Ural Mission - Defunct

By Jón Hjörleifur Stefánsson

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Jón Hjörleifur Stefánsson, M.A., is a Ph.D. candidate, Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam

The Ural Mission was a European Russian church unit that operated from 1911 to sometime after 1917.

Territory and Statistics1

Period: 1911–c. 1917

Territory: The Governorates of Kazan, Orenburg, Perm, Samara, Ufa, and Vyatka, and the Ural Oblast west of the Ural River

Membership: 316 (1915)

Churches: 16 (1915)

Organizational History

Adventists had arrived to at least some parts of the Ural Mission’s territory by the late nineteenth century.2 In 1906 the territory belonged to the Asian Russian Field, the East Russian Mission from 1907, and to the Siberian Mission from 1909.

In 1910, the East Russian Mission divided into the Ural and Volga Missions. This was a step in creating the Siberian Union with its subfields, all of which started operating in 1911. At the European Division meeting in September 1909, it was decided to organize Siberia into the Siberian Union separate from the Russian Union. The Russian Union agreed to the plan at its annual session, March 3–8, 1910. The changes took effect the following year. All the fields of the Siberian Union were organized at the same time (except the Turkmenistan Mission which already existed). One of the new Siberian church units was the Ural Mission. It comprised Kazan, Perm, and Vyatka Governorates from the Middle Russian Mission, and

Orenburg, Samara, and Ufa Governorates from the East Russian Mission (which was abolished at this time) and the Ural Oblast west of the Ural River. At the close of the first quarter of 1911, the membership was 195. The only initial officer listed was director G. Perk.3 The mission was transferred to the East Russian Union in 1914.4

Due to the Russian Civil War, the reports from the Russian Unions are missing from the Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook from 1918 to 1921. When the fields reappeared in 1922 and 1923, the territory of the Ural Mission was part of new church units. This record is incomplete, however, due to the political isolation of Russia from the outside world in the Communist era. Furthermore, the new regime overhauled the administrative division of the former empire, and without clear knowledge it is hard to trace what territory went where. Orenburg, Samara, and Ufa Governorates constituted the Samara-Ural Conference.5 In the mid-1920s the Perm Governorate was divided into the Ural Oblast and the Komi-Permyak Autonomous Okrug. The North Russian Conference included the Komi-Permyak Autonomous Okrug and Vyatka Governorate (1929).6 The White Sea Mission included the Kazan Governorate (1925)7 and later Permsk (1927).8 Kazan Governorate was divided in three in 1920: Chuvashia, Mari El, and Tatar. The Volga-Kama Conference included Chuvashia and Tatar (1929).9

List of Presidents

G. Perk, 1911; J. F. Ginter, 1912–1914; O. E. Reinke, 1915–1916; J. F. Ginter, 1917.

Sources

Annual Statistical Report. Washington, D.C.: General Conference of Seventh-day Adventists, 1915.

“Berichte des Sibirischen Unionfeldes vom 1. Januar bis 31. März 1910.” Zions-Wächter, May 1, 1911.

Conradi, Ludwig R. “Progress in the European Division.” ARH, November 10, 1910.

Dail, Guy. “The Russian Union Committee Meeting.” ARH, June 1, 1911.

Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook. Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald, 1905–1930.

Notes

  1. For period and territory, see the present article; for other statistics, see Annual Statistical Report (Washington, D.C.: General Conference of Seventh-day Adventists, 1915), 6.

  2. For the origin of Adventist work in the Orenburg Governorate, see “The Russian Mission.”

  3. On the organization of the Siberian Union and its fields, as well as the territory of the Ural Mission, see Ludwig R. Conradi, “Progress in the European Division,” ARH, November 10, 1910, 7; Guy Dail, “The Russian Union Committee Meeting,” ARH, June 1, 1911, 12; “East Russian Mission” and “Middle Russian Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald, 1910), 110; “Ural Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald, 1911), 111; “Berichte des Sibirischen Unionfeldes vom 1. Januar bis 31. März 1910,” Zions-Wächter, May 1, 1911, 196. The Ural Oblast is mentioned in Dail’s article but never appears in the territory description of the church unit in the Yearbook.

  4. “Ural Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald, 1914), 110.

  5. “Samara-Ural Conference,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald, 1923), 109. Perhaps the Ural Oblast territory also belonged to this church unit? It is nowhere mentioned in the Yearbooks of 1923–26.

  6. “North Russian Conference,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald, 1929), 162.

  7. “White Sea Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald, 1925), 116. This information is imperfect, since Kazan Governorate was divided in three in 1920: Chuvashia, Mari El, and Tatar.

  8. “White Sea Field,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald, 1927), 139. If this is Perm Governorate, this information is incorrect, since that governorate was abolished by then.

  9. “Volga-Kama Conference,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald, 1929), 162–63.

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Stefánsson, Jón Hjörleifur. "Ural Mission - Defunct." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. April 28, 2021. Accessed May 13, 2021. https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=BIBE.

Stefánsson, Jón Hjörleifur. "Ural Mission - Defunct." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. April 28, 2021. Date of access May 13, 2021, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=BIBE.

Stefánsson, Jón Hjörleifur (2021, April 28). Ural Mission - Defunct. Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. Retrieved May 13, 2021, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=BIBE.