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John Lipke

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Lipke, Johannes (John) Rudolph Berthold (1875–1943)

By The Brazilian White Center – UNASP

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The Brazilian White Center – UNASP is a team of teachers and students at the Brazilian Ellen G. White Research Center – UNASP at the Brazilian Adventist University, Campus Engenheiro, Coelho, SP. The team was supervised by Drs. Adolfo Semo Suárez, Renato Stencel, and Carlos Flávio Teixeira. Bruno Sales Gomes Ferreira provided technical support. The following names are of team members: Adriane Ferrari Silva, Álan Gracioto Alexandre, Allen Jair Urcia Santa Cruz, Camila Chede Amaral Lucena, Camilla Rodrigues Seixas, Daniel Fernandes Teodoro, Danillo Alfredo Rios Junior, Danilo Fauster de Souza, Débora Arana Mayer, Elvis Eli Martins Filho, Felipe Cardoso do Nascimento, Fernanda Nascimento Oliveira, Gabriel Pilon Galvani, Giovana de Castro Vaz, Guilherme Cardoso Ricardo Martins, Gustavo Costa Vieira Novaes, Ingrid Sthéfane Santos Andrade, Isabela Pimenta Gravina, Ivo Ribeiro de Carvalho, Jhoseyr Davison Voos dos Santos, João Lucas Moraes Pereira, Kalline Meira Rocha Santos, Larissa Menegazzo Nunes, Letícia Miola Figueiredo, Luan Alves Cota Mól, Lucas Almeida dos Santos, Lucas Arteaga Aquino, Lucas Dias de Melo, Matheus Brabo Peres, Mayla Magaieski Graepp, Milena Guimarães Silva, Natália Padilha Corrêa, Rafaela Lima Gouvêa, Rogel Maio Nogueira Tavares Filho, Ryan Matheus do Ouro Medeiros, Samara Souza Santos, Sergio Henrique Micael Santos, Suelen Alves de Almeida, Talita Paim Veloso de Castro, Thais Cristina Benedetti, Thaís Caroline de Almeida Lima, Vanessa Stehling Belgd, Victor Alves Pereira, Vinicios Fernandes Alencar, Vinícius Pereira Nascimento, Vitória Regina Boita da Silva, William Edward Timm, Julio Cesar Ribeiro, Ellen Deó Bortolotte, Maria Júlia dos Santos Galvani, Giovana Souto Pereira, Victor Hugo Vaz Storch, and Dinely Luana Pereira.

 

 

First Published: June 26, 2021

Johannes Rudolph Berthold Lipke (known as John Lipke) was a canvasser, evangelist, teacher, medical doctor, and one of the pioneers of the Adventist Church in Brazil.

Early Life, Conversion and Education

Johannes Lipke was born on June 27 of 18751 in an industrial district of Berlin, Germany.2 Son of Johanne Ulrike Theodore (Lagemann) Lipke and Wilhelm August Ferdinand Lipke, both from Lutheran families. While a newborn, John Lipke was baptized in the St. Johannis Church in his hometown.3

During this period, Germany was unified as a state, and Berlin became its political and economic capital attracting a vast group of people to the new opportunities. Despite his nominal connection with the Lutherans, during the period of his adolescence, Lipke began attending a Freewill Baptist Church in the district of Charlottenburg.4 A youth society was the bridge to connect John Lipke to the Adventist Church5 and on April 21 of 1894, he was baptized by Pastor Ludwig R. Conradi in the Spree River in Berlin. On that occasion, another seven people were baptized with him, of which three were his friends and members of the Freewill Baptist Church. Later, these friends would become pastors and missionaries in the Seventh-day Adventist Church.6

In those days, a great part of the work of the Seventh-day Adventist Church in Europe happened in Germany. A training school was founded in the city of Hamburg for new Seventh-day Adventist workers.7 The project was led by Pastor Conradi who coordinated the academic activities.8 Hamburg was known for being a city with generous civil rights compared to other German cities of the same time. Because of this, the city became an important evangelistic center for the Seventh-day Adventist Church.9

After his conversion, Lipke decided to study theology10 and in order to accomplish his goal he moved to Hamburg where he began canvassing in connection with a campaign led by Frederick Weber Spies.11 At that time, the German government kept a very strict military recruiting system that obligated every healthy man to serve in the Army for three years when he turned twenty, without any choice or option for religious objections.12

Marriage and Missionary to Brazil

In 1895 while canvassing, Lipke decided to be a missionary and left Germany for Holland and from there he went to the United States in the company of his friend Otto E. R. Reinke. The ship Zaandam left Amsterdan Harbor on October 613 headed for the United States. They arrived in New York City on October 16, 1895.14

After his arrival, Lipke began working as a canvasser15 in Missouri among the German immigrants.16 In 1897 in the company of his friend Otto Reinke,17 Lipke was enrolled at the Battle Creek College to prepare for service in the mission field.18 In this institution he studied the following disciplines: Old and New Testament, Music, English and German Languages, History, Health Principles, Missiology, Church Organization, and Canvassing.19

On September 12, 1897, Lipke married Augusta Wilhelmine Schulte (1871-1963), who studied at Battle Creek College.20 She was from New Haven, Missouri, and while in the mission field, served beside her husband as women´s dean.21 The couple adopted two children, Bertha and Daniel.22

While working at the Publishing Department, the Adventist missionary William H. Thurston desired to take John Lipke to work in the Brazilian mission field.23 On August 17, 1897, in a Foreign Mission Board held in Wilmington, Delaware, it was voted to send John Lipke to Brazil to work in the educational area.24 After this decision, the couple left the United States through New York on October 13, 189725 and they arrived in the city of Rio de Janeiro on November 23, 1897.26

After few days in the Brazilian capital, they left the city for the State of Rio Grande do Sul where Lipke joined with Pastor Huldreich Graf to coordinate the establishment of another missionary school in the city of Taquary. Up to that time there were only two Adventist schools in Brazil. The first was located in the city of Curitiba, Paraná State, led by Teacher Paul Kramer and the second in Brusque, Santa Catarina State, led by Teacher Guilherme Stein Jr.27

Lipke led the school up to December of 1898, when it was closed. In the following year the church opened a new school in the city of Porto Alegre where Lipke served for the whole period.28 At the end of 1899, Lipke accepted the invitation to be the director of the Seventh-day Adventist school in Brusque that was founded by Guilherme Stein Jr. In May of 1900, the Brazilian Mission decided to finance the construction of the men´s dorm in order to establish the first Adventist missionary school in Brazil.29

Still in 1900, Albert Stauffer began work in the school as the teacher of the agricultural department.30 Apart from teaching, Lipke divided his routine between the classroom and working with the students on the farm. For the young pioneer, the final goal of the school was to develop Christian character in the students. The curriculum of the school had the following subjects: Bible instruction, nature, physiology, arithmetic, German, grammar, reading, writing, geography, and Portuguese.31 Around 1902, Lipke and his wife Auguste adopted Bertha Alvina Jankowsky, a nine-year-old orphan child.32

In 1903, the school that Lipke worked in in Brusque was transferred to Taquary, in Rio Grande do Sul State, and he was asked to lead the project. Many Adventist Church pioneers studied in that institution that would go on to work in the Brazil territory. We can highlight the following names: Leopoldo Preuss, Saturnino Mendes de Oliveira, and José Amador dos Reis (the first Seventh-day Adventist Brazilian ordained Pastor).33

Up to that date, there were twelve Adventist parochial schools in the country and one of the greatest challenges was the lack of didactic books for the German and Portuguese languages. Apart from that, the teachers only earned from U$3.00 to $6.00 per month (about US$87–US$174 in 2020 dollars).34 According to Lipke, the work of the school was to “educate the young students, men and women, to be polite, kind, and humble with everyone; useful, helpful in every place and capable to do gospel work with cheerfulness and gladness.” The main goal of the school was to train canvassers, preachers, and missionaries.35

Work and Fundraising in the United States

From of April 23–30, 1904, the second conference of the Seventh-day Adventist Church in Brazil was held in the city of Joinvile, Santa Catarina State, and the committee suggested that John Lipke receive minister’s credentials.36 In addition, the committee authorized the first steps toward creating a publishing house at the Taquary school.37 After six years of work in Brazil, Lipke returned to the United States on May 6, 1904, to raise funds to establish the publishing work in Brazil. He arrived in the United States on June 19, and after a dialogue with General Conference President Arthur G. Daniels, Lipke began a campaign visiting many Adventist communities in the states of Missouri, Oklahoma, Kansas, Nebraska, Wisconsin, and Michigan.38

In every opportunity, Lipke presented the advancement of the Seventh-day Adventist Church in Brazil, appealing for donations to help in the missionary outreach in South America. As a result of his efforts, he raised US$1.500,00 (about $44,000 in 2020 dollars) plus one printing press from the Emmanuel Missionary College, that would be used in the first Adventist publishing house in Brazil.39

While at Emmanuel Missionary College, he met with his former teacher Edward A. Sutherland, from whom he had learned about the principles of Adventist education. 40 Before returning to South America, he participated in a meeting of the General Conference held in Lincoln, Nebraska (probably the Annual Council).41

Lipke left the United States. on December 5, 1904, arriving in Rio de Janeiro a month later. While in Rio, Lipke presented a report to the Adventist community about the contributions that he raised during his trip, showing how this would help to establish the first Adventist printing house in Brazil.

Strengthening the Adventist Work in Brazil

In March 1905, after an administrative meeting of the Seventh-day Adventist Church in the city of Taquary, Rio Grande do Sul State, it was voted that the first printing press would be placed in the missionary school at Taquary.42 Envisioning this goal, on that occasion the church sent three workers to the United States: Jorge Sabeff an experienced typographer, together with Augusto Pages and Leopoldo Preuss.43

Lipke was called to lead the missionary school at Taquary.44 After establishing the first printing press, Lipke offered some scholarships to students and as a result, many literature evangelists were added to the number of canvassing students.45 Lipke was the first manager, and he was later replaced by Augusto Pages, who had been working at the SDA Hamburg Press.46 The first material to be published was the Arauto da Verdade (Herald of Truth) on May 10, 1905.47

It was in this same year that, due to the significant growth of the Seventh-day Adventist Church in the southern part of Brazil, a group of protestants translated former Adventist pastor Dudley M. Canright’s book into Portuguese. Thus, Lipke had to face all these critics and opposition against the Seventh-day Adventist Church.48

In 1906 in an extraordinary session of the Brazil Conference, it was decided to divide the Brazil field by establishing the Rio Grande do Sul Conference. On that occasion, it was voted that John Lipke would serve on the administrative committee of the newly founded field in south Brazil.49

The advancement of the work in that area of the country faced many challenges due to the lack of workers. In 1907, Lipke wrote appealing to Review and Herald readers to dedicate their lives to the mission field in Brazil. Lipke tried to encourage them to face mission trials with a courageous spirit. He wrote that the missionaries´ hardships would be overcome by the conversions of new members. The very realistic discourse of Lipke provided American readers with a very clear idea of the Brazil field.50 In 1907 John Lipke was ordained to the pastoral ministry and was elected president of that new field.51

In mid-1908, Lipke traveled through many towns of Rio Grande do Sul State to strengthen the faith of newly converted members and recently formed Adventist groups in cities such as Taquara, Solitário, Rolante, and the German colony of Canta Galo. Due to seldom seeing a minister in these areas, a worship service that began at 10 am could go until 6 pm with a lunch break. On these Sabbaths there were baptisms and celebrations of the Lord’s Supper.52

Up to this time the Rio Grande do Sul Conference had only five churches for four hundred members. By in large, missionary campaigns had targeted German colonies. It was at this point that the book A Vinda Gloriosa de Cristo (The Glorious Coming of Christ) began to be sold by the canvassers in the urban centers such as Porto Alegre, Santa Maria, and Bagé. Lipke saw the need to contextualize the foreign missionaries’ efforts to be effective workers with Brazilian people. Therefore, his great goal was to prepare Brazilian citizens for involvement in the mission, believing they would be more efficient for teaching the Bible to their fellow Portuguese speakers.53

His conviction to reach the great urban centers developed by reading Ellen White´s writings. It was during this period that the first tents were bought for public evangelism campaigns. Lipke emphasized the importance of health principles among the SDA missionaries saying this kind of ministry would open the way for the reception of the Adventist message.54

In 1908, under Lipke’s supervision, a systematic plan of public evangelism for the southern region of Brazil began; the main urban centers were targeted.55 The first campaign occurred in Santa Maria in April of that year with sixty attendees. The tents were bought with donations from different people including Pastors J. W. Westphal and F. W. Spies.56

After conducting the campaign in Santa Maria, Lipke went to Taquara where he visited the people who had been reached by Ricardo Olm; from that group, five people were baptized. After the campaign, he visited other groups of Adventists in the cities of Rolante, Cantagalo Campestre, Solidário Parobé, São Lourenço, and Campos dos Quevedos.57

Lipke planned to strengthen evangelism in urban centers by inviting canvassers to be a part of these campaigns. To accomplish this, he formed a canvassing institute in the city of Taquary. After the first training session, he sent eight canvassers to work in several cities in Rio Grande do Sul State.58 Lipke remained conference president until the end of 1908.59 In 1909, he accepted the call to begin a missionary school to train canvassers in the city of São Bernardo do Campo, São Paulo State.60 In addition, between 1909 and 1911 Lipke led the Youth Department in his field. One of his initiatives in 1909 was to create and edit the German magazine Der Jugendfreund [The Youth’s Friend], designed to reach the youth of the general public.61

In 1910, Lipke was elected president of a new Adventist field, the East Brazil Mission that covered several states such as Bahia, Sergipe, Alagoas, and Pernambuco.62 In spite of being president of the field, Lipke canvassed in the big cities selling the book Steps to Christ.63 In November of 1911, Frederick Spies president of the Brazil Union visited John Lipke and discovered the need for more workers in that field. Since the Church did not have the means to meet the demand, Lipke began training a group of workers from among the new converts. He began preparing canvassers and Bible workers. During that time, two workers conducted an evangelistic campaign for a month in the cities of Maceió, Caruaru, and Recife. In this context, Pr. Spies wrote an article for the Review and Herald making an urgent appeal for more missionaries to come and work in the Brazil field.64

At the end of 1911, the Seventh-day Adventist Church reached the state of Paraíba for the first time where Pastor Lipke baptized the first three converts. With the addition of this new field, Lipke was the only ordained minister in an area of ten states, which made his work very hard in order to attend all the field demands.65

In 1912, Lipke made an appeal for missionaries in The Youth's Instructor periodical. The pioneer perceived great potential in Brazil for accepting the Adventist message. In his missiological view, Lipke believed missionaries needed to work in the areas of education and health.66

His endeavors led Adventist leaders to invite him to lead a canvassing course in the city of São Bernardo, São Paulo, in mid-1912. The course was presented with Pastors Germano Conrad and Frederick Spies and lasted three weeks.67 After returning to the Northeast, Lipke expanded his work reaching into the state of Rio Grande do Norte. Later, he reached the state of Pará, helping establish the Church in the great northern area of Brazil.68

In 1913, three leaders of the church in Brazil were invited to participate in the General Conference Session; they were Frederick Spies, John Lipke, and Waldemar Ehlers.69 During the meetings, these men presented a report to the world Church leaders telling about the advancements of the Seventh-day Adventist Church in Brazil, but also highlighting the challenges of the field. During every report, they conveyed the urgent need for more workers in the field. Their appeals were heard, and new missionaries were sent.70

Work in São Paulo 

Lipke led the East Brazil Mission for three years.71 During this period Lipke and his wife had some health problems as a result of the climate with temperatures that were very hot and dry. Because of this, church leaders decided to transfer them in the middle of 1913.72 During that year before he left, the northeast field experienced significant growth. Under Lipke´s supervision, in two years, the number of canvassers reached ten out of a total of twenty-seven in the whole country of Brazil.73 When he began his work in the East Brazil Mission, there were 18 members in the church. When he left three years later, the membership had grown to 140. His goal was to have at least one Adventist member in each of the north and northeast states.74

When leaving Bahia State, Lipke accepted a call to serve as president of São Paulo Mission, a position he held for the next four years.75 During these years Lipke faced very hard Catholic opposition in the city of Santo Amaro, São Paulo State. Therefore, the first fruits of his work were twenty baptisms, the result of a strategy he used that integrated the biblical message with the health message. In this phase of his ministry, Lipke developed an evangelistic method composed of training workers in preaching, health presentations, Bible reading, and visitation.76

In this manner, the attendance and participation of the audience in the evangelistic campaigns did not lessen, considering that the meetings occurred three times a week. The practical issues about health were a great attraction to participants. At that time, the General Conference sent two women to work in the medical missionary field and they made a special contribution to the evangelistic work in Santo Amaro. After a few months of work, dozens of people were baptized.77 Apart from his regular work, Lipke taught classes to the foreign missionaries that came to Brazil, teaching Portuguese and evangelistic strategies.78

In 1914, the construction of a missionary school in São Paulo started becoming a reality. Saturnino de Oliveira, a former student of Lipke in the school at Taquary, was working as Bible instructor in Santo Amaro. While doing his activities, a person named Pantaleão Teisen, who was interested in knowing the gospel, mentioned that he had a large property in the district of Capão Redondo.79 Ten leaders were appointed to visit the land and the owners.80 In this group were O. Montgomery, A. Pages, F. Spies, J. Lipke, J. Boehm, H. Meyer, M. Rohde, M. Kümpel, A. Rockel, and F. Kümpel.81

At that time Lipke discovered that Pastor John Boehm wanted to make a special contribution in the educational area. Boehm was a multi-talented person, trained in farming, building, mechanics, and other areas. Therefore, he was invited to leave the city of Nova Europa, São Paulo State where he worked as pastor and come to the new land, recently purchased, for the purpose of helping establish Brazil College.82 The new institution was inaugurated on May 6, 1915 with Lipke as president and Boehm as manager. Classes started on July 3, 1915, with twelve students.83

On August 2, 1915, the school received a visit from South American leaders and from W. W. Prescott of the General Conference. On that occasion, Pastor John Lipke was elected Director of the Seminary and they officially laid the foundation stone of the main building.84

In 1916, Lipke made another appeal, this time writing to the Mission Quarterly, showing the needs of Brazil College. He indicated the great goal of the institution was to educate native missionaries under an industrial structure and to provide scholarships to students in need. His ideas were to establish departments to produce bricks, roof tiles, poultry farming, and dairy. To reach this goal, Lipke appealed to American readers to help with their means and prayers.85

In October 1918, during an annual meeting of the Brazilian Union of the Seventh-day Adventist Church, Lipke stated it would be impossible to satisfy responsibilities both as the president of São Paulo Mission Conference and as director of Brazil College. Therefore, R. Süssmann was appointed to replace him at the São Paulo Mission Conference.86 At the end of 1918, T. W. Steen became the new director of Brazil College.87 Under his administration, there was a reorganization of the theological seminary curriculum, which resulted in the first graduating class in 1922.88

In 1919, Lipke was again invited to be the president of the Rio Grande do Sul Conference. While working in this position he was still in charge of the education department.89 In the following year, on April 10, 1920, John Lipke, W. E. Howell, and J. H. Westphal ordained José Amador dos Reis, the first Brazilian native to the pastoral ministry.90

Medical Education and Work

Up to that time, Lipke had worked twenty-three years in the Seventh-day Adventist Church in Brazil.91 Subsequently, together with his family, he traveled to the United States., moving to Loma Linda, California92 where he received some special treatments and later began to study medicine.93 During this time, Lipke was authorized by the General Conference to raise funds for the work in Brazil. Lipke asked to have their permission to learn new evangelistic techniques from what was being done in California and learn new methods that could be applied in Brazil.94

In 1921, together with Pastor Boehm, he participated in a publishing meeting at Mountain View, California.95 In addition, he had the opportunity to train students from the Pacific Union College for canvassing work.96 The following year, Lipke began an evangelistic campaign in Gustine, California. Part of their efforts were dedicated to reaching Portuguese speakers.97

Lipke graduated from medicine in 1925 and after returning to Brasil, he went to live in Rio de Janeiro where he utilized his ministerial skills in the Rio de Janeiro Conference.98 In February 1926, Lipke gave several presentations on the topic of health and simple treatments to the sick in a canvassing course he taught in Campos, Rio de Janeiro State.99

His work as a medical doctor in Brazil was very limited because he had to validate his diploma with the Brazilian authorities. Otherwise, he was only allowed to work in the company of a supervising doctor. Considering all these exigencies, in 1927 Lipke returned to the United States in order to do a postgraduate course.100

With the help of Dr. John Lipke, the leaders of the East Brazilian Union made plans to begin medical work in the city of Rio de Janeiro.101 A provision of US$ 2,000 was allotted for this purpose. After returning from his postgraduate course, Lipke was more prepared to serve the Church.102 Because of the bureaucracy and Brazilian laws, Lipke began to see patients in his own office.103 On the first floor of his own house he began a small clinic. Through the influence of that initiative, the Adventist health message experienced a new impulse in the city of Rio de Janeiro, which later on had a great impact in the process of establishing Silvestre Hospital.104

Final Years

Due to health problems, Lipke retired in 1935 going to live in São Paulo in the area of Santo Amaro.105 In spite of retirement, Lipke maintained a column in the Adventist Review in which he wrote on topics related to health.106 After experiencing health complications, Lipke died at 5:30 pm on June 18, 1943, leaving his wife, Augusta, and two adopted children, Bertha and Daniel. He was buried in the Santo Amaro Cemetery, in the city of São Paulo.107

During his 45 years of service, Johannes Rudolph Berthold Lipke made great contributions to the work of the Seventh-day Adventist Church in Brazil and he can be considered one of the most valuable workers for that country, strategically serving in several crucial areas such as canvassing, education, evangelism, pastoral ministry, administration, and health. His contributions can be observed in all geographic areas of Brazil, from south to north. With his tireless spirit and great commitment, he helped to spread the gospel throughout the country. His life is a great example of self-renouncing work toward the accomplishment of the mission of the Seventh-day Adventist Church.

Sources

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“East Brazil Notes.” South American Bulletin, November 1930.

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Araújo, Jairo T. “Parabéns, IAE!” Revista Adventista, December 1995.

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Howell, W. E. “A Glimpse of Mission Life.” ARH, November 1937.

Jayne, J. E. “Another Call Answered.” The Home Missionary, October 1897.

Kern, M.E. “Society Studies in Bible Doctrines.” The Youth's Instructor, August 1910.

Lessa, Rubens. “Casa Publicadora Brasileira: 85 anos de história.” Revista Adventista, October 1985.

Lipke, John. (1875-1943), National Adventist Memory Center Archive/Ellen G. White Research Center: Brazil Adventist University-Engenheiro Coelho Campus, S Stand 2, Shelf 14, Folder/Box John Lipke.

Lipke, John. “Brazil.” ARH, August 1908.

Lipke, John. “Brazil.” ARH, June 1905.

Lipke, John. “Bahia, Brazil.” ARH, November 1912.

Lipke, John. “Brazil.” The Missionary Magazine, September 1898.

Lipke, John. “Canvassers Institute in Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.” ARH, August 1908.

Lipke, John. “Christian Schools in Brazil.” The Advocate Christian Education, July 1904.

Lipke, John. “Missão Este Brasileira.” Revista Mensal, September 1911.

Lipke, John. “Needs of Brazil and Our Opportunities.” The Youth's Instructor, October 1912.

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Lipke, John. “Nosso Seminário.” Revista Adventista, April 1918.

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Lipke, John. “Travels in Behalf of Brazil.” ARH, December 1904.

Lipke, John. “Trip to a general meeting in Brazil.” ARH, September 1905.

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Loureno, Alisson de Souza. “John Lipke: sem fronteiras para a missão” Trabalho de conclusão de curso, Centro Universitário Adventista de São Paulo campus Engenheiro Coelho, 2016.

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Notes

  1. Germano G. Ritter, “Dr. John Lipke,” Revista Adventista, August 1943, 25; Anexo A – Certidão de nascimento de John Lipke, National Adventist Memory Center Archive/Ellen G. White Research Center: Brazil Adventist University, Engenheiro Coelho Campus), 1.

  2. Alisson de Souza Loureno, “John Lipke: sem fronteiras para a missão,” Trabalho de conclusão de curso, Brazil Adventist University, Engenheiro Coelho Campus, 2016, 13; John Lipke: primórdios, National Adventist Memory Center Archive/Ellen G. White Research Center: Brazil Adventist University, Engenheiro Coelho Campus), 1, 2.

  3. Anexo A – Certidão de nascimento de John Lipke, National Adventist Memory Center Archive/Ellen G. White Research Center: Brazil Adventist University, Engenheiro Coelho Campus, 1; Alisson de Souza Loureno, “John Lipke: sem fronteiras para a missão,” 13; and John Lipke: primórdios, 1, 2.

  4. John Lipke: primórdios, 1, 2; and Alisson de Souza Loureno, “John Lipke: sem fronteiras para a missão,” 15.

  5. “Missionary Volunteer Department,” General Conference Bulletin, Thirty-Eighth Session, June 4, 1913, 272.

  6. Anexo B – Batismo de John Lipke, National Adventist Memory Center Archive/Ellen G. White Research Center: Brazil Adventist University, Engenheiro Coelho Campus; John Lipke: primórdios, 2, 3.

  7. John Lipke: Origens, National Adventist Memory Center Archive/Ellen G. White Research Center: Brazil Adventist University, Engenheiro Coelho Campus, 1.

  8. Ibid., 2.

  9. Ibid., 4.

  10. G. G. Ritter, “John Lipke, M. D.,” ARH, September 30, 1943, 18.

  11. Ritter, “Dr. John Lipke,” 25.

  12. B. L. Whitney, “Historical sketches of the foreign missions of the Seventh-Day Adventist” (Basle: Imprimerie Polyglotte, 1886), 19-20; and Alisson de Souza Loureno, “John Lipke: sem fronteiras para a missão,” 16.

  13. Servindo a Deus nos Estados Unidos, National Adventist Memory Center Archive/Ellen G. White Research Center: Brazil Adventist University, Engenheiro Coelho Campus, 11; Alisson de Souza Loureno, “John Lipke: sem fronteiras para a missão,” 17.

  14. Anexo and – Registro portuário da viagem de Lipke and Reinke para os EUA em 1895, National Adventist Memory Center Archive/Ellen G. White Research Center: Brazil Adventist University, Engenheiro Coelho Campus, 1.

  15. Ritter, “Dr. John Lipke,” 25.

  16. Servindo a Deus nos Estados Unidos, 10, 11.

  17. Ibid.

  18. G. G. Ritter, “John Lipke, M. D.,” ARH, September 1943, 18; and Alisson de Souza Loureno, “John Lipke: sem fronteiras para a missão,” 17.

  19. Anexo F – Exemplar do conteúdo programático das Escolas Missionárias nos EUA, National Adventist Memory Center Archive/Ellen G. White Research Center: Brazil Adventist University, Engenheiro Coelho Campus, 1-7.

  20. Ritter, “Dr. John Lipke,” 25; “Lipke-Auguste Wilhelmine Schult,” ARH, July 1963, 25; Ritter, “John Lipke, M. D.,” 18; Anexo I – Certidão de casamento de John and Augusta Lipke (National Adventist Memory Center Archive/Ellen G. White Research Center: Brazil Adventist University, Engenheiro Coelho Campus).

  21. “Lipke-Auguste Wilhelmine Schult,” 25.

  22. Ritter, “Dr. John Lipke,” 25.

  23. W. H. Thurston, “Brazil,” ARH, October 1896, 638.

  24. Index of Proceedings of The Seventh-Day Adventist foreign Mission Board: Thirty-Third Meeting (National Adventist Memory Center Archive/Ellen G. White Research Center: Brazil Adventist University, Engenheiro Coelho Campus), 39 and 40.

  25. J. E. Jayne, “Another Call Answered,” The Home Missionary, October 1897, 194.

  26. Thurston, “Brazil,” 400; Alisson de Souza Loureno, “John Lipke: sem fronteiras para a missão,” 20; Ritter, “John Lipke, M. D.,” 18; Spies, F. W., “Brazil,” ARH, December 28, 1897, 831; John Lipke, “Brazil,” The Missionary Magazine, September 1898, 341; Kramer, Paul, “Our School at Curityba Brazil,” The Missionary Magazine, June 1899, 255.

  27. Thurston, “Brazil,” 400; Alisson de Souza Loureno, “John Lipke: sem fronteiras para a missão,” 20; Ritter, “John Lipke, M. D.,” 18; Spies, F. W., “Brazil,” ARH, December 28, 1897, 831; John Lipke, “Brazil,” The Missionary Magazine, September 1898, 341; Paul Kramer, “Our School at Curityba Brazil,” The Missionary Magazine, June 1899, 255.

  28. Thurston, “Brazil,” 400; Alisson de Souza Loureno, “John Lipke: sem fronteiras para a missão,” 20.

  29. W. H. Thurston, “Mission School in Brazil,” The Missionary Magazine, November 1900, 491-492; John Lipke, “Progress Brazil Mission School,” The Advocate Christian Education, January 1903, 26.

  30. F. W. Spies, “Notes from Brazil,” ARH, September 18, 1900, 11.

  31. John Lipke, “Progress Brazil Mission School,” The Advocate Christian Education, January 1903, 27.

  32. XV. John Lewis, National Adventist Memory Center Archive/Ellen G. White Research Center: Brazil Adventist University, Engenheiro Coelho Campus, 56.

  33. David Moróz, “Origem and história dos adventistas no Rio Grande do Sul - Primeira Parte,” Revista Adventista, December 1993, 8; Germano G. Ritter, “Dr. John Lipke,” Revista Adventista, August 1943, 25.

  34. John Lipke, “Christian Schools in Brazil,” The Advocate Christian Education, July 1904, 108-109.

  35. Cronologia do Instituto Adventista de Ensino, National Adventist Memory Center Archive/Ellen G. White Research Center: Brazil Adventist University, Engenheiro Coelho Campus, 1.

  36. F. W. Spies, “Brazil Conference,” ARH, August 1904, 13.

  37. Moróz, “Origem and história,” 8.

  38. Diálogo entre John Lipke and Arthur G. Daniells, National Adventist Memory Center Archive/Ellen G. White Research Center: Brazil Adventist University, Engenheiro Coelho Campus; Alisson de Souza Loureno, “John Lipke: sem fronteiras para a missão,” 22; John Lipke, “Travels in Behalf of Brazil,” ARH, December 1904, 17; Moróz, “Origem and história,” 8.

  39. Lipke, “Travels in Behalf of Brazil,” 17; Moróz, “Origem and história,” 8.

  40. Período Pré-formativo do Seminário de Teologia no Brazil (1900 - 1918), National Adventist Memory Center Archive/Ellen G. White Research Center: Brazil Adventist University, Engenheiro Coelho Campus, 9, 10.

  41. Lipke, “Travels in Behalf of Brazil,” 17.

  42. John Lipke, “Brazil,” ARH, June 1905, 18.

  43. Moróz, “Origem and história,” 8.

  44. W. A. Spicer, “Reorganization in Brazil,” ARH, June 1906, 5.

  45. Moróz, “Origem and história,” 8.

  46. Rubens Lessa, “Casa Publicadora Brasileira: 85 anos de história,” Revista Adventista, December 1985, 5, 6.

  47. Carlos A. Trezza, “A Página Impressa no Brasil,” Revista Adventista, May 1966, 51, 52.

  48. F. W. Spies, “Brazil - General Meetings,” ARH, November 1905, 16.

  49. J. W. Westphal, “A Conferência do Estado Rio Grande do Sul,” Revista Trimensal, July 1906, 3.

  50. John Lipke, “Young boys at the forefront,” ARH, June 1907, 23.

  51. “Rio Grande Conference,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1908), 123.

  52. John Lipke, “Brazil,” ARH, August 1908, 18.

  53. John Lipke, “The Rio Grande Do Sul Conference,” ARH, September 1907, 15.

  54. Ibid.

  55. John Lipke, “The First Tent-Meeting in Brazil,” ARH, May 1908, 13.

  56. John Lipke, “The Rio Grande (Brazil) Conference,” ARH, July 1908, 15.

  57. John Lipke, “Rio Grande do Sul,” Revista Adventista, October 1908, 6, 7.

  58. John Lipke, “Canvassers Institute in Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil,” ARH, August 1908, 16.

  59. “Rio Grande Conference,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1909), 126.

  60. “South American Union Conference,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1910), 123; Prener, H. S., “Brazil,” ARH, August 1909, 16.

  61. M. E. Kern, “Society Studies in Bible Doctrines,” The Youth's Instructor, August 1910, 13; “Young People's Missionary Volunteer Department,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1910), 16, 174; “Brazilian Union Conference,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1912), 139.

  62. “East Brazil Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1911), 126.

  63. John Lipke, “Working for Brazilian Officials,” ARH, April 1911, 16; John Lipke, “Missão Este Brasileira,” Revista Mensal, September 1911, 11, 12.

  64. Floyd Greenleaf, Terra de Esperança: O crescimento da Igreja Adventista na América do Sul (Tatui, SP: Casa Publicadora Brasileira, 2011), 123-124; F. W. Spies, “A Visit to the East Brazil Mission,” ARH, March 1912, 12.

  65. F. W. Spies, “From the eastern coast…” ARH, December 1911, 24.

  66. “Needs of Brazil and Our Opportunities,” The Youth's Instructor, October 1912, 14.

  67. F. W. Spies, “Curso de colportores em São Paulo,” Revista Mensal, August 1912, 5; F. W. Spies, “Noticiario,” Revista Mensal, August 1912, 5, 6.

  68. John Lipke, “Bahia - Brazil,” ARH, November 1912, 13.

  69. Anexo K – Registro portuário da viajem de John Like para a Conferência Geral de 1913, em Washington, EUA, National Adventist Memory Center Archive/Ellen G. White Research Center: Brazil Adventist University, Engenheiro Coelho Campus, 1.

  70. “Special Midsummer Services,” ARH, July 1913, 641.

  71. “East Brazil Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1911), 140, “East Brazil Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1913), 135.

  72. “Needs,” The General Conference Bulletin, June 1913, 215.

  73. Greenleaf, Terra de Esperança, 124.

  74. F. W. Spies, “East Brazil Mission,” ARH, January 1913, 16.

  75. “São Paulo Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1914), 148; “São Paulo Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1917), 163.

  76. “São Paulo (Brazil) Mission,” ARH, September 1914, 2.

  77. Ibid.

  78. Louise V. Wurts, “A Letter from Brazil,” Columbia Union Visitor, February 1914, 2.

  79. Eduardo Faiock Bomfim, “Saturnino Mendes de Oliveira” (Monografia, Instituto Adventista de Ensino, 1988), 9.

  80. Jairo T. Araújo, “Parabéns, IAE!,” Revista Adventista, December 1995, 35.

  81. Cronologia do Instituto Adventista de Ensino, National Adventist Memory Center Archive/Ellen G. White Research Center: Brazil Adventist University, Engenheiro Coelho Campus, 7.

  82. João M. Rabello, “John Boehm: educador pioneiro no Brasil,” Revista Adventista, April 1989, 15.

  83. Ibid.; Cronologia do Instituto Adventista de Ensino, National Adventist Memory Center Archive/Ellen G. White Research Center: Brazil Adventist University, Engenheiro Coelho Campus, 8.

  84. Lançamento da Primeira pedra do Edifício da Escola Missionária, National Adventist Memory Center Archive/Ellen G. White Research Center: Brazil Adventist University, Engenheiro Coelho Campus, 1; Cronologia do Instituto Adventista de Ensino, National Adventist Memory Center Archive/Ellen G. White Research Center: Brazil Adventist University, Engenheiro Coelho Campus, 10.

  85. John Lipke, “Our Need of a Training School,” Missions Quarterly, 1916, 15-17.

  86. O. Montgomery, “A Visit to Brazil,” ARH, February 1918, 12.

  87. “Brazilian Union Conference,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1918), 169; “Brazilian Seminary,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1919), 194; “North Brazil Union Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1919), 166.

  88. Alberto R. Timm, ed., A educação adventista no Brasil. Uma história de Aventuras and milagres (Engenheiro Coelho, SP: Unaspress, 2004), 129-131.

  89. “Rio Grande do Sul Conference,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1920), 182

  90. Ivan Schmidt, José Amador dos Reis, Pastor and Pioneiro, (Santo André, SP: Casa Publicadora Brasileira, 1980), 66.

  91. John L. Shaw, “The Work and Workers,” ARH, August 1920, 5.

  92. “Ministerial Directory,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, DC.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1921), 260; and Wilcox, Francis Mclellan, “Elder and Mrs. John Lipke,” ARH, September 1920, 32.

  93. Ritter, “John Lipke, M. D.,” 18; and “Our Health Ministry,” ARH, March 1929, 3.

  94. “Two Hundred Sixty-Ninth Meeting General Conference Committee: September 6, 1920” (National Adventist Memory Center Archive/Ellen G. White Research Center: Brazil Adventist University, Engenheiro Coelho Campus), 1.

  95. “Courage the keynote of the pacific press convention,” ARH, March 1921, 15.

  96. “The College Institute,” Pacific Union Recorder, April 1921, 2.

  97. “Central California,” Pacific Union Recorder, August 1922, 5.

  98. “Ministerial Directory,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1926), 335; and “Rio de January Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1927), 188.

  99. E. P. Mansell, “Campos Colporteur Institute,” South American Bulletin, April 1926, 6.

  100. “Missionary Sailings,” ARH, September 1926, 24; “Medical Work,” ARH, April 1927, 8; “Medical Missionary Work in South America,” ARH, March 1927, 2.

  101. “Medical Missionary Work in South America,” ARH, March 1927, 2.

  102. “A Long Reach in Medical Extension Work,” ARH, April 1927, 2.

  103. Greenleaf, Terra de Esperança, 395.

  104. “Our Health Ministry,” ARH, March 1929, 3.

  105. Ritter, “John Lipke, M. D.,” 19; Howell, W. E., “A Glimpse of Mission Life,” ARH, November 1937, 12.

  106. John Lipke, “Seção Médica,” Revista Adventista, April 1931, 3.

  107. Ritter, “John Lipke, M. D.,” 19.

×

UNASP, The Brazilian White Center –. "Lipke, Johannes (John) Rudolph Berthold (1875–1943)." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. June 26, 2021. Accessed May 26, 2022. https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=DGKD.

UNASP, The Brazilian White Center –. "Lipke, Johannes (John) Rudolph Berthold (1875–1943)." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. June 26, 2021. Date of access May 26, 2022, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=DGKD.

UNASP, The Brazilian White Center – (2021, June 26). Lipke, Johannes (John) Rudolph Berthold (1875–1943). Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. Retrieved May 26, 2022, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=DGKD.