Jornada, Fausto Habana Sr. (1888–1971)

By Jessie J. Aragon, and Donna Lou A. Aragon

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Jessie J. Aragon, Jr.

Donna Lou A. Aragon

First Published: November 5, 2020

Fausto Habana Jornada Sr. was an interpreter, evangelist, educator, church builder, leader, and ordained minister from the Philippines.

Early Life and Conversion

Fausto Habana Jornada Sr. was born on July 18, 1888, in Jaro, Iloilo, Philippines, to non-Adventist parents Guillermo Jornada and Petra Habana Jornada. He was the eldest of seven siblings. His two brothers were Pedro and Vicente, and his sisters were Raymunda, Anna, Guadalupe, and Arsenia in no particular order.1

Fausto spent most of his childhood in Jaro (no record of his early education is available). Being the eldest, he felt the burden to help his parents lift the family from poverty. But with limited education, he ended up working as house help for the rich Lopez family in Iloilo. Realizing that he was getting nowhere with his life or his family, he decided to seek better opportunities abroad.2

He travelled on the ship Chiyo Maru and arrived in Hawaii on August 27, 1909.3 He worked there as a laborer in sugar cane and pineapple fields.4 Not long after he arrived in Hawaii, he met an American by the name of Mr. Williams who invited Fausto to stay with his family as their house help. He found this American family to be very accommodating and kind to him. The family treated him as if he was an equal despite his brown skin. He was even given the chance to eat with them at the table during mealtimes. In return for their kindness, he did the best he could in fulfilling his tasks from household chores to marketing.5

While working with the Williams family, Fausto was told that he didn't have to work on Saturdays; instead, he was invited to study the Bible with them. Further, he was offered by Mrs. Williams the opportunity to learn to read and write, which he gladly accepted. Soon Fausto did not only learn to write, read, and speak the English language, but most importantly, he learned about Jesus, too.6 In 1912, Fausto was baptized into the Adventist faith.7 He was the first Filipino who was converted to Adventism outside the Philippines.8

Education and Marriage

When the Williams family returned to the mainland United States the same year Fausto was baptized, they invited him to go with them. He earned the admiration not only of the Williams couple but of everyone he encountered for his gift in public speaking. He displayed the confidence of a natural-born speaker. He could talk in English with power and authority.9

After the summer of 1912, Fausto, who was 24 years old at that time, was enrolled by the Williams family at Lodi Adventist Academy at Sacramento, California.10 He stayed there for two years to learn more about his newfound faith.11

Fausto married Beatriz Naranjo (1898-1983), who was one of the converts during his evangelistic work at Sido, Antique. She was the only daughter of the “Teniente del Barrio” (leader) Nemesio Naranjo, who eventually accepted the truth, too. Nemesio highly approved of Fausto to be his daughter’s husband because he found him a respectful and honorable man. Fausto and Beatriz were married twice. They had to be wed first by the Justice of the Peace in the town of San Remigio, Antique, before Nemesio could allow them to travel to Iloilo together. At that time, the only ordained minister who could perform weddings was Elder Eldridge Adams, and he was based in Iloilo. Their second wedding took place on June 21, 1915, officiated by Elder Adams.12

Beatriz was a consecrated Christian woman who was a great help to Fausto’s ministry.13 She worked as the cafeteria matron at West Visayan Academy, which was located on the island of Guimaras.14 The academy operated there from 1930 until the bombing of Pearl Harbor in 1941. When the war was over in 1945, the academy, after being closed for three years, was transferred to Molo, then eventually to Zarraga the following year.15 Beatriz was called again to serve as the cafeteria matron when the academy reopened.16

Their marriage was blessed with eight children. They included: Abner, Sr. (1917-1959), Ebenezer (1919-deceased), Benny (1921-1995) Fausto, Jr. (1923-2008) Belle (1925-deceased), Rosalinda (deceased at three years old due to complications with measles), Linda and Elmore, Sr. (1935-2016).17 Elmore became the principal of West Visayan Academy from 1966 to 1969.18

Ministry

When Fausto was still studying at Lodi Adventist Academy, he met Elder L. V. Finster, the man who built the first Adventist Church in the Philippines. Finster was on furlough at that time and was impressed by Fausto’s speaking ability. He encouraged Fausto to bring the gospel message to his people in the Philippines.19 He at first hesitated to go back to the Philippines, but eventually decided to respond to the call.20

Meanwhile, Floyd Ashbaugh pioneered the canvassing work in Iloilo in 1912. In early 1914, Elder and Mrs. Eldridge Adams and their family came to Iloilo to start an evangelistic work there.21 However, due to the language barrier, they had a hard time connecting with people, thus slowing down their work. 22 The Lord certainly prepared Fausto for the work in Iloilo. That same year (1914), Fausto was one of the 103 missionaries sent by the General Conference to the different mission fields worldwide. He was the only missionary sent to the Philippines (his own country) that year.23 Fausto served as the language teacher and interpreter for these foreign missionaries.24

The Lord greatly blessed Elder Adams’ effort in learning the Visayan language. As a result, their soul-winning activities prospered and resulted in the conversion of the first 12 converts who became the first Adventist believers in the whole Visayas. On April 13, 1915, the first Seventh-day Adventist Church in Jaro, Iloilo, was organized. There was a total of 15 baptized members including the three missionaries.25

Fausto felt the need for his family members to hear and accept the gospel message, too. By his consistent life, he was able to win them to the truth.26 He was blessed to see that his labor in his household proved to be fruitful. Soon his mother, brothers, sisters, and every near relative accepted the truth. They in turn became local missionaries who contributed to the growth of the church in the Visayan area.27

Soon after the church was established, Floyd Ashbaugh went to Antique, another island in Panay, to continue his literature evangelism. Fausto stayed in Iloilo to continue his witnessing ministry and to nurture the new church members. He then was sent to Antique to follow up on the interests generated by Mr. Ashbaugh’s book sales. He started working in Sibalom, one of the larger towns of Antique. However, the people were not receptive to the message, and they were kind of suspicious of his intentions. So, he transferred to a smaller barrio, Sido, where the leader, Nemesio Naranjo, was more sympathetic and allowed Fausto to proceed with his evangelistic work, He, later, became his father-in-law and was converted, too. 28

After Fausto and Beatriz were married in Iloilo in 1915, they returned to Sido and devoted their time and effort to the ministry together. By God's grace, the very first baptism in the province of Antique numbered 19 people who also became the nucleus of the first Adventist church in Antique.29

In 1918, Fausto became one of the earliest missionaries to Negros Island.30 He served as the translator of Floyd Ashbaugh in his literature ministry in Negros Occidental.31 Because of his zeal and dedication to the evangelistic work, Fausto H. Jornada Sr., together with Wenceslao Rodriguez, was ordained into the ministry in 1919 during the Third General Meeting of the West Visayan Mission that was held in Bacolod.32 Fausto and Wenceslao were the first two Visayan ministers to be ordained in the ministry.33

In the following years of his ministry, Pastor Jornada served in different capacities. In 1923, he was still actively working in Antique with one organized church. Together with lay workers and a teacher, they were able to form three Sabbath Schools with a total of 102 members; Church schools and two church buildings were established while he was assigned there.34 He was also assisting Elder Adams and the other workers in Iloilo during annual meetings.35

Pastor Jornada was also involved in the training of evangelists and office workers in soul-winning during the Iloilo Institute initiated by the West Visayan Mission in 1925. He assisted during this event.36

In 1926, he was working as the Home Missionary Secretary of the West Visayan Mission, working alongside Pastor Bergherm as they visited churches to encourage the members to participate in the gospel commission.37 He was commended as a well-organized leader of the department.38

Pastor Jornada was also assigned pastoral duties in Romblon.39 He was a passionate and dedicated worker for the Lord. He never seemed to stop sharing the message he loved with others even when he was stricken with tuberculosis in 1928. Despite his health problem, he continued with his evangelistic work of giving Bible studies to 48 souls at that time.40

In 1929, Pastor Jornada was called back from Romblon to Guimaras Island, now a province, to help oversee the construction of the buildings for West Visayan Academy. When the academy became functional, he became a member of the school board.41 Because of his feeble health, he was not able to do evangelistic work as he used to, but he still was in the work. He was assigned as the farm adviser of the academy.42

But by God's grace, he fully recovered from his illness and was back to good health again. The West Visayan Mission called him for some pastoral duties now and then. He was sent to different churches to perform weddings, baptisms, funeral services, or even to help settle disputes within some churches. He also sat with the executive committee of the West Visayan Mission again. Occasionally he would be called for to conduct evangelistic meetings within the West Visayan Mission territory.43

Pastor Jornada was also involved again during big meetings and series of training such as the West Visayan Mission Colporteur's Institute that took place on August 19-28, 1936. He was one of the speakers during the morning devotionals. 44

It’s unclear as to when Pastor Jornada exactly terminated his service from the church organization. But even up to the 1950s at the age of 62, he was still a member of the West Visayan Academy school board and was being called upon to do some pastoral work for West Visayan Mission even in his retired state.45

Upon Mrs. Jornada’s retirement in the late 1960s, both of them moved to Baesa, Caloocan, Rizal, the former location of Philippine Union College, now Adventist University of the Philippines, to be closer to their daughter, Mrs. Belle Castro, who at the time was a faculty member of the college. Her husband Pastor Romeo B. Castro also served in that capacity.46

In October 1971, Pastor and Mrs. Jornada decided to visit Iloilo. Unfortunately, that visit turned out to be a tragic one. On October 28, 1971, Pastor Jornada had a stroke that took his life at the age of 83. That ended a life of faithful service to the church and for the Lord.47

Contribution and Legacy

Pastor Fausto Habana Jornada Sr. was a man dedicated to his calling. Since the time he accepted the truth, he bore within him the responsibility and the enthusiasm to share the message of salvation to his family and fellow Filipinos at all costs. Not even sickness could stop him from doing his appointed work. He contributed much to the growth of the Church in the Visayan Island since the time he came back to the Philippines from the United States where he was converted.48

He believed in the importance of church schools as an avenue to prepare young people for Christ’s second coming and to train workers to help finish the gospel work here on earth. Through his involvement in education and training, he was considered a champion of Christian education.49

Pastor Jornada was a true pioneer in the history of Adventism in the Philippines. Attached to his name are the acknowledgments of being a forerunner in the ministry. He was the first Filipino SDA convert outside the Philippines.50 He was the only Filipino officially sent by the General Conference to be a missionary to his own country in 1914.51 He was one of the first missionaries who started the work in the West Visayan Mission that resulted in the organization of Jaro Seventh Day Adventist Church, the first in Iloilo.52 He was also one of the first pioneers who paved the way for the gospel to reach the people in Negros Occidental.53 He was highly involved in the construction of the buildings at Guimaras Island, where the first official West Visayan Academy campus (now Adventist Academy Iloilo located in Bongco, Pototan, Iloilo) was situated.54 And finally, Pastor Fausto Jornada Sr. was one of the first two Ilonggos who were ordained to the ministry.55

Pastor Jornada was a faithful and dedicated minister whom God had graciously prepared for His pioneering work in the Visayan Island in the Philippines.56 He was a veteran soldier of the cross and a hero of the faith whose contribution to the work at West Visayan Mission, now West Visayan Conference, gave it a unique reputation as a source of workers for the church and missionaries to distant places abroad. Pastor Jornada’s commitment to the work is highly evident through his own words, “If I had my life to live over, I would choose to be a worker for God,"57

About the Authors: Jessie J. Aragon Jr. is an ordained minister and the Dean of the School of Theology at Central Philippine Adventist College (CPAC), Alegria, Murcia, Negros Occidental, Philippines. Aragon finished his Bachelor of Theology from CPAC. He completed his Master of Ministry and Doctor of Ministry degrees from Adventist International Institute of Advanced Studies in Silang, Cavite, Philippines. He is married to Donna Lou Almaiz. They have two young adult sons.

Donna Lou Almaiz Aragon is a licensed nurse and licensed librarian. She is the Head College Librarian of Central Philippine Adventist College (CPAC), Alegria, Murcia, Negros Occidental, Philippines. She finished her Bachelor of Science in Nursing from CPAC. She completed Master of Arts in Education Emphasis in Library Administration from Adventist International Institute of Advanced Studies in Silang, Cavite, Philippines. Donna Lou is the wife of Pastor Jessie J. Aragon Jr. They have two sons.

Sources

Adams, Aldine R. “Fausto Makes Restitution.” The Youth’s Instructor, October 1933.

Adams, Eldridge. “The Panayan Mission.” ARH, March 1, 1919.

Blake, W. J. “Glimpses of the West Visayan Academy.” Far Eastern Division Outlook, December 1933.

Bergherm, W. H. “A Man Whom God Prepared.” Lake Union Herald, October 1929.

Bergherm, W. H. “The West Visayan Mission.” Far Eastern Division Outlook, September 1928.

Crisler, C. C. “The Iloilo Institute P.I.” Far Eastern Division Outlook, November 1925.

“Early Beginnings of the Advent Message in Negros Island.” Far Eastern Division Outlook, July 1966.

Finster, L. V. “Philippine Islands.” Missions Quarterly, First Quarter 1916.

Griggs, Frederick. “Goals and How to Win Them.” Far Eastern Division Outlook, August and September 1926.

Gulfan, Neildren Cuyos. Negros Occidental Conference retrieved from: https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=9AR2&highlight=negros|occidental|conference#fn11.

"Hawaii, Index to Filipino Passengers Arriving at Honolulu, 1900-1952," database with images, FamilySearch. https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-89JC-MRPK?

“History of West Visayan Academy.” Adventist Academy Iloilo.

Jackson, S. E. “Third General Meeting of the Western Visayan Mission.” ARH, October 23, 1919.

Jornada, Fausti H. “The Antique District.” Asiatic Division Outlook, November 1923.

Marrin, Hugh G. “The West Visayan Annual Meeting.” Asiatic Division Outlook, July 1923.

Miraflores, S. G. “Veteran Soldiers of the Cross.” Far Eastern Division Outlook, September 1964.

Mote, F. A. “West Visayan Mission Colporteur's Institute.” Far Eastern Division Outlook, October 1936.

Rubrico, James B. Sr. “A History of Adventism in the Philippines.” Outlook, 2nd Quarter, 2014.

Rubrico, James B. Sr. Dawn of Hope in Panay. Philippines: Goldine Printers, 2005.

Simmons, Marians. “Beginnings of Adventist Education in the Philippines.” Far Eastern Division Outlook, January 1973.

Spicer, William A. “To the Fields in 1914.” ARH, January 7, 1915.

Notes

  1. Linda Jornada Olarte, Daughter of Fausto H. Jornada Sr., interview by Donna Lou A. Aragon October 2021 via social media, Tacoma, WA.

  2. Ibid.

  3. "Hawaii, Index to Filipino Passengers Arriving at Honolulu, 1900-1952," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:QKYR-G93W: 1 March 2021), Fausto Jornada, 1909; citing Immigration, Ship Chiyo Maru, NARA microfilm publication A3407 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.); roll 5. https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-89JC-MRPK?i=5055&cc=2141043&personaUrl=%2Fark%3A%2F61903%2F1%3A1%3AQKYR-G93W.

  4. Linda Jornada Olarte, Daughter of Fausto H. Jornada Sr., interview by Donna Lou A. Aragon October 2021 via social media, Tacoma, WA.

  5. James B. Rubrico Sr., Dawn of Hope in Panay (Philippines: Goldine Printers, 2005), 139.

  6. Marian Simmons, “Beginnings of Adventist Education in the Philippines” Far Eastern Division Outlook, January 1973, 4. https://documents.adventistarchives.org/Periodicals/FEDO/FEDO19730101.pdf.

  7. James B. Rubrico Sr., Dawn of Hope in Panay, 139.

  8. James B. Rubrico Sr., “A History of Adventism in the Philippines” Outlook, 2nd Quarter, 2014, 7. http://adventist.asia/site/assets/files/5558/outlook_2nd_qt_2014.pdf.

  9. James B. Rubrico Sr., Dawn of Hope in Panay, 140.

  10. Ibid.

  11. W. H. Bergherm, “A Man Whom God Prepared” Lake Union Herald 21, no. 42 (October 1929) 1. https://adventistdigitallibrary.org/islandora/object/adl:345210/datastream/PDF/view.

  12. Linda Jornada Olarte, Daughter of Fausto H. Jornada Sr., interview by Donna Lou A. Aragon October 2021 via social media, Tacoma, WA.

  13. Aldine R. Adams, “Fausto Makes Restitution” The Youth’s Instructor 81, no. 40 (October 1933): 6. https://adventistdigitallibrary.org/islandora/object/adl:362244/datastream/PDF/view.

  14. W.J. Blake, “Glimpses of the West Visayan Academy” Far Eastern Division Outlook 122. No. 2 (December 1933): 5. https://adventistdigitallibrary.org/islandora/object/adl:343709/datastream/PDF/view.

  15. “History of West Visayan Academy,” Adventist Academy Iloilo, adventistacademyiloilo.org, accessed December 5, 2021.

  16. Linda Jornada Olarte, Daughter of Fausto H. Jornada Sr., interview by Donna Lou A. Aragon October 2021 via social media, Tacoma, WA.

  17. Ibid.

  18. “History of West Visayan Academy,” Adventist Academy Iloilo, adventistacademyiloilo.org, accessed December 5, 2021.

  19. James B. Rubrico Sr., Dawn of Hope in Panay, 140.

  20. Linda Jornada Olarte, Daughter of Fausto H. Jornada Sr., interview by Donna Lou A. Aragon October 2021 via social media, Tacoma, WA.

  21. Eldridge Adams, “The Panayan Mission,” ARH, March 1, 1919, 5. https://documents.adventistarchives.org/Periodicals/ADO/ADO19190301-V08-05.pdf.

  22. James B. Rubrico Sr., “A History of Adventism in the Philippines” Outlook 2nd Quarter (2014): 6. http://adventist.asia/site/assets/files/5558/outlook_2nd_qt_2014.pdf.

  23. William A. Spicer, “To the Fields in 1914,” ARH, January 7, 1915, 6. https://adventistdigitallibrary.org/islandora/object/adl:351820/datastream/PDF/view.

  24. James B. Rubrico Sr., “A History of Adventism in the Philippines” Outlook 2nd Quarter (2014): 8. http://adventist.asia/site/assets/files/5558/outlook_2nd_qt_2014.pdf.

  25. Ibid., 9.

  26. L. V. Finster, “Philippine Islands,” Missions Quarterly 5, no. 1 (First Quarter 1916): 5. https://documents.adventistarchives.org/Periodicals/MissionsQtrly/MQ19160101-V05-01.pdf.

  27. W. H. Bergherm, “A Man Whom God Prepared” Lake Union Herald 21, no. 42 (October 1929): 1. https://adventistdigitallibrary.org/islandora/object/adl:345210/datastream/PDF/view.

  28. Linda Jornada Olarte, Daughter of Fausto H. Jornada Sr., interview by Donna Lou A. Aragon October 2021 via social media, Tacoma, WA.

  29. Ibid.

  30. “Early Beginnings of the Advent Message in Negros Island,” Far Eastern Division Outlook, July 1, 1966, 14. https://documents.adventistarchives.org/Periodicals/FEDO/FEDO19660701-V52-07.pdf .

  31. Neildren Cuyos Gulfan, Negros Occidental Conference retrieved from: https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=9AR2&highlight=negros|occidental|conference#fn11.

  32. S. E, Jackson, Third General Meeting of the Western Visayan Mission, ARH, October 23, 1919, 15. https://documents.adventistarchives.org/Periodicals/RH/RH19191023-V96-43.pdf.

  33. Aldine R. Adams, “Fausto Makes Restitution” The Youth’s Instructor, October 3, 1933, 13. https://adventistdigitallibrary.org/islandora/object/adl:362244/datastream/PDF/view.

  34. Fausto H. Jornada, The Antique District, Asiatic Division Outlook, November 1, 1923, 4. https://documents.adventistarchives.org/Periodicals/ADO/ADO19231101-V12-21.pdf.

  35. G. Hugh Marrin, The West Visayan Annual Meeting, Asiatic Division Outlook, July 15, 1923, 4. https://documents.adventistarchives.org/Periodicals/ADO/ADO19230715-V12-14.pdf.

  36. C. C. Crisler, The Iloilo Institute, P.I., Far Eastern Division Outlook, November 1, 1925, 5. https://documents.adventistarchives.org/Periodicals/FEDO/FEDO19251101-V14-11.pdf.

  37. Frederick Griggs, Goals and How to Win Them, Far Eastern Division Outlook, August and September 1926, 7. https://documents.adventistarchives.org/Periodicals/FEDO/FEDO19260801-V15-08,09.pdf.

  38. W.H. Bergherm, The West Visayan Mission, Far Eastern Division Outlook, September 1, 1928, 4. https://documents.adventistarchives.org/Periodicals/FEDO/FEDO19280901-V17-09.pdf.

  39. Linda Jornada Olarte, Daughter of Fausto H. Jornada Sr., interview by Donna Lou A. Aragon October 2021 via social media platform, Tacoma, WA.

  40. W. H. Bergherm, “A Man Whom God Prepared” Lake Union Herald, October 23, 1929, 1. https://adventistdigitallibrary.org/islandora/object/adl:345210/datastream/PDF/view.

  41. Linda Jornada Olarte, Daughter of Fausto H. Jornada Sr., interview by Donna Lou A. Aragon October 2021 via social media, Tacoma, WA.

  42. Aldine R. Adams, “Fausto Makes Restitution” The Youth’s Instructor, October 3, 1933, 13. https://adventistdigitallibrary.org/islandora/object/adl:362244/datastream/PDF/view.

  43. Linda Jornada Olarte, Daughter of Fausto H. Jornada Sr., interview by Donna Lou A. Aragon October 2021 via social media, Tacoma, WA.

  44. F. A. Mote, “West Visayan Mission Colporteur's Institute,” Far Eastern Division Outlook, October 1, 1936, 6. https://adventistdigitallibrary.org/islandora/object/adl:343743/datastream/PDF/view.

  45. Linda Jornada Olarte, Daughter of Fausto H. Jornada Sr., interview by Donna Lou A. Aragon October 2021 via social media, Tacoma, WA.

  46. Ibid.

  47. Ibid.

  48. W. H. Bergherm, “A Man Whom God Prepared,” Lake Union Herald, October 23, 1929, 1. https://adventistdigitallibrary.org/islandora/object/adl:345210/datastream/PDF/view.

  49. Marian Simmons, “Beginnings of Adventist Education in the Philippines,” Far Eastern Division Outlook, January 1, 1973, 4. https://documents.adventistarchives.org/Periodicals/FEDO/FEDO19730101.pdf.

  50. James B. Rubrico Sr., “A History of Adventism in the Philippines,” Outlook, 2nd Quarter, 2014, 8. http://adventist.asia/site/assets/files/5558/outlook_2nd_qt_2014.pdf.

  51. William A. Spicer, “To the Fields in 1914,” ARH, January 7, 1915, 6. https://adventistdigitallibrary.org/islandora/object/adl:351820/datastream/PDF/view.

  52. James B. Rubrico Sr., “A History of Adventism in the Philippines,” Outlook, 2nd Quarter, 2014, 9. http://adventist.asia/site/assets/files/5558/outlook_2nd_qt_2014.pdf.

  53. “Early Beginnings of the Advent Message in Negros Island,” Far Eastern Division Outlook, July 1, 1966, 14. https://documents.adventistarchives.org/Periodicals/FEDO/FEDO19660701-V52-07.pdf.

  54. Aldine R. Adams, “Fausto Makes Restitution” The Youth’s Instructor, October 3, 1933, 13. https://adventistdigitallibrary.org/islandora/object/adl:362244/datastream/PDF/view.

  55. Ibid.

  56. W. H. Bergherm, “A Man Whom God Prepared” Lake Union Herald, October 23, 1929, 1. https://adventistdigitallibrary.org/islandora/object/adl:345210/datastream/PDF/view.

  57. S. G. Miraflores, Veteran Soldiers of the Cross, Far Eastern Division Outlook, September 1, 1964, 3. https://documents.adventistarchives.org/Periodicals/FEDO/FEDO19640901-V50-09.pdf.

×

Aragon, Jessie J., Donna Lou A. Aragon. "Jornada, Fausto Habana Sr. (1888–1971)." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. November 05, 2020. Accessed May 24, 2024. https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=CAQE.

Aragon, Jessie J., Donna Lou A. Aragon. "Jornada, Fausto Habana Sr. (1888–1971)." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. November 05, 2020. Date of access May 24, 2024, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=CAQE.

Aragon, Jessie J., Donna Lou A. Aragon (2020, November 05). Jornada, Fausto Habana Sr. (1888–1971). Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. Retrieved May 24, 2024, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=CAQE.