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Manaus Adventist Hospital in 2017.

Photo courtesy of Manaus Adventist Hospital Archives.

Manaus Adventist Hospital

By Arildo Coelho de Souza, Daniel Rodrigues Rebouças, and Ronivon da Silva dos Santos

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Arildo Coelho de Souza

Daniel Rodrigues Rebouças

Ronivon da Silva dos Santos

First Published: June 20, 2021

Manaus Adventist Hospital (Hospital Adventista de Manaus or HAM) is a medical missionary institution of the Seventh-day Adventist Church and is part of the Adventist International Health Network. This unit is operating in the territory of the Brazilian Northwest Union Mission (União Noroeste Brasileira or UNoB) on 139 Governador Danilo de Matos Areosa Ave. in Zip Code 69075-351 in the Distrito Industrial neighborhood in the city of Manaus, the capital of the state of Amazonas, Brazil.

Based on the same principles that guide more than 740 Adventist health institutions around the world, the HAM assists its clients in a wide variety of medical specialties and is a reference for the care and the special attention it dedicates to its patients. Nowadays, the hospital has 1,181 employees of whom 386 are physicians. The HAM’s structure contains 33 beds of which 20 are from the Intensive Care Centers (ICCs) for adults and 14 are in the Pediatric and Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU). In addition, there are six operating rooms, a Hemodynamics room, a diagnostic center, and a clinical analysis laboratory. For outpatient care, the hospital has almost 50 medical offices where 45 medical specialties are offered.1

Developments that Led to the Establishment of the Institution

In 1927, the East Brazil Union Conference (presently the Southeast Brazil Union Conference) sent Pastor John L. Brown and his family to the city of Belém in the state of Pará with the aim of establishing Adventist work in Northern Brazil. Thus, Pastor Brown was sent to Belém to be the president of the Lower Amazon Mission (currently the North Para Conference (Associação Norte do Pará or ANPa) which covered the states of Amazonas, Pará, Ceará, Maranhão, Piauí, Acre, Amapá, Rondônia, and Roraima. Evangelist canvasser 2 Hans Meyer and his wife, as well as canvasser André Gedrath, were sent to Belém to work with Pastor Brown. The trips were made by river and, for this reason, the two canvassers decided to build a launch to facilitate their locomotion.3

In 1929, Léo and Jessie Halliwell, with their two children Jack and Marian, were transferred from the state of Bahia, where they had worked as missionaries, to the Lower Amazon Mission. When making an exploratory trip on the Amazon River, they became aware of the poverty that existed in the region and how difficult the living conditions were for the people living there. The Society of Voluntary Missionaries (Missionários Voluntários or MV)4 in North and South America donated funds so that Halliwell could acquire a launch5 to preach the Advent message in that area.6

In 1930, after taking a course on tropical diseases in the United States, Halliwell returned to Brazil and built a boat he designed himself. The boat was 30 feet long and 10 feet wide and was piloted by the missionary for 30 years starting in 1931.7 The launch Luzeiro I [Light Bearer I]8 was the means of transportation that he sailed along the Amazon rivers, taking these missionaries on their mission. Allied to the evangelistic work, medical care was provided to the riverside communities.9 At first, in order to treat people, Halliwell bought medicine with the few resources he had. Later, he began to receive medications donated by doctors and pharmacies in the United States and from the department of public health of the state of Pará and Amazonas.10

In one of his first trips on the launch Luzeiro, in August 1931 on the way from Belém to Manaus, Halliwell docked in the capital of Amazonas and held a series of conferences at the Cine Teatro Guarany [Guarany Theater]. This series resulted in the formation of an Adventist congregation in the city, followed by its first baptism in 1933. Later, in 1938, this congregation was organized into a church. With the expansion of the Adventist message to the countryside of Northern Brazil, in 1940, the Central Amazon Mission (Missão Central da Amazônia or MCA), presently the Central Amazon Conference, was established. In 1946, the first Manaus Adventist temple was inaugurated due to the missionary work being carried out there.11

Leo and Jessie Halliwell served in the launch ministry from 1931 until 1954 when they officially handed over command of the missionary launch to Pastor Walter Streithrost and his wife Olga. During this period, the Halliwells had served more than 100,000 people, seeking to take care of the people`s integral health.12 The first hospital built as a direct result of the launch’s work was Belém Hospital (presently Belém Adventist Hospital), which was inaugurated in 1953 in the city of Belém.13 Until 1970, the Luzeiro motorboats were the main means of medical treatment not only in the surroundings of Manaus, but in the entire territory of Amazonas. Three launches had a dock in Amazonas, two in Manaus, and one in Maués.14

Foundation of the Institution

Eventually, medical care and its complexities could no longer be taken care of in a boat, and many people were already being sent to other Adventist medical centers in Brazil. In addition, missionaries yearned for a location to better serve the riverside residents as well as other patients in the capital of Amazonas. Then, in January 1976, missionary physician Raymond Ermshar and his wife Marian arrived in Manaus to begin the activities of the Adventist Clinic of Manaus. The couple came from the United States and brought with them an X-ray machine and equipment for a clinical analysis laboratory. Marian and Ermshar were, respectively, the son-in-law and daughter of Pastor Leo Halliwell.15

Ermshar donated the equipment from his office in California and requested contributions from other North American physicians. With faith and the will to carry through the work of God, in April 25, 1978, the Adventist Clinic of Manaus officially was inaugurated under the direction of physician Vanderley Granados and administrator Israel Barbosa.16 In its beginning, the clinic comprised of four workers: two directors, a gynecologist (Wilson Soares who later became one of the directors of the clinic), and nurse Telma Garcia. All the workers, volunteers, and each of the few employees of the clinic had the desire to contribute so themedical missionary work could develop.17

The clinic was installed on 520 Belém St. (now Professor Marciano Armond St.) in the Adrianópolis neighborhood. The house rented for that purpose was about 800 meters from the MCA office and was adapted to have a surgical center, a sterilization center for medical materials, a pharmacy, a kitchen, and five rooms for patient care. Next to the house on Belém St., there was a piece of land on the banks of the Rio Negro [Black River] in the Tarumã region in Manaus, and it was acquired for the construction of the Adventist Research Center in Manaus.18

The funds for these acquisitions came from the North Brazil Union (União do Norte do Brasil or UNB), the Central Amazon Mission and the Brazilian Adventist Hospital Group (Grupo Hospitalar Adventista Brasileiro or GHAB).19 Since the region was in need of hospital institutions, the clinic sought to serve people from the most diverse social classes, though they were mainly from riverside communities.20 To this end, from the beginning, its mission was defined as the search for promoting physical, mental, social, and spiritual well-being through the example of the servant of Jesus Christ, the Physician of physicians.21

History of the Institution

For nine months, the Manaus Adventist Clinic was financially maintained by Silvestre Adventist Hospital (Hospital Adventista Silvestre or HAS) in Rio de Janeiro. This institution directly participated in the growth of the Manaus Clinic. At the beginning, there were 11 beds, a laboratory room, and two offices in their facilities. Through this structure, the clinic was offering assistance in the specialties of General Clinic, Gynecology, Obstetrics, General Surgery, Respiratory Therapy, and Physiotherapy in addition to exams including electrocardiograms and X-rays, as well as hospitalizations.22

In November 1978, the “Health Guarantee” plan was created there following the pattern of those already existing in other Adventist hospitals. Months later, in July 1979, the plan already had 500 members including a former governor of the state of Amazonas. In addition to this plan, the clinic had an agreement with Petrobras, Caixa Econômica Federal, and Banco do Brasil, recognized Brazilian institutions. Also in 1979, the MCA acquired 120,000 square meters of land in the Distrito Industrial region, a good distance from Manaus downtown area, for the construction of Manaus Adventist Hospital. Until that time, there were three medical missionaries serving in the areas of general surgery, gynecology, and obstetrics. Non-Adventist physicians attended the other specialties.23

Four years later (1983), the cornerstone of the new Hospital in the Distrito Industrial was laid. From 1986 - the year when the construction began - to 1989, the hospital operated in temporary installations in a Fire Department shed that was revamped with local and international donations. Later, in this shed, the Nursing Assistants School of the HAM was established. The place where the School operated, nowadays houses the administrative headquarters of the Northwest Brazil Union.24

Finally, on November 16, 1989, the Clinic officially became the Manaus Adventist Hospital and was inaugurated at its current address. The inauguration was attended by international and local leaders from the Seventh-day Adventist Church and the Adventist Development and Relief Agency (ADRA) as well as the governor of Amazonas. After the event, the state government donated a tomography device considered to be the best one available on the market.25 Well equipped, the unit was inaugurated to the public on January 7, 1990.26 At first, the place had a capacity for 80 beds, 40 of which were in operation. The total built area was 4,600 square meters.27Also in 1989, the UNB appointed Silas Araújo Gomes as the first medical director of the new hospital.28

In April 1993, the Nursing Assistants School started its activities, and in the following year, it graduated its first class with 24 students. Also in that year (1993), a new wing and the obstetrical center were inaugurated. At that time, the hospital employed 177 employees. In 1994, the hospital’s Intensive Care Unit (ICU) was opened. Two years later, on August 31, 1996, the hospital launched an Ambulatory Care Center that was fully computerized and located in the Medical and Dental Center of Manaus (Cemom) on 12 Acre St. in the Vieira Alves neighborhood. The location had four offices, a reception area for adults, a children's waiting area, a collection room for laboratory testing, and a small dining room. In January 1997, the hospital improved its equipment by purchasing equipment including a tomography scanner, a lithotripsy device, and a urodynamic device.29

In 2006, with 56 beds and 14 offices for various medical specialties, the HAM performed more than 6,000 consultations and almost 22,000 clinical analysis exams per month. The city of Manaus also underwent changes, becoming an immigration hub due to the Distrito Industrial that, at that time, had already more than 100,000 employees. The number of patients in this hospital surrounded by industries was increasing, and the need for expansion was imminent since the structure had remained the same since 1989. It was then that, from September 2007, the reform and expansion of the HAM began. More than 5,300 square meters were reconfigured to provide 28 new offices, apartments, inpatient wards, ICU beds, a new laboratory and emergency room, ample parking, comfortable receptions, and an auditorium with baptismal tank.30

On February 27, 2008, the new hospital’s facilities were inaugurated. In all, the built area reached 10,000 square meters. At the time, the Adventist Church leaders were present from regional and national levels as well as state parliamentarians and the present governor of Amazonas. Soon after, equipment was purchased for the Intensive Care Center (ICU) and for the performance of 4D Ultrasound and Helical Tomography.31 These new and expanded facilities provided advances for the hospital. The HAM was a pioneer in Amazonas in hip arthroscopy surgery, the first surgery being performed on September 3, 2010. After this procedure, the Hospital became the first in the Northern Region to receive the credentialing from the Brazilian Society of Knee Surgery as a Forming and Training Center in this procedure.32 In May 2011, the Centro de Estudos do Hospital Adventista de Manaus [Manaus Adventist Hospital Research Center], in partnership with the Centro de Educação Tecnológica do Amazonas [Amazon Technological Educational Center] (CETAM), held the first Symposium of Orthopedic Immobilizations of Amazonas.33

Due to the facilities and reputation of the hospital, in 2014, the International Federation of Association Football (FIFA) chose the HAM as the only hospital authorized to serve the needs of the organizing medical committee during the World Cup matches held in the capital.34 Also, the Organizing Committee of the Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro had chosen the HAM as the reference institution for the games held in the capital in 2016.35 During the same period, the Hospital became part of the select group of hospitals associated with the National Agency of Private Hospitals (ANAHP), an institution representing the main private benchmark hospitals in the country that was recognized for the certification of quality and safety in hospital care.36 Also, during this time, the Residency in Clinical Medicine program started in the hospital with two more specialties being approved by the MEC [Ministry of Education] in the following year: General Surgery and Anesthesiology. By 2018, 12 specialists had graduated from these areas, having completed their residencies at the HAM.37

Together with other actions that are the features of Adventist health institutions, the HAM also has developed sustainable and environmental preservation actions. Because it is committed to the preservation of the environment, in 2016, the hospital was enrolled in the Programa de Hospitais Saudáveis [Healthy Hospitals Program] (PHS).38 The following year, it joined the “Desafio 2020” [“Challenge 2020”] campaign, carrying out actions to encourage good practices to achieve measurable results, focusing on promoting environmental care until 2020.39 For two consecutive years (2017 and 2018), the HAM was ranked by Great Place to Work (GPTW)40 as the sixth best health institution to work in Brazil.41 Also, in 2017, it received from Live Healthcare the first place prize in the survey “Referências da Saúde – Top Hospitalar” [“Health References - Hospital Top”] for the presentation of successful case of HAMARH Program - Manaus Adventist Hospital Evaluates, Recognizes, and Humanizes, on the Personnel Management pillar. At the time, 117 cases were enrolled in this research after the hospital had competed with 66 other health institutions in Brazil.42

With hundreds of employees and physicians, the HAM is considered the gold standard in the Northern Region due to the excellent quality of its medical-hospital care.43 In addition, the hospital was the first of Amazonas and Adventist health network in Brazil to obtain level 3 accreditation from the National Accreditation Organization (Organização Nacional de Acreditação or ONA). This non-governmental body was created in 2001 to certify responsible hospitals with patient safety (level 1), quality care (level 2), and sustainability (level 3).44 In 2018, Accreditation Canada International granted the HAM the certificate Qmentum International – Diamond, a certification that attests compliance with international criteria of excellence in health.45

Currently, the HAM has a high complexity radiodiagnosis center where about 12,000 monthly exams are performed, including bone densitometry, mammography, radiology, ultrasonography, urodynamics, magnetic resonance imaging, and tomography, including for cardiac examinations. In all these areas of clinical analysis, the total number of tests performed is approximately 60,500 per month. The clinical analysis laboratory has the Platinum Certificate of Laboratory Excellence of the National Quality Control Program of the Brazilian Clinical Analyses Society (Certificado Platina de Excelência Laboratorial do Programa Nacional de Controle de Qualidade da Sociedade Brasileira de Análises Clínicas or SBAC). In addition to all these tests carried out in various specialties, an emergency care unit operates 24 hours a day, serving approximately 7,000 people a month. All of this is possible thanks to God’s blessings and the commitment of servants to excellence in the service provided by this Adventist institution.46

Historical Role of the Institution

The HAM is among 172 Adventist hospitals distributed worldwide and has been an influence on Amazonian society when it comes to health promotion. From April 1 to 7, 1990, for example, the institution conducted an intensive health educational program at the Adventist Agro-Industrial Institute (Instituto Agro Adventista Industrial or IAAI). More than 40 people participated in the program including workers, employees, and friends and volunteers of the institution. The project included preventive medicine classes taught by several physicians and a dentist.47 In 1992, hospital employees were involved in the program of the Holy Week, offering, in addition to evangelistic series, lectures on health, courses on how to quit smoking, and seminars on the book of Revelation, and due to this work, 25 people were baptized.48

Continuing actively in their missionary vocation, the HAM’s staff have been dedicating themselves to the project “Impacto Esperança” [“Hope Impact”]49 and are already collecting significant experiences from this initiative. In 2016, for example, 40 volunteers from the Hospital and the leadership of the Northwest Brazil Union accepted the challenge of taking a long journey to the city of Caapiranga, 185 kilometers from Manaus by river. There, in addition to distributing about 3,000 missionary books, the volunteers held, in partnership with the municipal government, a health fair50 for the residents of the city. During the fair, more than 600 free medical consultations were conducted.51

In addition to actions like these, the HAM is a great supporter of the permanent medical service of missionary launches.52 With the Luzeiro launches, the hospital can serve the riverside residents with efficiency and safety. There are more than 120 free surgeries performed each year as well as more than 2,000 consultations and almost 10,000 clinical examinations and analyses provided to society through institutional Social Work. In this context, the Hospital has already conducted about 46,000 free exams in partnership with the city of Manaus in two years.53 At the time of the pandemic caused by COVID-19 (the recent coronavirus), hundreds of patients received care with the entire infrastructure offered by the hospital.54

Outlook

Manaus Adventist Hospital has great relevance to the Seventh-day Adventist Church and to the people of the state of Amazonas. Its pioneering procedures and medical care and recognition by local authorities make it a valuable institution, and in response to these facts, it strives to offer even better service. Prevention and care for integral health and quality in the provision of services are part of the institutional values of the hospital and will continue to be the guiding principles of the HAM.55

Its history shows that its work goes far beyond its facilities, positively affecting precious lives that receive attention and care for healthy living in an integral way. In this context, the HAM will continue to do everything possible to continue offering – to its patients and family members, suppliers, supporters, and society – quality medical care, and combined with the eternal Gospel of the Creator and Savior God that provides physical, mental, and spiritual healing.56

Names List57

Manaus Adventist Clinic (1978-1989); Manaus Adventist Hospital (1989- ).

Leaders List58

Clinical Directors: Raymond Ermshar (1976-1978); Wanderley Granados (1978-1983); Wilson Soares Silva (1983-1989); Silas de Araújo Gomes (1989-1990); Fonseca Tales (1991-1992); Merari Reinert dos Santos (1992); Milton Reinert (1992-2001); Adam Barbosa Souza (2001-2002); Daniel de Faria (2002-2010), Antônio Guilherme Lopes de Macedo (2010-present).

Administrators: Israel Barbosa (1978-1984); Dimas Targas (1984-1989); Elias Quadros Gabriel (1989-1990); Elcias Camargo (1990-1995); Dailson Monteiro Bezerra (1995-1999); Diomil Barbosa (1999-2001); Leonildo do Carmo dos Reis (2001-2005); Vander Rodrigues Alves (2005-2010), Gideon Oliveira Basilio (2010-present).59

Sources

Albuquerque, Valmir S. “Hospital Adventista de Manaus” [“Manaus Adventist Hospital”]. Revista Adventista 88, no. 9 (September 1992).

“Amazonas: oportunidade para servir” [“Amazonas: an opportunity to serve”]. Revista Adventista, September 1991.

Arlinsonn, Dhiego. “Nota de Esclarecimento #01 | COVID-19” [Clarification Note # 01 | COVID-19]. Manaus Adventist Hospital (Online), May 5, 2020.

Barbosa, Wellington. “Frutos da Amazônia” [“Amazon Results”]. Revista Adventista 111, no. 1316 (December 2016).

Butzen, Pedro. “HAM entra para a ANAHP” [“The HAM joins ANAHP”]. Manaus Adventist Hospital (Online), November 22, 2015.

Butzen, Pedro. “Visita da FIFA” [“Visit by FIFA officials”]. Manaus Adventist Hospital (Online), October 22, 2013.

Cavalcanti, Francisco Abdoval S. A conquista de uma cidade: conheça a história da capital mais evangelizada do Brasil [The conquest of a city: know the history of the most evangelized capital of Brazil]. Tatuí, SP: Brazilian Publishing House, 2016.

Centro Nacional da Memória Adventista no Brasil [Brazil National Center of Adventist History]. http://www.wikiasd.org/.

“Clínica Adventista de Manaus: Um Ano de Vitórias” [“Manaus Adventist Clinic: A Year of Victories”]. Revista Adventista, July 1979.

“Cura integral” [“Integral healing”]. Revista Adventista, August 2011.

Great Place to Work. https://gptw.com.br/ .

Greenleaf, Floyd. Terra de Esperança: o crescimento da Igreja Adventista na América do Sul [Land of Hope: the growth of the Adventist Church in South America]. Tatuí, SP: Brazilian Publishing House, 2011.

Hospital Adventista de Manaus [Manaus Adventist Hospital]. http://ham.org.br/ .

“Hospital faz trabalho educativo” [“Hospital does educational work”]. Revista Adventista, June 1991.

“Inaugurado o melhor hospital do Norte” [“The best hospital in the North was inaugurated”]. Revista Adventista, March 1990.

Lessa, Rubens. Construtores de esperança: na trilha dos pioneiros adventistas da Amazônia [Builders of hope: on the trail of Adventist pioneers in the Amazon]. Tatuí, SP: Brazilian Publishing House, 2016.

Luzeiro [Light Bearer]. https://www.luzeiro.org/ .

“Mais do que livros” [“Much more than books”]. Revista Adventista, June 2016.

“Manaus Ganha uma Clínica Adventista” [“Manaus Gets an Adventist Clinic”]. Revista Adventista, July 1978.

Mota, Franciele. “Socorro sobre as águas” [“Help on the waters”]. Revista Adventista 108, no. 1267 (December 2013).

Perales, Bruna. “Hospital referência nas olimpíadas” [“A benchmark hospital in the Olympics”]. Manaus Adventist Hospital (Online), September 13, 2016.

Portal da Igreja Adventista do Sétimo Dia [Seventh-day Adventist Church (Brazil) Website]. http://www.adventistas.org/pt/ .

“Rápidas” [“Brief News”]. Revista Adventista, December, 2008.

Rebouças, Daniel. “Hospital Adventista é eleito como a 6º melhor instituição de saúde para trabalhar no Brasil” [“Adventist Hospital is elected as the 6th best health institution to work in Brazil”]. Manaus Adventist Hospital (Online), September 26, 2018.

Rebouças, Daniel. “Saúde e Sustentabilidade” [“Health and Sustainability”]. Manaus Adventist Hospital (Online), May 11, 2016.

“Saúde e temperança: aspectos relevantes no quinquênio” [“Health and temperance: relevant aspects in the quinquennium”]. Revista Adventista, May 1990.

Sella, Luiz Fernando and Daniela Tiemi Kanno. Manual da Feira de Saúde [Health Fair Manual]. South American Division, 2015.

Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook. Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association. Various years. https://www.adventistyearbook.org/.

“Uninorte promove IX assembleia quadrienal” [“Uninorte promotes IX quadrennial meeting”]. Revista Adventista, October 1989.

Vinhote, Ton. “Hospital Adventista de Manaus inaugura ampliação” [“Manaus Adventist Hospital inaugurates expansion”]. Revista Adventista 103, no. 1199 (April 2008): 28.

Virmes, Tatiane. “Celebração dos 40 anos com certificação internacional” [“Celebration of the 40 years with international certification”]. Manaus Adventist Hospital (Online), December 26, 2018.

Virmes, Tatiane. “Projeto HAMARH recebe premiação” [“HAMARH Project receives an award”]. Manaus Adventist Hospital (Online), December 5, 2017.

Notes

  1. Ronivon Santos (UNoB Ministerial Secretary), e-mail message to Carlos Flavio Teixeira (ESDA associate editor), July 18, 2019.

  2. An evangelist canvasser of the Seventh-day Adventist Church is the missionary who “develops his ministry by acquiring and selling to the public the publications edited and approved by the Church, with the aim of transmitting to his fellow men the eternal Gospel that brings salvation and physical and spiritual well-being.” Seventh-day Adventist Church (Brazil) Website, “Colportagem” [“Canvassing”] accessed February 4, 2020, http://bit.ly/2J6tY1I .

  3. Centro Nacional da Memória Adventista no Brazil [Brazil National Center of Adventist History], “União Norte Brasileira da IASD” [“North Brazil Union of the SDA church”], accessed April 28, 2020, https://bit.ly/2KJ2RuV.

  4. The organization of the youth department took place at the Council of the General Conference in 1907. In the summer of the same year, about 200 workers gathered at a youth convention to choose a name for the department. Thus was adopted the name “Department of Voluntary Missionaries of Seventh-day Adventist Youth” or simply M.V. Seventh-day Adventist Church (Brazil) Website, “História” [“History”], accessed February 4, 2020, https://bit.ly/2K1fnW5.

  5. “Missionary launches are used to provide services to those who live on the riverbanks and places of difficult access. They are equipped for medical and dental care and are also attended by an Adventist pastor to provide spiritual assistance to families.” Centro Nacional da Memória Adventista no Brasil [Brazil National Center of Adventist History], “Lanchas Missionárias no Brasil” [“Missionary launches in Brazil”], accessed February 27, 2020, https://bit.ly/396w2mo.

  6. Centro Nacional da Memória Adventista no Brasil [Brazil National Center of Adventist History], “Leo Blair Halliwell,” accessed April 28, 2020, https://bit.ly/3bMZNtH.

  7. Centro Nacional da Memória Adventista no Brasil [Brazil National Center of Adventist History], “Leo Blair Halliwell,” accessed April 28, 2020, https://bit.ly/3bMZNtH; Centro Nacional da Memória Adventista no Brasil [Brazil National Center of Adventist History], “Jessie Rowley Halliwell,” accessed April 28, 2020, https://bit.ly/2YhSTsv .

  8. “The first Light Bearer Missionary Launch was inaugurated in July 1931 by the couple Leo and Jessie Halliwell, aiming to bring health education and free medical and dental assistance to the riverside population in the Amazon. [...] During these 80 years, thousands of people were directly benefited by the support provided by the launches. In many cases, this was the only way of these people to get some medical and dental assistance.” Luzeiro [Light-bearer], “História” [“History”], accessed January 22, 2020, https://www.luzeiro.org/ .

  9. Rubens Lessa, Construtores de esperança: na trilha dos pioneiros adventistas da Amazônia [Builders of hope: on the trail of Adventist pioneers in the Amazon], Tatuí, SP: Brazil Publishing House, 2016, 131.

  10. Centro Nacional da Memória Adventista no Brasil [Brazil National Center of Adventist History], "Leo Blair Halliwell," accessed April 28, 2020, https://bit.ly/3bMZNtH.

  11. Francisco Abdoval S. Cavalcanti, A conquista de uma cidade: conheça a história da capital mais evangelizada do Brasil [The conquest of a city: know the history of the most evangelized capital of Brazil], Tatuí, SP: Brazil Publishing House, 2016, 43-44, 51, 53, 74.

  12. Lessa, Construtores de Esperança: na trilha dos Pioneiros Adventistas da Amazônia [Builders of hope: on the trail of Adventist pioneers in the Amazon], 35-38.

  13. Floyd Greenleaf, Terra de Esperança: o crescimento da Igreja Adventista na América do Sul [Land of Hope: the growth of the Adventist Church in South America], Tatuí, SP: Brazil Publishing House, 2011, 461.

  14. “Institutions: South American Division,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, DC: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1970), 229.

  15. Rubens Lessa, Construtores de Esperança: na trilha dos Pioneiros Adventistas da Amazônia [Builders of Hope: on the trail of Adventist Pioneers in the Amazon], Tatuí, SP: Brazil Publishing House, 2016, 131; Centro Nacional da Memória Adventista no Brasil [Brazil National Center of Adventist History], “Luís Lindolfo Fuckner,” accessed May 4, 2020, https://bit.ly/2SzEyUH .

  16. Lessa, Construtores de Esperança: na trilha dos Pioneiros Adventistas da Amazônia [Builders of hope: on the trail of Adventist pioneers in the Amazon], 181-183.

  17. “Clínica Adventista de Manaus: Um Ano de Vitórias” [“Manaus Adventist Clinic: A Year of Victories”], Revista Adventista, July 1979, 31.

  18. “Manaus Ganha uma Clínica Adventista” [“Manaus Gets an Adventist Clinic”], Revista Adventista, July 1978, 19.

  19. “Clínica Adventista de Manaus: Um Ano de Vitórias” [“Manaus Adventist Clinic: A Year of Victories”], Revista Adventista, July 1979, 31.

  20. “Clínica Adventista de Manaus: Um Ano de Vitórias” [“Manaus Adventist Clinic: A Year of Victories”], Revista Adventista, July 1979, 31; Franciele Mota, “Socorro Sobre as Águas” [Help on the waters], Revista Adventista 108, no. 1267 (December 2013): 34-35.

  21. Hospital Adventista de Manaus [Manaus Adventist Hospital], “Missão, Visão e Valores” [“Mission, Vision and Values”], accessed August 8, 2019, https://bit.ly/31teywd .

  22. “Manaus Ganha uma Clínica Adventista” [“Manaus Gets an Adventist Clinic”], Revista Adventista, July 1978, 19.

  23. “Clínica Adventista de Manaus: Um Ano de Vitórias” [“Manaus Adventist Clinic: A Year of Victories”], Revista Adventista, July 1979, 31-32.

  24. Ronivon Santos (UNoB Ministerial Secretary), e-mail message to Carlos Flavio Teixeira (ESDA associate editor), July 18, 2019.

  25. “Inaugurado o melhor hospital do Norte” [“The best hospital in the North was inaugurated”], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], March 1990, 37.

  26. Valmir S. Albuquerque, “Hospital Adventista de Manaus” [Manaus Adventist Hospital], Revista Adventista 88, no. 9 (September 1992): 44.

  27. “Saúde e temperança: aspectos relevantes no quinquênio” [“Health and temperance: relevant aspects in the quinquennium”], Revista Adventista, May 1990, 13; “Manaus Adventist Hospital,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Hagerstown, MD: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1991), 489.

  28. “Uninorte promove IX assembleia quadrienal” [“Uninorte promotes IX quadrennial meeting”], Revista Adventista, October 1989, 44.

  29. 29 Lessa, Construtores de esperança: na trilha dos pioneiros adventistas da Amazônia [“Builders of hope: on the trail of Adventist pioneers in the Amazon”], 132.

  30. Francisco Abdoval S. Cavalcanti, A conquista de uma cidade: conheça a história da capital mais evangelizada do Brasil [The conquest of a city: know the history of the most evangelized capital of Brazil], Tatuí, SP: Brazil Publishing House, 2016, 223.

  31. Ton Vinhote, “Hospital Adventista de Manaus inaugura ampliação” [“Manaus Adventist Hospital inaugurates expansion”], Revista Adventista 103, no. 1199 (April 2008): 28.

  32. “Rápidas” [“Brief News”], Revista Adventista, December 2008, 35.

  33. “Cura integral” [“Integral healing”], Revista Adventista, August 2011, 25.

  34. Pedro Butzen, “Visita da FIFA” [“Visit by FIFA officials”], Manaus Adventist Hospital, October 22, 2013, accessed May 6, 2019, https://bit.ly/ 2YsGGS7.

  35. Bruna Perales, “Hospital referência nas olimpíadas” [“A benchmark hospital in the Olympics”], Manaus Adventist Hospital, September 13, 2016, accessed May 6, 2019, https://bit.ly / 3aO3Qot .

  36. Pedro Butzen, “HAM entra para a ANAHP” [“The HAM joins ANAHP”], Manaus Adventist Hospital, November 22, 2015, accessed May 6, 2019, https: // bit. ly / 2YgyMLq .

  37. Ronivon Santos (UNoB Ministerial Secretary), e-mail message to Carlos Flavio Teixeira (ESDA associate editor), July 18, 2019.

  38. “Association dedicated to transforming the health sector into an example for the whole society in terms of protecting the environment and the health of workers, patients and the population in general.” Hospital Adventista de Manaus [Manaus Adventist Hospital], “Saúde e Sustentabilidade” [“Health and sustainability”], accessed April 13, 2020, https://bit.ly/2KI1ZGT .

  39. Mishely Luz (UNoB secretary assistant), e-mail message to Carlos Flavio Teixeira (ESDA associate editor), April 9, 2019; Daniel Rebouças, “Saúde e sustentabilidade” [“Health and Sustainability”], Manaus Adventist Hospital, May 11, 2016, accessed May 6, 2019, https://bit.ly/2KI1ZGT .

  40. The GPTW is a global authority in the world of work and experts in transforming your organization into a Great Place to Work, helping organizations to achieve exceptional and, above all, sustainable results. Great Place To Work, “Quem somos” [“Who We Are”], accessed April 29, 2020, https://bit.ly/3cYb0I3.

  41. Daniel Rebouças, “Hospital Adventista é eleito como a 6ª melhor instituição de saúde para trabalhar no Brasil” [“Adventist Hospital is elected as the sixth best health institution to work in Brazil”], Manaus Adventist Hospital, September 26, 2018, accessed May 6, 2019, https://bit.ly/2VhQAFN.

  42. Tatiane Virmes, “Projeto HAMARH recebe premiação” [“Projeto HAMARH receives award”], Manaus Adventist Hospital, December 5, 2017, accessed May 6, 2019, https://bit.ly/3bQFewt.

  43. Cavalcanti, A conquista de uma cidade: conheça a história da capital mais evangelizada do Brasil [“The conquest of a city: know the history of the most evangelized capital of Brazil”], 223.

  44. Wellington Barbosa, “Frutos da Amazônia” [“Amazon Results”], Revista Adventista 111, no. 1316 (December 2016): 30.

  45. Tatiane Virmes, “Celebração dos 40 anos com certificação internacional” [“Celebration of the 40 years with international certification”], Manaus Adventist Hospital, December 26, 2018, accessed May 6, 2019, https: // bit.ly/300wFtt.

  46. Ronivon Santos (UNoB Ministerial Secretary), e-mail message to Carlos Flavio Teixeira (ESDA associate editor), July 18, 2019.

  47. “Hospital faz trabalho educativo” [“Hospital does educational work”], Revista Adventista, June 1991, 26.

  48. Valmir S. Albuquerque, “Hospital Adventista de Manaus” [“Manaus Adventist Hospital”], Revista Adventista 88, no. 9 (September 1992): 44.

  49. “The Impact Hope project is a program that encourages reading and provides for the annual mass distribution of books by Seventh-day Adventists in the territory of South America.” Seventh-day Adventist Church (Brazil) Website, “Impact Hope,” accessed February 4, 2020, https://bit.ly/34dZROO .

  50. “The Health Fair is a one, two or more-day event, open to the public of all ethnicities and beliefs, without cost or profit. It is usually organized in public places such as gyms, schools, parks, squares and malls. The community is invited to participate and receive the benefits of the tests and guidelines.” Luiz Fernando Sella and Daniela Tiemi Kanno, Manual da Feira de Saúde [Health Fair Manual] (South American Division, 2015), 15.

  51. “Mais do que livros” [“Much More than books”], Revista Adventista, June 2016, 30.

  52. “Amazonas: oportunidade para servir” [“Amazonas: an opportunity to serve”], Revista Adventista, September 1991, 6.

  53. Ronivon Santos (UNoB Ministerial Secretary), e-mail message to Carlos Flavio Teixeira (ESDA associate editor), July 18, 2019.

  54. Dhiego Arlinsonn, “Nota de Esclarecimento #01 | COVID-19” [Clarification Note # 01 | COVID-19], Manaus Adventist Hospital, May 5, 2020, accessed May 14, 2020, https://bit.ly/360BB4Z.

  55. Ronivon Santos (UNoB Ministerial Secretary), e-mail message to Carlos Flavio Teixeira (ESDA associate editor), July 18, 2019.

  56. Ibid.

  57. Ibid.

  58. Mishely Luz (UNoB secretary assistant), e-mail message to Carlos Flavio Teixeira (ESDA associate editor), April 9, 2019.

  59. More information about Manaus Adventist Hospital can be found on their website at http://ham.org.br/ or on their social network pages including Facebook and Instagram: @hospitaladventistademanaus and YouTube: Manaus Adventist Hospital.

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Souza, Arildo Coelho de, Daniel Rodrigues Rebouças, Ronivon da Silva dos Santos. "Manaus Adventist Hospital." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. June 20, 2021. Accessed May 20, 2022. https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=BGJ3.

Souza, Arildo Coelho de, Daniel Rodrigues Rebouças, Ronivon da Silva dos Santos. "Manaus Adventist Hospital." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. June 20, 2021. Date of access May 20, 2022, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=BGJ3.

Souza, Arildo Coelho de, Daniel Rodrigues Rebouças, Ronivon da Silva dos Santos (2021, June 20). Manaus Adventist Hospital. Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. Retrieved May 20, 2022, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=BGJ3.