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Frederick Bishop upon arrival to Chile.

Photo courtesy of Nidia Vyhmeister.

Bishop, Frederick William (1864–1929)

By Shawna Vyhmeister, and Matías H. López

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Shawna Vyhmeister holds a Ph.D. in education, and is a professor and research director at Middle East University where she works with her husband. Vyhmeister and her husband, Ronald Vyhmeister, have lived and worked in Africa, Asia, South America, and the United States. Their two adult sons and their wives live in the United States. Her hobbies include music, writing, travel, birding, diving, reading, cooking, learning languages, and playing games. Her greatest joy is working for the Lord, especially if it involves young people.

Matías H. López

First Published: January 29, 2020 | Last Updated: April 27, 2022

Frederick William Bishop was one of the first Adventist colporteurs and missionaries in Chile. Sent from California to South America by the Foreign Mission Board of the Seventh-day Adventist Church, he led many people to conversion, from which the main pioneers and pillars for the growth of the work emerged.

Early Years and Conversion

Frederick William Carle was born July 14, 1864, in Bristol, England to Lydia Carle,1 an unwed mother. At the age of two, he and his mother emigrated to Cleveland, Ohio, in the United States. When she married Edward Bishop, Fred became his adoptive son, and took his name.2 The family remained in Ohio until Fred was 16, when they moved to California.

While working in the San Francisco Bay area in California, Fred Bishop met an Adventist whom he described as “a little man with a big Bible,” at a friend’s home. The man proceeded to give a Bible study about the law of God and the Sabbath.3 Bishop was amazed by the way the man explained the scriptures, and soon he began attending the Adventist Church.4 He was baptized at the age of 28.5 Shortly after his conversion he had the opportunity to hear Ellen White preach, and this influenced him. He attended Healdsburg College (now Pacific Union College) in California for two years.,6 canvassing Adventist literature during the vacations to pay for his study expenses.7

Pioneer in Chile (1894–1897)

At the end of his second year at Healdsburg College, F.L. Mead, head of the Foreign Mission Board of the General Conference, visited the school and invited Bishop to canvass in Chile, pioneering the Adventist work in that country. After fasting and praying over the decision, Bishop decided to go, using the money he had saved for school to buy books to sell and passage on a ship.8 Mead recruited a fellow Healdsburg College student, Thomas H. Davis (1866–1911),9 to work with him. In October 1894 Bishop and Davis set sail for Chile.10 They left with just a few dollars (together they had US $2.50), some blankets, a few personal items, and some Adventist books to sell, printed in English. The trip was not very comfortable, as Bishop was seasick the whole way, and they stayed next to where the cattle were kept. They traveled through Mexico and stayed two days in Panama. There, needing money, Bishop sold some small tracts and his pocket Bible.11 On December 8, 1894, after traveling 54 days, they arrived at the harbor of Valparaíso, Chile.12

When they arrived, Bishop and Davis had only one Chilean peso to their names. They were welcomed and oriented by Clair A. Nowlen (1865–1961), who had been doing successful work as a colporteur in Argentina. Nowlen had been in Chile for only a short time and had achieved little success.13 It was agreed that Davis would go south immediately, and Bishop would remain to canvass in Valparaíso, where there were quite a few foreigners doing business, and to place orders for restocking.14 Nowlen had decided to go back to Argentina, so he sold Bishop several boxes of books when he left.

After Davis traveled south, Bishop briefly tried to sell books to the Spanish-speaking people, but with little success. He started canvassing among the English-speaking families in Valparaíso, selling Bible Readings for the Home Circle.15 Once Bishop found “English Hill” in Valparaíso, he managed to sell enough to pay for his room and board and to purchase Nowlen’s stock.16 Fortunately, a few of Nowlen’s books were in Spanish. Others were in French, German, and English.17 Davis took the train south to the agricultural area around Victoria, where he managed to sell 100 large books, mainly to immigrants, in 6 months.18 At the end of that time, Davis traveled back to Valparaíso to relieve Bishop, so he could travel north to Iquique.

Miracles Accompany Their Efforts

By the time Davis arrived, Bishop had sold what books he could in Valparaíso, so he traveled by ship from there to Iquique, selling books at every stop along the way.19 While on board, he shared the Adventist message with an Englishman he met, named William Springer. Springer became the first Adventist convert in Chile, accepting the message sometime before November 1895. Springer went on to become a colporteur, as well.20

From Iquique, Bishop continued by train to the town of Huara. There, he looked for an inexpensive place to stay, but, away from the coastal cities, he couldn’t find anyone who spoke English. After praying, he entered a shop, and met the owner, a tinsmith named Julián Ocampo. Bishop shared some pictures from the book Patriarchs and Prophets with him, and found him interested, but with his inability to speak Spanish, conversation was impossible. Then Ocampo took him to the next room, where a minister was preaching to around 15 people.21 Not only did the minister speak English: he had bought a book from Bishop in Valparaíso a few days earlier. The minister recommended Patriarchs and Prophets (the only book Bishop had in Spanish) to the listeners, and Bishop sold seven copies.22 The tinsmith invited him to stay overnight. The next morning, which was Sabbath, the bilingual minister left town. The tinsmith made signs to ask Bishop what he was planning to do next. Bishop opened his Bible and pointed to the fourth commandment, and other texts. The tinsmith got his Bible and looked up the texts. As he began to understand, he got a paper and wrote down a long list of verses which Bishop gave him about the Sabbath. They spent the day in Bible study. Realizing there was little more he could do since he didn’t speak the language, Bishop returned to Santiago. But the verses stayed. Ocampo shared them at his church on Sunday, and soon, there were eight believers ready for baptism.23 Ocampo later became the first Chilean Adventist pastor.24

Sales of books were followed up with visits and Bible studies, so it was important to go back over the same territory repeatedly. Thus, when Bishop returned, Davis again headed south to Victoria, to go over the ground there for a second time. On this trip, he met Enrique Balada, a Baptist colporteur-preacher from Spain who had recently come to Chile from Argentina. Davis sold Balada Bible Readings in French.25 They would meet again in Santiago.

Returning from his second tour to the south, Davis and Bishop decided they would canvass in Santiago together. Needing a place to stay, they found Balada, and rented a room in the Balada home. Soon Balada’s wife, and then he himself accepted the Sabbath and the rest of the Adventist message.26 The Baladas were baptized by Elder Granville Baber, who had just come to Chile in 1895 to be in charge of the Adventist work there. Elder Baber helped Mr. Balada, who lost his job as a Baptist minister when he became an Adventist,27 eventually hiring him as an Adventist pastor.28

Because Bishop and Davis knew little of the Spanish language when they arrived in Chile, their early efforts focused mainly on immigrants who spoke English. Together in Santiago, however, they worked to improve their language skills, using the Bible as their textbook.29 As they studied, they would read the Bible—one in Spanish, and the other in English.

One day, as they were walking along the Alameda, one of the main streets in Santiago, reading Psalm 103, they noticed a young man watching them intently. The man was Victor Thomann, a Swiss wood carver. With difficulty because of their limited Spanish, Victor managed to communicate his desire to study the Bible with them. These studies took place with Fred and Tom pointing to texts in the Bible, and each reading it in their own language. Thomann explained that some time earlier, he dreamed he saw two young men walking along the Alameda, reading Psalm 103—the exact scripture the colporteurs were studying when he met them. Convinced that God had led him to these young men, he readily accepted their message. When Victor visited his brother Eduardo, a leader in the Presbyterian Church, he found that Eduardo had also decided to keep the Sabbath as a result of a tract he had received. Elder Baber baptized both brothers.

In this way, Adventism began to be established.30 Two and a half years after Bishop and Davis arrived, there were 78 Adventists living in Chile.31

Marriage, Family, and Ministry

Bishop moved around the country, selling books and studying the Bible with those interested. At some point around 1897, he found himself canvassing in Los Angeles, Chile, at the home of the Schulz family. Fred often visited the Schulz home, selling books and giving Bible studies, and there he met Petronila Neumann. Petronila was technically an orphan, as her father had died when he was in his forties. When she and her mother needed help, her father’s sister, whom she lovingly called “Mutter Schulz,” took them in. Fred continued to visit the Schulz home for Bible studies, but soon it was clear that his visits were also of a personal nature. It is not certain at what point Petronila was baptized,32 but on May 19, 1897, Frederick Bishop and Petronila Neumann (1872–1949) were married.33

Petronila’s parents were German, and she spoke both English and Spanish. Family lore says that Fred taught her English. This was especially useful because Fred never learned to speak Spanish particularly well, and the children grew up speaking English at home. While Fred’s Spanish may not have been beautiful, however, it was apparently functional. In 1902 it is reported that he traveled along with Elder Herman Ketring, visiting several churches and translating Ketring’s sermons into Spanish.34

From Frederick and Petronila Bishop’s marriage, eight children were born—three boys and five girls: Benjamín (1898–1970), who married Luisa Schimpf; Eduardo (1900–1976), who married Lydia Fischer; Lidia (1902–1945), who married Samuel Fayard; Alice (1904–1964), who married German Nohke; Guillermina (1906–1988), who married Walter Vyhmeister; Tomás (1909–1987), who married Estela Gerber; Mary (1911–1983), who married Francisco Rodríguez; and Flora Ruth (1914–1996), who married Carlos Araya.35

Fred Bishop spent the rest of his life in Chile, supporting the Church as much as he was able to until his death. After his marriage, however, he settled in the area of Los Angeles, and worked mainly as a farmer until his retirement in 1921.36 In 1910, Bishop explained that he was farming “besides selling books.” He writes that he planted oats, wheat, potatoes and corn on his rented farm, which also had pear, plum, and apple trees.37 Whenever he felt he could get away, he would travel and do some canvassing. His daughter Guillermina said that his health suffered from the cold and wet of the canvassing trips.38 It seems that he explained this to church leaders, saying that he really could not make a living canvassing, since he did not speak the language, as he received assurances from Elder Wilcox, the Signs of the Times editor, that he could still be an effective missionary to those around him by the way he lived.39

Bishop never stopped working for the church, however. It is possible that the Los Angeles Church had their first meetings in the house of Fred Bishop. In 1901 he wrote that the room in his home was now ready, with six benches, and that they would begin church the following Sabbath.40 By 1905 the membership reported was four adults and two children.41 Bishop and his family worked in the area around Los Angeles, and because of these efforts, the church began to grow.42 One of the families that became part of the church in Los Angeles was the Vyhmeister family, whose son would eventually marry his daughter.43

Bishop continued to canvass as much as time allowed him to,44 also accompanying and mentoring other missionaries,45 and traveling through the southernmost parts of the world.46 In 1905 he was quoted as asking for English teachers to come to Chile as missionaries.47 Indeed, in most of his articles, he makes requests for more missionaries to join the effort. In 1906, Revista Adventista reported that he had sold over $1600 in books (estimated at more than $50,000 today) in one month in Valparaíso and Los Andes.48

In 1909 Bishop worked in Punta Arenas, on the Strait of Magellan.49 Bishop related that once while in Punta Arenas, he found a down comforter that had been blown off a clothesline. He went to the nearby house to return it, and while he was there, he tried to sell them a copy of the book he was canvassing. The man of the house said he had already bought that book in Brazil, and that he was an Adventist. For the rest of his stay in Punta Arenas, he spent Sabbaths with this family, studying God’s Word.50 Bishop also canvassed among the English-speaking immigrants from Tierra del Fuego.51 In 1910 he returned to work on the coasts of northern Chile, between Iquique and Valparaíso.52 He reports that he did very well in Antofagasta, where he ran out of books much sooner than he expected.53 In 1911, church leadership reported that he was trying to give the light of the message an opportunity to shine54 in the Los Angeles region.

In 1913 Bishop’s elderly mother, Lydia, sailed from New York to Chile with a group of other missionaries. She lived with Bishop, whom the Review and Herald called “one of our pioneer bookmen in South America,”55 until her death in 1917. 56 During that time, she became an Adventist and was baptized.57

In 1919, Bishop published an article in the Review and Herald, stating that there were now around a thousand Adventists in Chile, and that three of his children had been baptized.58 By 1928, he said that he had “retired from the battlefront,” but he was grateful that several of his children were working for the church, and the others were all following the truth.59

Final Years and Legacy

Bishop lived some years on the Vyhmeister farm outside Los Angeles, but at least by the time of his retirement in 1921, they were living in town.60 He had heart problems, which became especially pronounced during the last two years of his life.61 On January 31, 1929, at the age of 64, Frederick Bishop died suddenly of heart complications in Los Ángeles, Chile.62 He is buried there in the city cemetery.63

Together with Thomas Davis,64 Frederick Bishop will be remembered as one of the first Adventist missionaries to serve in Chile. Bishop was a dedicated and determined colporteur and evangelist who laid the foundation for Adventism in Chile.65

Sources

Arbol genealógico [Family Tree]. Accessed on May 30, 2018. https://gw.geneanet.org/aneumann?lang=es&n=bishop&oc=0&p=frederick+william&type=tree.

Baber, Granville H. “Chile.” ARH, May 5, 1896.

Bishop, Frederick W. “Chile, Antofagasta.” Revista Adventista, March 1910.

Bishop, Frederick W. “Chile.” The Home Missionary, November 1895.

Bishop, Frederick W. “Correspondencia,” Revista Adventista, September 1901.

Bishop, Frederick W. “Early Experiences in Giving the Third Angel´s Message in Chile.” ARH, November 20, 1919.

Bishop, Frederick W. “Farming in Chile.” ARH, September 1, 1910.

Bishop, Frederick W. “Porvenir, Tierra del Fuego.Revista Adventista, April 1909.

Bishop, Frederick W. “Principios de la Obra en Chile” [Beginnings of the Work in Chile]. Revista Adventista, February 20, 1928.

Bishop, Frederick W. “Punta Arenas” Revista Adventista, February 1909.

Bishop, Frederick W. “Punta Arenas, Magallanes.” Revista Adventista, March 1909.

Chaij, Nicolás. El Colportor de Éxito [The Successful Colporteur]. Buenos Aires, Argentina: Casa Editora.

Davis, Thomas H. “Five Years in Chile.” The Missionary Magazine, May 1900.

Gullón, Roberto. Nuestra Herencia: Historia de la Iglesia Adventista [Our Heritage: History of the Adventist Church]. Buenos Aires: South America Spanish Publishing House, 1985.

Howell, J.M. Necrología [Obituary]. “Federico W. Bishop: El Colportor Pionero de Chile, S. A.” [Frederick W. Bishop: Pioneer Colporteur to Chile, South America. Revista Adventista, April 1929.

Kern, M.E. “Opportunity for Teachers in Chile.” The Educational Messenger, November 15, 1905.

Mc Eachern, J.H. “Pioneering in Chile, South America.” ARH, September 18, 1919.

“Notas Editoriales” [Editor’s Notes]. Revista Adventista, August 1906.

Peverini, Héctor J. En las Huellas de la Providencia [In the Footsteps of Providence]. Buenos Aires: South America Spanish Publishing House, 1988.

Plenc, Daniel Oscar. 25 Historias de misioneros [25 Stories of Missionaries]. Buenos Aires: South America Spanish Publishing House, 2013.

Plenc, Daniel Oscar. Misioneros en Sudamérica: Pioneros del Adventismo en Latinoamérica [Missionaries in South America: Pioneers of Adventism in Latin America], 2nd ed. Buenos Aires: South America Spanish Publishing House, 2008.

Plenc, Daniel Oscar. “Thomas H. Davis (c. 1866-1911).” Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. Accessed April 11, 2022. https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=4GHL&highlight=Davis.

Thomann, Eduardo. “Viages [sic] Misioneros” [Mission Trips]. Revista Adventista, November 1902.

[Untitled notice.] ARH, August 21, 1913.

Westphal, Francisco H. “Chile: La Obra del Colportaje” [Chile: The Work of the Colporteur]. Revista Adventista, March 1909.

Westphal, Francisco H. “Comienzos de Nuestra Obra en Chile” [The beginnings of our work in Chile]. Revista Adventista, June 1986, 2-3. Article translated from the book Pioneering in the Neglected Continent, originally published in English in 1927.

Westphal, Francisco H. Hasta el fin del mundo: Liderando la misión en Sudamérica [Until the End of the World: Leading the Mission in South America]. Trans. Margarita Biaggi. Libertador San Martín, Entre Ríos: River Plate Adventist University Press, 2017.

Westphal, Francisco H. “La Obra en Chile” [The Work in Chile]. Revista Adventista, December 1911.

Westphal, Francisco H. “Necrología” [Obituary]. Revista Adventista, October 1917.

Westphal, J.W. “Death of a Pioneer Missionary to Chile.” South American Bulletin, May 1929.

Westphal, Maria T. “Informe de las Escuelas Sabáticas de la Costa Occidental, 4° Trimestre de 1905” [Sabbath School Report for the West Coast, 4th Quarter, 1905]. Revista Adventista, August 1906.

Wearner, Robert C. “Sowing the Seed in Chile.” ARH, August 31, 1986.

Zambra Ríos, Leopoldo. No con ejército, no con fuerza, sino con su Espíritu [Not by Might, Nor by Power, but by His Spirit]. Santiago, Chile: Adventist Book Center, 1994.

Notes

  1. Frederick W. Bishop, “Principios de la obra en Chile” [Beginnings of the Work in Chile], Revista Adventista, February 20, 1928), 9. According to his obituary, his date of birth was July 14, 1868 (See J. M. Howell, Necrología [Obituary], “Federico W. Bishop: El Colportor Pionero de Chile, S. A.” [Frederick W. Bishop: Pioneer Colporteur to Chile, South America, Revista Adventista, 29 April 1929, 14), but that year is wrong. The headstone on his grave in Los Angeles says 1864. To consult about his family data, see “Árbol genealógico” [Family Tree], https://gw.geneanet.org/aneumann?lang=es&n=bishop&oc=0&p=frederick+william&type=tree, accessed May 30, 2018.

  2. Nidia Vyhmeister, granddaughter of Fred Bishop, personal communication with Shawna Vyhmeister, March 23, 2022. Based on family historical records.

  3. Frederick W. Bishop, “Principios de la Obra en Chile” [Beginnings of the Work in Chile], Revista Adventista, February 20, 1928, 9; Leopoldo Zambra Ríos, No con ejército, no con fuerza, sino con su Espíritu [Not With an Army, Not With Force, but With His Spirit] (Santiago, Chile: Adventist Book Center, 1994), 33, 34.

  4. Robert G. Wearner, “Sowing the Seed in Chile,” ARH, July 31, 1986, 10.

  5. Frederick W. Bishop, “Principios de la obra en Chile” [Beginnings of the Work in Chile], Revista Adventista, February 20, 1928, 9.

  6. Although Healdsburg College included probably two years of higher education courses at that time, Bishop was attending high school classes. Personal communication, Nidia Vyhmeister (granddaughter of Fred Bishop), March 28, 2022; Daniel Oscar Plenc, Misioneros en Sudamérica: Pioneros del Adventismo en Latinoamérica [Missionaries in South America: Pioneers of Adventism in Latin America], 2nd ed. (Buenos Aires: South America Spanish Publishing House, 2008), 65.

  7. Zambra Ríos, 34; Wearner, 10.

  8. Wearner, 10.

  9. Davis worked in Chile until 1901, then returned in 1908 as publishing director, but died in 1911. For the history of Davis’ life, see the ESDA article on Thomas H. Davis, by Daniel Plenc.

  10. Zambra Ríos, 34.

  11. Frederick W. Bishop, “Early Experiences in Giving the Third Angel’s Message in Chile,” ARH, November 20, 1919, 16, 17.

  12. J. H. Mc Eachern, “Pioneering in Chile, South America,” ARH, September 18, 1919, 28. Plenc, Misioneros en Sudamérica [Missionaries in South America], 64; Thomas Davis gives the date of their arrival as December 10. See Thomas H. Davis, “Experiences in Chile,” ARH, February 1, 1898, 79; “Five Years in Chile,” The Missionary Magazine, May 1900, 216.

  13. Francisco H. Westphal, Hasta el fin del mundo: Liderando la misión en Sudamérica [Until the End of the World: Leading the Mission in South America], trans. Margarita Biaggi (Libertador San Martín, Entre Ríos: River Plate Adventist University Press, 2017), 75.

  14. Davis, “Five Years in Chile,” 216; Seventh-day Adventist Encyclopedia (1996), s.v. “Chile.”

  15. Daniel Oscar Plenc, 25 Historias de misioneros [25 Stories of Missionaries] (Buenos Aires: South America Spanish Publishing House, 2013), 20.

  16. Wearner, “Sowing the Seed in Chile,” 11.

  17. Thomas H. Davis, “Five Years in Chile,” Missionary Magazine, May 1900, 217.

  18. Wearner, “Sowing the Seed in Chile,” 11.

  19. Frederick W. Bishop, “Early Experiences in Giving the Third Angel’s Message in Chile,” ARH, November 20, 1919, 17.

  20. Frederick W. Bishop, “Chile,” The Home Missionary, November 1895, 240; Granville H. Baber, “Chile,” ARH, May 5, 1896, 284.

  21. Bishop gives the name of the one who translated for him as Pastor Vidaure. Frederick W. Bishop, “Principios de la Obra en Chile [Beginnings of the Work in Chile],” Revista Adventista, February 20, 1928, 9; F.W. Bishop, “Early Experiences in Giving the Third Angels’ Message in Chile,” 17; Nicolás Chaij, El Colportor de Éxito [The Successful Colporteur] (Buenos Aires, Argentina: Casa Editora), 43.

  22. Wearner, “Sowing the Seed in Chile,” 11.

  23. It was noted that Davis sold more books, but Bishop experienced earlier success in converts to the church. See J.H. Mc Eachern, “Pioneering in Chile, South America,” ARH, September 18, 1919, 28.

  24. Bishop, “Early Experiences in Giving the Third Angels’ Message in Chile,” 17.

  25. Davis, “Five Years in Chile,” 217.

  26. At that time, the Baladas had a large home and took in boarders. Westphal says that Mrs. Balada was the first Adventist convert in Chile, but Baber (more correctly) lists Springer as the first. See Bishop, “Early Experiences in Giving the Third Angels’ Message in Chile,” 17; Granville H. Baber, “Chile,” ARH, May 5, 1896, 284; Granville H. Baber, “Chile,” ARH, February 1897, 124; Héctor J. Peverini, En las Huellas de la Providencia [In the Footsteps of Providence] (Buenos Aires: South America Spanish Publishing House, 1988), 49, 50; Francisco H. Westphal, “Comienzos de Nuestra Obra en Chile,” [The beginnings of our work in Chile], Revista Adventista, June 1986, 2-3. This article is a translated section from the book Pioneering in the Neglected Continent, originally published in English in 1927.

  27. Balada worked as an assistant to Baber, traveling with him and acting as elder of the Santiago group, which in 1897 had around 40 attending. Granville H. Baber, “Chile,” ARH, February 1897, 124. Later, in 1909, Balada would become an ordained minister of the Adventist Church. Daniel Oscar Plenc, “Thomas H. Davis (c. 1866-1911),” Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=4GHL&highlight=Davis,.

  28. Bishop, “Early Experiences in Giving the Third Angels’ Message in Chile,” 17.

  29. Roberto Gullón, Nuestra herencia: Historia de la Iglesia Adventista [Our Heritage: History of the Adventist Church] (Buenos Aires: South America Spanish Publishing House, 1985), 148.

  30. Wearner, 12.

  31. Chaij, El Colportor de Éxito [The Successful Colporteur], 44.

  32. Bishop’s obituary says Petronila studied with Pastor Balada and was baptized ‘a few years before’ her marriage, but this does not match exactly with other accounts. J.M. Howell, “Necrología” [Obituary], Revista Adventista, April 8, 1929, 14, 15.

  33. Petronila was born March 18, 1872, in Los Angeles, Chile, and died in the same town on July 28, 1949, at the age of 77. Her parents were Julius Neumann (1834–1883) and Marie Dorothee Praast (b. 1828).

  34. H.F. Ketring, “Chile,” ARH, May 6, 1902, 18-19.

  35. J.M. Howell, “Necrología” [Obituary], Revista Adventista, April 8, 1929, 14, 15.

  36. Letter to Fred Bishop from the California Tract Society, January 30, 1899. The letter discusses his account with them and congratulates him on his marriage and son, and expresses hope that the wheat crop will do well so that he can wipe out his debt with them in the coming year.

  37. Frederick W. Bishop, “Farming in Chile,” ARH, September 1, 1910, 17.

  38. Guillermina Bishop de Vyhmeister, unpublished, undated manuscript (in Spanish) on memories of her father, Fred.

  39. Letter to F.W. Bishop from M.C. Wilcox, editor, Signs of the Times, August 22, 1899, Oakland, California.

  40. Frederick W. Bishop, “Correspondencia” [Correspondence], Revista Adventista, September 1901, 7.

  41. Maria T. Westphal, “Informe de las Escuelas Sabáticas de la Costa Occidental, 4° Trimestre de 1905” [Sabbath School Report for the West Coast, 4th Quarter, 1905], Revista Adventista, August 1906, 10.

  42. Nidia Vyhmeister, granddaughter of Fred Bishop, personal communication with Shawna Vyhmeister, March 27, 2022. See also Frank H. Westphal, “La Obra en Chile” [The Work in Chile], Revista Adventista, December 1911, 11.

  43. Personal communication, Nidia Vyhmeister, granddaughter of Frederick Bishop, March 27, 2022.

  44. Thomann reported in 1902 that “brothers Krieghoff and Bishop were dedicating a part of their time as they were able, to selling books for the Mission” [“los hermanos Krieghoíf y Bishop están dedicando una parte del tiempo que les es posible, en vender libros de la Misión”]. Eduardo Thomann, “Viages [sic] Misioneros” [Mission Trips], Revista Adventista, November 1902, 8.

  45. Frederick W. Bishop, “Principios de la Obra en Chile [Beginnings of the Work in Chile],” Revista Adventista, February 20, 1928, 10.

  46. Plenc, Misioneros en Sudamérica [Missionaries in South America], 64.

  47. Letter from Frank Westphal, citing Bishop as saying “if he understood the [English] grammar well, he could command good wages, as there are many who want to learn that language.” See M.E. Kern, “Opportunity for Teachers in Chile,” The Educational Messenger, November 15, 1905, 7.

  48. The amount is given as 460 Chilean pesos. Using available conversions to dollars in 1906 and from 1906 dollars to today’s dollars, this amount would be like selling $50,000 today. See “Notas Editoriales” [Editor’s Notes], Revista Adventista, August 1906, 12.

  49. F.W. Bishop, “Punta Arenas,” Revista Adventista, February 1909, 10; F.W. Bishop, “Punta Arenas, Magallanes,” Revista Adventists, March 1909, 13.

  50. Frederick W. Bishop, “Principios de la Obra en Chile [Beginnings of the Work in Chile],” Revista Adventista, February 20, 1928,10.

  51. Zambra Ríos, Con su Espíritu [With His Spirit], 131. F.W. Bishop, “Porvenir, Tierra del Fuego,” Revista Adventista, April 1909, 13.

  52. Zambra Ríos, 131.

  53. F.W. Bishop, “Chile, Antofagasta,” Revista Adventista, March 1910, 11.

  54. The text in Spanish says that Bishop was “trabajando para dar á la luz del mensaje una oportunidad de resplandecer” in the región of “Los Ángeles, Chillán y Linares” (see Frank H. Westphal, “La Obra en Chile” [The Work in Chile], Revista Adventista, December 1911, 11).

  55. An untitled note on the back page of the Review and Herald shows that she traveled with Elder F.H. Westphal, president of the Chile Conference, who was returning to his field. [Untitled notice], ARH, August 21, 1913, 24.

  56. F.H. Westphal, “Necrología” [Obituary], Revista Adventista, October 1917, 15.

  57. Nidia Vyhmeister, granddaughter of Fred Bishop, personal communication with Shawna Vyhmeister, March 23, 2022.

  58. Bishop, “Early Experiences in Giving the Third Angels’ Message in Chile,” 17.

  59. Frederick W. Bishop, “Principios de la Obra en Chile [Beginnings of the Work in Chile],” Revista Adventista, February 20, 1928, 10.

  60. Nidia Vyhmeister, personal communication with Shawna Vyhmeister, March 27, 2022.

  61. J.W. Westphal, “Death of a Pioneer Missionary to Chile,” South American Bulletin, May 1929, 8; Zambra Ríos, 35.

  62. Plenc, 25 historias de misioneros [25 Stories of Missionaries], 23.

  63. Howell, 15.

  64. See Plenc, “Thomas H. Davis,” ESDA.

  65. J.W. Westphal, 8.

×

Vyhmeister, Shawna, Matías H. López. "Bishop, Frederick William (1864–1929)." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. April 27, 2022. Accessed May 24, 2024. https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=DGFU.

Vyhmeister, Shawna, Matías H. López. "Bishop, Frederick William (1864–1929)." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. April 27, 2022. Date of access May 24, 2024, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=DGFU.

Vyhmeister, Shawna, Matías H. López (2022, April 27). Bishop, Frederick William (1864–1929). Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. Retrieved May 24, 2024, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=DGFU.