Central Chile Mission

By Marco Yañez, and Pablo Millanao Torrejón

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Marco Yañez

Pablo Millanao Torrejón

First Published: July 1, 2021

The Central Chile Mission (MCCh) is an administrative unit of the Seventh-day Adventist Church located in the territory of Chile Union Mission (UCh), with headquarters on 1038 Cinco Sur Street, Zip code 3461997, in the city of Talca, Talca Province, Maule Region, Republic of Chile.1

The Central Chile Mission administers the sixth region of Libertador General Bernardo O’Higgins and the seventh region of Maule. The O'Higgins region has an area of 16,387 km2 and a population of 914,555 inhabitants.2 It comprises the provinces of Cachapoal, Cardenal Caro, and Colchagua. The capital of Cachapoal province and Libertador General Bernardo O'Higgins region is the city of Rancagua, and it has 241,774 inhabitants. Its neighboring city is San Fernando, the capital of Colchagua, which has 73,973 inhabitants.3 In turn, the Maule region has an area of 30,269.1 km2 and borders the O'Higgins region to the north. There are 1,044,950 inhabitants in this region, and it is the fourth most-populated one in the country, behind the Metropolitana, Valparaíso, and Biobío regions. It is comprised of the provinces of Cauquenes, Curicó, Linares, and Talca. The latter is the regional capital and main urban center with 270,078 inhabitants, followed by Curicó with 149,136 inhabitants.4

In short, the Central Chile Mission territory has a total of 1,966,512 inhabitants, 7,133 SDA members and 709 other interested people. The average number of Adventists in the Central Chile Mission is one Adventist per 276 inhabitants.5 With these statistics in mind, in order to better reach and serve church and community members, the Central Chile Mission is divided into 14 pastoral districts, 62 churches, and 38 organized groups. Its congregations are established in two regions: the 6th region (Rancagua Zone) comprised of the missionary districts of Rancagua Norte, Rancagua Central, Rancagua Oriente, Rengo, San Fernando, and Santa Cruz, with 26 churches and 17 groups; and the 7th region (Talca Zone), which is comprised of the districts of Talca Central, Talca Oriente, Molina, Curicó, Talca Sur, Constitución, Linares, and Cauquenes, with 36 churches and 21 groups.6

The Central Chile Mission administers three educational institutions, all of them are part of the Adventist educational network and have the mission “to promote academic excellence and includes all the essential content for the practice of responsible citizenship. Its objective is to develop a balanced spiritual, intellectual, physical, social, emotional and vocational life of the students.”7 These schools offer education from the pre-school level to the elementary or middle-school level. The institutions in this field include: Molina Adventist Academy, established in 1932, located on 1955 Aromo Street, Molina, Maule, which has a total of 753 students; Rancagua Adventist Academy, established in 1983, located on 560 Araucana Street, Manzanal, Rancagua, O’Higgins, with 335 students; and Talca Adventist Academy, established in 1993, located on 1359 Cuatro Sur Street, Talca, Maule, with 579 students. In total, 1,667 students are part of this educational system in the central region of the country.8

In the social assistance area, the Central Chile Mission has service stations of the Adventist Development and Relief Agency International (ADRA).9 These branches are located in the cities of: Curicó on 6 Villota St. and on 91 Arturo Prat Street; Linares on 134 Colo Colo Street on Freire corner; San Clemente at San Clemente, VII Region; and Talca on third South St. 651 between West 1 and 2, and on Third St., East 2 and 3 North. In these social assistance centers, some programs are provided, such as Familia de Acogida Especializada [Specialized Host Family] (FAE-PRO),10 Programa Reparatorio en Maltrato [Abuse Rehabilitation Program] (PRM),11 Programa de Reparación del Abandono [Abandonment Reparation Program] (PRI),12 and Programa de Intervención Integral Especializada [Specialized Integral Intervention Program] (PIE).13 All these programs are linked to ADRA Chile and Chile National Service for Minors (SENAME).14 The target of both institutions is to help children and adolescents in situations of social risk and serious violation of their rights.15

The transmission of the Gospel through broadcasts has gained strength since July 2019, when Empedrado New Time Radio station (107.1 FM) was inaugurated, operating from the commune of Empedrado, Maule region.16 Prior to this, New Time Radio programs were broadcast thanks to the support of community radio stations in Constitución and Curicó. Other media such as TV channels and the Internet are also helping this population to prepare for the soon coming of Jesus.

Regarding the number of servers, the Central Chile Mission has 209 collaborators at the service of the institution, including pastors, workers, and employees. Among the pastors, 16 are ordained and four are licensed;17 In the districts, 14 exercise the role of district pastor18 and four work as administrators, department pastors, and field secretaries;19 among other workers, three are missionary-licensed and seven work with missionary credentials. Finally, 13 work in the Mission administrative offices.20

The Origin of the SDA Church Work in the Mission Territory

The history of the Adventist work in Chile is related to the arrival of the Dessignet family, a French Adventist couple, who landed in the country in 1885 with the aim of preaching the Gospel. Notwithstanding, “it was due to the work of Clair A. Nowlen, F. W. Bishop and Thomas H. Davis, from 1894, that the establishment of the Adventist Church in Chile was more successful. G. H. Baber was the first Adventist pastor to arrive in Chile, in 1895. The first church in the country was established in the city of Iquique, in 1896.”21 Shortly after the Adventist work began in Chile, in 1901 La Revista Adventista [the Spanish-language Adventist Review] requested reports from all the groups and churches constituted in the country, and among them were mentioned congregations in Rancagua, Rengo, and Salsipuedes, a city near Rancagua.22 The Rengo congregation is considered the first one organized as a church in this territory, having about 13 members at the time. It was organized by Frank H. Westphal and Eduardo Thomann in the middle of 1905.23

In that same decade, in 1907, the first Chile Conference (presently the Metropolitan Chile Conference) was established, headquartered in the city of Santiago, and from then on, the Mission would be advancing throughout the Chilean territory. Until that time, the Church in Chile had nine congregations and 192 members.24 It is worth noting that during the first decade of the 20th century, Rancagua and Rengo were in the common circuit of missionary visits by pioneers to believers who lived in this part of Chile.25

The records of 1932 report that in the 1930s, there were already active congregations in the cities of Curicó, Chimbarongo, Molina, Rengo, San Fernando, and Talca.26 As for the educational work, the records show the existence of a church school in Curicó in 193327 and another in the city of Molina.28

However, the beginning of the Adventist educational work in this Mission is related to the arrival of some Adventist families in the first decade of the 20th century, and the desire to give their children a Christian education. Nonetheless, this would only be possible in the 1930s with the inauguration of Molina Adventist Academy. The Molina Adventist Academy began its activities with the Seventh-day Adventist Church of Molina, which was located on 1846 West Avenue. That probably took place in the same year that the temple was inaugurated (1932). In the next stage, this educational project was transferred to a large house located on 2008 West Avenue that offered them adequate accommodations for 37 years.

In 1950, the Chile Conference had surpassed 4,000 members in the entire country and, nevertheless, due to this growing membership, the Chile Conference needed to divide the national territory in order to spread the Gospel more effectively.29 Thus, Chile began to have two church administrative units through a division that was rather geographic; that is, the Province of Ñuble would mark this division. Thus, South Chile Conference was responsible for southern Chile up to the provincial border of Ñuble-Linares.30 Consequently, the Central North Chile Conference (ACNCh) would cover the central-northern territory of the country. The Central North Chile Conference remained in the same offices as the old Chile Conference, which was located on 72 Porvenir Street, Santiago. In this new organization, Pastor Eliel Almonte was elected as president to manage the 24 churches and 2,065 Adventist members, and Juan Zevallos was the secretary-treasurer of the new Conference.31

In 1965, within the framework of the organization of Chile Union Mission,32 the newly established Union had an average of 1 Adventist per 791 inhabitants in the whole country.33 Due to the need of increasing resources and evangelistic efforts in this field and to better serve people, in 1966 the Union administration together with SAD decided to reorganize the Central North Chile Conference by dividing it into two. From that decision, the new North Chile Mission was established, and naturally the Central North Chile Conference became Central Chile Conference (ACCh).34 Thus, the Central Chile Conference remained headquartered in the city of Santiago. This time, Humberto Arias and E. F. Almonte were respectively elected as president and secretary-treasurer in order to lead 31 organized churches and 4,636 members.35

In 1981, Molina Adventist Academy (CAM), after a period of recess (since 1969), began to operate out of a central location in the city. Likewise, after two years, the second educational unit to be established was Rancagua Adventist Academy (CAR), which was officially founded in March 1983 by Pastor Jaime Montero, who had been tasked with launching an elemantary school. Initially, 150 students attended. Finally, in 1987, the Molina Adventist Academy was inaugurated and definitively established in a new building on 1950 Libertad Avenue.

Until 1988, Central Chile Conference administered the territories of the 4th, 5th, 6th, and 7th regions of Chile in addition to the Metropolitan Region. At that time, this Conference had 133 churches and 27,541 members, and accepted the great challenge of evangelizing a population of approximately 8,295,596 inhabitants.36 In that same year, a new church administrative unit was organized to assume the leadership of the churches in Region 4 and 5 of Chile, which until then had been part of the Central Chile Conference territory. This new administrative unit was called the Pacific Chile Mission (MChP), and it began to carry out its activities the following year, in 1989. Thus, the Central Conference then began to serve the Metropolitan, O'Higgins, and Maule regions.37 Its headquarters remained on 72 Porvenir Street, Santiago. Pastor Joel Leiva continued to work as president of this Conference, but this time he would have 104 churches and a total of 21,446 church members under his administration.38

This reorganization strengthened the growth of the Church in this region. This can be observed from the data referring to the growing number of members and churches since, in a period of one year, the Conference grew by 5.23 percent compared to the previous year; that is, in 1990, 1,176 believers were integrated and remained in the Adventist faith. Due to this growth, six more churches were organized.39

However, the last educational unit created in this Conference was Talca Adventist Academy (COADET) in 1993. The birth of COADET is closely linked to ministers, teachers, and laity who were all committed to Adventist education. Prior to this, in 1965, an initial work began in the city. Then a period of discontinuities and instability emerged until finally, on March 8, 1993, the institution reopened with a preschool level course, gradually implementing the elementary level in the following years. The new school received official recognition from the Ministry of Education in January 1998.40 In that same year, the Central Conference territory would undergo a restructuring.41

The Conference Organizational History

The organization of Chile Central Mission occurred in the context of various circumstances that prompted the Chile Central Conference to be divided in 1998. Among them was the rapid demographic growth of the city of Santiago and the consequent concentration of ministerial and financial capacities in the metropolitan region of Chile. These factors delayed pastoral and budgetary attention in the sixth and seventh regions of the country. This situation was apparent due to the decrease of tithes, in the soul-winning, in the projects of global mission, and in the progress of the educational work in comparison with the rest of the country. The recognition of this reality prompted a territorial and administrative restructuring that could respond more efficiently to the missionary challenges of the Church in those sixth and seventh regions.42

In these circumstances, the Chile Central Mission was organized in January 1998 when Luis Jerez was appointed as president and Jorge Rodríguez became secretary and treasurer (Vote of the Chile Union Mission Board of Directors 98-009). During this same event, the evangelistic growth of the territory was established as a high priority. In the beginning, the offices of the new mission operated in Talca Central Church, located on 1371 4th St. South. However, on August 6, 2001, the inauguration of its definitive headquarters, located on 1036 5th St. South, Talca, took place, where it remains to this day.

Bringing the Gospel to all parts of the world has its cost even in the best of the times, but even more so when it has to contend with forces of nature. The Seventh-day Adventist Church in Chile and its ecclesiastical administration have had to confront various telluric movements in the various regions of the country. This happens due to the fact that Chile is one of the most seismic countries in the world and "is part of the ‘Ring of Fire,’ a large area of the Pacific Ocean where the Nazca and South American plates collide."43 One example of this situation occurred in the early morning of February 27, 2010, when an 8.8 earthquake on the Richter scale shook the Chilean capital and the Central-South region of Chile. This tremor caused a tsunami with waves of more than 2.6 meters in Valparaíso Sea. That was the third-largest earthquake ever recorded in the history of Chile, and also was one of the five most powerful ever recorded in the world.44 Initially, according to reports, it was estimated that two million people had been directly affected and that more than 400 had died.45

This tragedy caused great damage to the properties of the Adventist Church in Chile and among the affected institutions were the headquarters of the South Conference and the Central Mission. So, they were forced to be vacated.46 Similarly, three schools were seriously affected, and ten churches destroyed. “More than seventy churches suffered severe structural damage and about 700 Adventist homes were also affected. Sadly, four of our members and a 9-year-old boy died.”47

Since the epicenter of the quake was at the sea in Maule region,48 the Central Chile Mission headquarters and nearby Adventist churches were seriously affected. The building of Central Chile Mission in Talca was destroyed. In addition, hundreds of people were left homeless. "As for the institutions, the [economic] loss was greater, around 10 million dollars. However, about $1 million had already been donated by South American Adventist headquarters and institutions” in the initial months after the disaster.49 Although the earthquake experience was certainly not a pleasant one, by the grace of God, the missionary work did not stop! The creation of Central Chile Mission facilitated missionary growth at the ecclesiastical and educational level.

Thus, during the first four-year period (1998-2002), the following churches were organized: Escuela de Molina (Molina district), Lagunillas (Constitución), Empedrado (Constitución), Graneros (San Francisco de Mostazal), Longaví (Linares), Santa Fe (Curicó), and Redención (WestTalca). The following groups were also organized: Quinta de Tilcoco (Rengo), Pelarco (Talca Oriente), Lo Miranda (Rancagua Central), El Boldo (Curicó), Las Américas (Talca Central), Las Gamboínas (Rancagua oriente), Baquedano (Rancagua Central), Costa Blanca (Constitución), Doñihue (Rancagua Central), Centinela (Constitución), Emanuel (Talca Oriente), Chancón (Rancagua Central), Peumo Negro (Talca Oriente), Jardín del Valle (Talca Central), and Coya (West Rancagua).

During the second four-year period, the following churches were organized: in 2003, Villa Las Américas (Central Talca), Valle Hermoso (Santa Cruz), and in 2005, Villa Francia (Central Talca). Seven groups were also organized during the same period. The growth in infrastructure and the formation of new congregations paralleled the increase in local donations and the implementation of special programs of the General Conference--with resources destined for the Global Mission of the South American Division and the Chile Union Mission.

These plans and strategies quickly demonstrated results since in 1999, 713 people were won for Christ, and after four years, in 2003, the Mission had 763 new converts. Thus, this field, which initially had 44 congregations until 2018, now had 60 organized churches and 38 groups.50 It was great progress for the Lord's work.

Another improvement made by the mission was the reconditioning and expansion of “Radal” Adventist camp facilities located in Siete Tazas National Reserve. This camp, which was built in the 1980s, has been a meeting place for trainings, gatherings, and camps for the Adventist community and for others.51 Likewise, in 2004, Central Chile Mission bought the land where Rancagua Adventist Academy is now located.

In relation to the mission of the Church, the Central Chile Mission promotes, together with the SAD, two very important projects for the Church in South America. The first is the Holy Week evangelization. The theme chosen for this special week in 2019 was “Renacidos: Un Nuevo Corazón” [Reborn: a new heart], which started on Saturday the 13th and ended on April 20, 2019. The purpose of this series was for the community to come closer to God during these dates during which the sacrifice of Jesus for us is remembered. At the end of this week, 126 people decided on baptism throughout the sixth and seventh regions.52

The second project promoted by this Mission was to reach all of society through the missionary project “Hope Impact.”53 For this reason, on Saturday, May 25, one month after the Holy Week, all the brothers from the different parts that composed the Central Chile Mission territory distributed the book “Esperanza para la familia” [Hope for the family] by Willie and Elaine Oliver. Under the framework of Hope Impact activities, on that Sabbath different health fairs were also held, offering help and advice about healthy living to the communities throughout the Central Mission territory. The total number of books distributed reached 22,620. Undoubtedly, these results could only be possible through the commitment shown by the leaders and members of the church.54

Finally, the servers and membership of this Mission, determined to encourage the spread of the Gospel, have closely accompanied the work carried out in “Espacio Nuevo Tiempo” [New Time Space] in Talca, which culminated in the conversion of many people. In reality, this space is a center of influence that meets the people's needs and aims to ensure that they enjoy a healthy and happy life through language classes, painting, exercise, and a guitar class, among other activities. This center of influence in Talca was supported by the volunteers of “A Year in Mission” who, in addition to accompanying the visitors, later offered Bible studies to each of the participants.55 In this way, the Gospel has been innovated and grows in this Mission through many other ministries such as Pathfinders, Adventurers, Youth, Caleb Mission, Women's Ministry, and Small Groups, among other programs.

Analyzing these more than 20 years of institutional history, it was possible to reveal that Central Chile Mission continues to successfully fulfill its role as a church in the Kingdom of God. Furthermore, its leaders are willing to use all available resources for the expansion of God’s work. However, in addition to the efforts of these servants of God, much additional support and volunteer work is needed to ensure that His work can be completed.

Chronology of Administrative Leaders56

Presidents: Luis Jerez S. (1998-2002); Josué Chandía Z. (2003-2007); Daniel Brieva C. (2008-2009); José Ojeda C. (2010-2012); Francisco Briceño L. (2013-2015); Josué Espinoza H. (2015-2019); Patricio Olivares M. (2019-Present).

Secretaries: Jorge Rodríguez (1998-2005); Ariel Vera (2006-2007); Guilhermo Acosta (2008); Héctor Ogalde (2009); Mauricio Comte (2010-2011); Juan Fernández (2012); Juan Carlos Sandoval (2013-2014); Hernán Sanzana (2015-2019); Cesar Montecinos R. (2019-Present).

Treasurers: Jorge Rodríguez (1998-2005); Ariel Vera (2006-2007); Guilhermo Acosta (2008); Daphne Cuellar (2009-2010); Américo Oliveira (2011-2012); Claudio Pardo (2013); Nestor Araneda (2014-2019); Antonio Parra (2019); Daniel Castro Pinochet (2020-Present).57

Sources

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Arias, Ángela. “Decenas de estudiantes se gradúan de ‘Espacio Nuevo Tiempo’ en Chile” [Dozens of students graduate from ‘New Time Space’ in Chile]. Adventist News (Online), December 6, 2017.

Arias, Ángela. “Radio Nuevo Tiempo llega a 38 estaciones en Chile” [New Time Radio reaches 38 stations in Chile]. Adventist News (Online), July 12, 2019.

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Köhler, Ertön. “Ano de catástrofes ou esperança?” [Year of catastrophes or hope?]. Revista Adventista, no. 1223 (April 2010).

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Sandoval, Isaac. “Terremoto Chile - Daños en Misión Central de Chile” [Chile Earthquake - Damage in Chile Central Mission] (Video). Damage caused by the earthquake, March 8, 2010. Accessed March 04, 2020, https://youtu.be/rS6sWM5JRnw.

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Notes

  1. Seventh-day Adventist Online Yearbook, “Central Chile Mission,” accessed March 15, 2020, http://bit.ly/2WeB3Wn.

  2. Chile Census 2017, Cachapoal, Rancagua, Census 2017 template, accessed November 19, 2019, https://bit.ly/2Tj0S5U.

  3. Instituto Nacional de Estadísticas de Chile [Chile National Institute of Statistics], “Estadísticas de la Región del Libertador General Bernardo O’higgins” [“Statistics of Liberator General Bernardo O’higgins Region”], accessed March 2, 2020, https://bit.ly/2TfDiXp.

  4. Ibid.

  5. Seventh-day Adventist Online Yearbook, “Central Chile Mission,” accessed March 15, 2020, http://bit.ly/2WeB3Wn.

  6. Adventist Church Management System (ACMS) - Central Chile Mission, 2016

  7. “Por qué Educación Adventista” [“Why Adventist Education”], Adventist Education Chile, accessed April 14, 2020, https://www.educacionadventista.com/chile/.

  8. Information obtained from the Adventist School System (SEA) - 2016.

  9. The Adventist Development and Relief Agency International (ADRA) “is the humanitarian agency of the Seventh-day Adventist Church. Through global network, it helps people in 130 countries, regardless of religion, race or political affiliation.” [ADRA works] "together to provide relief to those who need it most, through Community Development projects and assistance in emergencies and disasters.” ADRA Sudamérica [South America ADRA], “ADRA Sudamérica” [“South America ADRA”], accessed March 16, 2020, http://bit.ly/2xCMdd7.

  10. Site de ADRA Chile [Chile ADRA Website], “Tenemos 20 Sucursales de Familia de Acogida” [“We have 20 Host Family Branches], accessed March 15, 2020, http://bit.ly/3d1pBTV.

  11. Site de ADRA Chile [Chile ADRA Website], “Tenemos 5 Programa Reparatorio en Maltrato (PRM)” [We have 5 Abuse Rehabilitation Programmes (PRM)”], accessed March 15, 2020, http://bit.ly/2WbCLYF.

  12. Site de ADRA Chile [Chile ADRA Website], “Tenemos 1 DAM, 1 PIE y 1 PRI” [“We have 1 DAM, 1 PIE and 1 PRI”], accessed March 15, 2020, http://bit.ly/2Wg83NO.

  13. Ibid.

  14. The National Service for Minors (Sename) “is a centralized governmental body, collaborator of the judicial system and dependent on the Ministry of Justice and Human Rights. It is in charge of protecting the rights of children and adolescents, and of young people who are between 14 and 17 years old, who have broken the law. In addition, it regulates and controls adoption in Chile.” Sename, “Nuestra Institución” [“Our Institution”], accessed March 16, 2020, http://bit.ly/2WoiWx4.

  15. Site de ADRA Chile [Chile ADRA website], “Bienvenida/o” [“Welcome”], accessed March 15, 2020, http://bit.ly/2U6XABU.

  16. Ángela Arias, “Radio Nuevo Tiempo llega a 38 estaciones en Chile” [New Time Radio reaches 38 stations in Chile], Adventist News, July 12, 2019, accessed March 15, 2020, http://bit.ly/2U73h2F.

  17. “South American Division,” 2019 Annual Statistical Report (Silver Spring, MD.: Seventh-day Adventists Church, 2019), 41.

  18. Portal de la Iglesia Adventista del Séptimo Día [Seventh-day Adventist Church (Brazil) website], “Iglesias MCCh” [“MCCh Churches”], accessed March 15, 2020, http://bit.ly/33i8uZJ.

  19. Portal de la Iglesia Adventista del Séptimo Día [Seventh-day Adventist Church (Brazil) website], “Iglesias MCCh” [“MCCh Churches”], accessed March 15, 2020, http://bit.ly/2x1nRK4.

  20. Portal de la Iglesia Adventista del Séptimo Día [Seventh-day Adventist Church (Brazil) website], “Personal de Oficina” [“Office Staff”], accessed March 15, 2020, http://bit.ly/33kwkDV.

  21. Portal de la Iglesia Adventista del Séptimo Día [Seventh-day Adventist Church (Brazil) website], “Historia de América del Sur” [“South American History”], accessed March 16, 2020, http://bit.ly/2ScYEEu; Nuevo Tiempo Chile [Hope Channel - Chile], “Video 150 años de la Iglesia Adventista en Chile” [“Video 150 years of the Adventist Church in Chile”], Historical Video of Adventism in Chile, August 8, 2013, accessed March 26, 2020, https://bit.ly/2UhMFGF.

  22. Revista Adventista 1, no. 2 (February 10, 1901): 4.

  23. Leopoldo Zambra, Con su Espíritu [With His Spirit], Santiago: Educational Home and Health Service, 1994, 84; Daniel Oscar Plenc, Misioneros en Sudamérica: pioneros del adventismo en Latinoamérica [Missionaries in South America: pioneers of Adventism in Latin America], Buenos Aires, Argentina: Buenos Aires Publishing House, 2013, 78.

  24. W.J. Westphal, “The organization of the Chile Conference,” ARH, July 4, 1907, 15-16.

  25. Daniel Oscar Plenc, Misioneros en Sudamérica: pioneros del adventismo en Latinoamérica [Missionaries in South America: pioneers of Adventism in Latin America], Buenos Aires, Argentina: Buenos Aires Publishing House, 2013, 77-78.

  26. Chile Conference Minutes of the Board of Directors, August 15, 1932, vote no. 2812.

  27. Chile Conference Minutes of the Board of Directors, 1933, vote no. 2945.

  28. Chile Conference Minutes of the Board of Directors, 1936, vote no. 3676.

  29. “General Conference and Overseas, Spot News: South America,” ARH, May 4, 1950, 19, accessed March 16, 2020, http://bit.ly/2TRR7M2.

  30. R. O. Scully, “The Dying Race,” South American Bulletin 30, no. 3 (May-June 1955): 3.

  31. “North Chile Conference,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1951), 168.

  32. It was endorsed by a vote at the 1966 General Conference Congress Session. See “Proceedings of the General: Fiftieth Session, June 16-25, 1966,” ARH, June 19, 1966, 27, accessed March 16, 2020, http://bit.ly/38Zf6Nz.

  33. Moises S. Nigri, “Editorial,” South American Bulletin 42, nos. 1 and 2, (January-June 1966): 7, accessed March 16, 2020, http://bit.ly/2UdPN72.

  34. Moises S. Nigri, “Chile Union Mission Organized,” South American Bulletin 42, nos. 1 and 2, (January-June 1966): 8, accessed March 16, 2020, http://bit.ly/2UdPN72.

  35. “Central Chile Conference,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1967), 198.

  36. “Central Chile Conference,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Hagerstown, MD.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1989), 257.

  37. Chile Union Misson Minute of the Board of Directors, June 28, 1988, vote 88-224 that records the vote 88-303 of SAD.

  38. “Central Chile Conference,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Hagerstown, MD.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1990), 266.

  39. Seventh-day Adventist Online Statistics, “Central Chile Mission-Yearly Statistics (1989-1990),” accessed March 26, 2020, https://bit.ly/2UGMRhN.

  40. Colegio Adventista de Talca [Talca Adventist Academy], “Proyecto Educativo Institucional” [“Institutional Educational Project”], accessed March 2, 2020, https://bit.ly/2IiCef3.

  41. Chile Union Misson Minute of the Board of Directors, July 1, 1997, vote 97-110 that records the vote 97-109 of SAD.

  42. Gustavo González, “CHILE: Crisis dejó pérdidas y el menor PIB de la década en 1998” [“CHILE: Crisis caused losses and the lowest GDP of the decade in 1998”], Inter Press Service News Agency, January 7, 1999, accessed March 26, 2020, https://bit.ly/2QLzzzq.

  43. Icarito, “Chile: zona sísmica” [Chile: seismic zone], accessed March 17, 2020, http://bit.ly/3aYcl0u.

  44. “Os 10 terremotos mais potentes e com maior número de mortos da história da América Latina” [“The 10 most powerful and deadliest earthquakes in Latin America's history”], BBC News Brazil, September 24, 2017, accessed March 04, 2020, https://bbc.in/39pIBJz.

  45. Karen Cordovez, “Tremor ao lado” [“Next Door Quake”], Revista Adventista, no. 1223 (April 2010): 25.

  46. Isaac Sandoval, “Terremoto Chile - Daños en Misión Central de Chile” [“Chile Earthquake - Damage in Chile Central Mission”], Video of the damage caused by the earthquake, March 8, 2010, accessed March 4, 2020, https://youtu.be/rS6sWM5JRnw.

  47. Ertön Köhler, “Ano de catástrofes ou esperança?” [“Year of catastrophes or hope?”], Revista Adventista no. 1223 (April 2010): 4.

  48. From G1, with international agencies, “Número de mortos por terremoto no Chile passa de 100, diz presidente eleito” [“Chilean earthquake death toll exceeds 100, says president-elect”], G1, February 27, 2010, accessed March 4, 2020, https://glo.bo/2Tpga97.

  49. Karen Cordovez, “Tremor ao lado” [“Next Door Quake”], Revista Adventista no. 1223 (April 2010): 25.

  50. Seventh-day Adventist Online Statistics, “Central Chile Mission-Yearly Statistics (1998-2018),” accessed March 26, 2020, https://bit.ly/3dtwtJX.

  51. Alfredo Müller, “III Campamento Escolar reúne a 230 personas en Radal” [“III School Camp gathers 230 people in Radal”], Adventist News, March 30, 2015, accessed March 18, 2020, http://bit.ly/39WtNCx; Portal de la Iglesia Adventista del Séptimo Día [Seventh-day Adventist Church (Brazil) website], “1° Asamblea Radal 2019” [“1st Radal Assembly 2019”], accessed March 18, 2020, http://bit.ly/2U1LKda.

  52. Portal de la Iglesia Adventista del Séptimo Día [Seventh-day Adventist Church (Brazil) website], “Programa Semana Santa” [“Holy Week Program”], accessed March 24, 2020, https://bit.ly/2xup6Bn.

  53. The project “Hope Impact is a program that encourages the practice of reading and provides a mass annual distribution of books on the part of the Seventh-day Adventist in the South American territory.” Portal de la Iglesia del Séptimo Día [Seventh-day Adventist Church (Brazil) website], accessed February 4, 2020, http://bit.ly/2Uqqu1q.

  54. Portal de la Iglesia Adventista del Séptimo Día [Seventh-day Adventist Church (Brazil) website], “Impacto Esperanza” [“Hope Impact”], accessed March 24, 2020, https://bit.ly/3ajXbD4.

  55. Ángela Arias, “Decenas de estudiantes se gradúan de ‘Espacio Nuevo Tiempo’ en Chile” [“Dozens of students graduate from ‘New Time Space’ in Chile”], Adventist News, December 6, 2017, accessed March 18, 2020, http://bit.ly/390X3Xw.

  56. Seventh-day Adventist Online Yearbook, “Central Chile Mission,” accessed March 15, 2020, http://bit.ly/2WeB3Wn; “Central Chile Mission,” Hagerstown, MD.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1999), 260; “Central Chile Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Nampa, ID.: Pacific Press Publishing Association, 2018), 235. For more details about all the presidents, secretaries, and treasurers in the MCCh history, see the SDA Yearbooks from 1999 to 2018.

  57. Portal de la Iglesia Adventista del Séptimo Día [Seventh-day Adventist Church (Brazil) website], “Líderes Administrativos” [“Administrative Leaders”], accessed March 3, 2020, http://bit.ly/2x1nRK4. More information about Central Chile Mission can be found on the website: www.mcch.adventistas.org, or on social networks – Facebook: @mcchchile, Instagram: @iasdmcch, Twitter: @MisionCentralCh and Youtube: Misión Central Chile IASD.

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Yañez, Marco, Pablo Millanao Torrejón. "Central Chile Mission." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. July 01, 2021. Accessed June 13, 2024. https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=DGL2.

Yañez, Marco, Pablo Millanao Torrejón. "Central Chile Mission." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. July 01, 2021. Date of access June 13, 2024, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=DGL2.

Yañez, Marco, Pablo Millanao Torrejón (2021, July 01). Central Chile Mission. Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. Retrieved June 13, 2024, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=DGL2.