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Griffiths and Marion Jones in Portugal, c. 1933.

Photo courtesy of Stephen Currow.

Jones, Griffith Francis (1864–1940) and Marion (Vallentine) (1860–1939)

By Stephen J. Currow

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Stephen Currow, D.Min. (Fuller Theological Seminary, Pasadena, California, the United States), is the vice president (academic) at Avondale College of Higher Education, Cooranbong, NSW, Australia. Trained as a pastor, he has worked in various ministry positions including pastor, lecturer, and administrator in Australia, New Zealand, Fiji, Papua New Guinea and the United Kingdom. His research interests and publications have been in the areas of congregational life, youth ministry and Adventist mission history. He is married to Narisa and has two adult daughters.

Captain Griffith Francis Jones, and his wife, Marion, were pioneer missionaries in Singapore,1 the Solomon Islands,2 New Caledonia,3 New Britain,4 and Gibraltar.5 Jones lived in 18 different countries and held evangelistic meetings in 38 countries with people from 34 different language groups.6 He was well known as the captain of the Melanesia, the largest mission vessel of the Seventh-day Adventist (SDA) Church’s South Pacific fleet.7 However, Jones made many more significant contributions, including changing the focus of the SDA mission in Papua from industry to evangelism.8 Yet, as a widower, when assisting in the dedication of missionaries en route to Papua New Guinea, “he was convinced he had only one talent—willingness.”9 In 2007 he was inducted into Southwestern Adventist University’s Alumni Hall of Fame.10

Early Years

Griffith Francis Jones, the youngest son of David and Mary Jones (née Gittins), was born in Llanerfyl, Wales, on May 11, 1864.11 At the time of the 1881 census, when Jones was 17 years of age, he was visiting his aunt, a housekeeper at Margam Castle, near Swansea.12 In April that year Jones commenced an apprenticeship on boats that supplied copper to the industries in Swansea. These trips took him to Chile, Brazil, China, the West Indies, and the United States.13 During this time Jones qualified as a second mate (Dublin, 1885),14 first mate (Liverpool, 1888),15 and finally as a master mariner (Liverpool, 1890).16

Conversion

While on watch as an officer on a ship crossing the Atlantic, Jones noticed a scrap of paper on the deck. It was a portion of the magazine Present Truth.17 He was impressed by what he read. While on leave between voyages in London, he met a canvasser who sold him a number of other SDA publications. On the next voyage he discovered that another seaman had a copy of Daniel and Revelation, which he lent to Jones.18 Under conviction that God was calling him, he left his work in the merchant navy to canvass the Present Truth. Despairing the limited success he was having in London, he sailed to Dublin to escape his failure and to try to understand where God was leading him. While sitting in Phoenix Park, he was found by John McEvoy, the leader of the canvassers in London. Embarrassed by this providential encounter, he decided to confess his failure as a canvasser. After prayer together they both went to Belfast to canvass. Subsequently Jones was baptized in a river in Ireland on May 11, 1893. Significantly, the qualities that emerged from this period of confused failure provided Jones with the confident faith and personal evangelism skills that he demonstrated continually throughout his life of ministry.19

Denominational Employment

After canvassing for some time in Ireland, Jones returned to England and canvassed briefly in London and then in and around Nottingham and Derbyshire. As a result of his work, a number of people were baptized. One young convert he mentored in the art of canvassing. He then went to Liverpool, where he joined a team canvassing sailors.20 On this team he met Marion Vallentine, who had become an SDA one year prior to Jones.21 They married in Birkenhead on September 15, 1896,22 and continued canvassing in the area for the next two years or so. After the Doctors Kress opened the health retreat Dunellin (near Red Hill on the southern outskirts of London) in 1899, Griffith and Marion Jones assisted them for a period of time.23

Desiring greater training for mission service, the couple traveled to Keene Industrial Academy, Texas, in September 1900.24 As the institution was still under construction, they lived in a small rural house. They both benefited from enrolling in the Bible instructor’s course and learned to labor with their hands, growing crops, weaving, building, etc. Jones also sang in a quartet.25 They were in a class of 28, of which at least six became missionaries to foreign lands.26

With their seafaring background and knowledge of French, they were appointed, at the 1901 General Conference session in Battle Creek, to serve in the Society Islands (French Polynesia).27 Another classmate from Keene Industrial Academy, George Beckner, was also appointed to the Society Islands to serve at the new school on the island of Raiatea.28 Later in life, when reflecting on the lifetime of service emerging from this call, Jones wrote, “My poor wife and I accepted it gladly as a duty of love, although we knew nothing of its dangers, hardships, and trials.”29

Griffith and Marion Jones initially spent time in Papeete learning the language and culture. When the British Consul in Tahiti gifted a boat to the Pitcairn Islanders, Jones felt obliged to sail the boat, named Pitcairn II, to Pitcairn Island, accompanied by a number of Pitcairn Islanders.30 Thanks to a faulty chronograph and storms, this was probably the most challenging voyage Jones ever sailed.31 As there was no shelter for the boat on Pitcairn, Jones stored the boat in Mangareva, where Marion joined him. Jones resided on Mangareva and visited Pitcairn Island regularly. During this time he attempted to teach a group of Pitcairn Islanders navigation and also engaged in mission work.32 The most significant convert was a well-known businessman in Mangareva.33

In May 1903 Jones sailed the Pitcairn II to Papeete with the delegation from Pitcairn Island onboard. At these meetings, at which E. H. Gates was present, the East Polynesian Mission was formed and Jones was ordained34 and reassigned to the Cook Islands to relieve A. H. Piper, who needed respite from the tropics.35 During their time in the Cook Islands, another school opened at Titikaveka that attracted members of the London Missionary Society who wanted to worship on Sabbath.36 The Titikaveka church also opened on Monday, May 23, 1904.37 Although Jones was anxious to visit the outer islands,38 it doesn’t appear that this happened in his first and only year.

After a year of respite, Piper was ready to return to the Cook Islands. The Joneses, at the ages of 40 and 43, respectively, were appointed to commence the work in Singapore, receiving the news by mail that arrived on the same steamer on which they departed from Rarotonga.39 En route to Singapore they visited New Zealand and Australia for the first time, as well as visiting a number of other places that they would frequent later in their mission service.40 Initially, Singapore, the Malay Peninsula, and the East Indies were assigned to the Australasian Union, but during Jones’s time these territories were transferred to the Asiatic Division.41

Reporting on their first council held in Jones’s home in January 1905, Jones said, “It was clear to us that this great eastern city—a center of a thickly populated field of fifty millions—should at once be supplied with a doctor, nurses, canvassers, book depository, health food agency, and a small printing press.42 These were ambitious plans for this fledging mission. However, these plans and more were accomplished within a few years.43 Although Marion commenced a school soon after their arrival, this developed further when land was secured in 1906 and two teachers, Fletcher and Mills, arrived at the end of 1906.44 A church was finally constructed in Penang Lane, off Orchard Road, and opened in August 1909.45

Toward the end of their assignment in Singapore, Jones had some health issues. The first was a throat condition that resulted in the Joneses taking a 14-month break in Western Australia.46 No doubt the choice of location was influenced by the recent migration there of Marion’s younger brother, Thomas.47 The second was a severe malarial attack that Jones contracted on return from meetings of the Asiatic Division in Shanghai in 1912.48 This resulted in Jones leaving the territory for an extended furlough in the United States.49

In addition to the work in Singapore, Jones, as superintendent of the Malaysian Mission, had oversight of the Malay Peninsula and the East Indies. Jones’s report to the 1913 General Conference session summarized progress in these fields. In his introduction Jones explained that the administration of these territories was divided between the British and Dutch. He also noted that while there was free access in the British colonies, permits had to be approved by the Dutch governor-general for each worker and their allocation to specific districts or towns.50

In the Malay States a mission station was opened in Kuala Lumpur, the capital city of the Malay States, in 1911. In Java, after the work opened in 1907,51 the first church was opened in Batavia (now Jakarta) in June 1912 and Sourabaya in July 1912. However, by this time the workers were confined to Batavia, Sourabaya, and Samarang.52 Also in Java was a mountain retreat at Soemba Wekas just 35 miles from Sourabaya at an altitude of 2,400 feet, which had been purchased and provided a welcome respite from the malaria-ridden coast.53 In Sumatra, where the Munsons had commenced work in Padang around 1900, no church had yet been established, although work still continued in Padang as well as in the highlands among the Muslims. In Borneo a Chinese SDA employee working for the British and Foreign Bible Society had recently opened the work in British Borneo, creating significant interest among the well-to-do Chinese.54

Although Jones expected to return to Singapore after their furlough,55 the 1913 General Conference session reassigned him to the Australasian Union Conference (AUC),56 where he was subsequently appointed to commence work in the Solomon Islands as soon as possible.57 While waiting for the necessary preparations, including the building of a small launch, Jones served as chaplain at the Sydney Sanitarium for six months.58

At ages 50 and 53, respectively, Griffith and Marion Jones set sail on May 16, 1914, for the Solomon Islands on board the S.S. Mindini.59 Also on board was their little boat the Advent Herald, built by W. M. Ford.60 Unlike anywhere else they served, the Solomon Islands did not have a town or city into which they could move.61 The boat would become their home while negotiating a place for the initial mission station, and subsequently exploring new places to commence additional mission stations.62 Severe and repeated attacks of malaria had the Joneses return to Australia for four months in 1915.63 Yet despite this setback, Jones was successful in opening new mission stations in and around the Marovo Lagoon and facilitating the arrival of new missionary recruits.64 However, World War I significantly impacted their ability to recruit more missionaries.65

As the work in the Solomon Islands grew, the AUC council in 1916 voted to form the Melanesia Mission Field and appoint Jones as its Superintendent. To facilitate the operations of this mission, it was agreed to provide a larger vessel.66 Fund-raising for the vessel was allocated to the young people throughout Australia and New Zealand.67 While waiting for this vessel to be completed, Jones attended a number of camp meetings, including one in Western Australia, promoting missions and mission service.68 In preparation for the maiden voyage of the Melanesia, four Solomon Islanders arrived in Sydney at the end of April 1917.69 The Melanesia was dedicated on June 370 and sailed on July 2 with Captain Jones and a crew of future missionaries.71

After visiting the existing mission stations in the Solomon Islands, Jones sailed the Melanesia to visit the New Hebrides (now Vanuatu) in late 1917.72 In early 1918 Jones sailed the Melanesia to Port Moresby Papua,73 to visit the Bisiatabu Rubber Plantation, where he would later serve. Soon after their return to the Marovo Lagoon, Jones conducted the first SDA wedding in the Solomon Islands at Sasaghana.74 On April 4, 1918, the bride, Emily Koglin, a nurse who had commenced training at the Sydney Sanitarium when Jones was the chaplain,75 married Robert Tutty, who was the chef on the maiden voyage of the Melanesia.76

Toward the end of 1919 it was Marion’s turn for health challenges. The situation was so bad that Jones commenced designing a coffin using the floorboards of their house.77 However, Emily Tutty traveled two days from their mission station on another island and nursed Marion back to health.78 Marion then spent some time recuperating in Tasmania.79

During Jones’s time there were two significant developments beyond the Marovo Lagoon. The first was the mission station at Ughele on the island of Redova, started by the Maunders in 1917.80 The second was the mission station at Dovele on the island of Vella LaVella, started by the Tuttys in 1919,81 with a satellite station on the neighboring island of Ranongo, started by Pana in 1920.82 At the end of Jones’s six years in the Solomon Islands, there were “five central stations . . . and seventeen outstations, with a total Sabbath school membership of 1108.”83

After a furlough in Tasmania recuperating from the tropics,84 the Joneses arrived at Bisiatabu in April 1921. This was expected to be a six-month appointment relieving while the Lawsons were on furlough.85 After 13 years in Papua, the work of the church was still restricted by the Comity Agreement to a rubber plantation, as established mission agencies, endorsed by the colonial authorities, had divided the country into their own territories.86 As Jones reviewed the situation, he negotiated alternative arrangements with the governor and recommended to the church administration a major change in direction, advocating the industry be closed and schools be opened.87 This strategy resulted in the first major baptism in Papua conducted in October 1924,88 soon after Jones returned to Australia. Jones also pioneered the Efogi ranges, and opened up the territory, enabling W. N. Lock to reside and evangelize.89 Even government officials noted the impact the SDA mission had on the Koiaris, who previously had given the government a lot of trouble.90 In January 1924, after almost three years, the Joneses returned to Australia to escape malarial-infested territory.91

Later that year, at the ages of 60 and 63, respectively, Griffith and Marion Jones were assigned to New Caledonia. This decision was influenced by their pioneering experience, a knowledge of French, and their earlier experience in French Polynesia. While Jones explored the possibilities in this challenging French territory, Marion again visited her family in Western Australia.92 Jones was unsuccessful commencing work in 1924, and returned to Australia, where he visited the North NSW, South NSW,93 Victorian,94 and Tasmanian95 camp meetings. He also ministered in Melbourne,96 Wahroonga,97 and visited with Kanak members in Mackay and the aboriginals at Monamona Mission.98

After eventually receiving permission from the French authorities, the couple arrived in Noumea in October 1925. Jones regarded this as probably the most challenging field in the South Pacific.99 About a year later Cecile Guiot, a young French woman, converted through the ministry of the Sydney Sanitarium and Hospital, joined the Joneses in New Caledonia,100 living with them and learning their missionary skills.101 In November 1927 some technicalities regarding Jones’s immigration permit were identified, and they departed hastily.102 However, Cecile Guiot, as a French citizen, was able to continue as the missionary in New Caledonia, nurturing the new believers that Jones had baptized, and leading the mission for many years.103 She had become like a daughter to the Joneses, and spent at least one furlough with them on Lord Howe Island.104

After this interruption, Jones was granted furlough to the UK.105 They traveled via Capetown, where they spent a month visiting churches.106 Arriving in the UK, they visited family and were also reunited with people whose conversion they had influenced.107 In addition to the family connections, Jones went to Paris to meet with the French government to negotiate formal access for the church in the French Pacific territories.108

En route back to Australia, Jones was invited to spend two months in Singapore renewing acquaintances.109 The couple left Singapore to commence work in New Britain,110 aged 65 and 68, respectively. Jones traveled with A. G. Stewart to the meetings in the Solomon Islands en route to Rabaul.111 Marion later sailed direct to Rabaul. During the meetings in the Solomon Islands, two Solomon Island missionaries, Oti and Salau, were appointed to go to Rabaul with Jones to assist in the establishment of the mission.112 Without a boat, the work focused on Matupit Island, where a school was opened.113 At the end of 1929 Arthur Atkins was transferred from Batuna to Rabual.114 Soon after his arrival, Jones left in January 1930 because of failing health.115

Later Years

After almost thirty years of mission service in the South Pacific and Asia, Jones was appointed as a delegate to the 1930 General Conference session in San Francisco.116 Here the Joneses renewed their friendships with Mr. and Mrs. C. M. Lee, the first Chinese converts from Singapore. After the meetings they traveled with the Lees to Denver, Colorado,117 where Jones had been appointed to serve as the chaplain at the Porter Memorial Hospital. This appointment lasted only a few months, as there were delays in renewing his visa.118 During their time in the United States, both before and after the sojourn in Denver, they met many friends, colleagues, and acquaintances from the United Kingdom, the United States, the South Pacific, and South East Asia.119

After their time in the United States, they arrived in Liverpool in April 1931.120 After visiting family and friends, Jones assisted Roy and Clifford Anderson for several months in their evangelism at the Empire Theatre in Woodgreen, London.121 While in London the Joneses met the Ingle doctors, who were planning to go to South Africa and work among the Zulus.122 As the Joneses were advised to spend some months in warmer climates,123 they also decided to go to Durban and evangelize the Zulus,124 departing London in November 1931125 and returning in October 1932.126

In May 1933 the Joneses left London for the final time, to visit self-supporting missionary doctor friends, the Hilborns, in Morocco.127 However, because of the cost of living in Morocco, they relocated to Spain128 and later Gibraltar.129 While living in Spain, they often visited Gibraltar, where they engaged in door-to-door work.130 Jones was also invited to be a guest speaker at church meetings in Morocco and Algiers,131 and, toward the end of 1933, was invited to speak with the literature evangelists in Spain and Portugal.132 In March 1934 they departed Gibraltar and returned to Australia, arriving in May 1934.133

In October 1934, when it was decided to appoint separate ministers to Lord Howe and Norfolk islands, the Joneses, aged 70 and 73, respectively, accepted the position on Lord Howe Island.134 After four years Marion’s failing health had her return to Sydney. Jones arrived back for the AUC session, where he was replaced on Lord Howe Island.135 Soon after, Marion died in the Sydney Sanitarium on January 2, 1939.136

Jones continued to support seafaring missionaries and refine their navigation skills.137 He also visited Tonga, Samoa, and Niue.138 At the beginning of 1940, when Cecile Guiot was due furlough, Jones replaced her for several months in New Caledonia.139 Soon after his return, Jones died in the Sydney Sanitarium on September 14, 1940.140 Both Griffith and Marion Jones are buried in what was Sydney’s Northern Suburbs Cemetery, now named Macquarie Park Cemetery, North Ryde, New South Wales, Australia .141

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———. “In the Footsteps of John Williams—Life Story of Captain G. F. Jones, Part 3.” Australasian Record, July 13, 1959.

———. “Marion Jones obituary.” Australasian Record, January 23, 1939.

———. “New Guinea: The Land That Time Forgot—Life Story of Captain G. F. Jones, Part 9.” Australasian Record, August 31, 1959.

———. “Opening a New Mission Field in the Territory of New Guinea.” Australasian Record, July 8, 1929.

———. “Our Visit to the Solomon Islands.” Australasian Record, June 3, 1929.

———. “The Mission Field of the Australasian Union Conference: From the Report Presented to the Annual Council by Pr. A. G. Stewart, Vice President.” Australasian Record, September 9, 1938.

“Strange Sects in Singapore: Adventists, Faith Healers, and Salvationists.” Eastern Daily Mail and Straits Morning Advertiser, September 7, 1905 .

Teasdale, Geo. “Goodbye.” Union Conference Record, December 31, 1906.

“The Advent Herald.” Australasian Record, June 1, 1914.

“The British Consul in Tahiti . . .” Union Conference Record, October 1, 1902.

“The building of the chapel . . .” The Straits Times, August 18, 1909.

“The S.S. Mindini . . .” Australasian Record, October 4, 1920.

“The Union Conference Council—Distribution of Labour.” Australasian Record, August 15, 1904.

“Thirty-second Meeting: June 5, 10 A.M.—Distribution of Labour, #11.” ARH, June 19, 1913.

“Thomas Welsh Vallentine.” Accessed September 1, 2019. https://www.wikitree.com/wiki/Vallentine-27

Turner, W. G. “Recent Actions of the Union Conference Committee.” Australasian Record, February 25, 1924.

———. “Secretary’s Report of the Australasian Union Conference.” Australasian Record, September 15, 1924.

Tutty, R. H. “Experiences of a Native Worker on Bougainville.” The Missionary Leader, September 1929.

———. “Ranonga, Solomon Islands.” Australasian Record, November 1, 1920.

Vergel, Alfredo “Griffith Francis Jones Papers.” Adventist Heritage Center, Southwestern Adventist University, Keene, Texas.

“Visiting After the Conference.” Australasian Record, July 28, 1930.

Watson, C. H. “The Queensland Camp.” Australasian Record, October 2, 1916.

———. “The Union Conference Council.” Australasian Record, September 25, 1916.

“We have received word . . .” Australasian Record, February 25, 1929.

White, H. C. “North New South Wales Camp-Meeting.” Australasian Record, December 1, 1924.

White, W. C. “General Meetings in Europe.” ARH, July 21, 1892.

“Writing regarding her trip to Western Australia . . .” July 7, 1924.

Notes

  1. “Brother G. F. Jones . . . ,” Union Conference Record,” February 1, 1905, 8.

  2. “Pastor G. F. Jones and wife, after years of faithful service . . . ,” Australasian Record, October 13, 1913, 8.

  3. “Pastor G. F. Jones sailed from Sydney . . . ,” Australasian Record, June 2, 1924, 8.

  4. A. W. Anderson, “A Forward Movement in Our Mission Field,” April 29, 1929, 8.

  5. W. A. Spicer, “A Correction and Addition,” ARH, May 10, 1934, 4, 5.

  6. A. G. Stewart, “Jones, Griffith Francis,” October 8, 1940, 7.

  7. C. H. Pretyman, “Dedication of the Melanesia,” Australasian Record, June 25, 1917, 1–4.

  8. G. F. Jones, “Progress in New Guinea,” Australasian Record, October 30, 1922, 65–69; W. G. Turner, “Secretary’s Report of the Australasian Union Conference, presented at the Council—New Guinea,” Australasian Record, September 15, 1924, 3.

  9. “Farewell!” Australasian Record, December 5, 1938, 3.

  10. Alfredo Vergel, Griffith Francis Jones Papers, Adventist Heritage Center, Southwestern Adventist University, Keene, Texas.

  11. Llanerfyl, Wales, Birth Certificate, May 11, 1864, Griffith Francis Jones, County of Montgomery, Wales.

  12. “98 Margam Park, Jane Gittins—House Keeper Domestic; Griffith F. Jones—Visitor,” 1881 Wales Census for Glamorgan, Margum, District 2b, accessed July 1, 2019, www.ancestry.com.au/interactive/8059/ GLARG11_5330_5334-0932?pid=5698305&ba...

  13. Griffith Francis Jones, “Application to Be Examined for a Certificate of Competency as Master or Mate,” Liverpool, October 3, 1890, as cited by Brian Pugh Phillips, A Century of Adventism in Wales, 1885–1985: A History of Seventh-day Adventism in Wales and the Border Counties (PhD thesis, University of Glamorgan, 1992), Appendix B.

  14. Registrar General, Board of Trade, “Certificate of Competency as Second Mate—Griffith Francis Jones,” The Lords of the Committee of Privy Council for Trade, October 15, 1885.

  15. Registrar General, Board of Trade, “Certificate of Competency as First Mate—Griffith Francis Jones,” The Lords of the Committee of Privy Council for Trade, August 16, 1888.

  16. Registrar General, Board of Trade, “Certificate of Competency as Master—Griffith Francis Jones,” The Lords of the Committee of Privy Council for Trade, October 11, 1890.

  17. G. F. Jones, “My Early Morning Visitor: The Romance of a Scrap of Paper. How ‘Present Truth’ Made a Pioneer Missionary,” The Missionary Worker, July 25, 1924, 18, 19.

  18. A. G. Stewart, “From Mariner to Missionary—Life Story of Captain G. F. Jones, Part 2,” Australasian Record, July 6, 1959, 9.

  19. G. F. Jones, “My Early Morning Visitor.”

  20. Ibid.

  21. Marion studied with Miss May Taylor from the US. In 1895 Miss Taylor went as a missionary to India and later became Mrs. Quantock. See G. F. Jones, “Letter From Pastor Jones: Written to Pastor A. H. Piper,” Australasian Record, June 1, 1931, 8; W. C. White, “General Meetings in Europe,” ARH, July 21, 1892, 6; W. A. Spicer, “Our First Seed Sowing in India,” ARH, February 9, 1950, 1.

  22. Birkenhead, United Kingdom, Certificate of Marriage, September 15, 1896, Griffith Francis Jones and Marion Vallentine,” Counties of Birkenhead and Chester.

  23. D. S. Porter, “The Growth of Institutions and Conferences,Messenger: Centennial Historical Special, September 1974, 11; Stewart, “From Mariner to Missionary,” 10.

  24. Ibid.

  25. Fredrik W. Edwardy, “A Seven-Year Sojourn: Captain Jones, Missionary Mariner, Part Five,” The Youth’s Instructor, January 11, 1949, 19.

  26. C. C. Lewis, “Keene Academy Calendar,” ARH, June 25, 1901, 16.

  27. “Minute 111,” General Conference Proceedings—Thirteenth Meeting, April 23, 1901, 36.

  28. “In harmony with a recommendation . . . ,” ARH, September 17, 1901, 12; W. A. McCutchen, “Texas Camp-Meeting and Conference,” ARH, October 8, 1901, 12.

  29. G. F. Jones, “The Waiting Isles,” Australasian Record, August 7, 1939, 4.

  30. “The British Consul in Tahiti . . . ,” Union Conference Record, October 1, 1902, 8; Stewart, “From Mariner to Missionary,” 10.

  31. Fredrik W. Edwardy, “From Papeete to Pitcairn: Captain Jones, Missionary Mariner, Part Six,” The Youth’s Instructor, January 18, 1949, 7, 8.

  32. Stewart, “From Mariner to Missionary,”10.

  33. .E. H. Gates, “Bound for New Zealand,” ARH, September 3, 1903, 13; E. H. Gates, “Report of the Island Missions,” Union Conference Record, September 11, 1903, 9; G. F. Jones, “Report From Gambier Islands,” Union Conference Record, October 1, 1903, 2.

  34. E. H. Gates, “From San Francisco to Sydney,” Union Conference Record, July 15, 1903, 4.

  35. G. F. Jones, “From Mangareva to Rarotonga,” Union Conference Record, November 1, 1903, 5.

  36. G. F. Jones, “Rarotonga,” Union Conference Record, May 1, 1904, 9; G. F. Jones, “Rarotonga, Cook Islands,” Union Conference Record, May 15, 1904, 2.

  37. A. G. Stewart, “In the Footsteps of John Williams—Life Story of Captain G. F. Jones, Part 3,” Australasian Record, July 13, 1959, 5.

  38. “Pastor G. F. Jones writes from our mission . . . ,” Union Conference Record, April 1, 1904, 3.

  39. “The Union Conference Council—Distribution of Labour,” Australasian Record, August 15, 1904, 4; G. F. Jones, “Rarotonga,” Australasian Record, September 15, 1904, 2.

  40. The stopovers included Brisbane; British New Guinea—Samarai, Herbertshohe (Kokopo), Matupi, and Simpson’s Harbour (Rabaul); German New Guinea—Frederic Wilhelm’s Hafen (Madang); Dutch East Indies—Banda, Macassar (Ujong Padang—Sulawesi), Batavia (Jakata). See Mrs. G. F. Jones, “From Rarotonga to Singapore,” ARH, January 5, 1905, 13–15.

  41. Singapore and the states of the Malay Peninsula transferred from the Australasian Union Conference to the newly established Asiatic Division at the 1909 General Conference session. See “In the Asiatic Division,” ARH, June 16, 1909, 18. The East Indies Mission transferred from the Australasian Union Conference to the Asiatic Division from January 1, 1912. See M. Lukens, “Report of the General Conference Council,” Australasian Record, October 9, 1911, 1.

  42. G. F. Jones, “Singapore,” Union Conference Record, April 1, 1905, 6; Geo A. Irwin, “En Route to the General Conference,” Union Conference Record, June 15, 1905, 7, 8; “Council of the Malaysian Mission,” Union Conference Record, June 15, 1905, 8.

  43. E. C. Davey and M. Davey, “Our Medical Work in Singapore,” Union Conference Record, September 1, 1905, 2; G. F. Jones, “Singapore,” Union Conference Record, October 1, 1906, 63, 64; “Strange Sects in Singapore. Adventists, Faith Healers, and Salvationists,” Eastern Daily Mail and Straits Morning Advertiser, September 7, 1905, 2; “A New Paper,” Union Conference Record, February 4, 1907, 8.

  44. E. H. Gates, “Mission Secretary’s Report,” Union Conference Record, October 1, 1906, 10; A. G. Stewart, “From Singapore to the Solomon Islands—Life Story of Captain G. F. Jones, Part 4,” Australasian Record, July 20, 1959, 9; Geo Teasdale, “Goodbye,” Union Conference Record, December 31, 1906, 3, 4; and J. Mills, “Singapore,” Union Conference Record, December 31, 1906, 4.

  45. “The building of the chapel . . . ,” The Straits Times, August 18, 1909, 6; Stewart, “From Singapore to the Solomon Islands.”

  46. “Having been advised to seek a cooler climate . . . ,” Union Conference Record, March 7, 1910, 8.

  47. “Thomas Welsh Vallentine,” accessed September 1, 2019, https://www.wikitree.com/wiki/Vallentine-27.

  48. Sister Jones, “The Straits Settlements,” Newsletter for the Asiatic Division, June 1, 1912, 9.

  49. “August 26 Brother and Sister G. F. Jones . . . ,” Newsletter for the Asiatic Division, October 1, 1912, 1; “From a letter received from Pr. G. F. Jones . . . ,” Newsletter for the Asiatic Division, November 1, 1912, 4.

  50. G. F. Jones, “Malaysian Mission,” General Conference Bulletin, May 16, 1913, 45, 46.

  51. “East Indian Field.” The General Conference Bulletin, May 23, 1909, 115, 116.

  52. G. F. Jones, “Malaysian Mission.”

  53. “East Indian Field.”

  54. G. F. Jones, “Malaysian Mission.”.

  55. “In a letter from Brother G. F. Jones . . . ,” Australasian Record, February 3, 1913, 3.

  56. “Thirty-second Meeting: June 5, 10 A.M.—Distribution of Labour #11,” ARH, June 19, 1913, 7; A. H. Piper, “Notes of Travel,” Australasian Record, August 4, 1913, 2.

  57. “Actions Taken by the Union Conference Council Held at Wahroonga, New South Wales, September 23 to October 3, 1913: Distribution of Labour,” Australasian Record, October 13, 1913, 4.

  58. G. F. Jones, “Our Sydney Sanitarium,” Australasian Record, January 12, 1914, 7; “Pastor Hubbard has been chosen . . . ,” Australasian Record, April 13, 1914, 8.

  59. “Pastor G. F. Jones and wife sailed on . . . ,” Australasian Record, May 25, 1914, 8.

  60. The Advent Herald,” Australasian Record, June 1, 1914, 8.

  61. G. F. Jones, “Pioneering Experiences in the Solomon Islands—No. 1,” ARH, August 24, 1916, 11.

  62. G. F. Jones and M. V. Jones, “In the Solomon Islands,” Australasian Record, July 6, 1914, 3.

  63. “On Tuesday, November 23 . . . ,” Australasian Record, December 6, 1915, 8.

  64. The mission stations included Viru Harbour, Marovo, and Gatukai. See G. F. Jones, “The Solomon Islands—No. 1,” Australasian Record, August 9, 1915, 3, 4; The other missionaries were the Nicholsons, Hellestrands, and Grays. See “In accordance with . . . ,” Australasian Record, July 17, 1916, 8; “In the Mission Field,” Australasian Record, February 21, 1917, 4.

  65. G. F. Jones, “Pioneering Experiences in the Solomon Islands—No. 6," ARH, October 26, 1916, 13.

  66. Jones was appointed the superintendent for the new Melanesia Mission comprising the Solomon Islands, New Hebrides, New Guinea, Lord Howe Island, Norfolk Island, New Caledonia, Banks, Torres, Santa Cruz, and the islands of the Bismark Archipelago. See C. H. Watson, “The Union Conference Council,” Australasian Record, September 25, 1916, 7.

  67. C. H. Watson, “The Queensland Camp,” Australasian Record, October 2, 1916, 6; F. Knight, “Missionary Volunteer Work in Australasia: Our Work for 1917,” The Missionary Leader, December 1916, 18.

  68. “Pastor G. F. Jones and wife, while recuperating . . . ,” Australasian Record, October 2, 1916, 8.

  69. The names of the four Solomon Islanders who crewed the Melanesia on its maiden voyage from Sydney were Lokete, Varane, Londi, and Kioto. See “Four Solomon Islanders. . . ,” Australasian Record, May 14, 1917, 8; A. W. Anderson, “The ‘Melanesia’ Sails for the Solomon Islands,” Australasian Record, July 16, 1917, 8.

  70. C. H. Pretyman, “Dedication of the Melanesia,” Australasian Record, June 25, 1917, 1.

  71. . Anderson, “The ‘Melanesia’ Sails for the Solomon Islands.”

  72. A. G. Stewart and his wife were on the island of Aitchin, and Norman Wiles and his wife, Alma, were on the island of Malekula. See G. F. Jones, “In the New Hebrides,” Australasian Record, December 31, 1917, 5; A. G. Stewart, “Among the Big Nambus in the New Hebrides: Meeting a Cannibal Chief—Life Story of Captain G. F. Jones, Part 8,” Australasian Record, August 24, 1959, 3.

  73. G. F. Jones, “The ‘Melanesia’ Visits New Guinea,” Australasian Record, April 22, 1918, 3.

  74. G. F. Jones, “Solomon’s Island: The Missionary’s Wedding,” Australasian Record, June 3, 1918, 3, 4.

  75. Eva Edwards, “Opening of Nurses’ Training School,” Australasian Record, March 16, 1914, 6.

  76. Anderson, “The ‘Melanesia’ Sails for the Solomon Islands.”

  77. Stewart, “Among the Big Nambus in the New Hebrides.”

  78. Ibid.

  79. “Sister G. F. Jones . . . ,” Australasian Record, December 22, 1919, 8.

  80. G. F. Jones, “Solomon Islands,” Australasian Record, December 3, 1917, 2, 3; G. F. Jones, “Solomon Islands: Rendova Mission,” Australasian Record, September 23, 1918, 4.

  81. “Pastor G. F. Jones sends the following report . . . ,” Australasian Record, May 12, 1919, 8; Emily Tutty, “Some Experiences in the Solomon Islands,” Australasian Record, August 18, 1919, 3.

  82. R. H. Tutty, “Ranonga, Solomon Islands,” Australasian Record, November 1, 1920, 3.

  83. “The S.S. Mindini . . . ,” Australasian Record, October 4, 1920, 8.

  84. “Pastor G. F. Jones and wife left on December 1 . . . ,” Australasian Record, December 13, 1920, 8.

  85. “In order to release . . . ,” Australasian Record, May 2, 1921, 8.

  86. A. G. Stewart, “New Guinea: The Land That Time Forgot—Life Story of Captain G. F. Jones, Part 9,” Australasian Record, August 31, 1959, 8; “A Trip Inland in New Guinea,” Australasian Record, December 7, 1908, 3; G. F. Jones, “The ‘Melanesia’ Visits New Guinea. ”

  87. G. F. Jones, “Progress in New Guinea,” Australasian Record, October 30, 1922, 1–5.

  88. The first baptism in Papua New Guinea was at Bisiatabu on Sabbath October 25, 1924. See G. Peacock, “Baptism at Bisiatabu, New Guinea,” Australasian Record, December 15, 1924, 3.

  89. H. M. Blunden, “The Spirit of a Pioneer Missionary,” Australasian Record, May 1, 1922, 8.

  90. A senior magistrate noted, “Those Koiaris give us a lot of trouble, but you are doing much good among them, and you are bound to succeed on the lines you are following” (Stewart, “New Guinea: The Land That Time Forgot”).

  91. W. G. Turner, “Recent Actions of the Union Conference Committee,” Australasian Record, February 25, 1924, 8.

  92. “Writing regarding her trip to Western Australia . . . ,” July 7, 1924, 8.

  93. H. C. White, “North New South Wales Camp-Meeting,” Australasian Record, December 1, 1924, 3; A. H. Piper and Walter H. Hopkin, “Conference and Camp-Meeting,” Australasian Record, December 1, 1924, 6.

  94. “Pastor and Sister G. F. Jones . . . ,” Australasian Record, January 5, 1925, 8; A. W. Anderson, “Victorian Camp-Meeting,” Australasian Record, February 23, 1925, 4.

  95. J. L. Smith, “Notes,” Australasian Record, February 23, 1925, 4.

  96. G. F. Jones, “Our Young People,” Australasian Record, March 2, 1925, 2.

  97. “Pastor and Mrs. G. F. Jones have returned to Wahroonga . . . ,” Australasian Record, April 6, 1925, 8.

  98. “Pastor G. F. Jones is spending some time . . . ,” Australasian Record, June 15, 1925, 8.

  99. “Pastor and Mrs. G. F. Jones sailed from . . . ,” Australasian Record, November 2, 1925, 8.

  100. A French young lady . . . ,” Australasian Record, December 6, 1926, 8.

  101. “After spending a few weeks . . . ,” Australasian Record, September 26, 1927, 8.

  102. G. F. Jones, “Back From New Caledonia,” Australasian Record, December 5, 1927, 8.

  103. “A Story and Its Sequel,” Australasian Record, June 11, 1928, 4, 5.

  104. Jessie Ferris, “Little Lord Howe Holds a Camp Meeting,” Australasian Record, January 14, 1935, 3.

  105. A. H. Piper, “Veteran Missionaries’ Furlough,” Australasian Record, January 2, 1928, 8.

  106. G. F. Jones, “A Letter From Pastor G. F. Jones,” Australasian Record, March 26, 1928, 8.

  107. Piper, “Veteran Missionaries’ Furlough.”

  108. “Letter From Mrs. G. F. Jones,” Australasian Record, October 8, 1928, 8; Mission Board, “Our Foreign Missions: A Late Word From New Caledonia,” The Church Officers Gazette, December 1, 1928, 16.

  109. C. H. Anscombe, “Transportation Notes,” The Missionary Worker, November 16, 1928, 8; “We have received word . . . ,” Australasian Record, February 25, 1929, 8; “Many of the older residents . . . ,” The Straits Times, December 11, 1928, 8.

  110. “Pastor G. F. Jones to Labour Among Cannibals,” Malay Tribune, February 26, 1929, 10; “Now that camp-meeting season is over . . . ,” Australasian Record, April 15, 1929, 8.

  111. A. G. Stewart, “Our Visit to the Solomon Islands,” Australasian Record, June 3, 1929, 2, 3.

  112. R. H. Tutty, “Experiences of a Native Worker on Bougainville,” The Missionary Leader, September 1929, 1; A. G. Stewart, “Opening a New Mission Field in the Territory of New Guinea,” Australasian Record, July 8, 1929, 8.

  113. G. F. Jones, “A Letter From Pastor G. F. Jones, ” Australasian Record, November 18, 1929, 6.

  114. “From a radio message . . . ,” Australasian Record, January 6, 1930, 8.

  115. “Pastor and Mrs. G. F. Jones arrived in Sydney . . . ,” Australasian Record, February 3, 1930, 8.

  116. A. H. Piper, “The Australasian Delegation to the General Conference,” Australasian Record, May 19, 1930, 8.

  117. “Visiting After the Conference,” Australasian Record, July 28, 1930, 8.

  118. G. F. Jones, “Letter From Pastor Jones: Written to Pastor A. H. Piper,” Australasian Record, June 1, 1931, 8.

  119. These colleagues included the Drs. Kress, Dr. Harrower, R. W. Smith, E. H. Gates, Alma Wiles, Ramona Parker, Mrs. Semmens, Bro. S. T. Hare, E. W. Farnsworth, F. W. Paap, H. M. Blunden, Mrs. C. H. Watson, Prof. and Mrs. W. W. Prescott, Mrs. Fulton, B. J. Cady, Mrs. May Quantock, classmates from Keene, including Prof. J. L. Jones and Beckners. See G. F. Jones, “From California to Denver Colorado,” Australasian Record, October 27, 1930, 3; G. F. Jones, “Letter from Pastor Jones: Written to Pastor A. H. Piper”; A. G. Stewart, “A Providential Opening in Rabaul—Life Story of Captain G. F. Jones, Part 10,” Australasian Record, September 7, 1959, 5.

  120. G. F. Jones, “Letter from Pastor Jones: Written to Pastor A. H. Piper,” Australasian Record, June 1, 1931, 8.

  121. “Our readers will be interested . . . ,” Australasian Record, August 24, 1931, 8; D. S. Porter, “Chapter 7: Progress and Prejudice,” Messenger: Centennial Historical Special, September 1974, 25.

  122. “Pastor and Mrs. G. F. Jones,” Australasian Record, January 18, 1932, 8.

  123. A. G. Stewart, “A Providential Opening in Rabaul—Life Story of Captain G. F. Jones, Part 10,” Australasian Record, September 7, 1959, 5.

  124. “Mr. and Mrs. G. F. Jones . . . ,” The Advent Survey, January 1, 1932, 7; “Elder G. F. Jones . . . ,” Southern African Division Outlook, April 1, 1932, 10.

  125. “Names and Descriptions of British Passengers Embarked at the Port of London—S.S. Grantully Castle, Union Castle Line, November 26, 1931, Jones, G. F., and Jones, M,” UK Outward Bound Passenger Lists, 1890–1960, accessed July 1, 2019, https://search.ancestry.com.au/cgi-bin/sse.dll?indiv=1&dbid=2997&h=146247452&tid=&pid...

  126. “List of Passengers Disembarking at Southampton, S.S. Wangoni, Woermann Line, October 19, 1932, Mr. G. F. Jones and Mrs. G. F. Jones, UK Incoming Passenger Lists, Southampton 1878–1960, accessed July 1, 2019. https://www.ancestry.com.au/interactive/1518/30807_A001004-00208?pid=13729459&backurl...

  127. Jules Rey, “North African Union Mission,” ARH, January 12, 1933, 10; Marion V. Jones, “A Letter From Sis. G. F. Jones,” Australasian Record, February 5, 1934, 8.

  128. “Pastor G. F. Jones writes in a letter . . . ,” Australasian Record, October 9, 1933, 8.

  129. Mission Board, “Our Foreign Mission: Among Colporteurs in Spain and Portugal,” The Church Officers Gazette, October 1, 1934, 32.

  130. “Pastor G. F. Jones . . . ,” Australasian Record, October 9, 1933, 8.

  131. G. F. Jones, “Meetings in Northern Africa,” ARH, December 14, 1933, 14.

  132. Mission Board, “Our Foreign Mission: Among Colporteurs in Spain and Portugal,” The Church Officers Gazette, October 1, 1934, 32.

  133. “After four years abroad . . . ,” Australasian Record, May 21, 1934, 8.

  134. “Pastor and Mrs. G. F. Jones have been invited . . . ,” Australasian Record, October 1, 1934, 8.

  135. A. G. Stewart, “The Mission Field of the Australasian Union Conference: From the Report Presented to the Annual Council by Pr. A. G. Stewart, Vice President,” Australasian Record, September 9, 1938, 2.

  136. A. G. Stewart, “Marion Jones obituary,” Australasian Record, January 23, 1939, 7.

  137. A. G. Stewart, “Facing the Sunset—Life Story of Captain G. F. Jones, Part 11," Australasian Record, September 14, 1959, 9, 10.

  138. “Pastor G. F. Jones left for the Tongan Group . . . ,” Australasian Record, June 12, 1939, 8.

  139. “Pastor Jones arrived safely . . . ,” Australasian Record, January 29, 1940, 8; “After spending six months . . . ,” Australasian Record, July 1, 1940, 8.

  140. A. G. Stewart, “G. F. Jones obituary,” Australasian Record, October 7, 1940, 7.

  141. Stewart, “Marion Jones obituary”; Stewart, “G. F. Jones obituary.”

×

Currow, Stephen J. "Jones, Griffith Francis (1864–1940) and Marion (Vallentine) (1860–1939)." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. April 28, 2021. Accessed September 22, 2021. https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=BAWG.

Currow, Stephen J. "Jones, Griffith Francis (1864–1940) and Marion (Vallentine) (1860–1939)." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. April 28, 2021. Date of access September 22, 2021, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=BAWG.

Currow, Stephen J. (2021, April 28). Jones, Griffith Francis (1864–1940) and Marion (Vallentine) (1860–1939). Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. Retrieved September 22, 2021, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=BAWG.