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Philip B. Rudge (Record, November 16, 2013).

Rudge, Philip Bulpit (1856–1938)

By Shirley Tarburton

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Shirley Tarburton, M.Litt. (Distinction) (University of New England, Armidale, New South Wales, Australia) retired in 2008 after 40 years teaching church-school (mainly high school but including eight years at university). An Australian, she has taught in four mission fields, Australia, and New Zealand. She has authored five books and co-authored one on church history, biography and family history, as well as several magazine articles. She is married to Dr. Michael Tarburton with two adult children and four grandchildren.

 

First Published: July 19, 2020

Philip Bulpit Rudge was an Australian Seventh-day Adventist businessman who established the Church’s health-food business in Australia as a financially viable concern. He later became an evangelist and pioneered the Adventist missions for the Aboriginal people of Queensland and New South Wales.1

Early Years

Philip Bulpit Rudge was born August 2, 1856, in Carrick, Tasmania,2 the eighth of twelve children of Frederick Rudge (1821-1885)3 and his wife Maria Bean (1819-1907).4 His siblings were Fanny (1844-1920),5 Maria Ann (1845-1920),6 Elizabeth Jane (1846-1920),7 Gertrude (1848-1920),8 Lydia (1851-1933),9 Frederick Bean (1853-1857),10 George Caleb (1855-1928),11 William Frederick (1859-1947),12 Mary Beatrice (1860-1953),13 Robert Henry Yeadon (1862-1891),14 and another sister whose details are unknown.15

Philip Rudge’s parents emigrated to Tasmania separately in the 1840s; his father had been an officer in the East India Company16 and his mother came from England.17 After marrying in 1843,18 they lived in several different locations in the north of Tasmania before settling at Carrick in the Latrobe area.19 His father was a brewer and miller,20 first in Carrick and, after 1874, in Latrobe.21 Philip and his brothers grew up learning those trades.

Marriage and Family

On March 24, 1881, Philip Rudge married local girl Isabella Mitchell in her widowed mother’s home in Latrobe.22 Her parents, William Mitchell (1824-1876) and Margaret

née Craig moved their young family from Ayrshire, Scotland, to Tasmania, and Isabella was born there in Port Sorrell on October 2, 1856.23 She had two older siblings and four younger—Helen (1849-1914),24 John Byron (1853-1932),25 James (1858-1926),26 Robert (1860-?),27 Marion (1863-1937),28 and Jane (1865-?).29 William Mitchell also spent time as a brewer before becoming the town baker; consequently, he would have dealt regularly with Frederick Rudge to obtain the flour for his bread.

Philip and Isabella Rudge had eight children. William Frederick (October 7, 1882-February 24, 1927)30 was born at Waratah while his father was an overseer31 at what later became the Mount Bischoff tin mine. William took nursing training at the Sydney Sanitarium and worked for the Adventist Church in various capacities in health and pastoral ministry.32 Lydia Waratah (June 2, 1884-July 12, 1944)33 was also born while the family lived at Waratah. She trained as a nurse at the Sydney Sanitarium where she met and married her husband, Thomas William Carr, and together they served there and in the Adventist sanitarium in Christchurch, New Zealand.34 Edmund Bean (August 9, 1886-October 14, 1960)35 was born after the family had moved back to Latrobe. He trained as a minister and as a nurse, spending his life in ministry and administration for the Adventist Church in Australia, Britain, and the Northern European Division.36 Ivy Isobel (June 11, 1888-April 17, 197437) was born in Latrobe and married Wilfrid Thomas Smith (son of pioneer pastor W. J. Smith), who spent a number of years as manager of several branches of the Sanitarium Health Food Company.38 Philip Craig (May 19, 1890-February 1, 1957),39 Harry (August 18, 1893-May 29, 1983),40 and Beryl (December 14, 1894-July 17, 1966)41 who married William Ethan Mills, were all also born in Latrobe. Their youngest child, Victor Northcote (November 6, 1898-February 28, 1979),42 was born in Northcote, Victoria, and spent all his working life in Wahroonga, New South Wales.43

Career

When Philip and Isabella Rudge married, his occupation was given as “improver,” which means an apprentice.44 From 1882 to 1884, he was a mining overseer.45 In December 1884, he opened a business buying and selling flours, grains, and legumes.46 In 1887, he took over the Latrobe Cordial Factory,47 opening a branch at Wynyard in 1890.48 These businesses were evidently prosperous, because in 1892 he commissioned the building of a spacious residence of “ten large rooms with every modern convenience.”49

Conversion

Meanwhile, in November 1890, Robert Hare had pitched a meeting tent in Latrobe in the same street as Rudge’s store and commenced evangelistic meetings.50 It seems that Rudge was not interested at first. Apart from his work, he was heavily involved in various aspects of the community. He was a Senior Warden in the Masonic Lodge,51 a shareholder in the Latrobe Gas Company,52 and a member of the Latrobe Road Trust Board.53 He was a member of the local cricket club and his services as an umpire were in demand.54 Just a few weeks before Hare commenced his meetings, there was great excitement from the discovery of gold at a mine in which Rudge’s older brother had an interest, and Rudge travelled there to get some samples.55 So there was plenty to occupy his mind and time.

However, some other family members attended the meetings, and Isabella Rudge’s sister-in-law, Louisa, was converted.56 With her encouragement, Isabella and her older sister, Helen, attended and so did Rudge.57 Helen was interested, but not convicted and did not make her decision to join the Adventist Church until later.58 Rudge accepted that what he was hearing was right, but he was slow in putting it into practice. It took him some time to decide to close his business on Sabbath.59 Pastor and Mrs. Hare left Latrobe in December 1891.60 At the session of the Australian Conference held in Melbourne on December 27, the Latrobe Seventh-day Adventist church was admitted into the conference.61 It was only a “small company,”62 but Hare kept writing to Rudge. In 1892,63 he finally made the decision to join the Church.64 By June 1893, there were twelve Sabbath School members in the Latrobe Seventh-day Adventist church.65 It was stated that only “four or five” of these were church members, so the others must have been their children.66

In April 1894, Rudge built a small church67 and donated it to the Latrobe group.68 He led Bible studies with interested people and started selling Adventist literature.69 He commenced the painful business of withdrawing from the Masonic Order and other political and business associations with which he had long been involved.70 His business interests were sold as he could not continue operating them and keep the Sabbath.71 These great changes brought about estrangement with some of his family members, and his immediate family suffered considerable financial loss throughout this transition.72

Working for the Adventist Church

In September 1894, Rudge sailed to Melbourne as a delegate to a convention that met at the conclusion of a Bible school session.73 The following year, he moved his family to Zeehan, where he had a branch of his cordial manufacturing business, in order to engage in literature ministry amongst the miners and other residents of the isolated West Coast town.74 To fund this missionary venture, he sold this business to his manager.75 The disposal of his business and the keeping of the seventh-day Sabbath made a lasting impression upon many in the town.76

During this time, Rudge was invited to join the conference staff. Consequently, he attended the annual session of the Central Australian Conference of Seventh-day Adventists in Adelaide in October 1896 where he was issued with a missionary license.77 The following year he was asked to move his family to Melbourne and become the business manager of the soon-to-be established church health food business.78

At the time, church employees were expected to fund their own relocations. With a family of seven children, the cost was beyond what Philip and Isabella Rudge could now pay.79 Making it a matter of prayer, they received a £500 cheque in payment of a long-outstanding debt (for which they had given up all hope of receiving) that was enough to cover their relocation to Melbourne.80 They arrived in April 189881 and settled in Northcote where a bakery had been leased and a limited range of health foods was being produced by E. C. Halsey from the Battle Creek, Michigan, food factory.82

Pioneer Work in the Sanitarium Health Food Company

Early in 1899, work commenced on construction of a permanent food factory on land purchased from the Avondale estate in New South Wales.83 Rudge went up there to supervise its establishment. It commenced production in a limited way in July 1899 as the Sanitarium Health Food Company.84 Isabella Rudge, with her new baby and the other seven children, joined him and set up their home in Cooranbong.85

There were many other calls for Rudge’s expertise. At the August council of the Australasian Union Conference (AUC) in 1900, he was made a director of the Sydney Sanitarium, of the Avondale Health Retreat, and of the Avondale Press.86 Early the following year, he was appointed to the finance committee of the Union Conference Medical Council which was preparing to build the 100-bed Sydney Sanitarium and Hospital.87

Literature Ministry

Rudge returned to Tasmania where he was given responsibility for overseeing the canvassing work (sales of Adventist books and distribution of literature) in Tasmania.88 At the same committee meeting, he was also appointed to the constituent body of the Sydney Sanitarium and Benevolent Association.89

In 1902 Rudge was appointed to oversee the canvassing work of the New South Wales Conference.90 In January 1906, he ran the first New South Wales canvassers’ convention, providing in-service training.91 He was a “hands-on” leader, selling books full-time. Isabella also sold books door-to-door.92 In 1907 and 1908, Rudge canvassed in Dubbo, New South Wales,93 until his health broke and the family returned to Sydney94 so he could receive treatment at the Sydney Sanitarium and Hospital.95

Evangelism

When Rudge had recovered, he engaged in evangelistic work as a Bible worker with tent missions in Annandale96 and Drummoyne in97 Sydney. At the New South Wales Conference session held in September 1910, he was elected vice president of the conference98 and once again found himself on a number of boards and committees.99 Nevertheless, he continued his evangelistic work with the mission teams.100

Pioneering Among the Australian Aborigines

The following year at the AUC council, Rudge was appointed to commence work for the Barambah Aboriginal Settlement in Queensland.101 This was a state-run settlement, but members from the Murgon Seventh-day Adventist church a few kilometers away had been visiting in an endeavor to bring Christ to those living there.102 Rudge became the first Adventist minister to be appointed by the AUC to evangelize Aboriginal Australians, and he and his family worked there until August 1913.103 During this time, his work was severely hampered by the settlement being under government control and the inhabitants being required to attend meetings held by other missions.104 He had to live at a distance and found that when any of the people started to show interest, they were likely to be sent far away as domestic workers.105

With the financial support of the AUC, and the cooperation of the Chief Protector of Aboriginals in Queensland, Philip and Isabella Rudge established Mona Mona Mission with James Branford on Djabugay lands near Kuranda and Inland from Cairns, in far-north Queensland, in August 1913.106 The property was raw bush, so they lived in tents until they built their house. They found the tropical heat oppressive but, although Rudge was now 57 years old, he worked with the energy of a man half his age. After four months, he was very pleased to have twelve Aborigines come to live at the settlement he was building, while a number of others lived in the bush on the property.107

The following year, a school was opened by Mrs. Roy of the mission staff. Philip and Isabella Rudge were encouraged when some of the adults attended along with the children.108

Unfortunately, Isabella Rudge’s health could not be sustained in the tropical conditions and they reluctantly left to return south in mid-1914.109 They had the satisfaction of knowing the settlement was thriving with over fifty inhabitants (which had increased to seventy-two two months later110) and that some were showing interest in spiritual matters.111

Rudge’s next challenge was to evangelize the large population of Australian Aborigines around Kempsey in the mid-north coast of New South Wales. The Rudges settled there in October 1914 and by December were ready to commence a series of evangelistic meetings.112 Along the roads radiating from Kempsey were a number of Aboriginal settlements and Rudge was soon working in six of them,113 covering the distances at first with a horse and sulky,114 then in a motor car supplied by the conference because of the large distances involved.115 At times, he and Isabella would be on the road for two weeks before returning home.116 Baptisms followed,117 victories were won over gripping vices,118 and there was a growth in spiritual understanding.119 The work steadily grew, and by the end of 1917 there were groups in eight different settlements that came together to study God’s word, while a church had been established at Burnt Bridge.120

Ordination

On October 26, 1918, at the age of 62, Rudge was ordained to the gospel ministry.121 In May 1920, he convened the first Adventist Aboriginal Camp Meeting at Nulla Nulla, during which twelve committed their lives to Christ.122

Return to Kempsey

When he turned sixty-six, Rudge was called back to Sydney by the New South Wales Conference and placed in a team running tent evangelistic meetings.123 Isabella had developed serious health issues but gradually recovered somewhat.124 Rudge loved evangelistic work and had been connected with twelve tent efforts up until this time,125 but his heart was with the work for the Aboriginal people.126 He repeatedly requested that the AUC allow him to return to work in Kempsey.127 Finally, seeing that the “work among the aborigines of the Kempsey area has languished,” the AUC acceded to the Rudge’s request.128

The Rudges returned to Kempsey in April 1926, three and a half months before Philip Rudge’s seventieth birthday.129 He found a number of his earlier converts still faithful and was encouraged that many others were showing interest.130 Realizing the interest was so great that he would need help, he requested assistance and in November was sent Miss Eva Perry,131 with whom he had worked on the Fairfield evangelistic team.132 Her arrival was very timely as on December 24, 1926, Isabella Rudge suddenly died.133

Philip Rudge was greatly comforted by the love and sorrow of the people they were serving, and remained at Kempsey, resuming his ministry among them.134

When Isabella Rudge realized that she would not recover from her last sudden illness, she had suggested to her husband and Eva Perry that they should marry so that they could continue their work (which was also dear to her heart) for the Aborigines together.135 They married on September 22, 1927, at the farm of retired missionary F. A. Allum near Wauchope.136

Eva Edith Perry

Eva Perry was forty-four years old at the time, having been born in South Australia in 1883.137 She was the eldest of the six children of William and Rachel (née Kitto) Perry, and had been a Bible Worker all her working life. Her youngest brother was J. C. Hamley Perry, missionary to the New Hebrides (now Vanuatu) and the Solomon Islands.138

Retirement and Death

Philip and Eva Rudge continued their mission work in Kempsey until 1929 when Rudge finally retired.139 On leaving, the Rudges left behind them hundreds who loved them spread “from Port Macquarie and Nambucca to the outskirts of Armidale.”140 They moved to Wahroonga141 where Philip Rudge’s youngest son, Victor, was living.142 The Rudges also provided a home for two of the young women of the mission, Lena Holten and her cousin, who moved to Wahroonga with them, incidentally being trained in Christian living during the five years they were part of the Rudge family.143

Rudge was seventy-three when he permanently retired and spent his final years living in Wahroonga. During his last year of life, he had the pleasure of having his second son, Edward, also living nearby as he was the vice president of the Australian Union Conference.144 His eldest son had died a few months after Isabella,145 but there were seven children and a score of grandchildren who mourned his passing on February 1, 1938, in the Sydney Adventist Hospital, Wahroonga,146 the same hospital of which he had been a director when it was in the planning stages.

Eva Rudge lived another twenty-seven years, and married a widower, Arthur Cleverdon, in 1945147 who only lived for four more years.148 She died on August 4, 1965, in Temora, New South Wales.149

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Anderson, A. W. “Pastor P. B. Rudge.” Australasian Record, March 7, 1938.

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Cooper, H. J. “Murgon, Queensland.” Australasian Record, February 3, 1908.

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“Country News, Latrobe.” Daily Telegraph, December 4, 1890.

Daniels, A. G. “Tasmania.” Bible Echo and Signs of the Times, December 8, 1893.

Farnsworth, E. W. and E. M. Graham. “Union Conference Medical Council.” Australasian Record, March 1, 1901.

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“Former Member’s Wife Buried.” The Herald, July 22, 1920.

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“Gold Discovery at Middlesex.” Launceston Examiner, August 12, 1890.

Hare, R. E. “In Memoriam—Pastor E. B. Rudge.” Australasian Record, November 7, 1960.

Hare, R. “Isabella Rudge obituary.” Australasian Record, January 24, 1927.

Harvey, L. R. “Louisa Mitchell obituary.” Australasian Record, June 21, 1948.

“The Late Mr. F. Rudge...” Devon Herald, September 18, 1885.

“Latrobe Cordial Factory.” The North Western Chronicle, October 21, 1887.

“Latrobe Gas Company.” North Coast Standard, August 12, 1891.

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“Mary Beatrice Rudge obituary.” Advocate, May 16, 1953.

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“Monthly Summary of Australasian Canvassing Work.” Australasian Record, September 2, 1907.

“Monthly Summary of Australasian Canvassing Work.” Australasian Record, May 18, 1908.

Morse, G. W. “The Health Food Business.” Australasian Record, September 1, 1899.

“Mr. W. H. Biggins...” Zeehan and Dundas Herald, April 6, 1895.

George Caleb Rudge obituary.” Examiner, September 19, 1928.

Names Index. Libraries Tasmania. N.d. Accessed January 14, 2020. https://libraries.tas.gov.au/family-history.

“New Business.” Devon Herald, December 5, 1884.

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New Zealand, Death Index, 1848-1966. William Frederick Rudge. Ancestry.com. Accessed April 1, 2020. https://www.ancestry.com.

“Robert Henry Yeadon Rudge obituary.” Wellington Times and Agricultural and Mining Gazette, October 22, 1891.

“On Saturday morning...” Examiner, April 12, 1920.

“On the first Sabbath...” Australasian Record, December 9, 1918.

Palmer, C. S. “Beryl Mills obituary.” Australasian Record, August 29, 1966.

Palmer, C. S. “Philip Craige Rudge obituary.” Australasian Record, March 18, 1957.

Parker, Lewis. “Ivy Isobel Smith obituary.” Australasian Record, May 20, 1974.

“Pastor and Mrs J. C. H. Perry . . .” Australasian Record, May 27, 1968.

“Pastor and Mrs P. B. Rudge...” Australasian Record, April 26, 1926.

“Pastor P. B. Rudge...” Australasian Record, April 23, 1923.

Philip Bulpit Rudge Biographical Record. South Pacific Division of the General Conference Archives.

Piper, H. E. “William Frederick Rudge obituary.” Australasian Record, April 18, 1927.

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“Recent Actions of the Union Conference Committee.” Australasian Record, February 15, 1926.

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“Responding to a call...” Australasian Record, November 22, 1926.

Rosendahl, E. C. “Lena Quinlan obituary.” Australasian Record, August 16, 1971.

Rosendahl, E. “Our First Australians.” Australasian Record, July 3, 1972.

Rosendahl, Thelma. “Just in Time.” Australasian Record, October 14, 1963.

Rudge, E. B. “A Pioneer in Work for the Aborigines.” Australasian Record, January 23, 1956.

Rudge, P. B. “A Bible Class at Barambah.” Australasian Record, June 24, 1912.

Rudge, P. B. “An Aboriginal’s Experience with Tobacco.” Australasian Record, June 14, 1915.

Rudge, P. B. “Barambah Good-bye.” Australasian Record, September 15, 1913.

Rudge, P. B. “Canvassers’ Convention.” Australasian Record, February 1, 1906.

Rudge, P. B. “Fairfield Mission, NSW.” Australasian Record, August 13, 1923.

Rudge, P. B. “Kempsey Aboriginal Mission Week of Prayer.” Australasian Record, June 21, 1915.

Rudge, P. B. “Kempsey Aboriginal Mission.” Australasian Record, June 28, 1920.

Rudge, P. B. “Kempsey Aborigines Mission.” Australasian Record, January 25, 1915.

Rudge, P. B. “Kempsey Aborigines Mission.” Australasian Record, December 31, 1917.

Rudge, P. B. “Kempsey Aborigines Mission.” Australasian Record, July 26, 1926.

Rudge, P. B. “Kempsey Aborigines Mission.” Australasian Record, July 11, 1927.

Rudge, P. B. “Mission for the Aborigines, Kempsey, New South Wales.” Australasian Record, January 4, 1915.

Rudge, P. B. “Monamona and the Natives.” Australasian Record, January 26, 1914.

Rudge, P. B. “Monamona Mission.” Australasian Record, January 5, 1914.

Rudge, P. B. “Monamona Mission.” Australasian Record, June 22, 1914.

Rudge, W. E. “Victor Northcote Rudge obituary.” Australasian Record, April 16, 1979.

Rudge, W. E. “Rudge.” Australasian Record, July 16, 1983.

Starr, G. B. “Little Raymond Fisher.” Australasian Record, June 29, 1908.

Starr, G. B. “Tasmania.” Bible Echo and Signs of the Times, March 1, 1892.

Stocken, S. A. “Eva Edith Perry Cleverdon obituary.” Australasian Record, August 30, 1965.

Streeter, H. S. “Wilfred Thomas Smith obituary.” Australasian Record, October 25, 1965.

“Table Cape Jottings.” Launceston Examiner, September 16, 1890.

“Tasmania was represented...” Bible Echo and Signs of the Times, October 1, 1894.

Teasdale, George. “Zeehan, Tasmania.” Australasian Record, May 15, 1904.

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Woods, J. H. “Helen Fletcher obituary.” Australasian Record, March 16, 1914.

Woods, J. H. “Gleanings from the Field.” Australasian Record, December 5, 1910.

Woods, J. H. “Interests in New South Wales.” Australasian Record, June 20, 1910.

Wrigley, C. A. “Arthur G. Cleverdon obituary.” Australasian Record, October 24, 1949.

Notes

  1. A. W. Anderson, “Pastor P. B. Rudge,” Australasian Record, March 7, 1938, 7; E. B. Rudge, “A Pioneer in Work for the Aborigines,” Australasian Record, January 23, 1956, 2-3.

  2. Philip Bulpit Rudge Biographical Records, South Pacific Division of the General Conference Archives, folder: “Rudge, Philip Bulpit,” document: “Worker’s Biographical Record.”

  3. Rudge Family Tree online, Geneanet, n.d., accessed January 12, 2020,

    https://gw.geneanet.org/alisontassie?lang=en&n=rudge&oc=0&p=frederick.

  4. Ibid.

  5. “About People,” Examiner, February 28, 1920, 8.

  6. “On Saturday morning...,” Examiner, April 12, 1920, 6.

  7. Burial Record, No. BU 22215, “Elizabeth Jane Sprent,” Cornelian Bay Cemetery (Millingtons Cemeteries), Hobart, Tasmania, accessed April 1, 2020, http://www.millingtons.com.au/cemetery-records-search/.

  8. “Former Member’s Wife Buried,” The Herald, July 22, 1920, 1.

  9. Burial Record, No. CV 24606, “Lydia Atkinson,” Cornelian Bay Cemetery (Millingtons Cemeteries), Hobart, Tasmania, accessed April 1, 2020, http://www.millingtons.com.au/cemetery-records-search/.

  10. Name Index, Frederick Bean Rudge, RGD35/1/26 no. 388, Libraries Tasmania, n.d. accessed January 14, 2020, https://libraries.tas.gov.au/family-history.

  11. “George Caleb Rudge obituary,” Examiner, September 19, 1928, 8.

  12. New Zealand, Death Index, 1848-1966, William Frederick Rudge, Ancestry.com, accessed April 1, 2020, https://www.ancestry.com.

  13. “Mary Beatrice Rudge obituary,” Advocate, May 16, 1953, 4.

  14. “Robert Henry Yeadon Rudge obituary,” Wellington Times and Agricultural and Mining Gazette, October 22, 1891, 3.

  15. “About People,” The North West Post, September 7, 1907, 2.

  16. “A Latrobe Pioneer,” Advocate, September 19, 1928, 2.

  17. “Latrobe,” Daily Telegraph, September 7, 1907, 10.

  18. Tasmanian marriages, RGD37/1/3 no 23, Libraries Tasmania, n.d., accessed January 14, 2020, https://libraries.tas.gov.au/family-history.

  19. “Latrobe,” Daily Telegraph, September 7, 1907, 10.

  20. Ibid.

  21. “The Late Mr. F. Rudge...,” Devon Herald, September 18, 1885, 2.

  22. Name Index, Isabella Mitchell, Libraries Tasmania, n.d., accessed January 12, 2020, https://libraries.tas.gov.au/family-history.

  23. Name Index, Isabella Mitchell, RGD33-1-34 no 667, Libraries Tasmania, n.d., accessed January 14, 2020, https://libraries.tas.gov.au/family-history.

  24. J. H. Woods, “Helen Fletcher obituary,” Australasian Record, March 16, 1914, 7.

  25. “John Byron Mitchell obituary,” Advocate, December 21, 1932, 2.

  26. Name Index, James Mitchell, RGD33/1/36 no 1797, Libraries Tasmania, n.d., accessed January 14, 2020, https://libraries.tas.gov.au/family-history.

  27. Name Index, Robert Mitchell, RGD33/1/38 no 1979, Libraries Tasmania, n.d., accessed January 14, 2020, https://libraries.tas.gov.au/family-history.

  28. Name Index, Marion Mitchell, RGD33/1/41 no 1369, Libraries Tasmania, n.d., accessed January 14, 2020, https://libraries.tas.gov.au/family-history.

  29. Family Records held in the personal collection of the author.

  30. H. E. Piper, “William Frederick Rudge obituary,” Australasian Record, April 18, 1927, 5.

  31. Tasmanian Births, 1882, William Frederick Rudge, 1148, Libraries Tasmania, n.d., accessed January 14, 2020, https://libraries.tas.gov.au/family-history.

  32. H. E. Piper, “William Frederick Rudge obituary,” Australasian Record, April 18, 1927, 5.

  33. A. W. Anderson, “Lydia Waratah Carr obituary,” Australasian Record, September 4. 1944, 7.

  34. Ibid.

  35. R. E. Hare, “In Memoriam—Pastor E. B. Rudge,” Australasian Record, November 7, 1960, 13.

  36. Ibid.

  37. Lewis Parker, “Ivy Isobel Smith obituary,” Australasian Record, May 20, 1974, 15.

  38. H. S. Streeter, “Wilfred Thomas Smith obituary,” Australasian Record, October 25, 1965, 15.

  39. C. S. Palmer, “Philip Craige Rudge obituary,” Australasian Record, March 18, 1957, 15.

  40. W. E. Rudge, “Rudge,” Australasian Record, July 16, 1983, 14.

  41. C. S. Palmer, “Beryl Mills obituary,” Australasian Record, August 29, 1966, 15.

  42. W. E. Rudge, “Victor Northcote Rudge obituary,” Australasian Record, April 16, 1979, 14.

  43. Ibid.

  44. Name Index, Isabella Mitchell, Libraries Tasmania, n.d., accessed January 12, 2020, https://libraries.tas.gov.au/family-history.

  45. Tasmanian Births, 1882, William Frederick Rudge, 1148; Tasmanian Births, 1884, Lydia Waratah Rudge, 1288, Libraries Tasmania, n.d., accessed January 14, 2020, https://libraries.tas.gov.au/family-history.

  46. “New Business,” Devon Herald, December 5, 1884, 2.

  47. “Latrobe Cordial Factory,” The North Western Chronicle, October 21, 1887, 3.

  48. “Table Cape Jottings,” Launceston Examiner, September 16, 1890, 4.

  49. “Latrobe,” The North Coast Standard, June 8, 1892, 2.

  50. “Country Intelligence, Latrobe,” Launceston Examiner, November 22, 1890, 3.

  51. “Country News, Latrobe,” Daily Telegraph, December 4, 1890, 4.

  52. “Latrobe Gas Company,” North Coast Standard, August 12, 1891, 2.

  53. “Latrobe,” Launceston Examiner, October 15, 1892, 5.

  54. “Railway (2nds) vs Newtown (2nds),” Devon Herald, December 8, 1885, 2.

  55. “Gold Discovery at Middlesex,” Launceston Examiner, August 12, 1890, 3.

  56. L. R. Harvey, “Mitchell,” Australasian Record, June 21, 1948, 7.

  57. R. Hare, “Isabella Rudge obituary,” Australasian Record, January 24, 1927, 7; J. H. Woods, “Fletcher,” Australasian Record, March 16, 1914, 7; E. B. Rudge, “A Pioneer in Work for the Aborigines,” Australasian Record, January 23, 1956, 2-3.

  58. J. H. Woods, “Fletcher,” Australasian Record, March 16, 1914, 7.

  59. E. B. Rudge, “A Pioneer in Work for the Aborigines,” Australasian Record, January 23, 1956, 2-3.

  60. “Local and General,” North Coast Standard, December 19, 1891, 2.

  61. “Minutes of the SDA Conference,” Bible Echo and Signs of the Times, January 15, 1892, 28.

  62. G. B. Starr, “Tasmania,” Bible Echo and Signs of the Times, March 1, 1892, 80.

  63. Philip Bulpit Rudge Biographical Record, South Pacific Division of the General Conference Archives, folder: “Rudge, Philip Bulpit,” document: “Worker’s Biographical Record.”

  64. E. B. Rudge, “A Pioneer in Work for the Aborigines,” Australasian Record, January 23, 1956, 2-3.

  65. “Australian Sabbath-School Association Report for Quarter Ending June 30, 1893,” Bible Echo and Signs of the Times, August 15, 1893, 268.

  66. A. G. Daniels, “Tasmania,” Bible Echo and Signs of the Times, December 8, 1893, 390.

  67. “Brevities,” The North Coast Standard, April 10, 1894, 2.

  68. E. B. Rudge, “A Pioneer in Work for the Aborigines,” Australasian Record, January 23, 1956, 2-3.

  69. Ibid; “Report of the Corresponding Secretary of the Australian Tract Society,” Bible Echo and Signs of the Times, November 5, 1894, 342.

  70. E. B. Rudge, “A Pioneer in Work for the Aborigines,” Australasian Record, January 23, 1956, 2-3.

  71. Ibid.

  72. Ibid.

  73. “Tasmania was represented...,” Bible Echo and Signs of the Times, October 1, 1894, 312.

  74. E. B. Rudge, “A Pioneer in Work for the Aborigines,” Australasian Record, January 23, 1956, 2-3.

  75. “Mr. W. H. Biggins...,” Zeehan and Dundas Herald, April 6, 1895, 2.

  76. George Teasdale, “Zeehan, Tasmania,” Australasian Record, May 15, 1904, 4.

  77. “Central Australian Conference,” The Gleaner, October 1896, 21-22.

  78. “We have recently had . . . ,” Australasian Record, March 1898, 35.

  79. E. B. Rudge, “A Pioneer in Work for the Aborigines,” Australasian Record, January 23, 1956, 2-3.

  80. Ibid.

  81. “The health food business . . . ,” Australasia Record, May 1, 1898, 68.

  82. “Medical Missionary Work,” Australasian Record, January-February 1898, 5-6.

  83. G. W. Morse, “The Health Food Business,” Australasian Record, September 1, 1899, 18.

  84. Ibid.

  85. A. W. Anderson, “Pastor P. B. Rudge,” Australasian Record, March 7, 1938, 7.

  86. “Australasian Union Conference Council,” Australasian Record, October 1, 1900, 12.

  87. E. W. Farnsworth, E. M. Graham, “Union Conference Medical Council,” Australasian Record, March 1, 1901, 13.

  88. “Union Conference Proceedings,” Australasian Record, July 31, 1901, 88-89.

  89. Ibid., 94.

  90. “New South Wales Conference,” Australasian Record, November 1, 1902, 4.

  91. P. B. Rudge, “Canvassers’ Convention,” Australasian Record, February 1, 1906, 5.

  92. “Monthly Summary of Australasian Canvassing Work.” Australasian Record, September 2, 1907, 5.

  93. Ibid; “Monthly Summary of Australasian Canvassing Work.” Australasian Record, May 18, 1908, 3.

  94. G. B. Starr, “Little Raymond Fisher,” Australasian Record, June 29, 1908, 6-7.

  95. “For some time . . . ,” Australasian Record, June 29, 1908, 7.

  96. “New South Wales,” Australasian Record, December 6, 1909, 3.

  97. J. H. Woods, “Interests in New South Wales,” Australasian Record, June 20, 1910, 3.

  98. “The New South Wales Conference,” Australasian Record, October 7, 1910, 3.

  99. “Report of the Australasian Union Conference Held October 23 – November 1, 1910.” Australasian Record, November 7, 1920, 60.

  100. J. H. Woods, “Gleanings from the Field,” Australasian Record, December 5, 1910. 5.

  101. “Union Conference Council.” Australasian Record, October 2, 1911, 1-2.

  102. H. J. Cooper, “Murgon, Queensland, Australasian Record, February 3, 1908, 5-6; J. L. Branford, “Monamona Mission,” Australasian Record, September 28, 1914, 51.

  103. P. B. Rudge, “Barambah Good-bye,” Australasian Record, September 15, 1913, 3-4.

  104. E. B. Rudge, “A Pioneer in Work for the Aborigines,” Australasian Record, January 23, 1956, 2-3.

  105. P. B. Rudge, “A Bible Class at Barambah,” Australasian Record, June 24, 1912, 2-3.

  106. P. B. Rudge, “Monamona Mission,” Australasian Record, January 5, 1914, 4.

  107. Ibid; P. B. Rudge, “Monamona and the Natives,” Australasian Record, January 26, 1914, 2-3.

  108. P. B. Rudge, “Monamona Mission,” Australasian Record, June 22, 1914, 4.

  109. “Brother P. B. Rudge...,” Australasian Record, June 29, 1914, 8.

  110. J. L. Branford, “Monamona Mission,” Australasian Record, September 28, 1914, 51.

  111. “Brother P. B. Rudge...,” Australasian Record, June 29, 1914, 8.

  112. P. B. Rudge, “Mission for the Aborigines, Kempsey, New South Wales,” Australasian Record, January 4, 1915, 4.

  113. Ibid.

  114. Thelma Rosendahl, “Just in Time,” Australasian Record, October 14, 1963, 2.

  115. “Recent Actions of the Union Conference Committee,” Australasian Record, February 15, 1926, 7-8.

  116. Thelma Rosendahl, “Just in Time,” Australasian Record, October 14, 1963, 2.

  117. P. B. Rudge, “Kempsey Aborigines Mission,” Australasian Record, January 25, 1915, 4.

  118. P. B. Rudge, “An Aboriginal’s Experience with Tobacco,” Australasian Record, June 14, 1915, 4.

  119. P. B. Rudge, “Kempsey Aboriginal Mission Week of Prayer.” Australasian Record, June 21, 1915, 4.

  120. P. B. Rudge, “Kempsey Aborigines Mission,” Australasian Record, December 31, 1917, 4.

  121. “On the first Sabbath...,” Australasian Record, December 9, 1918, 8.

  122. P. B. Rudge, “Kempsey Aboriginal Mission,” Australasian Record, June 28, 1920, 4.

  123. “Pastor P. B. Rudge...,” Australasian Record, April 23, 1923, 8.

  124. R. Hare, “Isabella Rudge obituary,” Australasian Record, January 24, 1927, 7.

  125. P. B. Rudge, “Fairfield Mission, NSW,” Australasian Record, August 13,1923 5.

  126. “Recent Actions of the Union Conference Committee,” Australasian Record, February 15, 1926, 7-8.

  127. Ibid.

  128. Ibid.

  129. “Pastor and Mrs P. B. Rudge...,” Australasian Record, April 26, 1926, 8.

  130. P. B. Rudge, “Kempsey Aborigines Mission,” Australasian Record, July 26, 1926, 5.

  131. “Responding to a call...,” Australasian Record, November 22, 1926, 8.

  132. P. B. Rudge, “Fairfield Mission, NSW,” Australasian Record, August 13, 1923, 5.

  133. “The sad news...,” Australasian Record, January 10, 1927, 8.

  134. P. B. Rudge, “Kempsey Aborigines Mission,” Australasian Record, July 11, 1927, 5-6.

  135. F. A. Allum, “Rudge-Perry,” Australasian Record, January 30, 1928, 4.

  136. Ibid.

  137. S. A. Stocken, “Eva Edith Perry Cleverdon obituary,” Australasian Record, August 30, 1965, 15.

  138. “Pastor and Mrs J. C. H. Perry…,” Australasian Record, May 27, 1968, 8.

  139. E. B. Rudge, “A Pioneer in Work for the Aborigines,” Australasian Record, January 23, 1956, 2-3.

  140. E. Rosendahl, “Our First Australians,” Australasian Record, July 3, 1972, 8-9.

  141. E. C. Rosendahl, “Lena Quinlan obituary,” Australasian Record, August 16, 1971, 15.

  142. W. E. Rudge, “Victor Northcoate Rudge obituary,” Australasian Record, April 16, 1979, 14.

  143. E. Rosendahl, “Our First Australians,” Australasian Record, July 3, 1972, 8-9; E. C. Rosendahl, “Lena Quinlan obituary,” Australasian Record, August 16, 1971, 15.

  144. R. E. Hare, “In Memoriam – Pastor E. B. Rudge,” Australasian Record, November 7, 1960, 13.

  145. H. E. Piper, “William Frederick Rudge obituary,” Australasian Record, April 18, 1927, 5.

  146. A. W. Anderson, “Pastor P. B. Rudge,” Australasian Record, March 7, 1938, 7.

  147. Australia, Marriage Index, 1788-1950, Arthur George Francis Cleverdon, Ancestry.com, April 1, 2020, https://www.ancestry.com.

  148. C. A. Wrigley, “Arthur G. Cleverdon obituary,” Australasian Record, October 24, 1949, 7.

  149. S. A. Stocken, “Eva Edith Perry Cleverdon obituary,” Australasian Record, August 30, 1965, 15.

×

Tarburton, Shirley. "Rudge, Philip Bulpit (1856–1938)." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. July 19, 2020. Accessed September 25, 2022. https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=D83Q.

Tarburton, Shirley. "Rudge, Philip Bulpit (1856–1938)." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. July 19, 2020. Date of access September 25, 2022, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=D83Q.

Tarburton, Shirley (2020, July 19). Rudge, Philip Bulpit (1856–1938). Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. Retrieved September 25, 2022, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=D83Q.