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The Christian family, from left to right: Valerie (Lawson), Herbert, Owen, Brian, with Melva (Mrs. Christian) seated.

Photo courtesy of Shirley Tarburton from the private collection of Valerie Lawson.

Christian, Herbert Bollensdorf (1913–1989) and Olivevine Melva Sprengel (1911–1989)

By Shirley Tarburton

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Shirley Tarburton, M.Litt. (Distinction) (University of New England, Armidale, New South Wales, Australia) retired in 2008 after 40 years teaching church-school (mainly high school but including eight years at university). An Australian, she has taught in four mission fields, Australia, and New Zealand. She has authored five books and co-authored one on church history, biography and family history, as well as several magazine articles. She is married to Dr. Michael Tarburton with two adult children and four grandchildren.

 

First Published: January 29, 2020

Herbert B. Christian was an Australian Seventh-day Adventist (SDA) minister who spent ten years as a missionary in Western Samoa (now Samoa) and more than twenty years in Australia and New Zealand in pastoral ministry and conference administration.1

Early Years

Herbert Bollensdorf Christian was born on October 22, 1913, to second-generation German immigrants in Murray Bridge, South Australia.2 He was the third child of Carl Wilhelm Christian and his wife, Martha Ida Kutzer, and received as his middle name the surname of his paternal grandmother.3 His other siblings were Elvira Cecilie (“Vera”) (Mrs. Norm Green, 1910–2006); Harold Richard (1911–1995); and Clemens Victor (“Clem”) (1925–2001). Both of his brothers also became ordained SDA ministers.4

Herb grew up on his father’s farm near Murray Bridge and attended the Murray Bridge Primary School.5 After leaving school, he helped his father with the sheep, dairy cattle, and wheat fields of their farm.6

Conversion

When Herb was 12 years old, S. L. Patching and J. J. Potter came to run evangelistic meetings in Murray Bridge7 and the Christian family attended. A church was organized in the town in August 1926,8 and after further Bible studies, Mr. and Mrs. Christian, Herb and his older brother and sister were baptized on September 29, 1928.9

College and Initial Employment

A little more than five years later, at the commencement of the 1934 academic year, Herb enrolled in the Bible workers’ course at the Australasian Missionary College at Avondale.10 He stayed an extra year to undertake the building construction course in order to be as skilled as possible.11 This was to prove invaluable in years to come. Upon completion of his studies, he was appointed to literature evangelism in South New Zealand (SNZ),12 and took up his post early in 1939.13 He set about his task diligently, selling many denominational books over the next nine months.14

In September, at the 1939 SNZ Conference Council, Herb was transferred to direct evangelistic work.15 Shortly thereafter he joined a team headed by C. J. Griffin, and they commenced a series of outreach meetings (a “mission”) in Invercargill,16 the southernmost city in the country. They were encouraged when, as a result of their outreach, a number of inactive members returned to church, and by August they were also conducting a baptismal class of about thirty people.17

Marriage and Family

While studying at Avondale, Herb met Melva Sprengel, whose family lived in Avondale Road, Cooranbong, NSW.18 Olivevine Melva Sprengel was born on October 29, 1911, in Milford, QLD, the youngest of the eight children of John Albert Sprengel (1869–1955)19 and his wife, Sarah (Zahl, 1875–1964).20 In 191021 they had bought Bible Readings for the Home Circle from literature evangelist John Tinworth, and as a result joined the SDA Church. 22

Melva’s siblings were Dorothy Esta (Mrs. Albert L. Were, 1895–1975),23 Albert Adolphus (pioneer USA health food manufacturer, 1897–1988),24 Ruby (Mrs. Reuben J. Palmer, 1899–1985),25 Harold (missionary and teacher, 1902–1990),26 Lydia (Mrs. Julius A. E. Speers, 1904–1977),27 Una Frances (1906–1993, a nurse whose husband, E. Malcolm Abbott, died in New Guinea as a Japanese POW),28 and Grace Elizabeth (Mrs. Norman W. Stewart, 1909–1988).29

When Melva was still an infant, the Sprengel family moved to Cooranbong near Avondale College so that the older children could attend the college.30 They bought the property that had been the home of W. C. White, opposite Sunnyside (his mother’s [Mrs. E. G. White’s] home), and here Melva grew up.31

On December 17, 1940, Herb and Melva married in the Papanui SDA Church, Christchurch, South New Zealand.32 Three children were born to them; Valerie Joy (married Pastor Ken Lawson), Owen Stanley (married Pamela Reibelt), and Brian Leslie (married Glenice Watkins).33

Career

In 1941 Herb was issued with a ministerial probationer license34 and appointed to pastoral work at Nelson, at the northern end of SNZ.35 After a year he joined S. M. Uttley in Timaru,36 where they ran a successful mission.37 After Uttley was transferred in mid-1943,38 Herb became the church pastor,39 continuing to build up the Timaru church until the end of 1944.40

On December 23, 1944, at the conference session held in Christchurch, he was ordained to the gospel ministry.41 Early in the new year, 1945, Christian moved to Greymouth and took on responsibility for the pastoral care of the entire West Coast district of SNZ.42 He was still getting settled into this job when he was given an overseas appointment.

Mission Service

January 1946 saw the Christian family heading for Apia on the island of Upolu, Samoa,43 where Herb became the superintendent of the Samoa Mission.44 Herb adapted well to this new environment and was well accepted by the people there.45 The previous superintendent had negotiated the acquisition of land for the establishment of a mission station at Lalovaea in Apia, so Herb was soon involved in the building of a church, mission office, and homes for the mission workers.46

His work involved much travel between the islands of Upolu, Savaii, and Tutuila (American Samoa), where the SDA message had only recently been accepted.47 While he was away from home, Melva attended to the daily operation of the mission and, as there was no secretary-treasurer, was often needed to assist in various functions.48 They had the thrill of seeing the church on Tutuila grow under the ministry of Tini Inu as the enthusiastic new converts in turn won others.49 At the July 1950 General Conference session church leaders around the world were challenged to double the church membership in their areas during the following quadrennium. Herb was pleased to be able to report that it took only two years from that time to increase the membership of the Samoa Mission from 300 to 523.50

He presided during a period when the Seventh-day Adventist church in Samoa transitioned from being generally regarded as an insignificant, heretical body51 to the wider recognition that it was contributing positively to the community.52 A notable example brought the SDA Church into prominence in 1948, when, under the United Nations Trustee Agreement, New Zealand approved the creation of a Samoan flag. The local government instituted “Flag Day” and announced a competition for a national anthem.53 The winning entry was composed by a deacon of the Apia SDA Church, Sauni Kuresa, and at the inaugural “Flag Day” celebrations on June 1, 1948, he conduc­­ted the rendition of the anthem by a 200-voice SDA choir accompanied by the Leavuaa Village brass band.54 This brought Herb, as president of the mission, into contact with the Samoan political leaders and fostered a convivial relationship.55

When the Christian family had arrived in Samoa in 1946, a Samoan-language SDA evangelistic paper, O le Tala Moni, was being distributed with a monthly circulation of three thousand copies.56 Herb wanted to extend the reach of this paper and add other publications, so by 1947 he commenced planning the establishment of a mission press.57 By 1949 E. Reye had his translation of Steps to Christ ready for printing and was working on other material.58 Despite difficulties with finance, Herb pressed ahead, and at the end of his term of service in Samoa he was applauded as having “set up the best-equipped press in the union.”59

The other outstanding legacy of Herb’s ten years in Samoa was the establishment and expansion of the church school at Lalovaea, which within ten years had the largest enrollment of any SDA school in the Australasian Division.60 An English-medium lower-primary school was initially commenced in the basement of the new church building in 1951. The church members obtained the services of a missionary teacher for this school by raising the funds for his wage through a plan devised by Herb. By 1953, enrollments had reached 150 children and they could no longer fit under the church.61

Recognizing that they would have to fund the building of a larger school themselves, Herb, described as an “astute financial strategist,”62 commenced the fund-raising by charging for public screenings of movie film he had taken of celebrations for the coronation of Queen Elizabeth II and of her subsequent visit to Fiji, and also of footage he had filmed around Samoa. This proved very popular, and soon the money was in hand to buy the materials needed.63

Construction of the school, entirely by volunteer labor, commenced in the last half of 1954. When Herb finished his work for the day, he was often to be found late into the evening, in the makeshift workshop under his house, constructing the window frames and casements needed for the school building. There was much pride when the building was dedicated July 5, 1955.64 Eighteen months later, when the first high school class was added, the enrollment topped 500.65

On the same weekend that the school was dedicated, a new European-style church was dedicated at Samatau,66 and on October 27,67 another at Fasitoo’utai was also opened.68

Pastoral Work in Australia

In early 1956, after ten years in Samoa, the Christian family returned permanently to Australia to work in the Queensland Conference.69 From 1956 to 1961 Herb was the pastor of the Toowoomba SDA Church. Here he led the congregation in the fund-raising for, and building of, their new church, which was opened on July 27, 1958.70 The following year a separate bell tower and carillion was added, which aroused interest throughout the whole city.71

In 1960 Herb was listed as a member of the Queensland Conference executive committee.72 In the same year, he commenced leading the Gatton SDA Church in constructing its new building, which was completed after he was transferred to Rockhampton.73

Rockhampton also needed a new church building, so Herb obtained the use of the plans used in Toowoomba, complete with bell tower, and the church was dedicated November 25, 1962. His first sermon in the church was his farewell sermon on December 1 after which he left for his next appointment.74

The fifty-fifth session of the Queensland Conference was held at the Queensland camp meeting (where Herb was the camp superintendent). At the session (August 1962) Herb was appointed to be the Home Missionary and Sabbath School secretary of the conference for the term of office commencing in January 1963.75 This necessitated another move for the family, this time to Brisbane.76

As was his practice, he put all his energy into his job, an early task of which was the annual appeal for missions.77 Within a couple of months the position of public relations and radio secretary was added to his portfolio.78 Just the previous year the Dial-a-Prayer ministry had commenced in Brisbane79 and Herb promoted this at every opportunity.80

In 1964 he was made building project supervisor and materials buyer for the two-story extensions to the Brisbane conference office that were begun in October of that year.81 This was on top of his other responsibilities. This project was completed in mid-1965 and officially opened on June 20.82 He also had a major role in the establishment of the Mount Gravatt SDA School.83

Later in 1965 an exchange was arranged between the Queensland Conference and the North New South Wales Conference, which saw Herb move to the NNSW Conference (to hold the same portfolios) early in 1966.84 One of his first tasks was to organize the 1966 Appeal for Missions program, which included arranging for teams of students from Avondale College to collect in a number of country centres. Even though he had not had long to organize it, the program was “an outstanding success.”85

Administration

After just one year in this position, Herb was invited to become the president of the South New South Wales Conference and took on this responsibility in January 1967,86 moving to Canberra. During his four years in this position, he continued his emphasis on church growth and increasing church infrastructure. Church buildings were purchased for two recently organized churches, the building of four other churches was undertaken and planning for a new church and a school for Canberra commenced.87

In July 1970 Herb was invited back to Samoa, to dedicate the new church at Satala, on Tutuila.88

January 1971 saw him become the president of the Victorian Conference, based in Melbourne.89 Under his leadership in this conference new churches were planted at Healesville, Mooroolbark, Portland,90 and Vermont.91 Five new church buildings were opened, and the construction of five others was commenced.92 A new school building was opened at Warburton,93 and a new library for Hawthorn Adventist High School.94 Extensions to the aged-care facility, Coronella, were completed greatly enlarging its capacity.95 SDA Welfare Services in Victoria committed to a closer relationship with the government civil defense organization,96 and a mobile emergency kitchen was put into operation.97 Retreats were run for ministers98 and interns,99 and conventions were held for community welfare services100 and laymen’s evangelism.101

Retirement and Death

At the end of this very busy four years, Herb Christian announced his retirement.102 In the report that he gave at the seventy-ninth annual camp meeting and business session of the Victorian Conference, held in January 1975, he revealed that the conference had experienced “spectacular growth.”103

He retired on February 8, 1975, and he and Melva took up residence near Toronto, NSW.104 In 1976 they enjoyed participating in the fiftieth anniversary celebration of the Murray Bridge SDA Church, in which their family was strongly featured, so it also became a Christian family reunion.105

After a few years living near Toronto, Herb and Melva moved to a retirement village at Caloundra, near Nambour. Here, Melva died on February 9, 1989.106 She had devotedly supported her husband wherever they were posted, and contributed to the church program whenever she could. Herb lived for a further five months after her death, passing away at their daughter’s home in Orange, NSW, on July 21, 1989.107 Both were only in their mid-seventies, but they left a lasting legacy.

Sources

“Appointments and Transfers—Recommendations Passed by the 1939 Council.” Australasian Record, October 2, 1939.

“As we go to press . . .” Australasian Record, January 25, 1971.

Aveling, R. L. “Encouraging Progress in Polynesia.” Australasian Record, January 9, 1956.

Broomhall, R. “Jubilee at Murray Bridge.” Australasian Record, August 16, 1976.

“Brother Herbert Christian has connected . . . ” Australasian Record, March 21, 1939.

Brown R. K. “A ‘Teach-In’ for Laymen.” Australasian Record, November 8, 1971.

Christian, H. B. “Hard Work and Sacrifice Culminated in Joyous Dedication.” Australasian Record, August 29, 1955.

———. “Honour for Samoan Adventist.” Australasian Record, September 20, 1948.

———. “Samoa.” Australasian Record, December 6, 1948.

———. “Toowoomba Shows How to Raise Funds,” Australasian Record, November 9, 1959.

———. “Victories in Samoa,” Australasian Record, May 5, 1947.

Coffin, James. “The Adventist Health-Food Industry: How Healthy Is It?” Adventist Review, April 7, 1983.

“Colporteurs’ Monthly Summary.” Australasian Record, May 15, 1939.

Cooke, W. E. “Large Congregation Attends Toowoomba Church Dedication.” Australasian Record, September 8, 1958.

Coombe, L. C. “Were.” Australasian Record, May 26, 1975.

Coombe, R. L. “Dollars Despite the Drought.” Australasian Record, May 30, 1966.

Cormack, James E. “Spice From the Central Pacific Mission President’s Piquant Reports.” Australasian Record, March 16, 1953.

“Distribution of Labour.” Australasian Record, September 26, 1938.

Dyason, A. P. “Speers.” Australasian Record, October 3, 1977.

Edwards, Rex D. “Combined Effort Builds Gatton Church.” Australasian Record, February 5, 1962.

Find a Grave, https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/188131738/albert-adolphus-sprengel.

Hankinson, J. K. “Meat in Due Season.” Australasian Record, March 29, 1971.

Hay, David E. Samoa 100+ Years, The South Pacific—and Beyond. Newcastle, NSW: WHO Presentation Services, 2005.

Helsby, G. B. “From ‘The Land of Talking Men.’ ” Australasian Record, June 15, 1953.

Herbert Bollensdorf Christian. Worker’s Biographical Record. South Pacific Division of the General Conference Archives. Folder: “Christian, Herbert Bollensdorf.” Document: “Worker’s Biographical Record.”

———. Worker’s Service Record. South Pacific Division of the General Conference Archives. Folder: “Christian, Herbert Bollensdorf.” Document: “Worker’s Service Record.”

Herbert, A. S. “Regional Meetings, South New Zealand.” Australasian Record, March 10, 1941.

———. “South New Zealand Secretary-Treasurer’s Yearly Session Report.” Australasian Record, February 26, 1945.

Howse, E. W. “Church Built in Six Days.” Australasian Record, January 23, 1956.

Howse, J. T. “Stewart.” Australasian Record, February 20, 1988.

Inu, Tini. “Mission News From Tutuila Island, American Samoa.” Australasian Record, February 3, 1947.

Johanson, E. J. “Evangelism in South New Zealand.” Australasian Record, November 2, 1942.

———. “Notes on South New Zealand.” Australasian Record, September 27, 1943.

Lawson, David. “Christian.” Australasian Record, March 25, 1989.

Lemke, L.D.A. “Items of Special Interest.” Australasian Record, February 15, 1926.

Moulds, H. G. “Literature for Island Groups.” Australasian Record, October 10, 1949.

Naden, L. C. “Christian–Sprengel.” Australasian Record, March 10, 1941.

———. “Good News From the Field.” Australasian Record, August 19, 1940.

“1974 Victorian Conference Convention.” Australasian Record, June 24, 1974.

“Of recent weeks . . .” Australasian Record, July 12, 1943.

Parmenter, K. S. “Conquering for Christ in Queensland.” Australasian Record, April 22, 1963.

Parr, Robert H. “Government Minister Opens New School.” Australasian Record, March 13, 1972.

Pascoe, A. L. “Sprengel.” Australasian Record, October 31, 1955.

“Pastor E. F. Giblett . . .” Australasian Record, January 17, 1966.

“Pastor H. B. Christian . . . ” Australasian Record, April 16, 1956.

Patching, S. L. “Word From Murray Bridge, South Australia.” Australasian Record, September 13, 1926.

Price, E. B. “Victoria’s First Panorama of Community Services.” Australasian Record, March 4, 1974.

Queensland Births Index, 1897 C4449.

Richards, W. J. “South New Zealand.” Australasian Record, August 14, 1944.

Roenfelt, Erwin E. “Six Weeks in New Zealand.” Australasian Record, January 11, 1943.

Russell, N. “Rockhampton Adds a Carillion.” Australasian Record, February 4, 1963.

Salom, A. P. “Palmer.” Australasian Record, October 5, 1985.

Salom, Alwyn, and David Judd. “Abbott.” Australasian Record, November 27, 1993.

South Australian Births, 1913, 922/403.

“South N. Z. Conference, a Year of Progress.” Australasian Record, March 11, 1940.

Steed, E.H.J. “Public Relations Bureau.” Australasian Record, January 7, 1963.

Steed, Ernest J. “Prayer for the Multitudes.” Australasian Record, May 4, 1964.

Stewart, A. G. “An Inspirational Visit to Samoa.” Australasian Record, June 14, 1948.

Stewart, M. M. “New £30,000 Extensions to Queensland Headquarters.” Australasian Record, September 6, 1965.

———. “Progress in Queensland, 1964 in Retrospect.” Australasian Record, April 5, 1965.

———. “Queensland’s Fifty-fifth Conference Session.” Australasian Record, October 8, 1962.

Taylor, Ron. “Christian.” Australasian Record, September 9, 1989.

———. “Pastor Herbert Christian.” Australasian Record, September 9, 1989.

Taylor, Ron W. “The Samoan Fono.” Australasian Record, January 6, 1947.

“This is where . . . ” Australasian Record, February 10, 1975, 16.

Thomas, R.H.H. “A Tour Around the Victorian Conference.” Australasian Record, March 12, 1973.

———. “Adventist Administrators Guests of Commonwealth Government Civil Defence School.” Australasian Record, January 8, 1973.

———. “The ‘John Marks’ Meet in Victoria.” Australasian Record, February 4, 1974.

———. “Victorian Biennial Convention.” Australasian Record, May 19, 1975.

———. “We Must Attempt Unusual Exploits.” Australasian Record, December 17, 1973.

Thrift, R.A.R. “New Zealand to the Fore.” Australasian Record, February 26, 1945.

Trood, R. J. “Sprengel, Harold.” Australasian Record, September 15, 1990.

Turner, W. G. “Sprengel.” Australasian Record, September 14, 1964.

Twist, O. H. “Camp-Meeting Grows Better Every Year.” Australasian Record, July 11, 1960.

———. “Happenings in Queensland.” Australasian Record, June 17, 1963.

Ward, M. J. “A New Library Opened.” Australasian Record, May 29, 1972.

Notes

  1. Ron Taylor, “Pastor Herbert Christian,” Australasian Record, September 9, 1989, 13.

  2. South Australian Births, 1913, 922/403.

  3. Ibid.

  4. Valerie Lawson to Shirley Tarburton, April 2, 2019, e-mail.

  5. Ibid.

  6. Herbert Bollensdorf Christian, Worker’s Biographical Record, South Pacific Division of the General Conference Archives (Folder: “Christian, Herbert Bollensdorf”; Document: “Worker’s Biographical Record”).

  7. L.D.A. Lemke, “Items of Special Interest,” Australasian Record, February 15, 1926, 6; S. L. Patching, “Word From Murray Bridge, South Australia,” Australasian Record, September 13, 1926, 5.

  8. R. Broomhall, “Jubilee at Murray Bridge,” Australasian Record, August 16, 1976, 1.

  9. Ibid.

  10. Herbert Bollensdorf Christian, Worker’s Biographical Record.

  11. Valerie Lawson to Tarburton., April 2, 2019, e-mail.

  12. “Distribution of Labour,” Australasian Record, September 26, 1938, 6.

  13. “Brother Herbert Christian has connected . . . ,” Australasian Record, March 21, 1939, 8.

  14. “Colporteurs’ Monthly Summary,” Australasian Record, May 15, 1939, 6, and subsequent monthly reports.

  15. “Appointments and Transfers—Recommendations Passed by the 1939 Council,” Australasian Record, October 2, 1939, 5.

  16. “South N. Z. Conference, A Year of Progress,” Australasian Record, March 11, 1940, 5.

  17. L. C. Naden, “Good News From the Field,” Australasian Record, August 19, 1940, 3.

  18. L. C. Coombe, “Were,” Australasian Record, May 26, 1975, 15.

  19. A. L. Pascoe, “Sprengel,” Australasian Record, October 31, 1955, 15.

  20. W. G. Turner, “Sprengel,” Australasian Record, September 14, 1964, 15.

  21. R. J. Trood, “Sprengel,” Australasian Record, September 15, 1990, 18.

  22. Pascoe, 15.

  23. Coombe, 15.

  24. James Coffin, “The Adventist Health-Food Industry: How Healthy Is It?” Adventist Review, April 7, 1983, 8; Queensland Births Index, 1897 C4449; Find a Grave, https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/188131738/albert-adolphus-sprengel.

  25. A. P. Salom, “Palmer,” Australasian Record, October 5, 1985, 14.

  26. Trood, 18.

  27. A. P. Dyason, “Speers,” Australasian Record, October 3, 1977, 14.

  28. Alwyn Salom and David Judd, “Abbott,” Australasian Record, November 27, 1993, 14.

  29. J. T. Howse, “Stewart,” Australasian Record, February 20, 1988, 14.

  30. Turner, 15.

  31. Coombe, 15.

  32. L. C. Naden, “Christian–Sprengel,” Australasian Record, March 10, 1941, 7.

  33. Valerie Lawson to Shirley Tarburton, April 2, 2019, e-mail.

  34. A. S. Herbert, “Regional Meetings, South New Zealand,” Australasian Record, March 10, 1941, 6, 7.

  35. Naden, “Christian–Sprengel.”

  36. E. J. Johanson, “Evangelism in South New Zealand,” Australasian Record, November 2, 1942, 3.

  37. Erwin E. Roenfelt, “Six Weeks in New Zealand,” Australasian Record, January 11, 1943, 5.

  38. “Of recent weeks . . . , ” Australasian Record, July 12, 1943, 8.

  39. E. J. Johanson, “Notes on South New Zealand,” Australasian Record, September 27, 1943, 4.

  40. W. J. Richards, “South New Zealand,” Australasian Record, August 14, 1944, 5.

  41. R.A.R. Thrift, “New Zealand to the Fore,” Australasian Record, February 26, 1945, 3.

  42. A. S. Herbert, “South New Zealand Secretary-Treasurer’s Yearly Session Report,” Australasian Record, February 26, 1945, 3, 4.

  43. David E. Hay, Samoa 100+ Years, The South Pacific—and Beyond (Newcastle, NSW: WHO Presentation Services, 2005), 210.

  44. Herbert Bollensdorf Christian, Worker’s Service Record, South Pacific Division of the General Conference Archives (Folder: “Christian, Herbert Bollensdorf”; Document: “Worker’s Service Record”).

  45. Ron W. Taylor, “The Samoan Fono,” Australasian Record, January 6, 1947, 3.

  46. A. G. Stewart, “An Inspirational Visit to Samoa,” Australasian Record, June 14, 1948, 6.

  47. Tini Inu, “Mission News From Tutuila Island, American Samoa,” Australasian Record, February 3, 1947, 6.

  48. Stewart, “An Inspirational Visit to Samoa,” Australasian Record, June 14, 1948, 6.

  49. H. B. Christian, “Samoa,” Australasian Record, December 6, 1948, 8.

  50. James E. Cormack, “Spice From the Central Pacific Mission President’s Piquant Reports,” Australasian Record, March 16, 1953, 5.

  51. H. B. Christian, “Victories in Samoa,” Australasian Record, May 5, 1947, 3, 4, 8.

  52. G. B. Helsby, “From ‘The Land of Talking Men,’ ” Australasian Record, June 15, 1953, 11.

  53. Hay, 249.

  54. H. B. Christian, “Honour for Samoan Adventist,” Australasian Record, September 20, 1948, 3.

  55. Hay, 251, 252.

  56. Ibid., 210–213.

  57. Ibid.

  58. H. G. Moulds, “Literature for Island Groups,” Australasian Record, October 10, 1949, 3, 4.

  59. R. L. Aveling, “Encouraging Progress in Polynesia,” Australasian Record, January 9, 1956, 8, 9.

  60. Hay, 263.

  61. Ibid., 263, 264.

  62. Ibid., 264.

  63. Ibid.

  64. Ibid.; H. B. Christian, “Hard Work and Sacrifice Culminated in Joyous Dedication,” Australasian Record, August 29, 1955, 1, 2.

  65. Hay, 266.

  66. Christian, “Hard Work and Sacrifice Culminated in Joyous Dedication.”

  67. E. W. Howse, “Church Built in Six Days,” Australasian Record, January 23, 1956, 6, 7.

  68. R. L. Aveling, “Encouraging Progress in Polynesia,” Australasian Record, January 9, 1956, 8, 9.

  69. “Pastor H. B. Christian . . . ,” Australasian Record, April 16, 1956, 8.

  70. W. E. Cooke, “Large Congregation Attends Toowoomba Church Dedication,” Australasian Record, September 8, 1958, 3.

  71. H. B. Christian, “Toowoomba Shows How to Raise Funds,” Australasian Record, November 9, 1959, 5, 6.

  72. O. H. Twist, “Camp-Meeting Grows Better Every Year,” Australasian Record, July 11, 1960, 3, 4.

  73. Rex D. Edwards, “Combined Effort Builds Gatton Church,” Australasian Record, February 5, 1962, 3.

  74. N. Russell, “Rockhampton Adds a Carillion,” Australasian Record, February 4, 1963, 6.

  75. M. M. Stewart, “Queensland’s Fifty-fifth Conference Session,” Australasian Record, October 8, 1962, 3, 4.

  76. Russell, 6.

  77. K. S. Parmenter, “Conquering for Christ in Queensland,” Australasian Record, April 22, 1963, 3.

  78. O. H. Twist, “Happenings in Queensland,” Australasian Record, June 17, 1963, 2.

  79. E.H.J. Steed, “Public Relations Bureau,” Australasian Record, January 7, 1963, 15.

  80. Ernest J. Steed, “Prayer for the Multitudes,” Australasian Record, May 4, 1964, 4, 5.

  81. M. M. Stewart, “Progress in Queensland, 1964 in Retrospect,” Australasian Record, April 5, 1965, 2-4.

  82. M. M. Stewart, “New £30,000 Extensions to Queensland Headquarters,” Australasian Record, September 6, 1965, 1, 2.

  83. Ron Taylor, “Pastor Herbert Christian,” Australasian Record, September 9, 1989, 13.

  84. “Pastor E. F. Giblett . . . ,” Australasian Record, January 17, 1966, 16.

  85. R. L. Coombe, “Dollars Despite the Drought,” Australasian Record, May 30, 1966, 4.

  86. Herbert Bollensdorf Christian, Worker’s Service Record.

  87. J. K. Hankinson, “Meat In Due Season,” Australasian Record, March 29, 1971, 8, 9.

  88. Hay, 237.

  89. “As we go to press . . . ,” Australasian Record, January 25, 1971, 16.

  90. R.H.H. Thomas, “Victorian Biennial Convention,” Australasian Record, May 19, 1975, 8-11.

  91. R.H.H. Thomas, “A Tour Around the Victorian Conference,” Australasian Record, March 12, 1973, 8, 9.

  92. Ibid.

  93. Robert H. Parr, “Government Minister Opens New School,” Australasian Record, March 13, 1972, 8, 9.

  94. M. J. Ward, “A New Library Opened,” Australasian Record, May 29, 1972, 8, 9.

  95. Thomas, “A Tour Around the Victorian Conference.”.

  96. R.H.H. Thomas, “Adventist Administrators Guests of Commonwealth Government Civil Defence School,” Australasian Record, January 8, 1973, 6.

  97. “1974 Victorian Conference Convention,” Australasian Record, June 24, 1974, 2-4.

  98. R.H.H. Thomas, “We Must Attempt Unusual Exploits,” Australasian Record, December 17, 1973, 8.

  99. R.H.H. Thomas, “The ‘John Marks’ Meet in Victoria,” Australasian Record, February 4, 1974, 2.

  100. E. B. Price, “Victoria’s First Panorama of Community Services,” Australasian Record, March 4, 1974, 4.

  101. R. K. Brown, “A ‘Teach-In’ for Laymen,” Australasian Record, November 8, 1971, 7.

  102. “This is where . . . ,” Australasian Record, February 10, 1975, 16.

  103. Thomas, “Victorian Biennial Convention.”

  104. Valerie Lawson to Tarburton, April 2, 2019, e-mail.

  105. R. Broomhall, “Jubilee at Murray Bridge,” Australasian Record, August 16, 1976, 1.

  106. David Lawson, “Christian,” Australasian Record, March 25, 1989, 14.

  107. Ron Taylor, “Christian,” Australasian Record, September 9, 1989, 12, 13; Valerie Lawson to Tarburton, April 2, 2019, e-mail.

×

Tarburton, Shirley. "Christian, Herbert Bollensdorf (1913–1989) and Olivevine Melva Sprengel (1911–1989)." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. January 29, 2020. Accessed May 20, 2022. https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=B7UO.

Tarburton, Shirley. "Christian, Herbert Bollensdorf (1913–1989) and Olivevine Melva Sprengel (1911–1989)." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. January 29, 2020. Date of access May 20, 2022, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=B7UO.

Tarburton, Shirley (2020, January 29). Christian, Herbert Bollensdorf (1913–1989) and Olivevine Melva Sprengel (1911–1989). Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. Retrieved May 20, 2022, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=B7UO.