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South Mato Grosso Conference headquarters, 2019.

Photo courtesy of South Mato Grosso Conference Archives.

South Mato Grosso Conference

By Julia Castilho, and Rebeca Silvestrin

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Julia Castilho

Rebeca Silvestrin

First Published: June 6, 2021

South Mato Grosso Conference (ASM) is an administrative unit of the Seventh-day Adventist Church located in the territory of West Central Brazil Union Mission (UCOB). It’s headquartered at Amando de Oliveira St., no. 135 ZIP code 79005-370, in Amambai district, Campo Grande, capital city of the state of Mato Grosso do Sul.1

The territory served by this administrative unit involves the entire state of Mato Grosso do Sul, which is in the midwest region of Brazil and bordered by five Brazilian states: Mato Grosso (north), Goiás and Minas Gerais (northeast), São Paulo (east), and Parana (south and southeast). In addition, Mato Grosso do Sul is bordered by two other South American countries: Paraguay and Bolivia. Regarding the state's economy, the main activities are agriculture (soybean, corn, cotton, rice, and sugar cane), livestock (cattle), mining (iron, manganese and limestone), and industry (food, cement, and mining).2

The territorial extension of the state is 357,145 km². Its population is 2,778,986 inhabitants, spread in 79 towns. In Campo Grande alone, the most populous city in the state, there are about 895,982 inhabitants. ASM currently serves 22,141 members in 43 districts with 257 congregations, or one Adventist per 125 inhabitants throughout Mato Grosso do Sul.3

In ASM territory there are seven educational institutions: Campo Grande Adventist Academy, in the city of Campo Grande, with 1,554 students; Corumbá Adventist Academy, in Corumbá with 337 students; Jardim dos Estados Adventist Academy, in Campo Grande with 902 students; Mundo Novo Adventist Academy, in Mundo Novo with 301 students; Nova Andradina Adventist Academy, in Nova Andradina with 336 students; Dourados Adventist Academy, in Dourados with 513 students; and Miranda Adventist Academy, in Miranda with 200 students. In all, there are 4,143 enrolled students in these school units.4

In the field of care, there is a non-profit institution, Children's Home Lygia Hans, in the city of Campo Grande, which can accommodate at least 10 children. This home provides children with a more domestic environment, helping to develop and strengthen family and community bonds. One of the objectives of the services offered by this institution is to promote family reintegration and assist in the adoption process.5

ASM's mission field currently has 58 active pastors, of whom 50 are ordained and eight are licensed; 43 are district pastors, seven are school pastors, and eight serve as administrators, department leaders, and field secretaries.6

Origin of the SDA Work in the Conference Territory

The Adventist message reached Mato Grosso through a woman named Gabriela Nunes. She heard about Adventism in the town of Corrientes, Argentina during her visits to public conferences carried out by an SDA pastor. However, it would only bear fruit years later when Gabriela left São Borja, in the state of Rio Grande do Sul, for the state of Mato Grosso, accompanied by her husband José Cândido dos Santos.7

The couple was part of a large entourage of more than 100 people seeking to escape the insecurity established in southern Brazil after the Federalist Revolution (1893-1895).8 This group consisted of their 12 children and respective families. They had more than 10 wooden ox carts. Some went on foot, while others on horseback.9

After a long journey, the party finally arrived in the state of Mato Grosso. The families, who had been united in one big group, spread throughout the great territory - in regions near the cities of Bela Vista and Ponta Porã (which are currently part of Mato Grosso do Sul). They also spread to the Vacaria and Entre Rios prairies, currently comprised of the towns of Rio Brilhante and Nova Alvorada, to the town of Maracaju. Thus, in 1903, the seed of the Adventist message reached southern Mato Grosso through the region of Ponta Porã, on the border with Paraguay. By 1915, Gabriela was a faithful Sabbathkeeper, and she passed on her teachings to her children and others who lived around her.10

Later, in 1920, Max Rhone, an Adventist pastor of German origin, retired from Brazil Publishing House (CPB), arrived in Campo Grande. For him, retirement meant the beginning of other opportunities to continue his mission of evangelism. Rhode met Ernesto Matias and went on to study the Bible with him and his family. Shortly after, he established a Bible class in their house, on Avenida Afonso Pena, where a Sabbath School class also began.11

Also, in 1920, Rhode visited a small group of evangelized people living in Ponta Porã under the coordination of Sister Laudelina Cuerman, who taught them Adventist doctrine. At the time, Rhode baptized several of them, who were awaiting the visit of an Adventist pastor to baptize them. The following year, in 1921, the pastor performed the second baptism in this region of southern Mato Grosso, this time in the city of Campo Grande. Rhode performed the baptism in a tank near his house in the region where the Federal University of Mato Grosso do Sul (UFMS) is currently located. Ernesto Matias and his wife Amanda were among the people baptized.12

Around the time that the first Adventists were baptized in Campo Grande, the first converts evangelized by Gabriela Nunes built a hall near Santa Luzia farm in the interior of the state of Rio Brilhante. There, Gabriela taught Bible doctrines to her daughter and son-in-law, sons, daughters-in-law, and grandchildren. However, it was at another location near Santa Luzia farm, on another farm called “Sempre Alegre” [Always Happy], that the first building was erected to house the church that emerged from the union of Sabbathkeepers. A few years later, in 1937, in this same building, an Adventist school was also opened,13 the second school in the entire state.

Conference Organizational History

The history of the SDA church in Mato Grosso do Sul14 began when the churches of this territory were still under the administration of the current conference of Seventh-day Adventists in Brazil, the current Central Brazil Union Conference (UCB), which was headquartered in the city of São Paulo.15 For the good advancement of Adventism in Mato Grosso, in 1921, the first administrative unit responsible for the work in the state was established, Mato Grosso Mission, in Campo Grande.16 Its mission was to preach the everlasting gospel in the context of the three angels’ message of Revelation 14: 6-12, to all people of the territory.17

At the time, there was only one formally recognized congregation in the region with 13 members. However, the church grew in a short time. In 1927, there were at least 35 baptized members bound to Mato Grosso Mission.18 The first leader of this new unit was Pastor Max Rhode, who served as superintendent from 1921 to 1929.19 In 1935, Alfredo L. Meier was elected to lead the breakthrough of the work in Mato Grosso. At the same time, Emilio Keppek was elected to serve in the region as secretary and treasurer. Furthermore, in 1935, another church was built in Campo Grande, now on Rio Branco St., at the corner of Rui Barbosa St.

Next to this church, a small headquarters was built for Mato Grosso Mission in order to improve the office to meet the advancement of work in the state.20 The following year, 1936, teacher Iolanda Karrú was sent by the mission team to meet the needs of the church at Sempre Alegre farm. Therefore, Adventist education began in the region.21 In 1938, under the guidance of Pastor Alfredo Barbosa (district pastor serving the northern region of the state), the third Adventist church of Mato Grosso was built.22

Later, in 1942, the mission's headquarters was located at Barão do Rio Branco St., at the corner of February 24th St.23 Subsequently, in 1949, Durval S. Lima assumed the leadership of the administrative unit. He and his wife decided to use part of their efforts in the medical work. Thus, they started their activities at Penfigo Adventist Hospital, still operating today in the city of Campo Grande. The hospital was established in an area donated by Sister Ida Bais. Its first facilities were small huts recently built.24

In 1951, in a field of 450,000 inhabitants, Mato Grosso Mission had the support of at least four evangelist canvassers.25 Ulysses Alencar, who worked selling The Story of Jesus books; Jerónimo Rocha da Cunha, who worked in the mines; Sérgio Cavalieri, South American Division (SAD) sales champion and salesman in a city of just under 20,000 inhabitants; and Clementino de Albuquerque, who worked on farms located 1,000 kilometers from the mission - where materials were delivered only by air transportation.26

The development of canvassing was significant at that time. With impressive results, the South Mato Grosso field stood out at the South American level. In addition, the evangelist colporteurs mentioned above travelled throughout the territory of Mato Grosso Mission by various means of transport, including planes, ox carts, and even canoes.27 They carried the Advent message with them, which was gradually sown in many parts of the state.

Two years later, in 1953, the mission had its office transferred to 14 de Julho St., no. 417, house 1, in Campo Grande.28 In order to reach more cities with the Advent message, in August 1956 the administration of Mato Grosso Mission sent a worker named Olival Costa to work in the city of Aquidauana. He soon began a series of conferences called the Southern Princess of Mato Grosso. Thus, through the conferences and the canvassers who worked on site on December 22, at least 12 people were baptized.29 Due to the gospel advancement in Aquidauana, a few years later the local congregation had at least 32 baptized members and a Sabbath School with more than 50 members enrolled.30

Given the growth experienced in Mato Grosso Mission, in 1957 the organization underwent a new change of headquarters. This was done to better meet the demands of the mission field. On this occasion, the mission headquarters was relocated back to 599 Barão do Rio Branco St. in Campo Grande.31 A few years later, due to the steady growth in Adventist numbers in the city of Aquidauana, a new church was built to house the congregation meetings. The opening of this church took place on August 29 and 30, 1959, and was attended by leaders of South Brazil Union Conference (USB), representatives of Mato Grosso Mission, and the director of Pênfigo Adventist Hospital.32 At the time, the mission had about 1,104 members and five organized churches throughout its territory.33

Over time, the work continued to advance in Mato Grosso. About seven years later, the number of organized churches doubled and the number of members was 2,873.34 In a few years, in 1972, leading some 7,500 members in 23 organized churches, the mission had its headquarters relocated to Padre José Cripa St., no 486, also in Campo Grande.35 However, the headquarters did not stay at this place for long. In 1976, a new change took place, this time at Amando de Oliveira St., nº 125, in Amambai neighborhood, in Campo Grande, where the headquarters currently remains.36

In 1979, it was necessary to restructure Mato Grosso Mission because, geopolitically, Mato Grosso was divided by the Brazilian government into two states, Mato Grosso and Mato Grosso do Sul. A great distance separated the north and south regions, which also impacted the missionary challenges of the Church. Thus, on July 17, by vote no. 79-038, a study was requested to verify the possibility of dividing the mission field. In response, a special board was formed to carry out the studies and submit them to the SAD. Thus, on July 19 of the same year, by vote no. 79-473, USB registered the SAD vote no. 79-397, informing the examination and approval of the ad hoc board report, which recommended the creation of a new administrative unit of the church in the new field of the state of Mato Grosso.37

The result was the division of the mission field of the current Mato Grosso Mission; thus South Mato Grosso Mission began operations at Campo Grande, Mato Grosso do Sul, in the former headquarters of Mato Grosso Mission.38 In turn, the new mission, which would bear the name of Mato-Grossense [Mato Grosso], began to manage the mission field of Mato Grosso, located at Zulmira Canavarros St., no. 285, in Cuiabá. During this reconfiguration, South Mato Grosso Mission was responsible for leading 7,301 members in 19 churches organized in Mato Grosso do Sul, and Mato Grosso Mission was responsible for serving 5,139 members in 14 churches organized in Mato Grosso.39

The reorganization carried out in the territory of South Mato Grosso Mission helped streamline and strengthen gospel preaching in the region. “The canvassers were given closer assistance, which speeded the arrival of materials to help facilitate the service of these missionaries.” In addition, the mission restructuring made it possible to set up Adventist schools in strategic cities, as well as the purchase of a radio station to broadcast the gospel message and the broadcasting of Hope Channel on an open TV channel. It also allowed more training, as well as camp and evangelistic campaigns in the region, which increased the number of members in the churches.40

The evangelistic programs carried out over the following years were successful, evidenced from the significant increase in membership in about five years after the territorial reorganization. In 1985, there were nearly 10,000 Adventist converts.41 The expansion continued and consequently, on December 21, 1993, South Mato Grosso Mission, through vote no. 93-234, forwarded to USB a request for changing its institutional status from “mission” to “conference.”42 Once approved, it began being called Associação Sul-Mato-Grossense [South Mato Grosso Conference] (ASM), which is its current name. At the time, ASM registered 10,500 members, gathered in 45 organized congregations.43

In 1995, ASM carried out the I Gratitude and Renewal Congress, where many leaders from many Adventist institutions worldwide were present. Among them were João Wolff, then president of SAD, Céril Müller, then president of Texas Union Conference, in the United States, and representatives of USB.44 In addition, Pastor Alfredo Barbosa and his wife were also present. Barbosa was the first district pastor in Mato Grosso do Sul, and was honored by the work done since the earliest days of Adventism in the region. Pastor Kühl stated that Mato Grosso do Sul was the “most evangelized state of South Brazil Union Conference, maintaining a ratio of one Adventist per 54 inhabitants.” At the time ASM had 20 pastoral districts, 11 schools, 70 canvassers, and 12,200 members.45

In the following years many training events were carried out, so that more evangelistic fronts could become real in ASM. The first three months in 1997 were widely spent on training. During this period, pastors and church leaders participated in training courses suggested by the leadership team of ASM. The general motivation was to reach three towns in Mato Grosso do Sul which did not have an Adventist presence.46

Plans and goals were drawn up by many departments of the institution. Among the initiatives were three evangelistic campaigns that were soon put into practice, as well as the goal to have at least 1,600 baptisms in 1997.47 Due to the campaigns, on June 29, 1997, 18 converts from Juti - a city that is 320 kilometers from Campo Grande – were baptized following a 90-night summit. Until then, the 6,000 city inhabitants had never had the opportunity to hear the Adventist message.48

Subsequently, Adventist work continued to expand in Mato Grosso do Sul. In 2000, the number of Adventists statewide was 16,873 - an average of one Adventist per 129 inhabitants. There were at least 81 organized churches - almost double the number of existing churches when ASM changed its status.49 In 2001, New Time Radio was established, available on AM 630. Projeto Evangelismo Integrado [Integrated Evangelism Project]. In addition, through the internet - given its exponential expansion - the gospel began to spread more widely, thus consolidating the various evangelistic projects already implemented in challenging regions of the countryside.50

In 2005, ASM began leading the West Central Brazil Union Mission (UCOB), headquartered in Brasília, Federal District.51 With UCOB support and as a result of evangelistic fronts such as Impacto Esperança [Hope Impact],52 Hope Channel, New Time Radio, small groups, and Caleb Mission - there has been a significant increase in the number of youth, young adults, and adult members involved in church missionary projects. In Caleb Mission alone, the number of participants went from 400 to 985 in 2014.53

Such missionary efforts have been continuous since then. ASM's leadership teams have encouraged and mobilized members to participate in the programs and projects developed by the SAD, including Hope Impact,54 Caleb Mission,55 Breaking the Silence,56 and Caravanas da Esperança [Caravans of Hope].57 In 2016, during Hope Impact, about 200,000 missionary books were handed out to the population of Mato Grosso do Sul. The movement had the participation of conference leaders and local SDA members.58

In the following year, 2017, about 2,800 youth participated in the Caleb Mission Project throughout Mato Grosso do Sul. In the same year, the youth conducted many social actions which led many people to be reached by the gospel. Among the evangelistic actions carried out, health fairs and clothes donations stood out.59 But in 2018, ASM also conducted other actions such as Breaking the Silence Project. This edition had the specific purpose of raising awareness in the community about suicide with the help of the Pathfinder60 and Adventurer61 Clubs, as well as help from members of other churches, who conducted campaigns, parades, talks, seminars, and handed out reviews. In total, more than 35,000 reviews with preventive suicide content were handed out in the state.62

In 2018, there were eight days of intensive Caravans of Hope programs all over Mato Grosso do Sul. This caravan went through six cities and reached about 9,500 people, of whom about 700 were baptized after finishing their Bible studies. Of these, 150 were baptized during the evangelism nights. Still in 2018, the Holy Week programs were carried out63 in about 1,500 strategic points in the region. This program reached 3,000 people throughout the state. During the week, more than 2,200 SDA members studied the Bible with interested people. More than 2,000 began studying the scriptures after participating in the programs and at least 219 were baptized.64

Moreover, in 2019, about 4,380 volunteers dedicated their vacations to do evangelism, public places reforms, cleaning parks, and revitalizing leisure spaces in the districts where the Caleb Mission Project was carried out. Furthermore, Projeto Esperança Pantanal [Wetland Hope Project], a version of Caleb Mission Project provided for many high school students of the Adventist network to go to the cities of Bonito and Corumbá. There they could hold health fairs and serve the population during the day, and hold evangelistic campaigns in the evenings,65 besides handing out missionary books to the local community

The evangelistic journey in the ASM territory has been a testimony to the continued efforts of the work of Adventist pioneers in Mato Grosso do Sul. One of the key challenges facing the conference today is to keep young people in church since 34% of SDA members in the ASM region are young people. For the SDA church in this territory to continue successfully, the leadership recognizes the necessity of investing in these new generations as they will have great missionary challenges to face and will need to do this work without measuring their efforts to fulfill the mission.66

Furthermore, there’s the challenge of motivating members to stay permanently engaged in missionary work.67 To this end, the Church seeks to arouse a sense of the need for revival and reformation. Training sessions and celebrations are held to encourage and develop each member's personal communion with God. While prioritizing these aspects, there is also attention and investments in infrastructure. On all missionary fronts, the goal is to contribute in every possible biblical way so that the Adventist message continues to unfold in the vast and promising state of Mato Grosso do Sul.68

Chronology of Administrative Executives69

Presidents: Max Rhode (1921-1929); H. E. Wilcox (1931-1935); Alfredo L. Meier (1935-1939); Nelson Schwantes (1940); José R. Passos (1941-1943); Emílio R. Azevedo (1944-1948); Durval S. Lima (1949-1952); O. L. Reis (1953-1957); G. R. Marski (1958-1959); O. F. G. Lindqvist (1960-1961); Benito Raymundo (1963-1966); Athaliba Huf (1968-1974); Elias Lombardi (1975-1980); Leonid Bogdanow (1981-1984); Osório F. dos Santos (1986-1987); Laércio Mazaro (1988-1995); Ênio dos Santos (1996-1997); Luís Lindolfo Fuckner (1998-2000); Uesley Peyerl (2001-2005); Marcos Moreira Nardy (2006-2011); Maiquel da Silva Nunes (2012-2015); Fernando Campanha Rios (2016-current).

Secretaries: Emílio Keppke (1935-1938); H. Bergold (1939); E. Langenstrassen (1940-1941); João de Deus Pinho (1942-1948); Rubens S. Ferreira (1949-1951); Hugo Gegembauer (1952-1954); H. T. Araújo (1955-1962); Leontino Ramalho (1963-1964); L. M. Grellmann (1966-1968); E. E. Bergold (1971); Jairo Oliveira (1972-1973); O. A. Souza (1974-1977); Gumercindo A. Martins (1978-1981); Edinor M. Gruber (1982-1984); Jurandir de Oliveira (1985-1987); Valdilho Quadrado (1988-1990); Nelson Wolff (1991-1994); Ênio dos Santos (1995); Luís Lindolfo Fuckner (1996-1997); Ênio dos Santos (1998); Uesley Peyerl (1999-2000); Abisai Nunes do Nascimento (2001); Naor Rossi (2002-2005); Elieser Ramos (2006-2009); Gilberto Batista de Oliveira (2010-2012); Cleiber Ziviani (2013); Raul Daniel G. Nicoll (2014-2015); Evaldo de Souza Oliveira (2016-2017); José Hadson Gomes de Araújo (2018-current).

Treasurers: Emílio Keppke (1935-1938); H. Bergold (1939); E. Langenstrassen (1940-1941); João de Deus Pinho (1942-1948); Rubens S. Ferreira (1949-1951); Hugo Gegembauer (1952-1954); H. T. Araújo (1955-1962); Leontino Ramalho (1963-1964); L. M. Grellmann (1966-1968); E. E. Bergold (1971); Jairo Oliveira (1972-1973); O. A. Souza (1974-1977); Gumercindo A. Martins (1978-1981); Edinor M. Gruber (1982-1984); Jurandir de Oliveira (1985-1992); Marlon de Souza Lopes (1993-2000); Homero Ribas Nemes (2001-2005); Daniel Grubert (2006-2010); Ronei José Pereira (2011-2014); Anilson Seemund Soares (2015-current).70

Sources

Adventist Statistics. http://www.adventiststatistics.org/.

Arruda, Gerson G. de. “Missão Matogrossense e sua história” [Mato Grosso Mission and its history]. Monography, Brazil College, 1985.

Conceição, Edmir. “História de MS é marcada pela efervescência política e movimentos sociais” [MS history is marked by political uneasiness and social movements], Mato Grosso do Sul (Online), n. d.

Fagundes, Evellin. “Caravana da Esperança passará por Itabuna” [Caravan of Hope will go through Itabuna]. Adventist News (Online), July 14, 2016.

Ferreira, Rubens Ségre. “A Colportagem em Mato Grosso” [Canvassing in Mato Grosso]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], June 1951.

“Igreja Sul-Mato-Grossense celebra nascimento” [South Mato Grosso Church celebrates opening]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], June 1995.

“Juti para Cristo – Evangelismo lança semente e colhe os primeiros frutos” [Juti for Christ - Evangelism casts seed and harvests the firstfruits]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], October 1997.

“Lançando as bases – líderes são preparados para os desafios do ano” [Laying the foundations – leaders are being prepared for the year challenges]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], May 1997.

Home Lygia Hans. http://www.larlygiahans.org.br/.

Lima, S. F. A. 100 anos em memórias: Adventistas do sétimo dia em Mato Grosso do Sul [100 years in memories: Seventh-day Adventists in Mato Grosso do Sul]. Campo Grande, MS: Alvorada Publishing House, 2015.

Mato Grosso do Sul. Brazilian Census 2018. Panorama. IBGE. Accessed on September 5, 2019. http://bit.ly/2lOgCiF.

Ordinary Meeting of the Executive Board Minute of the West Central Brazil Union Mission of the Seventh-day Adventist Church, October 21, 2004, vote no. 2004-064.

Seventh-day Adventist Church Portal. http://www.adventistas.org/pt/.

Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook. Various years. https://www.adventistyearbook.org/.

Silva, Alberto Fabrício B. N. e. “História da Igreja Adventista do 7º Dia Central de Campo Grande, MS” [History of the Seventh-day Adventist Central Campo Grande Church, MS]. Monography, Brazil College, 2002.

Silva, Antônio S. da. “Mais um Templo na Mato Grosso Mission” [One More Temple in Mato Grosso Mission]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], January 1959.

Silvestrin, Rebeca. “Mais de 200 mil livros missionários serão distribuídos em todo o MS” [More than 200 thousand missionary books will be handed out all over MS], Adventist News (Online), July 25, 2017.

Silvestrin, Rebeca. “Mais de 200 mil livros missionários serão distribuídos em todo o MS” [More than 200 thousand missionary books will be handed out all over MS], Adventist News (Online), May 13, 2016.

Siqueira, Fábia. “Projeto Quebrando o Silêncio é marcado por diversas ações em MS” [Breaking the Silence Project is marked by many actions in MS], Adventist News (Online), September 25, 2018.

Notes

  1. “South Mato Grosso Conference,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Nampa, ID.: Pacific Press Publishing Association, 2018), 265.

  2. Brazilian Census 2018, Mato Grosso do Sul, panorama, IBGE, accessed on September 5, 2019, http://bit.ly/2lOgCiF.

  3. Management System of the Adventist Church – West Central Brazil Union Mission, 2019.

  4. Information obtained in the School Secretary System – 2019.

  5. Children's Home Lygia Hans, “Quem somos” [Who we are], accessed on August 29, 2019, http://bit.ly/2ZrCL9K.

  6. Management System of the Adventist Church – West Central Brazil Union Mission, 2019.

  7. S. F. A. Lima, 100 anos em memórias: Adventistas do sétimo dia em Mato Grosso do Sul [100 years in memories: Seventh-day Adventists in Mato Grosso do Sul] (Campo Grande, MS: Alvorada Publishing House, 2015), 12.

  8. Civil war that occurred in southern Brazil, in an attempt to remove the state of Rio Grande do Sul from the government of Julio de Castilhos – the current state leader. Ricardo Westin, “Na Revolução Federalista, em 1893, senadores chegaram a pegar em armas” [In the Federalist Revolution in 1893, senators even took up arms], Senate News, November 3, 2015, accessed on August 29, 2019, http://bit.ly/2NIeAN5.

  9. S. F. A. Lima, 100 anos em memórias: Adventistas do sétimo dia em Mato Grosso do Sul [100 years in memories: Seventh-day Adventists in Mato Grosso do Sul] (Campo Grande, MS: Alvorada Publishing House, 2015), 18.

  10. Ibid., 15, 18.

  11. Ibid., 28.

  12. Ibid., 29.

  13. Ibid., 32-33.

  14. For some time, the areas of Mato Grosso and Mato Grosso do Sul formed a single Brazilian state called Mato Grosso. The decision to dismember this state was taken no earlier than April 1977. However, it was not until January 1979 that such a dismemberment actually took place - when the state of Mato Grosso do Sul arose. Edmir Conceição, “História de MS é marcada pela efervescência política e movimentos sociais” [MS history is marked by political uneaseness and social movements], Mato Grosso do Sul, n. d., accessed on August 30, 2019, http://bit.ly/2UkZIFF.

  15. South Mato Grosso Conference Archive.

  16. “Matto Grosso Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1922), 129.

  17. Centro de Pesquisas Ellen G. White, “Declaração de Missão da Igreja Adventista do Sétimo Dia” [Seventh-day Adventist Church’s Mission Declaration], accessed on September 11, 2019, http://bit.ly/2mdy80l]

  18. Adventist Statistics, “Mato Grosso Conference – Yearly Statistics (1920-2017),” accessed on September 02, 2019, http://bit.ly/2lzBQAJ.

  19. “Matto Grosso Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1922), 129; “Matto Grosso Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1930), 236.

  20. Alberto Fabrício B. N. e Silva, “História da Igreja Adventista do 7º Dia Central de Campo Grande, MS” [Campo Grande Seventh-day Adventist Central Church History, MS], (Monography, Brazil College, 2002), 7-8.

  21. Ibid., 8.

  22. South Mato Grosso Conference Archive.

  23. “Mato Grosso Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1943), 152.

  24. Alberto Fabrício B. N. e Silva, “História da Igreja Adventista do 7º Dia Central de Campo Grande, MS” [Campo Grande Seventh-day Adventist Central Church History, MS], (Monography, Brazil College, 2002), 8-9.

  25. An evangelist canvasser is a missionary that “builds its ministry by acquiring and selling to the public the Church published and approved publications, with the objective of conveying to its fellows the eternal gospel that brings salvation and physical and spiritual well-being.” Accessed on August 30, 2018, http://bit.ly/2J6tY1I.

  26. Rubens Ségre Ferreira, “A Colportagem em Mato Grosso” [Canvassing in Mato Grosso], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], June 1951, 12-13.

  27. Ibid.

  28. “Mato Grosso Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1954), 176.

  29. Antônio S. da Silva, “Mais um Templo na Missão Mato Grosso” [One More Temple in Mato Grosso Mission], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], year 54, no. 1 (January 1959): 28.

  30. Ibid., 29.

  31. “Mato Grosso Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1958), 157.

  32. Antônio S. da Silva, “Mais um Templo na Missão Mato Grosso” [One More Temple in Mato Grosso Mission], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], year 54, no. 1 (January 1959): 29.

  33. “Mato Grosso Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1960), 167.

  34. “Mato Grosso Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1967), 210.

  35. “Mato Grosso Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1973-74), 236.

  36. “Mato Grosso Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1977), 263.

  37. Gerson G. de Arruda, “Missão Matogrossense e sua história” [Mato Grosso Mission and its history] (Monography, Brazil College, 1985), 22, 27.

  38. Ibid., 22.

  39. “Mato Grosso Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1981), 281; “Matto Grosso Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1981), 283.

  40. Fernando Campanha Rios, interview conducted by authors via email, April 4, 2019.

  41. “South Mato Grosso Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Hagerstown, MD.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1986), 288.

  42. South Mato Grosso Mission Minute of the Seventh-day Adventist Church, September 21, 1993, vote no. 93-234.

  43. “South Mato Grosso Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Hagerstown, MD.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1994), 278.

  44. “Igreja Sul-Mato-Grossense celebra nascimento” [South Mato Grosso Church celebrates opening], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], June 1995, 26.

  45. Ibid.

  46. “Lançando as bases – líderes são preparados para os desafios do ano” [Laying the foundations - leaders are being prepared for the year challenges], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], May 1997, 20.

  47. Ibid.

  48. “Juti para Cristo – Evangelismo lança semente e colhe os primeiros frutos” [Juti for Christ - Evangelism casts seed and harvests the firstfruits], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], October 1997, 35.

  49. “South Mato Grosso Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Hagerstown, MD.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 2001), 278.

  50. Fernando Campanha Rios, interview conducted by authors via email, April 4, 2019.

  51. Ordinary Meeting of the Executive Board Minutes of the West Central Brazil Union Mission of the Seventh-day Adventist Church, October 21, 2004, vote no. 2004-064.

  52. “Hope Impact is a program that motivates reading and provides the annual mass distribution of books on the part of Seventh-day Adventists in the whole South American territory.” Accessed on October 9, 2019, https://bit.ly/2WZNdzY.

  53. Fernando Campanha Rios, interview conducted by authors via email, April 4, 2019.

  54. “Hope Impact is a program that motivates reading and provides the annual mass distribution of books on behalf of Seventh-day Adventists in the whole South American territory.” Accessed on April 9, 2019, https://bit.ly/34dZROO.

  55. “Caleb Mission Project aims to mobilize thousands of youth all over South America, challenging them to dedicate part of their vacations doing evangelism in places where there’s no Adventist presence.” Accessed on November 8, 2018, https://bit.ly/2ZfF5Mz.

  56. “Breaking the Silence is an educative and preventive project against domestic abuse and violence annually fostered by the Seventh-day Adventist Church in eight countries of South America, (Argentina, Brazil, Bolivia, Chile, Ecuador, Paraguay, Peru, and Uruguay) since 2002.” Accessed on October 9, 2019, https://bit.ly/2HFxj8K.

  57. “The movement called Caravan of Hope is promoted by the Seventh-day Adventist Church and covers cities in South America with the objective of presenting Bible themes and applying them today to foster reflection and motivate the participants on making good decisions.” Accessed on November 27, 2019, https://bit.ly/2JIiogj.

  58. Rebeca Silvestrin, “Mais de 200 mil livros missionários serão distribuídos em todo o MS” [More than 200 thousand missionary books will be handed out all over MS], Adventist News, May 13, 2016, accessed on September 5, 2019, http://bit.ly/2lZHVqt.

  59. Rebeca Silvestrin, “Mais de 200 mil livros missionários serão distribuídos em todo o MS” [More than 200 thousand missionary books will be handed out all over MS], Adventist News, July 25, 2017, accessed on September 5, 2019, http://bit.ly/2kw2HOa.

  60. The Pathfinders is a group of “boys and girls between the ages of 10 to 15, from different social classes, ethnicity, and religion who gather, generally, once a week to learn how to develop talents, skills, perceptions, and a taste for nature.” These boys and girls “get excited with outdoors activities. They like camping, hiking, climbing, exploring woods and caves. They know how to cook outdoors, by making fire without matches.” Furthermore, they demonstrate “skill with discipline through drill commands and have their creativity awaken by craftsmanship. They also fight against tobacco, alcohol, and drugs.” Accessed on October 9, 2019, http://bit.ly/2FDRqTh.

  61. A group of boys and girls from 6 to 9 years old, from different social classes, ethnicity, and religion who usually gather, at least twice a month to develop their gifts and talents, alongside their families. Proper activities are carried out for each child in their respective age, aiming to assist in the child's learning with the parents' participation. Adventistas Brasil [Brazil Adventists], “O que são os Aventureiros? – Udolcy Zukowski Diretor para América do Sul” [What are Aventureiros? - Udolcy Zukowski Director for South America] (video from Youtube explaining, Brazil Adventists, May 29, 2015), accessed on June 27, 2019, http://bit.ly/2KH7PdN.

  62. Fábia Siqueira, “Projeto Quebrando o Silêncio é marcado por diversas ações em MS” [Breaking the Silence Project is marked by many actions in MS], Adventist News, September 25, 2018, accessed on September 5, 2019, http://bit.ly/2kxb5wG.

  63. “The harvesting evangelism during the Holy Week is a very special moment to introduce Jesus and the life that we find in Him through the Word of God. The evangelistic goal is to remember the sacrifice, death, and resurrection of our Lord Jesus Christ on behalf of humankind.” Accessed on November 27, 2019, encurtador.com.br/ijrtJ.

  64. Karina Soares (South Mato Grosso Conference secretary), email message to the authors, August 23, 2019.

  65. Ibid.

  66. Fernando Campanha Rios, interview conducted by authors via email, April 4, 2019.

  67. Ibid.

  68. Ibid.

  69. “Matto Grosso Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1922), 129; “South Mato Grosso Conference,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Nampa, ID.: Pacific Press Publishing Association, 2018), 265; Alberto Fabrício B. N. e Silva, “Histórico da Igreja Adventista do 7º Dia Central de Campo Grande, MS” [History of the Seventh-day Adventist Central Campo Grande Church, MS] (Monography, Brazil College, 2002), 7. For a more detailed verification about all presidents, secretaries, and treasurers of South Mato Grosso Conference, please see the yearbooks from 1922 to 2018.

  70. More info about South Mato Grosso Conference can be accessed on the website: asm.adventistas.org/, or on social media– Facebook: @AdventistasMS, Instagram: @adventistas_ms, Twitter: @ComunicASM e Youtube: Adventistas MS.

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Castilho, Julia, Rebeca Silvestrin. "South Mato Grosso Conference." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. June 06, 2021. Accessed June 18, 2024. https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=DGET.

Castilho, Julia, Rebeca Silvestrin. "South Mato Grosso Conference." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. June 06, 2021. Date of access June 18, 2024, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=DGET.

Castilho, Julia, Rebeca Silvestrin (2021, June 06). South Mato Grosso Conference. Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. Retrieved June 18, 2024, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=DGET.