020, https://familysearch.org.

Victoria, Australia, Death Index, 1836-1988. Ancestry.com. Accessed March 11, 2020. https://www.ancestry.com.

“The Victorian Conference.” Australasian Record, March 7, 1910.

“Victorian Panorama.” Australasian Record, July 29, 1946.

“We are glad to . . .” Australasian Record, January 21, 1907.

Weiss, C. C. “Honour Member for Australasian Division.” Australasian Record, November 17, 1952.

“While returning from Samoa...” Australasian Record, March 2, 1914.

Woods, J. H. “Gleanings from the Field.” Australasian Record, December 5, 1910.

Woods, J. H. “New South Wales.” Australasian Record, January 2, 1911.

Woods, J. H. “Notes from the New South Wales Conference.” Australasian Record, February 6, 1911.

“Writing the day before embarking...” Australasian Record, February 25, 1929.

Notes

  1. P. A. Donaldson, “Butz,” Australasian Record, May 27, 1957, 15.

  2. New York Passenger List, SS Makura, 1926 https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:33S7-95GC-SKX?i=68&cc=1916078&personaUrl=%2Fark%3A%2F61903%2F1%3A1%3AKX4T-STY accessed February 20, 2020

  3. Victoria, Australia, Death Index, 1836-1988, Edwin Sebastian Butz, Ancestry.com, accessed March 11, 2020, https://www.ancestry.com.

  4. 1870 United States Census, Macon County, Illinois, roll M593_249; FHL microfilm 545748, page 616B, digital image, “Wise, George,” FamilySearch.org, accessed February 25, 2020, https://familysearch.org; Bernhard Butz arrived in New Orleans aboard the Milan in 1854. See “United States Germans to America Index, 1850-1897,” FamilySearch.org, accessed March 11, 2020, https://familysearch.org.

  5. United States Passport Applications, 1795-1925, digital image, “Edwin Sebastian Butz,” FamilySearch.org, accessed February 20, 2020, https://familysearch.org.

  6. Bernard Butz served in the New York Infantry, 52nd Regiment of the Union Army. See “Soldiers and Sailors Database,” United States National Park Service, 2015, accessed February 25, 2020, https://www.nps.gov/civilwar/soldiers-and-sailors-database.htm.

  7. 1870 United States Census, Macon County, Illinois, roll M593_249; FHL microfilm 545748, page 616B, digital image, “Wise, George,” FamilySearch.org, accessed February 25, 2020, https://familysearch.org.

  8. Gwen M. Judge, “Another Beginning at New Zealand Missionary School,” Australasian Record, April 9. 1928, 4.

  9. Ibid.

  10. Edwin S. Butz, “Missionary Adventures of 1894,” Australasian Record, December 14, 1942, 4-5.

  11. R. M. Kilgore, “Illinois Conference Proceedings,” ARH, October 22, 1889, 666.

  12. E. S. Butz, “Tonga To Sydney,” Australasian Record, February 1, 1906, 2-3.

  13. E. S. Butz, “Present When the ‘Pitcairn’ was Dedicated,” Australasian Record, July 29, 1935, 7.

  14. California Marriages, 1850-1945, Edwin S. Butz, FamilySearch.org, accessed February 20, 2020, https://www.familysearch.org.

  15. Ibid.

  16. “California, San Francisco Passenger Lists, 1893-1953,” digital image, “Butz, Edwin Sebastian,” FamilySearch.org, accessed February 20, 2020, https://familysearch.org.

  17. P. A. Donaldson, “Florence Martha Butz obituary,” Australasian Record, May 27, 1957, 15.

  18. Iowa Death Certificates, Fayette County, 1904-1920, 1906 No. 33 481.

  19. Nason Hoyt, “Minerva Davis obituary,” ARH, September 15, 1874, 103.

  20. Ibid.

  21. “Mrs. E. S. Butz writes...,” Australasian Record, July 29, 1935, 7.

  22. P. A. Donaldson, “Florence Martha Butz obituary,” Australasian Record, May 27, 1957, 15.

  23. “Retreat Items,” Pacific Health Journal and Temperance Advocate, September 1892, 285.

  24. E. E. Andross, “Edna Fern Butz obituary,” ARH, April 16, 1895, 254.

  25. R. Brandstater, “Life-Sketch of Alma Bernice Wiles,” Australasian Record, June 16, 1980, 10.

  26. A. G. Stewart, “Obituary, Wiles,” Australasian Record, August 9, 1920, 6.

  27. Ibid.

  28. R. Brandstater, “Life-Sketch of Alma Bernice Wiles,” Australasian Record, June 16, 1980, 10.

  29. “The General Conference,” ARH, March 5, 1895, 154-155.

  30. “The General Conference,” ARH, March 12, 1895, 170-171.

  31. George C. Tenney, “The company sailing . . .,” ARH, May 14, 1895, 320.

  32. E. S. Butz, “Missionary Adventures of 1894,” Australasian Record, December 7, 1942, 4-5; “Pitcairn (schooner),” Wikipedia, accessed November 15, 2019, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pitcairn_(schooner).

  33. E. S. Butz, “Missionary Adventures of 1894,” Australasian Record, December 7, 1942, 4-5.

  34. Ibid.

  35. E. Hilliard, “Tonga Island,” ARH, December 29, 1896, 830-831.

  36. G. A. Irwin, “My Trip to Australia,” ARH, November 1899, 758.

  37. E. Hilliard, “From Tongatabu to Sydney,” Australasian Record, November 1, 1899, 13.

  38. E. S. Butz, “Missionary Adventures of 1894,” Australasian Record, December 7, 1942, 4-5.

  39. R. W. Smith, “Edwards,” Australasian Record, October 2, 1922, 7.

  40. E. S. Butz, “Hawaiian Mission Field,” General Conference Bulletin, April 17, 1901, 298-299.

  41. P. A. Donaldson, “Florence Martha Butz obituary,” Australasian Record, May 27, 1957, 15; M. G. Huffman, “Illinois,” ARH, December 31, 1901, 853.

  42. “The Lake Union Conference Council,” ARH, August 20, 1901, 542-543.

  43. “Brother E. S. Butz...,” ARH, January 21, 1902, 48.

  44. Geo. A. Irwin, “The Work in Australia,” Australasian Record, June 1, 1902, 13-15.

  45. Ibid.

  46. E. H. Gates, “The Tongan Islands,” Australasian Record, July 1, 1904, 2.

  47. E. S. Butz, “Word from Tonga,” Australasian Record, April 15, 1905, 2-3.

  48. J. Cernik, “Golden Jubilee, Tonga, Friendly Islands,” Australasian Record, November 28, 1949, 6.

  49. Edwin S. Butz, “Tonga to Sydney,” Australasian Record, February 1, 1906, 2-3.

  50. “Brother and Sister Butz, . . . ,” Australasian Record, January 15, 1906, 7.

  51. “After spending . . . ,” Australasian Record, February 1, 1906, 2-3.

  52. T. H. Craddock, J. E. Steed, “South Australia,” Australasian Record, March 5, 1906, 4-5.

  53. O. A. Olsen, “South Australian Conference,” Australasian Record, May 14, 1906, 8.

  54. Ibid.

  55. H. Mitchell, “The Spirit of the Pioneers,” Australasian Record, June 21, 1948, 2.

  56. George A. Randle, “Young People’s Society, Kensington, South Australia,” Australasian Record, October 21. 1906, 7.

  57. “Pastor Butz and family...,” Australasian Record, November 29, 1909, 8.

  58. “It is with much regret . . .,” Australasian Record, December 31, 1906, 7.

  59. “From a recent letter . . . ,” Australasian Record, February 4, 1907, 7.

  60. “We are glad to . . .,” Australasian Record, January 21, 1907, 7.

  61. “From a recent letter . . .,” Australasian Record, February 4, 1907, 7.

  62. J. E. Fulton, “South Australian Camp-Meeting,” Australasian Record, April 28, 1907, 5.

  63. “Pastor Butz planned . . .,” Australasian Record, April 29, 1907, 7.

  64. E. S. Butz, “South Australia,” Australasian Record, January 20, 1908, 5.

  65. O. A. Olsen, “Recent Labours,” Australasian Record, May 17, 1909, 8.

  66. “Distribution of Labour,” Australasian Record, October 4, 1909, 4.

  67. “Pastors Fulton and Butz...,” Australasian Record, October 4, 1909, 8.

  68. Pastor Butz and family...,” Australasian Record, November 29, 1909, 8.

  69. T. Aylesbury Brown, “Mt Gambier,” Australasian Record, December 13, 1909, 5-6.

  70. “Pastor Butz is starting...,” Australasian Record, December 20, 1909, 8.

  71. “The Victorian Conference,” Australasian Record, March 7, 1910, 5-8.

  72. C. H. Parker, “Tasmanian General Meeting,” Australasian Record, April 4, 1910, 4.

  73. E. S. Butz, “Tasmania, Some Notes from My Diary,” Australasian Record, August 29, 1910, 4.

  74. J. H. Woods, “Gleanings from the Field,” Australasian Record, December 5, 1910, 5.

  75. C. H. Parker, “Tasmanian Camp-Meeting,” Australasian Record, January 2, 1911, 4.

  76. J. H. Woods, “New South Wales,” Australasian Record, January 2, 1911, 4.

  77. J. H. Woods, “Notes from the New South Wales Conference,” Australasian Record, February 6, 1911, 6.

  78. “Brother Walde and family...,” Australasian Record, May 13, 1912, 8; Alma B. Butz, “Avondale Church Missionary Meeting,” Australasian Record, April 24, 1911, 8.

  79. “Pastors Butz and Paap...,” Australasian Record, October 30, 1911, 8.

  80. “New South Wales Camp-Meeting,” Australasian Record, October 30, 1911, 5.

  81. “Pastor E. S. Butz...,” Australasian Record, September 2, 1912, 8.

  82. “Lord Howe Island,” Australasian Record, April 7, 1913, 3.

  83. “From Lord Howe Island to the New Hebrides,” Australasian Record, April 7, 1913, 4.

  84. C. H. Parker, “Mission Property,” Australasian Record, September 28, 1914, 46-48.

  85. Cecil K. Meyers, “A Missionary Fallen,” Australasian Record, June 14, 1920, 20.

  86. “Sister Ferris of Norfolk...,” Australasian Record, April 7, 1913, 8.

  87. “Pastor Butz returned...,” Australasian Record, July 7, 1913, 8.

  88. “Distribution of Labour,” Australasian Record, October 13, 1913, 4.

  89. “Liquor Misrepresentation,” Australasian Record, October 13, 6.

  90. “A member and worker...,” Australasian Record, October 13, 1913, 8.

  91. “In accordance with...,” Australasian Record, November 3, 1913, 8.

  92. “On his arrival...,” Australasian Record, December 8. 1913, 8.

  93. Ibid.

  94. “Sister Dexter...,” Australasian Record, December 15, 1913, 8.

  95. Ibid.

  96. Edwin S. Butz, “The Mission Site in Samoa,” Australasian Record, March 2, 1914, 3.

  97. Ibid.

  98. Edwin S. Butz, “Vavau, Tonga Islands,” Australasian Record, March 9, 1914, 5.

  99. “From Neiafu, Vavau, Tonga...,” Australasian Record, March 2, 1914, 8.

  100. G. G. Stewart, “Tonga, Friendly Isles,” Australasian Record, January 12, 1914, 5.

  101. Edwin S. Butz, “Vavau, Tonga Islands,” Australasian Record, March 9, 1914, 5.

  102. “While returning from Samoa...,” Australasian Record, March 2, 1914, 8.

  103. Ibid.

  104. “Pastor Butz reached Suva...,” Australasian Record, March 30, 1914, 8.

  105. “Pastor E. S. Butz arrived...,” Australasian Record, May 4, 1914, 8.

  106. Edwin S. Butz, “Attention! Union Conference and New South Wales Camp-Meeting,” Australasian Record, August 3, 1914, 7.

  107. J. E. Fulton, “The Coming Union Conference,” Australasian Record, August 3, 1914, 7.

  108. “Report of the Australasian Union Conference,” Australasian Record, October 12, 1914, 13.

  109. Ibid.

  110. Edwin S. Butz, “John Patava obituary.” Australasian Record, January 11, 1915, 7.

  111. “Brother Norman Wiles...,” Australasian Record, January 11, 1915, 8.

  112. “Distribution of Labour,” Australasian Record, July 5, 1915, 7.

  113. “On July 10, Pastor C. H. Watson...,” Australasian Record, July 19, 1915, 8.

  114. Edwin S. Butz, “Baptismal Service in the South Brisbane Church,” Australasian Record, June 21, 1915, 7.

  115. L. and L. Currow, “News from Cairns, Queensland,” Australasian Record, September 6, 1915, 6.

  116. Ibid.

  117. E. S. Butz, “Monamona Mission,” Australasian Record, September 20, 1915, 2-3.

  118. Ibid.

  119. “On July 10, Pastor C. H. Watson…,” Australasian Record, July 19, 1915, 8.

  120. R. Hare, “Queensland Camp-Meeting,” Australasian Record, October 11, 1915, 6-7.

  121. “Pastor H. E. Piper...,” Australasian Record, April 24. 1916, 8.

  122. Ibid.

  123. C. A. Paap, “Manilla Mission,” Australasian Record, October 4, 1915, 6.

  124. “Pastor Butz...,” Australasian Record, July 10, 1916, 8.

  125. E. H. Gates, P. G. Foster, “New South Wales Conference,” Australasian Record, November 27, 1916, 5.

  126. F. J. Butler, “Notes from New South Wales,” Australasian Record, April 9, 1917, 5.

  127. Ibid.

  128. Edwin S. Butz, “A New Church Organized,” Australasian Record, June 4, 1917, 7.

  129. “Pastor E. S. Butz,...,” Australasian Record, July 30, 1917, 7.

  130. “New South Wales Conference,” Australasian Record, December 3, 1917, 3-4.

  131. Ibid.

  132. F. J. Butler, “Notes from New South Wales,” Australasian Record, March 25, 1918, 8.

  133. Ibid; Charles E. Ashcroft, “A Baptismal Service,” Australasian Record, April 22, 1918, 8.

  134. F. J. Butler, “Notes from New South Wales,” Australasian Record, March 25, 1918, 8.

  135. “The Australasian Missionary College...,” Australasian Record, February 11, 1918, 8.

  136. J. M. Cole, “New South Wales Conference,” Australasian Record, October 21, 1918, 38-39.

  137. “Distribution of Labour,” Australasian Record, November 11, 1918, 36.

  138. “Brother and Sister Butz...,” Australasian Record, December 9, 1918, 36.

  139. Edwin S. Butz, “Western Australia,” Australasian Record, May 12, 1919, 4.

  140. “In Boulder...,” Australasian Record, June 9, 1919, 8.

  141. Edwin S. Butz, “Western Australia,” Australasian Record, May 12, 1919, 4.

  142. J. Mancy, “Dedication of New Health Food Factory,” Australasian Record, April 18, 1921, 5.

  143. “Pastor Butz...,” Australasian Record, August 18, 1919, 8.

  144. Ross E. G. Blair, “Trophies for Christ,” Australasian Record, July 21, 1919, 5-6.

  145. M. Ferguson, “A Dedicatory Service,” Australasian Record, April 5, 1920, 2.

  146. H. C. Harker, “Cottesloe Beach, West Australia,” Australasian Record, May 31, 1920, 6.

  147. W. G. Turner, “West Australian Camp Meeting,” Australasian Record, May 2, 1921, 3-4.

  148. “Decisions of the Union Conference Council, Held July 19 to August 4, 1921,” Australasian Record, September 5, 1921, 5.

  149. Ibid, 6.

  150. Pastor Butz and wife...,” Australasian Record, October 3, 1921, 8; R. H. Constandt, “West Australia,” Australasian Record, October 31, 1921, 8.

  151. Thelma Mason, “Our Teachers,” Australasian Record, March 17, 1924, 4.

  152. Rhae Allbon, “College Notes,” Australasian Record, December 1, 1924, 2.

  153. Rhae Allbon, “Here and There at the College,” Australasian Record, March 29, 1926, 4.

  154. Ibid.

  155. J. E. Fulton, “Sailing for America,” Australasian Record, April 5. 1926, 8.

  156. Ibid.

  157. O. Montgomery, C. K. Meyers, “Proceedings of the General Conference,” ARH, May 30, 1926, 11.

  158. E. S. Butz, “Letter from Pastor Butz,” Australasian Record, December 6, 1926, 2.

  159. “Pastor and Mrs. E. S. Butz,...,” Australasian Record, March 28, 1927, 8.

  160. Ibid.

  161. C. H. Schowe, “Education Department,” Australasian Record, April 25, 1927, 4.

  162. “Distribution of labour in...,” Australasian Record, February 13, 1928, 8.

  163. “Union Conference Appointments,” Australasian Record, February 25, 1929, 8.

  164. “News Notes from Avondale,” Australasian Record, October 17, 1927, 5.

  165. “Writing the day before embarking...,” Australasian Record, February 25, 1929, 8.

  166. Edwin S. Butz, “Our Return to New Zealand,” Australasian Record, January 13, 1930, 3.

  167. “Mrs. Ada M. Christian of Pitcairn...,” Australasian Record, October 28, 1929, 8.

  168. E. S. Butz, “Baptism on Pitcairn,” Australasian Record, October 28, 1929, 8.

  169. Edwin S. Butz, “Our Return to New Zealand,” Australasian Record, January 13, 1930, 3.

  170. “Pastor E. S. Butz...,” Australasian Record, February 10, 1930, 8.

  171. P. Glockler, “North New Zealand Annual Conference,” Australasian Record, March 2, 1931, 6.

  172. W. G. Turner, “The New Zealand Earthquake,” Australasian Record, February 16, 1931, 8.

  173. E. S. Butz, “Hawkes Bay, New Zealand,” Australasian Record, November 9, 1931, 6.

  174. “Letter from Brother Hookings,” Australasian Record, March 16, 1931, 4-5.

  175. “Dedication Ceremony of New Church at Napier,” Australasian Record, February 15, 1932, 5.

  176. “Pastor E. S. Butz...,” Australasian Record, February 15, 1932, 8.

  177. “Notes from North New Zealand,” Australasian Record, July 25, 1932, 4-5.

  178. “Pastor E. S. Butz...,” Australasian Record, November 7, 1932, 8.

  179. A. H. Piper, “The North New Zealand Camp,” Australasian Record, February 13, 1933, 6.

  180. J. Allday Sheffield, “Hastings, New Zealand,” Australasian Record, March 20, 1933, 8.

  181. H. E. Piper, “Evangelistic Missions in North New Zealand,” Australasian Record, June 12, 1933, 3; H. E. Piper, “Our Evangelistic Missions,” Australasian Record, December 4, 1933, 6.

  182. “After six and a half...,” Australasian Record, July 2, 1934, 8.

  183. “South Australian Conference and Camp-Meeting,” Australasian Record, April 29, 1935, 3.

  184. S. L. Patching, “Dedication of Prospect Central School,” Australasian Record, June 1, 1936, 5.

  185. John A. Charlton, “Dedication of City Church, Adelaide,” Australasian Record, October 5, 1936, 14.

  186. For example, see obituaries for Frances Page, Sister Sparrow, and Charles Barnes in the Australasian Record, March 27, 1939, 6.

  187. “Thirty-Seventh Annual Session, South Australia,” Australasian Record, April 25, 1938, 5.

  188. F. J. Butler, “Victorian Conference Session, January 9-21, 1940,” Australasian Record, March 4, 1940, 3.

  189. Rhoda A. Dyason, “Some Personalities at the Session,” Australasian Union Conference Bulletin No. 2, September 11, 1940, 2.

  190. J. Pascoe, “Victoria,” Australasian Record, March 2, 1942, 4.

  191. Edwin S. and Florence M. Butz, “Appreciation,” Australasian Record, June 29, 1942, 7.

  192. H. E. Piper, “Notes from Victoria,” Australasian Record, September 13, 1943, 5.

  193. W. R. Litster, “Victorian Conference Session,” Australasian Record, February 12, 1945, 8.

  194. “Victorian Panorama,” Australasian Record, July 29, 1946, 5-6.

  195. W. R. Litster, “Distribution of Labour in Victoria,” Australasian Record, June 3, 1946, 4.

  196. “Victorian Panorama,” Australasian Record, July 29, 1946, 5-6.

  197. “In the Oakleigh Town Hall, . . .,” Australasian Record, March 17, 1947, 8.

  198. “Owing to the advanced age . . . ,” Australasian Record, July 24, 1950, 8.

  199. Edwin S. Butz, “Rouke,” Australasian Record, July 16, 1951, 7.

  200. “On the first Sabbath, . . .,” Australasian Record, January 28, 1952, 8.

  201. H. W. Kingston, “Butcher-Cole–Dyson-Cole,” Australasian Record, October 27, 1952, 7.

  202. “Their Friends Did Not Forget,” Australasian Record, July 14, 1952, 3-4.

  203. C. C. Weiss, “Honour Member for Australasian Division,” Australasian Record, November 17, 1952, 4.

  204. Noel H. J. Smith, “Commemoration Stone Laid at Oakleigh,” Australasian Record, December 1, 1952, 4.

  205. “The friends of Pastor . . .,” Australasian Record, March 22, 1954, 15; T. C. Lawson, “An Evening With the Australasian Division,” ARH, June 1, 1954, 159; “Regular Readers for 57 Years,” Australasian Record, July 11, 1955, 13.

  206. “Pastor and Mrs E. S. Butz . . .,” Australasian Record, October 17, 1955, 16.

  207. “Personal,” Australasian Record, May 21, 1956, 2.

  208. T. C. Lawson, “Butz,” Australasian Record, August 6, 1956, 14.

  209. P. A. Donaldson, “Florence Martha Butz obituary,” Australasian Record, May 27, 1957, 15.

  210. Hebrews 11:10.

×

Tarburton, Shirley. "Butz, Edwin Sebastian (1864–1956) and Florence Martha (Davis) (1868–1957)." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. March 15, 2021. Accessed August 03, 2022. https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=AF5M.

Tarburton, Shirley. "Butz, Edwin Sebastian (1864–1956) and Florence Martha (Davis) (1868–1957)." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. March 15, 2021. Date of access August 03, 2022, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=AF5M.

Tarburton, Shirley (2021, March 15). Butz, Edwin Sebastian (1864–1956) and Florence Martha (Davis) (1868–1957). Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. Retrieved August 03, 2022, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=AF5M.