Limón Zamudio, Vicente (1918–2007)

By José Luis Bouchot

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José Luis Bouchot Díaz, M.A. (Montemorelos University, Montemorelos, N. L., Mexico), is the secretary of Chiapas Mexican Union Conference. He has served in pastoral ministry in the Central Section of Chiapas, as youth pastor of Linda Vista University, and as Sabbath school and youth department director, secretary, and president of Metropolitan Mexican Conference of Central Mexican Union Mission. He is married to Gladiola Sánchez Jiménez and has two children.

Vicente Limón Zamudio was a pastor, chaplain, colporteur, dean of men, mission department director, and mission president, who loved young people and his Church and who established many schools and churches.

Early Years

Vicente Limón Zamudio was born in Tlacotalpan, Veracruz, on September 21, 1918. His parents were Ventura Limón Dimas and Amanda Zamudio.1 Vicente had five siblings: Mauricio, Armando, Jesús, Rita, and Amalia. Vicente did not grow up as an Adventist, but a tragic event, the loss of his mother, would lead him to a knowledge of the gospel.

This situation led him to leave his hometown and go to the Port of Veracruz where he came to know the Adventist religion through Juanita Trujillo who invited him to her home to study the Bible. Vicente was baptized in the Xamapa River, Veracruz, by Pastor José de la Paz Matus, on August 8, 1942.2

Sometime later he began his studies at the Escuela Agricola Industrial Mexicana (Mexican Industrial Agricultural School).3 With much effort and expectation, working during the school year and selling books as a colporteur during the summer breaks, he finished his ministerial studies at that institution.

First Administrative Responsibilities

Vicente began his work in the Seventh-day Adventist Church in 1947 in the Gulf Mission,4 based in Saltillo, Coahuila, as a colporteur director. The following year he received an invitation to be dean of men at the Escuela Agrícola Industrial Mexicana in Montemorelos, Nuevo León.5

Marriage and Ministry

Vicente married Lupita Luque Gil,6 originally from Guadalajara, Jalisco, on June 12, 1949, after a year of courtship. Vicente and Lupita had four daughters: Carmen Susana, Amanda, Esther Amalia, and Laura Margarita.7

Their first move was in response to the call of the Inter-Oceanic Mexican Mission to work in the Sabbath School and missionary activity departments.8 On February 28, 1953, Vicente was ordained to the pastoral ministry.9

Then he received an invitation from the North Mexican Mission, based in Monterrey, Nuevo León, to lead the youth and education departments.10 In this responsibility he had the opportunity to put into practice the knowledge acquired in his youth in the Mexican Red Cross. He took part in various youth activities that he himself initiated as part of the Adventist Medical Cadet Corps and diverse youth groups.

In 1956 Pastor Limón received an invitation to be president of the Inter-Oceanic Mexican Mission based in Puebla,11 where he founded the Adventist school that for a long time bore the name of Juanita Miranda Elementary School (name of the person who donated the land). Today it is known as Valentín Gómez Farías School.

In 1963 he was called to be president of the Southern Mexican Mission.12 His passion for Adventist education motivated him to establish several Adventist schools in that territory, among which is the Gilberto Velázquez School in the city of Tuxtla Gutiérrez and the Rosario Castellanos School in Tecpatán.

In 1966 Pastor Limón and his family received a call to minister to Adventist university students enrolled in various careers at the Universidad Autónoma de Guadalajara (Autonomous University of Guadalajara).13 He founded the Clínica Granja (Farm Clinic) and Vicente Guerrero Elementary School in the city of Guadalajara.

In 1971 he was appointed pastor to the vast district of Oaxaca and, a year later, he was invited to be chaplain for the nursing school at the Yerba Buena hospital, in Chiapas. In 1974 he was invited to pastor the district of Villaflores, Chiapas; a territory in which he left a very important legacy. He founded one more school, Colegio Niños Héroes.

Later Life

His last responsibility was as pastor of the district of Cintalapa, Chiapas, where he retired at the age of 62 after serving the Adventist Church for 30 years.14 Although retired, he continued to preach and baptize the people who accepted the message until he could not do it anymore.15

Pastor Limón’s wife, Lupita, after a life of service to the Lord, died on April 12, 2001. Five years after her death, Pastor Vicente Limón Zamudia died on June 14, 2007 at the age of 87.

Sources

Chiapas Mexican Union Conference minutes. “Nominating and Distribution Commission Report.” 3044, 1942-2012 UMS, December 10, 1963, Chiapas Mexican Union Conference archives. Chiapas, Mexico.

Chiapas Mexican Union Conference minutes. “Various Transfers” 3329, 1942-2012 UMS, March 22, 1966, Chiapas Mexican Union Conference archives. Chiapas, Mexico.

Chiapas Mexican Union Conference minutes. “Vicente Limón – Departmental Director, North Corporation.” 2006, 1942-2012 UMS, October 8, 1954. Chiapas Mexican Union Conference archives. Chiapas, Mexico

Chiapas Mexican Union Conference minutes. “Vicente Limón – Ordination.” 1815, 1942-2012 UMS. February 8, 1953. Chiapas Mexican Union Conference archives. Chiapas, Mexico.

Chiapas Mexican Union Conference minutes. “Vicente Limon – President Inter-Oceanic Mexican Mission.” 2270, 1942-2012 UMS, December 27, 1956. Chiapas Mexican Union Conference archives, Chiapas, Mexico.

Chiapas Mexican Union Conference minutes. “Vicente Limon Zamudio – Retirement Request.” 335, 1942-2012 UMS, October 12, 1980, Chiapas Mexican Union Conference archives, Chiapas, Mexico.

Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook. Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1948 and 1950.

Notes

  1. Amanda Limón Luque, daughter of Vicente Limón Zamudio, telephone interview by author, 2019.

  2. Ibid.

  3. Ibid.

  4. “Gulf Mexican Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1948), 132.

  5. Amanda Limón Luque, daughter of Vicente Limón Zamudio, telephone interview by author, 2019.

  6. Ibid.

  7. Ibid.

  8. “Inter-Oceanic Mexican Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1950), 141.

  9. Chiapas Mexican Union Conference, “Vicente Limón – Ordination,” 1815, 1942-2012 UMS, February 8, 1953, Chiapas Mexican Union Conference archives.

  10. Chiapas Mexican Union Conference, “Vicente Limón – Departmental Director, North Corporation,” 2006, 1942-2012 UMS, October 8, 1954, 2006, Chiapas Mexican Union Conference archives.

  11. Chiapas Mexican Union Conference, “Vicente Limon – President Inter-Oceanic Mexican Mission,” 2270, 1942-2012 UMS, December 27, 1956, Chiapas Mexican Union Conference archives.

  12. Chiapas Mexican Union Conference, “Nominating and Distribution Commission Report,” 3044, 1942-2012 UMS, December 10, 1963, Chiapas Mexican Union Conference archives.

  13. Chiapas Mexican Union Conference, “Various Transfers” 3329, 1942-2012 UMS, March 22, 1966, Chiapas Mexican Union Conference archives.

  14. Chiapas Mexican Union Conference, “Vicente Limon Zamudio – Retirement Request,” 335, 1942-2012, October 12, 1980, Chiapas Mexican Union Conference archives.

  15. Ibid.

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Bouchot, José Luis. "Limón Zamudio, Vicente (1918–2007)." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. April 16, 2021. Accessed April 19, 2021. https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=BHZQ.

Bouchot, José Luis. "Limón Zamudio, Vicente (1918–2007)." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. April 16, 2021. Date of access April 19, 2021, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=BHZQ.

Bouchot, José Luis (2021, April 16). Limón Zamudio, Vicente (1918–2007). Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. Retrieved April 19, 2021, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=BHZQ.