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Graf, Huldreich F. (1855–1946)

By The Brazilian White Center – UNASP

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The Brazilian White Center – UNASP is a team of teachers and students at the Brazilian Ellen G. White Research Center – UNASP at the Brazilian Adventist University, Campus Engenheiro, Coelho, SP. The team was supervised by Drs. Adolfo Semo Suárez, Renato Stencel, and Carlos Flávio Teixeira. Bruno Sales Gomes Ferreira provided technical support. The following names are of team members: Adriane Ferrari Silva, Álan Gracioto Alexandre, Allen Jair Urcia Santa Cruz, Camila Chede Amaral Lucena, Camilla Rodrigues Seixas, Daniel Fernandes Teodoro, Danillo Alfredo Rios Junior, Danilo Fauster de Souza, Débora Arana Mayer, Elvis Eli Martins Filho, Felipe Cardoso do Nascimento, Fernanda Nascimento Oliveira, Gabriel Pilon Galvani, Giovana de Castro Vaz, Guilherme Cardoso Ricardo Martins, Gustavo Costa Vieira Novaes, Ingrid Sthéfane Santos Andrade, Isabela Pimenta Gravina, Ivo Ribeiro de Carvalho, Jhoseyr Davison Voos dos Santos, João Lucas Moraes Pereira, Kalline Meira Rocha Santos, Larissa Menegazzo Nunes, Letícia Miola Figueiredo, Luan Alves Cota Mól, Lucas Almeida dos Santos, Lucas Arteaga Aquino, Lucas Dias de Melo, Matheus Brabo Peres, Mayla Magaieski Graepp, Milena Guimarães Silva, Natália Padilha Corrêa, Rafaela Lima Gouvêa, Rogel Maio Nogueira Tavares Filho, Ryan Matheus do Ouro Medeiros, Samara Souza Santos, Sergio Henrique Micael Santos, Suelen Alves de Almeida, Talita Paim Veloso de Castro, Thais Cristina Benedetti, Thaís Caroline de Almeida Lima, Vanessa Stehling Belgd, Victor Alves Pereira, Vinicios Fernandes Alencar, Vinícius Pereira Nascimento, Vitória Regina Boita da Silva, William Edward Timm, Julio Cesar Ribeiro, Ellen Deó Bortolotte, Maria Júlia dos Santos Galvani, Giovana Souto Pereira, Victor Hugo Vaz Storch, and Dinely Luana Pereira.

 

 

Huldreich F. Graf was an evangelist, missionary, pastor, and teacher in South America.

Early Years

Huldreich F. Graf was born on July 8, 1855, in the old province of Posen, Prussia, today Poznan, Poland. He was the brother of Julius J. Graf who, as Huldreich, became a pastor and worked throughout his ministry among the German people.1 The Graf family emigrated to the United States in 1869, where they established a farm in Good Thunder, Minnesota. At 20 years old, in 1875, Huldreich married Alwine Henrietta (Scheunert) Graf (1856-1919), born in Landsberg, Germany. From the union were born nine children, of which three have registered names: Minna, Ohne and Lulu. Years later, after the death of his first wife, he married Carolina H. Graf (1874-1948).2

Ministry

The Grafs learned the Adventist message in the 1880s through an evangelistic effort among the Germans held in Good Thunder by W. B. Hill and L. R. Conradi. They were some of the first members of the local SDA church organized in February of 1884. Not long after his baptism, Huldreich entered the seminary in order to serve God as a pastor.3 After graduating, he entered the ministry in 1889 in the Wisconsin Conference where he served in the Milwaukee German Institute. The institute offered annual training for Adventist workers in order to instruct them in the German language. In the same year he started working in the Minnesota Conference where he held evangelistic meetings in Sanborn, Stockton, and Winona.4

Huldreich served for many years as an evangelist in the American Midwest states. In 1890, he organized a Sabbath School for a new German church in North Branch, Minnesota and held evangelistic meetings in Mankato, Minnesota.5 In 1891, he was ordained to the pastoral ministry and assisted German churches in Napoleon and Good Thunder. Later in the year, along with his brother J. J. Graf, he conducted evangelistic meetings in a tent at Mountain Lake.6 As a part of his evangelistic work, he also gave basic medical assistance and instructions on healthful living by which many people were cured. As a result, a church was organized in Mountain Lake.7

In May of 1892, he organized a church at Oshkosh, North Dakota, where he once more worked among Germans. In that same year he accepted a call to teach German and Bible classes at Union College, Nebraska, where he served until 1895.8 In addition to teaching during this period, Huldreich continued conducting evangelistic meetings among the German people. In 1894, he organized a Sabbath School in Iowa. He also assisted at the German camp meetings in North and South Dakota. At the administrative and evangelistic meetings for the organization of the Oklahoma Conference, nearly one half of the people were German.9

In 1895, Graf was chosen by the General Conference Mission Board to be a missionary in Brazil.10 Having accepted the call, on September 3 he arrived with his family in Hamburg, Germany to wait for transport to Brazil. On September 11, they embarked on the Belgrano and, in October, arrived at the Rio de Janeiro port. The family was welcomed by W. H. Thurston, president and treasurer of the Brazil Mission at the time. Graf was the first ordained pastor to work full-time in the country and the only one until the arrival of Pastor Frederick. W. Spies in 1896.11

The Graf family settled in the city of Rio de Janeiro. Having not yet received the funds from the Church in the United States, they went survived two weeks eating only corn porridge because they didn’t want to reveal their situation to the brethren. When he began his work, it consisted of traveling throughout the territories that had been evangelized by the missionary canvassers in order to visit, baptize, and instruct the new SDA Church members. In 1895 he organized the second SDA church in Brazil in Rio de Janeiro City on October 27 and the third SDA church in Brazil in Santa Maria do Jetibá, near Santa Leopoldina City, in Espírito Santo State on December 14 of 1895.12

From Espírito Santo, Graf traveled to the state of Santa Catarina where, in the city of Brusque, he was stoned and persecuted. Despite the adversities that happened there, he held baptisms and organized a church. He then traveled to Joinville, where he organized a church with 36 members in April. After that, he went to Florianópolis, capital of the state, where a canvasser had started an evangelistic effort. However, on the following day he had to return to Rio de Janeiro because of his wife’s illness. Seeing her condition, he decided to move the family to Curitiba, in the state of Paraná, where she would be closer to Adventist brethren who could help her.13

This adjustment turned out to be a blessing because, some days later, Graf visited German colonies in the west of the state and great interest was awakened. In his absence, Alwine made missionary contacts in the region. Adventism prospered in such a way in the city that it became evident a school was needed. The very first Adventist school in Brazil was inaugurated in Curitiba on July 1 with Graf as director and Guilherme Stein as teacher. Sometime later both were infected with yellow fever remaining sick for six weeks. At the same time, Thurston was recovering in Rio de Janeiro from the same sickness, leaving the Brazil Mission under the exclusive responsibility of Spies for a while. Graf returned to the active work in 1897, when in January he organized the Curitiba Church.14

Shortly after that, Graf traveled to Espírito Santo where he joined Spies in visiting the Santa Maria do Jetibá Church. Although suffering severe persecution, he found a persevering church that had doubled in the number of members. On that occasion, they baptized more 23 people. In July of 1897, Graf organized the Alto Benedito Novo Church in the state of Santa Catarina. When passing through Brusque, the brethren revealed to them the necessity of an Adventist school for their children. On returning to Curitiba, he met teacher Paul Krämer who had arrived to lead the local school. Therefore, Graf sent Guilherme Stein to open a school in Brusque, the second Adventist school in the country.15

In October, accompanied by canvasser Albert Stauffer, Graf traveled to the Rio Grande do Sul for the first time. In Porto Alegre City, he baptized the first Adventist in the state. They continued to Ijuí where, on November 27, they organized a church. They also visited and held baptisms in São Pedro, Vila Germânia, Taquari, and Santa Cruz where another church was organized. Upon returning to Taquari, Graf received the news that his son was seriously ill and traveled immediately to Curitiba. However, the boy sadly passed away.16

In 1899, Graf moved to Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul state, where he held evangelistic meetings. At this place an interesting story happened as related in the General Conference Minutes. A woman that was confined to bed for months came to know of the presence of Adventists in the region and asked them to visit her. After reading the Bible and talking to her, Graf and his wife believed the woman had the necessary faith to be cured. Following Jesus’s instruction, Graf anointed her with oil and laid his hand on her. Immediately, her health was restored. Still in 1899, Graf visited the Santa Catarina and Paraná fields along with Spies.17

Following the council of J. W. Westphal, superintendent of the South American Missions, the Brazil Conference was organized at a meeting held from May 10 to 20 of 1902 in Gaspar Alto. The headquarters was established in Rio de Janeiro. Graf was elected as the first president, being responsible for fifteen churches and 860 members, and serving until 1906.18

Near the beginning of 1906, the South American field received a visit by W. A. Spicer, secretary of the General Conference after approving its reorganization to Union Conference status. During meetings held in Paraná, capital of the Entre Rios Province, Argentina, J. W. Westphal was elected president of the new South American Union with H. F. Graf as vice-president. On the same occasion, the Brazil Conference was reorganized into two conferences: Santa Catarina and Rio Grande do Sul and Graf was elected president of the latter.19

Last Years

In 1907, after twelve years dedicated as a missionary in Brazil, Graf returned with his wife to the United States.20 During the following years, he was pastor in many districts and worked actively in evangelism among Germans. In 1907 he served in Good Thunder, Minnesota also leading meetings in the German language in Winona. He also participated in many camp meetings where he shared his testimony from his time as a missionary in Brazil.21

In mid-1908, he accepted a call to lead the German work in the state of Ohio. Some time later, on November 8 of 1908, he organized the Cleveland German Church where he was pastor until 1912.22 In that year, he accepted the invitation to serve in the Central California Conference with headquarters in Fresno. At the beginning of 1913, he organized a church in the city of Dinuba. Later in 1913, he started working in the Wisconsin Conference with headquarter in Milwaukee, where he served until his retirement in 1915. Upon retirement, he moved to Cleveland where he assisted the German church.23

Later, he returned to Brazil to be closer to his children. Even advanced in years, he took part in Ingathering campaigns, preached, held baptisms, and participated in administrative meetings where he was always ready to give his testimony. Graf died on December 4, 1946, at 91 years-and-a-half in Taquari, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.24

Contribution

Huldreich F. Graf made important contributions to the SDA Church leaving a legacy of service as a pastor to Germans in the United States and as a missionary in Brazil. During the twelve years he worked in South America, he baptized more than 1400 people and organized many of the first Adventist churches in the nation, especially in the state of Rio Grande do Sul. Energic in preaching the gospel, he added to that the talent of singing that he always used in evangelistic meetings. In his missionary travels, he carried with him emergency medicine and instructed people on how to apply natural treatments. He was involved in the organization of the first missionary schools, even with limited resources. These schools do not exist today, but in 1915 resulted in the foundation of the Brazil College (today Central Adventist University of Sao Paulo). His pioneer work in Brazil contributed greatly to the advancement of the Adventist message in this country.

Sources

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“Field Notes.” Signs of the Times, December 26, 1892.

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“The Foreign Mission Board…” ARH, October 15, 1895.

“Várias Notícias.” Revista Trimensal, March 1907.

Behrens, J. H. “Central California Conference.” Pacific Union Recorder, March 6, 1913.

Boehm, J. H. “Two Pioneers.” ARH, October 17, 1940.

Boettcher, J. T. “Dedication of German Church in Cleveland Ohio.” Columbia Union Visitor, March 31, 1921.

Breed, A. J. “Minnesota Conference Proceedings.” ARH, July 5, 1892.

Breed, A. J. “The Oklahoma Camp-Meeting.” ARH, October 9, 1894.

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Conradi, L. R. “The German Work at Large.” ARH, September 13, 1892.

Daniells, A. G. “One Hundred and Seventeenth Meeting.” General Conference Committee, October 2, 1906.

Gaede, G. P. “Ohio.” ARH, May 28, 1908.

Graf, H. F. “Cleveland, Ohio.” Northern Union Reaper, June 23, 1908.

Graf, H. F. “Good Words from Brazil.” The Home Missionary, December 1896.

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Graf, H. F. “On the Way to Brazil.” ARH, October 8, 1895.

Graf, H. F. “The German Work in Minnesota.” ARH, April 16, 1889.

Graf, H. F. “Travels in Rio Grande do Sul.” The Missionary Magazine, June 1899.

Graf, H. F. and W. B. Hill. “Minnesota.” ARH, August 6, 1889.

Greenleaf, Floyd, Terra de Esperança. Tatuí, SP: Brazil Publishing House, 2011.

Gregory, Aleb L, M.D. “Experiences in Brazil.” ARH, May 16, 1907.

Johnson, F. B. “Minnesota Notes” Northern Union Reaper, August 6, 1907.

Johnson, F. B. “Minnesota.” ARH, March 22, 1892.

Johnson, F. B. “Minnesota.” ARH, October 6, 1891.

Kern, M. E. “A Union College Reunion.” The Educational Messenger, April, 1908.

Link, Edgar. “Raízes da Nossa História.” Revista Adventista, December 2017.

Lipke, John. “Christian Schools in Brazil.” The Advocate of Christian Education, July 1904.

Murray, W. E. “Pioneering Missions in South America.” ARH, August 13, 1959.

Neilsen, N. P. “Among the Churches.” South American Bulletin, November 1927.

Neilsen, N. P. “Opposition and Victory.” ARH, July 19, 1928.

Neufeld, Don F. and Julia Neuffer, editors. Seventh-day Adventist Encyclopedia. Hagerstown, MD: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1996.

Nigri, M. S. “As Bienais na União Sul-Brasileira.” Revista Adventista, May 1956.

Olsen, Ellsworth, Origin and Progress of Seventh-day Adventists. Takoma Park, Washington D. C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1926.

Porter, R. C. “Minnesota Conference Proceedings.” ARH, June 30, 1891.

Russell, K. C. “The Kansas Camp-Meeting.” ARH, October 3, 1907.

Schubert, G. W.. “Experiences in South Brazil.” ARH, February 9, 1928.

Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook. Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1889, 1890, 1891, 1893, 1894, 1909, 1912.

Shultz, H. “Among the Germans.” ARH, August 7, 1894.

Spicer, W. A. “New Union Conference in the Field.” ARH, May 31, 1906.

Spies, F. W. “As Primeiras Experiencias no Brasil.” Revista Adventista, September 1924.

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Spies, F. W. “Organization of the Brazil Conference.” ARH, October 21, 1902.

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Stuhlman, Friedrich. “Joinville, Santa Catharina, Brazil.” The Missionary Magazine, July 1899.

Thurston, W. H. “A Trip to Southern Brazil.” ARH, April 6, 1897.

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Thurston, W. H. “Brazil.” ARH, September 29, 1896.

Thurston, W. H. “From Brazil.” ARH, November 26, 1895.

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Valentine, A. “Encouraging News from the German Field.” ARH, February 6, 1894.

Valentiner, Theo. “Brother Carl Scholl…” The Home Missionary, November 1890.

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Notes

  1. “H. F. Graf,” ARH, June 26, 1947, 26; Seventh-Day Adventist Encyclopedia (1996), 622.; Seventh-day Adventist Encyclopedia (National Center of Adventist History/ Ellen G. White Research Center: UNASP-EC, Engenheiro Coelho, SP), 608; F. B. Johnson, “Minnesota,” ARH, March 22, 1892, 188.

  2. Seventh-Day Adventist Encyclopedia (1996), 622; “Graf,” Revista Adventista, September 1948, 25; W. E. Murray, “Pioneering Missions in South America,” ARH, August 13, 1959, 16; C. W. Weber, “Alwine Graf,” Columbia Union Visitor, August 7, 1919, 10.

  3. Seventh-Day Adventist Encyclopedia (1996), 622; “Interest Among the Germans,” Signs of the Times, April 17, 1884, 251; O. A. Olsen, “Appointments,” ARH, January 29, 1884, 79; L. R. Conradi, “Minnesota and Dakota,” ARH, July 29, 1884, 492; [L.] R. Conradi, “Minnesota and Dakota,” ARH, March 4, 1884, 156.

  4. Neufeld and Neuffer, 622; H. F. Graf, “The German Work in Minnesota,” ARH, April 16, 1889, 252; “Committee on Education of Foreign Laborers,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1889), 53; “Workers’ Directory,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1890), 8; W. B. Hill and H. F. Graf, “Minnesota,” ARH, August 6, 1889, 507.

  5. Theo Valentiner, “Brother Carl Scholl…” Home Missionary, November 1890, 256; “Minnesota Conference,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1891), 8, 28.

  6. “Minnesota Conference,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook, 8, 28; R. C. Porter, “Minnesota Conference Proceedings,” ARH, June 30, 1891, 413; H. Graf, “Minnesota: Mountain Lake,” ARH, July 21, 1891, 459; Johnson, 1892, 188.

  7. H. Graf, “Minnesota,” ARH, February 9, 1892, 90; F. B. Johnson, “Minnesota,” ARH, October 6, 1891, 618; L. R. C[onradi], “The German Work at Large,” ARH, September 13, 1892, 586.

  8. A. J. Breed, “Minnesota Conference Proceedings,” ARH, July 5, 1892, 428; “Field Notes,” Signs of the Times, December 26, 1892, 125; J. M. Willoughby, “Southeastern Iowa Camp-Meeting,” ARH, November 8, 1892, 700; “Union College,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1893), 44.

  9. “Union College,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1894), 45; A. Valentine, “Encouraging News from the German Field,” ARH, February 6, 1894, 96; H. Shultz, “Among the Germans,” ARH, August 7, 1894, 509; A. J. Breed, “The Oklahoma Camp-Meeting,” ARH, October 9, 1894, 636.

  10. “Seventh Meeting General Conference Committee,” Spring Session 1895, 18; “General Conference,” ARH, March 5, 1895, 155.

  11. H. F. Graf, “On the Way to Brazil,” ARH, October 8, 1895, 650, 651; L. R. C[onradi], “The German Mission,” ARH, October 15, 1895, 665; “Elder H. Graf and family…” ARH, October 1, 1895, 640; W. H. Thurston, “From Brazil,” ARH, November 26, 1895, 764; “The Foreign Mission Board…” ARH, October 15, 1895, 672; F. W Spies, “As Primeiras Experiencias no Brasil,” Revista Adventista, September 1924, 5.

  12. H. F Graf, “Good Words from Brazil,” The Home Missionary, December 1896, 282; Floyd Greenleaf, Terra de Esperança (Tatuí, SP: Brazil Publishing House, 2011), 83; Edgar Link, “Raízes da Nossa História,” Revista Adventista, December 2017, 6; Spies, “As Primeiras Experiencias no Brasil,” 5.

  13. “In Brazil some of our workers…” Home Missionary, September 1896, 203; H. F. Graf, “Good Words from Brazil,” Home Missionary, December 1896, 282; Friedrich Stuhlman, “Joinville, Santa Catharina, Brazil,” The Missionary Magazine, July 1899, 302; “Addresses,” ARH, May 19, 1896, 319; W. H. Thurston, “Brazil,” ARH, September 29, 1896, 622; F. W. Spies, “The Brusque Training School in Brazil,” ARH, March 10, 1903, 12.

  14. “In Brazil some of our workers…,” 203; Graf, “Good Words from Brazil,” 282; Stuhlman, “Joinville, Santa Catharina, Brazil,” 302; “Addresses,” ARH, 319; Thurston, “Brazil,” (1896), 622; Spies, “The Brusque Training School in Brazil,” 12; Theo Valentiner, “Our International School in Brazil,” ARH, April 20, 1897, 251.

  15. H. F. Graf, “Travels in Rio Grande do Sul,” The Missionary Magazine, June 1899, 238; A. B. Stauffer, “Brazil,” ARH, April 26, 1898, 272; F. W. Spies, “Brazil,” ARH, May 25, 1897, 331; H. F. Graf, “Brazil,” ARH, June 1, 1897, 347; W. H. Thurston, “A Trip to Southern Brazil,” ARH, April 6, 1897, 220; Edgar Link, “Raízes da Nossa História,” Revista Adventista, December 2017, 6; John Lipke, “Christian Schools in Brazil,” The Advocate of Christian Education, July 1904, 109; A. B. Stauffer, “The Second School in Brazil,” ARH, February 8, 1898, 95; W. H. Thurston, “Mission School in Brazil,” The Missionary Magazine, November 1900, 491.

  16. H. F. Graf, “Travels in Rio Grande do Sul,” The Missionary Magazine, June 1899, 238; Stauffer, “Brazil,” (1898), 272; Spies, “Brazil,” (1897), 331; Graf, “Brazil,” (1897), 347; Thurston, “A Trip to Southern Brazil,” 220; Link, 6.

  17. W. H. Thurston, “Brazil,” ARH, June 20, 1899, 400; “Elder H. F. Graf…” The Indicator, February 1, 1899, 4; “In Southern Brazil…” General Conference Proceedings, April 7, 1901, 79.

  18. Floyd Greenleaf, Terra de Esperança (Tatuí, SP: Brazil Publishing House, 2011), 85; F. W. Spies, “Organization of the Brazil Conference,” ARH, October 21, 1902, 17.

  19. M. S. Nigri, “As Bienais na União Sul-Brasileira,” Revista Adventista, May 1956, 12; Ellsworth Olsen, Origin and Progress of Seventh-Day Adventists (Takoma Park, Washington D. C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1926), 574; W. A. S[picer], “New Union Conference in the Field,” ARH, May 31, 1906, 5; F. W. Spies, “Organization of the Rio Grande do Sul (Brazil) Conference,” ARH, August 2, 1906, p. 13.

  20. A. G. Daniells, “One Hundred and Seventeenth Meeting,” General Conference Committee, October 2, 1906, 196; “Várias Notícias,” Revista Trimensal, March 1907, 2.

  21. K. C. Russell, “The Kansas Camp-Meeting,” ARH, October 3, 1907, 19; “Field Notes and Gleanings,” ARH, November 21, 1907, 21; F. B. Johnson, “Minnesota Notes,” Northern Union Reaper, August 6, 1907, 5; “Conference Proceedings,” Echoes from the Field, September 11, 1907, 3; Aleb L. Gregory, M.D., “Experiences in Brazil,” ARH, May 16, 1907, 17; “Minnesota Conference,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1908), 57.

  22. “Ohio Conference,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1909), 40; “Ohio Conference,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1912), 36; M. E. Kern, “A Union College Reunion,” The Educational Messenger, April 10, 1908, 2; H. F. Graf, “Cleveland, Ohio,” Northern Union Reaper, June 23, 1908, 2; “Minnesota Notes,” Northern Union Reaper, May 5, 1908, 7; G. P. Gaede, “Ohio,” ARH, May 28, 1908, 16; J. T. Boettcher, “Dedication of German Church in Cleveland Ohio,” Columbia Union Visitor, March 31, 1921, 2.

  23. “Central California: News Notes,” Pacific Union Recorder, December 26, 1912, 3; “Elder H. F. Graf...” Columbia Union Visitor, January 22, 1913, 5; “Elder C. W. Weber,” Columbia Union Visitor, May 7, 1913, 5; J. H. Behrens, “Central California Conference,” Pacific Union Recorder, March 6, 1913, 1; “A note from Sawtell...” ARH, March 27, 1913, 304.

  24. N. P. Neilsen, “Among the Churches,” South American Bulletin, November 1927, 5; G. W. Schubert, “Experiences in South Brazil,” ARH, February 9, 1928, 18; N. P. Neilsen, “Opposition and Victory,” ARH, July 19, 1928, 11; J. H. Boehm, “Two Pioneers,” ARH, October 17, 1940, 19.

×

UNASP, The Brazilian White Center –. "Graf, Huldreich F. (1855–1946)." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. April 28, 2021. Accessed October 23, 2021. https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=BGIJ.

UNASP, The Brazilian White Center –. "Graf, Huldreich F. (1855–1946)." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. April 28, 2021. Date of access October 23, 2021, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=BGIJ.

UNASP, The Brazilian White Center – (2021, April 28). Graf, Huldreich F. (1855–1946). Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. Retrieved October 23, 2021, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=BGIJ.