São Paulo Old People’s Home

By Adilson da Silva Vieira

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Adilson da Silva Vieira

São Paulo Old People’s Home (CACI) was an institution that assisted impoverished elderly Adventists who had no one to take care of them. It operated from 1950 to 2007. The place, known as the Old People’s Home, operated as a boarding facility providing services for elderly men and women. Its last address was in the territory of the Central Brazil Union Conference (UCB), at Celavisa Street, no. 18, Zip Code 05890-060, Jardim Alvorada, São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil.

Developments That Led to the Institution’s Establishment

The twentieth century was marked by two great world wars which took millions of lives.1 While these wars caused a historic rupture on a global level, a “missionary incursion” in the city of São Paulo led to very different results. On August 10, 1912, the first Adventist converts were baptized in the city of São Paulo, which at the time had 350,000 inhabitants. The result of the work of missionary Frederick W. Spies, on that occasion four people gave their lives to Christ in the Tietê River waters. Spies was optimistic he would soon be able to build a church for the congregation in the city.2

By 1914, the situation was less optimistic, as opposition to the Adventist message arose in São Paulo. In one instance, a prestigious Catholic priest approached the city police chief asking for the Adventists to be banned. The clergyman wanted to end any evangelistic work that had been started in the city. The commander refused to accept the request of the religious leader; nevertheless, the persecutions continued in other ways.3

Amid resistance, the Adventist Church continued to seek and reach people for Christ. In 1914, John Lipke introduced the health message into his biblical evangelistic presentations. His new method reaped results. Twenty people decided to give their lives to Jesus, and another fourteen made a commitment to do so at a later opportunity. On August 22, 1914, seventeen more people were baptized, this time in the neighboring city of Santo Amaro, which was about ten kilometers from São Paulo. Construction of a chapel to serve as a place of worship for the new converts was completed in September 1914.4 Events like these filled Adventist members with enthusiasm. This sequence of events was one of the factors that contributed to the establishment of the first Adventist church in the capital, established on January 17, 1915.5

The year 1915 was also marked by the establishment of the Brazilian Seminary (CAB, now Brazil Adventist University, Campus São Paulo or UNASP-SP). The establishment of the CAB promoted the development of Adventist education in the country.6 CAB would eventually become “the largest educational institution of the SDA Church in the world.”7 Although the creation and establishment of this educational institution demonstrated Adventists’ commitment to serving young people, the Church’s goal was to assist people of all ages.

In this context, the Church focused on evangelistic actions that would also reach elderly people. It was estimated that the elderly population of the entire state of São Paulo was around 4% of the total population. This percentage, although reflecting the 1920s and 1940s reality,8 was significant in numerical terms. Around the mid-1930s, the capital São Paulo became the largest city in Brazil and the first city in the federation to surpass the amount of one million inhabitants.9

Over the years, the elderly population in Brazil grew and with it the need to provide services for their specific concerns. Although it was already a developed city, the reality was no different in São Paulo. At that time, Adventists were already providing aid through the Dorcas Society.10 Such contributions developed in different parts of Brazil, as well as in the regions of the main city of São Paulo. However, it was evident that more focused missionary actions would still be needed specifically for the older population.

At the time, there was a transition in leadership of the Adventist Church in the state of São Paulo. In 1941, coming from southern Brazil, Germano Ritter arrived in São Paulo to take over the presidency of the São Paulo Conference (AP). Thereafter, efforts began for the development of the medical missionary work in the territory covered by the AP.11 As a result, on March 8, 1942, the São Paulo Clinic (now São Paulo Adventist Hospital or HASP) was inaugurated. This was the first official Adventist health institution to be established in Brazil.12

After this event, the São Paulo Conference began planning for more substantive assistance to the elderly population. In 1943, the conference recommended to the South Brazil Union Conference (USB, no the Central Brazil Union Conference) that they study the possibility of establishing an old people’s home in the city. On December 2 of that same year, the names of Germano Ritter, A. Schwantes, Moisés Nigri, R. Belz, Galdino N. Vieira, Maria Dias, Mauro Silveira, and J. Santos Pinto13 were voted to form a commission tasked to study the plans for the organization of an old people’s home.

The commission met at CAB in January 1944 and concluded that the establishment of an old people’s home would help to ease the assistance problems of this demographic. In addition to this resolution, the commission evaluated several different requests for the creation of specific assistance services. At that same meeting, the commission also decided that it was time to build an old people’s home. For this project, the conference would provide financial support through both existing resources and fundraising campaigns. In addition, the South American Division was asked to fund the purchase of a piece of land near the CAB.14

Some months went by before the São Paulo Conference had a chance to study the project. Then, a new commission was formed with the purpose of studying and recommending the project blueprint. Their agenda was to: (1) study the old people’s home construction and maintenance financing plan; (2) outline a draft of the institution’s internal regulations; and (3) chose the facility’s name.15 On April 19, 1945, a new request was made to the institutions that maintained the AP (USB and SAD), requesting approval to begin construction of the old people’s home. The request was accompanied by a report of considerations supporting the immediate need for the old people’s home.

At the time, the conference received a donation from a church member named Maria Dias, who when making the contribution clearly stated that the amount should be used exclusively to build the old people’s home. The AP had already purchased the land for the construction.16 In addition to area for a building, the land had an orchard.17 However, the end of the decade was approaching, and the dream of building an old people’s home had not yet come through. In 1948, São Paulo Conference asked the Dorcas Society to run a special Christmas campaign throughout the conference of which 50% of the proceeds would be used towards the old people’s home.18 The plan was that, the institution would initially house not only elderly people, but also orphans and other needy people. At the time, there were 189 Adventist congregations in the state of São Paulo, as well as institutions like the Brazilian Seminary and São Paulo Clinic.19

Founding of the Institution

Construction begin in April 1948 on the property purchased by the AP in the Vila Guarani neighborhood of São Paulo. To finance the construction, assistance from the USB was necessary, and part of the São Paulo Clinic profits were also used for this purpose.20 Ernesto Bohry supervised construction. To clear the road that would lead to the building, Norman Manski was hired. Campaigns continued to raise funds for the project.21

The construction was not easily completed. Many obstacles arose during the building process before it was possible to inaugurate the long-dreamed building. At the end of 1949, only water and electricity installation were missing. Trying to solve the issues related to electricity, the old people’s home was assisted by neighbors, who provided a new electricity grid installation. For everything to be successfully completed, the old people’s home received other contributions, including funds from the Brazilian Seminary and the Adventist health food factory, Superbom.22

Despite the obstacles, church leaders expected the building to be complete by February 27, 1950. However, when the day arrived the building was not ready for occupancy. In addition, some medical equipment was still missing. Within a few weeks, this equipment was obtained through the financial contributions of the Ilida Nigri, Cecília Kuempel, Isaura Peixoto, Isolina Waldvogel, among others.23

By 1950, the AP leadership concluded that they could not wait for all the details to be in place before opening the Old people’s Home. It was evident its services were urgently needed as some Adventist elderly were close to abandonment, while others were close to death in other institutions without the spiritual comfort they needed. Another aggravating problem was that some elderly people who became ill did not have relatives to take care of them. When they were hospitalized at São Paulo Clinic, they did not want to leave because life outside of the hospital held many uncertainties. Thus, the decision was made to expedite the inauguration of the Old People’s Home.24

The Old People’s Home final opened in September 1950. At the inauguration ceremony, it was named the Lar Adventista da Velhice (São Paulo Old People’s Home), affectionately known as the Lar da Velhice (Old People’s Home). The institution was established at kilometers from São Paulo, in a considerably large area surrounded by nature.25 To direct the home, the São Paulo Conference invited Pastor Germano Conrado to be the first administrator. The institution also had an administrative board consisting of the USB president, the AP president and treasurer, the São Paulo Clinic director, the home’s director, the AP social service department director, and a board member appointed by the AP administrative board.26

The first residents were finally able to check in to the facility on November 5, 1950. They were Estevam Massmann and his sister. The following day, three more elderly women checked in: Josefina M. da Silva, Josina A. Barreto, and Virgília França.27 São Paulo Old People’s Home had a capacity for up to twenty-five people. The place offered its residents activities such as gardening, plant irrigation, and other manual activities that helped elderly people to have a more dynamic life experience.28

Until the end of 1950, São Paulo Old People’s Home admission policy had few requirements. However, after noticing certain possible risks stricter guidelines were created. One of the complications was that the home was not staffed with permanent care nurses who could care for residents with visual and motor difficulties, or elderly people who needed specific medical care. In addition, due to the large number of candidates that were almost or completely helpless, elderly people whose families had the possibility of keeping them in their care would not be accepted unless there were vacant rooms. These rules, although restrictive, were necessary to ensure the smooth functioning of the home and to avoid possible legal complications.29

History of the Institution

During the following decades, São Paulo Old People’s Home hosted social events which enriched the routine of elderly people. One of these was in May 1964, when the Dorcas Society honored elderly people on Mother’s Day. On that occasion, the society gave them twenty-four quilts and donated a new floor polishing machine. During the event there were several emotional moments, and tears, smiles and applauses of recognition marked the occasion.30 This was one of several programs provided by the Dorcas Society over the years.31

Throughout its history, São Paulo Old People’s Home had a considerable number of residents. From twenty-five residents in 1950, it grew to forty in 1964. Elderly people with different types of needs were assisted there. In 1966, the home received a lady named Elvira, who suffered from a spine disease that forced her to move around in a wheelchair. Due to this serious illness, she was welcomed in the Home at the age of forty.32 Even in such unfavorable circumstances, this illness did not prevent her from experiencing happy moments at São Paulo Old People’s Home. Remarkably, she married Roberto Beckendorf during the first years of her hospitalization. This is one of the most notable events in the home’s history.33

The 1970s was a decade of great progress for the Old People’s Home.34 During this period, the home functioned to full patient capacity. Ensuring the spiritual health of the residence was central to its mission. In the home’s routine schedule, two services were held daily for residents: A devotional service in the cafeteria space in the morning before breakfast, and an evening service in the chapel area.35

In the late 1970s, the home faced some adversities. Its facilities, as well as its furniture, suffered natural deterioration with time and use. As it was not possible to make necessary updates, the home could no longer offer adequate services. Unable to invest the considerable amount of money needed for upgrades and to maintain the home’s original mission, the AP voted on August 3, 1978, to gradually discontinue the São Paulo Old People’s Home.36

In the 1980s, the AP administration studied a transfer plan for the Old People’s Home facilities. The idea was to establish a new building for the home in the Campo de Fora neighborhood of Capão Redondo where there was already land that belonged to the Adventist Church. However, this relocation was not accomplished. What was done at the time was an address change.37 The new location to hold part of the activities was then at 18 Rua Celavisa, in Jardim Alvorada neighborhood, in the district of Capão Redondo, in São Paulo (SP).38 However, this change did not ease the difficulties that the institution faced. Unable to transfer all the activities of the home to the new address, it attempted to continue using the old and worn out facilities. But the situation was untenable due to both physical condition and lack of financial support from the AP.39

A possible solution to enable the continuation of the home arose through a partnership between AP and a company that supported the medical missionary work of the Adventist Church. The Golden Cross (a company that belonged at the time to the Brazilian entrepreneur and Adventist benefactor, Milton Afonso) was willing to help by donating all the necessary material for a complete renovation of the institution’s facilities. The conference was responsible for the workforce, and Golden Cross took over the financial responsibility for the entire renovation until its conclusion.40 After an administrative meeting, held on December 8, 1988, it was decided that the name of the institution would change to Centro Adventista de Convivência para Idosos (São Paulo Old People’s Home or CACI).41

This renovation extended the life of the home for nearly twenty more years. Even so, it was necessary to close the home in 2007. CACI made an important contribution to the history of Adventism in the state of São Paulo for about fifty-seven years.42 In its last years of operation, the home had ten employees and its facilities consisted of twelve rooms, six bathrooms, a ground floor building, a laundry room, a linen room, a warehouse, a chapel for religious meetings, three houses for elderly people, and a home for its administrator.43

Historical Role of the Institution

For more than fifty years, the São Paulo Old People’s Home filled a gap in the care for the elderly. Its mission was to care for the physical, mental, social, and spiritual well-being of its patients. Thus, during the time it operated, the institution followed the welfare principles bequeathed to the Adventist Church through Ellen G. White’s prophetic message.44 Over the years the home earned a reputation for excellent care. The institution left a legacy of Christian love for all elderly people who received care there.

Name List

Old People’s Home (1950-1988), São Paulo Old People’s Home (1989-2007).

List of Directors

Germano Conrado (1950-1955), Fernando Garcia (1956), Odorino Souza (1957), Edson Gomes (1958), Benedito Lisboa (1959-1960), Benoni Teixeira (1961), Antônio Torres (1962-1963), Frida Lopes (1964-1971), Romualdo Ferreira da Silva (1971-1974), Antônio Torres (1974-1976), Evaldo Krahembull (1976-1982), José Mendes (1982-1985), Alvino Xavier de Campos (1985-1992), Rubens Segre Ferreira (1993-2007).45

Sources

Beckedorff, Roberto. “Elvira.” Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], December 1971, 20.

Beckedorff, Roberto. “Lar da Velhice” [Old People’s Home]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], April 1970.

Bertoldo, Leandro. História e memória do adventismo em Mogi das Cruzes 1913-2017 [Adventism history and memory in Mogi das Cruzes 1913-2017]. Rio de Janeiro: Litteris, 2018.

Centro Nacional da Memória Adventista do Brasil [Brazil National Center of Adventist History]. Accessed July 2, 2020. https://bit.ly/2D480gK.

“Ecos da Assembleia da Associação Paulista” [São Paulo Conference Assembly Echoes]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], April 1948.

“Elvira Perebone Beckendorf.” Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], June 1987.

“Falecimentos: Linda Talvik de Oliveira” [Deaths: Linda Talvik de Oliveira]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], July 1990.

Ferraz, Francisco César Alves. “As Guerras Mundiais e seus veteranos: uma abordagem comparativa” [The World Wars and Their Veterans: A Comparative Approach]. Revista Brasileira de História [Brazilian Review of History] 28, no. 56 (December 2008): 463-486.

Guarda, Márcio Dias. “Ensino Superior” [Higher Education]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], May 6, 2015.

Hospital Adventista de São Paulo [São Paulo Adventist Hospital]. Accessed April 29, 2019. https://hasp.org.br/.

Hosokawa, Elder. “Da colina, rumo ao mar: Colégio Adventista Brasileiro, Santo Amaro, 1915-1947” [From the Hill, Towards the Sea: Brazil College, Santo Amaro, 1915-1947]. MA thesis, University of São Paulo, 2001.

Junior, Rodolpho T., José Cândido M.S. Machado e Fernanda Carvalho. “Perfil demográfico e condições sanitárias dos idosos em área urbana do Sudeste do Brasil” [Demographic profile and health conditions of the elderly in Brazil’s Southern urban area]. Academic article, São Paulo State University, 1995.

Keppke, E. “Dorcas Alemãs no Lar da Velhice” [German Dorcas at the Old People’s Home]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], December 1964.

Lipke, John. “Missão do Estado de S. Paulo” [State of S. Paulo Mission]. Revista Mensal [Monthly Review] 9, no. 5 (May 1914).

Minutes, East São Paulo Conference, 1950-1978. East São Paulo Conference archives, Sao Paolo, SP, Brazil.

Parotti, Duilio. “Festa das Mães no ‘Lar da Velhice’” [Mothers Celebration on the ‘Old People’s Home’]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], September 1964.

Rosa, Edson (ed.). 100 anos: conduzindo vidas em São Paulo [100 years: leading lives in São Paulo]. Tatuí, São Paulo: Brazil Publishing House, 2006.

Rueschel, R. “Visitando o ‘Lar da Velhice’” [Visiting the ‘Old People’s Home’]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], October 1971.

Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook. Hagerstown, MD.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1984-2008.

Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook. Washington, DC: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1949.

Silva da, Daniel Luis. “Centro Adventista de Convivência para Idosos: “Lar da Velhice” [São Paulo Old People’s Home: Old People’s Home]. Monograph: Brazil College, 1990.

Spies, FW “Missão Paulista” [São Paulo Mission]. Revista Mensal [Monthly Review] 7, no. 8 (August 1912): 4-5.

White, Ellen. Conselhos Sobre o Regime Alimentar [Counsels on Diet and Foods]. Tatuí, São Paulo: Brazil Publishing House, 2002.

Zanirato, Silvia Helena. “São Paulo 1930/1940: novos atores urbanos e a normatização social” [São Paulo 1930/1940: New Urban Actors and Social Normalization]. Academic Article Maringá State University, 2000.

Notes

  1. Francisco César Alves Ferraz, “As Guerras Mundiais e seus veteranos: uma abordagem comparativa” [The World Wars and Their Veterans: A Comparative Approach], Revista Brasileira de História [Brazilian Review of History] 28, no. 56 (December 2008): 463-486.

  2. F. W. Spies, “Missão Paulista” [São Paulo Mission], Revista Mensal [Monthly Review] 7, no. 8 (August 1912): 4-5.

  3. John Lipke, “Missão do Estado de S. Paulo” [State of S. Paulo Mission], Revista Mensal [Monthly Review] 9, no. 5 (May 1914): 2-5.

  4. Ibid.

  5. Edson Rosa (ed.), 100 anos: conduzindo vidas em São Paulo [100 Years: Leading Lives in São Paulo], (Tatuí, São Paulo: Brazil Publishing House, 2006), 31.

  6. Elder Hosokawa, “Da colina, rumo ao mar: Colégio Adventista Brasileiro, Santo Amaro, 1915-1947” [From the Hill, Towards the Sea: Brazil College, Santo Amaro, 1915-1947], (MA thesis, University of São Paulo, 2001), 88.

  7. Márcio Dias Guarda, “Ensino Superior” [Higher Education], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], May 6, 2015, accessed on May 23, 2019, https://bit.ly/2WbEpdZ.

  8. Rodolpho T. Junior, José Cândido MS Machado and Fernanda Carvalho, “Perfil demográfico e condições sanitárias dos idosos em área urbana do Sudeste do Brasil” [Demographic Profile and Health Conditions of the Elderly in Brazil’s Southern Urban Area] (Academic article, São Paulo State University, 1995), 490.

  9. Silvia Helena Zanirato, “São Paulo 1930/1940: novos atores urbanos e a normatização social” [São Paulo 1930/1940: New Urban Actors and Social Normalization], (Academic Article, Maringá State University, 2000), 1.

  10. “Dorcas Society was an assistance entity established by the Seventh-day Adventist Church in 1874, with the goal to ‘provide for the poor and needy’ in local churches. The name derives from the biblical character Tabita, or Dorcas, a Christian believer who helped the poor (Acts 9:36). Currently, it’s called Seventh-day Adventist Welfare Service (ASA).” South American Division, Manual da Ação Solidária Adventista [Seventh-day Adventist Welfare Service Manual], (Brasília, Brazil: South American Division, 2016): 13.

  11. Edson Rosa (ed.), 100 anos: conduzindo vidas em São Paulo [100 Years: Leading Lives in São Paulo], (Tatuí, São Paulo: Brazil Publishing House, 2006), 49.

  12. São Paulo Adventist Hospital, “História” [History] accessed April 29, 2019, https://bit.ly/2Xt3b8p.

  13. Ronaldo Alberto de Oliveira, São Paulo Conference executive secretary, email message to Carlos Flavio Teixeira, ESDA associated editor, May 20, 2019.

  14. Ibid.

  15. Ibid.

  16. Daniel Luis da Silva, “Centro Adventista de Convivência para Idosos: ‘Lar da Velhice’” [São Paulo Old People’s Home: Old People’s Home], Monograph: Brazil College, 1990, 2, 7.

  17. Ronaldo Alberto de Oliveira, São Paulo Conference executive secretary, email message to Carlos Flavio Teixeira, ESDA associated editor, May 20, 2019.

  18. Minutes of São Paulo Conference, November 10, 1948, vote no. 368-48.

  19. “Ecos da Assembleia da Associação Paulista” [São Paulo Conference Assembly Echoes], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], April 1948, 12; “São Paulo Conference,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, DC: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1949), 168.

  20. Ronaldo Alberto de Oliveira, São Paulo Conference executive secretary, email message to Carlos Flavio Teixeira, ESDA associated editor, May 20, 2019.

  21. Ibid.

  22. Daniel Luis da Silva, “Centro Adventista de Convivência para Idosos: ‘Lar da Velhice’” [São Paulo Old People’s Home: Old People’s Home], Monograph: Brazil College, 1990, 3.

  23. Ronaldo Alberto de Oliveira (São Paulo Conference executive secretary), email message to Carlos Flavio Teixeira (ESDA associated editor), May 20, 2019.

  24. Ibid.

  25. Minutes of São Paulo Conference, January 30, 1950, vote no. 50-50.

  26. Ronaldo Alberto de Oliveira (São Paulo Conference executive secretary), email message to Carlos Flavio Teixeira (ESDA associated editor), May 20, 2019.

  27. Daniel Luis da Silva, “Centro Adventista de Convivência para Idosos: ‘Lar da Velhice’” [São Paulo Old People’s Home: Old People’s Home], (Monography, Brazil College, 1990), 4.

  28. Leandro Bertoldo, História e memória do adventismo em Mogi das Cruzes 1913-2017 [Adventism history and memory in Mogi das Cruzes 1913-2017], (Rio de Janeiro: Litteris, 2018), 229.

  29. Ronaldo Alberto de Oliveira (São Paulo Conference executive secretary), email message to Carlos Flavio Teixeira (ESDA associated editor), May 20, 2019.

  30. Duilio Parotti, “Festa das Mães no ‘Lar da Velhice’” [Mothers Celebration on the ‘Old People’s Home’], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 9, year 59 (September 1964): 25.

  31. E. Keppke, “Dorcas Alemãs no Lar da Velhice” [German Dorcas at the Old People’s Home], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 12, year 59 (December 1964): 21; R. Rueschel, “Visitando o ‘Lar da Velhice’” [Visiting the ‘Old People’s Home’], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], October 1971, 27.

  32. Roberto Beckedorff, “Elvira,” Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], December 1971, 20; “Elvira Perebone Beckendorf,” Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], June 1987, 36.

  33. Brazil National Center of Adventist History, “Centro Adventista de Convivência para Idosos” [São Paulo Old People’s Home], accessed July 2, 2020, https://bit.ly/2zUR4If.

  34. Daniel Luis da Silva, “Centro Adventista de Convivência para Idosos: ‘Lar da Velhice’” [São Paulo Old People’s Home: Old People’s Home], Monograph: Brazil College, 1990, 17.

  35. Roberto Beckedorff, “Lar da Velhice” [Old People’s Home], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], April 1970: 29.

  36. Minutes of the East São Paulo Conference, August 3, 1978, vote no. 78-239.

  37. Ronaldo Alberto de Oliveira (São Paulo Conference executive secretary), email message to Carlos Flavio Teixeira (ESDA associated editor), May 20, 2019.

  38. “São Paulo Old People’s Home,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Hagerstown, MD: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1984), 523.

  39. Daniel Luis da Silva, “Centro Adventista de Convivência para Idosos: ‘Lar da Velhice’” [São Paulo Old People’s Home: Old People's Home], Monograph: Brazil College, 1990, 15.

  40. Ibid., 15-16.

  41. Ronaldo Alberto de Oliveira, São Paulo Conference executive secretary, email message to Carlos Flavio Teixeira, ESDA associated editor, May 20, 2019.

  42. “São Paulo Old People’s Home,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Hagerstown, MD: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 2008), 257.

  43. Leandro Bertoldo, História e memória do adventismo em Mogi das Cruzes, 1913-2017 [Adventism history and Memory in Mogi das Cruzes, 1913-2017], (Rio de Janeiro: Litteris, 2018), 229.

  44. Ellen White, Conselhos Sobre o Regime Alimentar [Counsels on Diet and Foods], (Tatuí, São Paulo: Brazil Publishing House, 2002), 73.

  45. “São Paulo Old People’s Home, “Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Hagerstown, MD: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1984), 523; “São Paulo Old People’s Home,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Hagerstown, MD: Review and Herald Publishing, 2004), 561; Daniel Luis da Silva, “Centro Adventista de Convivência para Idosos: ‘Lar da Velhice’” [São Paulo Old People’s Home: Old People’s Home], Monograph: Brazil College, 1990, 16. More detailed information about all administrative officers can be found in the Adventist yearbooks from 1984 to 2004.

×

Vieira, Adilson da Silva. "São Paulo Old People’s Home." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. April 13, 2021. Accessed April 15, 2021. https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=AIHA.

Vieira, Adilson da Silva. "São Paulo Old People’s Home." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. April 13, 2021. Date of access April 15, 2021, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=AIHA.

Vieira, Adilson da Silva (2021, April 13). São Paulo Old People’s Home. Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. Retrieved April 15, 2021, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=AIHA.