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North Parana Conference headquarters facade in 2016.

Photo courtesy of North Parana Conference Archives.

North Parana Conference

By Eronildes Oliveira Chagas, and Renato Gross

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Eronildes Oliveira Chagas

Renato Gross

The North Paraná Conference (Associação Norte-Paranaense or ANP) is an administrative unit of the Seventh-day Adventist Church, located in the territory of the South Brazil Union Conference (União Sul-Brasileira or USB).

The North Paraná Conference’s headquarters are located on 1336 Carlos Corrêa Borges Avenue at Zip Code 87060-000 in the Jardim Iguaçu neighborhood in the city of Maringá in the state of Paraná, Brazil.1 The North Paraná Conference’s mission field covers 146 cities with a total population of 3,193,112 people. Among these cities, five still need to be evangelized since there are neither churches nor Adventists in these places. The Adventist population in the region is about 22,527 members.2 There are 41 pastoral districts with 260 congregations. The average is 1 Adventist per 141 inhabitants. In order to meet the Adventist demand in this region, this administrative unit has 575 staff members, six of whom are employees working in The Home and Health Educational Service (Serviço Educacional Lar e Saúde or SELS), 270 in the educational area, and 299 in the religious area and in the churches. Of these 299, 41 are district pastors and three are auxiliary pastors or chaplains. Considering the institutional administration, there are 60 ministers linked to the ANP, 48 of whom are ordained, and 12 are licensed.3

In the ANP’s territory, there are five educational institutions from the Adventist Educational Network. They are: Maringá Adventist School, in the city of Maringá, with 465 students; Cianorte Adventist Academy, in Cianorte, with 312 students; Apucarana Adventist Academy, in Apucarana, with 156 students; Maringá Adventist Academy, in Maringá, with 836 students; and Londrina Adventist Academy, in Londrina, with 982 students. By the end of 2018, 2,751 students were served by these units.4 The ANP’s territory still contains the Parana Adventist Academy (Instituto Adventista Paranaense or IAP), which is located in the city of Ivatuba in the metropolitan region of Maringá. However, it is managed directly by the South Brazil Union Conference.5

The region also has TV Novo Tempo [Hope Channel Brazil] and Rádio Novo Tempo [New Time Radio] on an open channel, sharing the message of hope 24 hours a day. The Channel is present in 17 cities with a potential reach of 1.3 million people. In turn, the radio channel is present in 94 cities with a potential reach of 1.6 million people.6

The Origin of the Adventist Church Work in the Conference Territory

The northern region of Paraná received the Adventist message in the mid-1920s when the colonization of the territory was expanded. The first Adventists to settle in the region were João and Josefina Reichert, a couple who were volunteer missionaries who worked as wagon manufacturers. They were from the city of Maracaí in the countryside of the state of São Paulo, and they settled in the city of Sertanópolis in the metropolitan region of Londrina. It was in Sertanópolis where the first Adventist meetings in this region took place and later where the first Adventist congregation in the ANP field of evangelization was also established.7

As they arrived in Sertanópolis, the Reicherts founded a Sabbath School class that operated in their home. The first resident of the city to attend those meetings was a man named Pedro Domingues. Little by little, other people began to attend Sabbath School at the Reicherts' house to the point that the place became too small to accommodate so many people. For this reason, João Reichert removed one of the walls of his house, joining two rooms to form a larger room. This room, for many years, served as an auditorium for the meetings of the Adventists from Sertanópolis.8

As the congregation grew, it was necessary for an Adventist pastor to be able to assist this group. Thus, the first pastor to visit Sertanópolis was Alfredo Süssmann, who came in 1926. In parallel to this, John and Josefina Reichert continued to study the Bible with those interested in the message. Later, in 1937, Pastor Durval Stockler de Lima performed the region’s first baptismal ceremony. On that occasion, José Afonso de Paula, Clara Martins de Paula, Ernesto Rosa, and Geralda de Paula Rosa all were baptized. A year later, in 1938, the Sertanópolis Adventist temple was inaugurated. The building was made of wood, and it was 6 meters long by 8 meters wide.9

During the 1930s, several factors contributed to the expansion of the Adventist message in what is currently the ANP mission field. One was the means of transportation. After moving around in wagons, the people from Paraná started to travel by trains and locomotives. In 1935, the city of Londrina already had a railway line that made it possible to expand missionary service, thus reaching the cities of Maringá and Cianorte. Along the railroad, it was possible to visit a row of cities such as Rolândia, Arapongas, Apucarana, Jandaia do Sul, Mandaguaçu, Mandaguari, Marialva, and Sarandi, among others. Thus, starting from Cianorte where the railroad ended, it was possible to access the entire northwest of Paraná.10

With the establishment of the railway, Adventist families from the south of the state of São Paulo began to settle in villages and cities along the railroad line. In 1937, two years after the implementation of the railway, there were two Adventist families in Londrina. The city also had a temple made of wood, and even with only two Adventist families, 60 people attended Sabbath School each Sabbath. At the end of the 1930s, the Londrina congregation already had about 50 members. In the meantime, Adventists were already present in cities such as Sertanópolis, Rolândia, Cornélio Procópio, Arapuã, Cambará, Ribeirão Claro, and Santo Antônio da Platina.11

The region of Londrina was receptive to the Adventist message. This enabled the growth of the Church in that region and, due to that, Londrina soon became the headquarters of a pastoral district with Pastor Emílio de Azevedo as the first district pastor. This district had a large territorial extension ranging from the Itararé border in the state of São Paulo to the city of Campo Mourão in Paraná. Altogether, it was over 500 km long with only one pastor to assist. In addition, at the time, the roads were extremely precarious.12

In this time of great challenges, “God’s worker [Pastor Emílio de Azevedo] received so many calls that he did not know who he would answer first [...]. We, at first, tried with bicycles, but that was not a good choice, because when it rained heavily that purple mud used to stick on the tires and thicken the wheels in a such way that they couldn’t spin anymore.” World War II (1939-1945) was another factor that hampered the development of the Adventist work. During this conflict, all gasoline previously sold was reserved for the Armed Forces. Wheat, which was also imported, disappeared. “Many families dismantled the pasta (in an attempt) to make some bread.”13

Even with the war and all the elements that hindered the work of evangelization, the first Adventists in the region did not give up on the objective of consolidating the Church in that area. It is worth mentioning the work of evangelist canvassers14 such as Belarmino Pereira and José Januário Justino, who also played an important role in the formation of the Church in that region. Another development factor was the Sabbath School branches15 established by pioneer families on farms and ranches. Finally, public evangelism campaigns carried out during the 1940s marked the development of Adventist work in northern Paraná. As the time went by, other congregations were organized, and temples were built initially of wood and later renovated with masonry.16

During the 1940s, new Adventist Church work fronts began to develop in the region, one of which was Adventist education. Due to the constant flow of immigrants to the north of Paraná, the educational challenge in relation to children increased. Thus, in 1945, the Sertanópolis Adventist Academy was created through the efforts of the Adventists in the city. At the head of the project was the director of the educational department of Paraná-Santa Catarina Conference (nowadays the Santa Catarina Conference), Pastor Romeu Ritter dos Reis. In its first year of activities, the school operated in the church building using desks provided by the city. Considering that this was not the ideal condition for a school, it was decided to build a school with larger and brighter rooms. In this new building, classes started in 1946.17

The Adventist Church continued to grow in the region, and it was reflected in the new cities that were reached by the message. In Maringá, for example, Adventist history is more recent when compared to other cities in the region. This, however, is due to the fact that this city emerged in a more contemporary period. Its first Adventist chapel was inaugurated on November 18, 1949. In the following year (1950), the pastoral district of Maringá was organized - the sixth district of Paraná Conference (nowadays the South Paraná Conference) with a small group of Adventists. Its first district pastor was José Turíbio de Burgo.18

As the time went by, more people continued to be reached by the Adventist message, including those who had left the Church in the past. This was the case of Stephan Azsalos and his family, Germans who were baptized again in April 1951. Azsalos and his family had been part of the reform movement for more than 20 years both in Europe and in Brazil, but after that time, they decided to return to the Adventist Church.19 The experience of the Azsalos family led Pastor Burgo and a member of the church, Paulo de Freitas, to start a series of public meetings in Maringá, an event through which they obtained good results.20 Finally, on August 23, 1952, the Maringá Adventist Church was organized with the presence of Pastor Moisés Nigri, then president of South Brazil Union Conference (presently the Central Brazil Union Conference), and the local pastor, Ricardo Zukowski.21

With the growth in the number of members and those interested in the Adventist message, the wooden temple in Londrina started to become too small to accommodate everyone. A new Adventist temple was inaugurated and dedicated in that city on May 26 and 27, 1951. The ceremony was attended by 15 pastors, including the then-president of South American Division (SAD), Pastor W. E. Murray. The leaders of South Brazil Union Conference and Paraná-Santa Catarina Conference were also present. The project for the new temple was designed by Brother Guilherme Malsbenden, who had already prepared the projects for the first two temples in Curitiba. The old temple building was adapted to serve the city's Adventist primary school. From then on and during the 1960s, Adventism was spread throughout the region.22

During the expansion and consolidation of the Adventist Church in Northern Paraná, education continued to be an important tool for social development and evangelization. In 1973, the Paraná Conference purchased the Santa Maria Farm with 123 bushels of area in the city of Ivatuba in the region of Ivaí’s valley. The new Paraná Adventist Academy started to operate there, which was transferred from Curitiba region. The cornerstone of the Academy in Ivatuba was laid on August 12, 1974. Three years later, in 1977, the first graduation of elementary school took place in which 27 graduates were present. In this way, Adventist education was established more strongly in the north of Paraná. Nowadays, the IAP maintains Paraná Adventist College (Faculdade Adventista do Paraná or FAP), which offers higher education to young people from all over Brazil.23

The Conference Organizational History

In order to help the Church in its expansive growth and be better served in relation to its needs, two successive Triennial Assemblies were held. The delegates present expressed what the Church desired in the north of Paraná: a reorganization in Paraná mission field. It was requested, among other factors, due to the distance between Curitiba, where Paraná Conference was headquartered, and the north of the state of Paraná. In addition to this scenario, there was a topographic factor that generated a demographic vacuum between the north and the south of the state of Paraná.24

Aware of the need to more effectively support the Church growth in this region and of the request of Adventists in Northern Paraná, the USB held a meeting with the Executive Board in the city of Curitiba on August 11, 1987. At that meeting, the Board voted to forward the survey request to South American Division in order to consider the feasibility of reorganizing the Paraná Conference (Associação Paranaense or AP) in two administrative regions. It was also voted, at the same meeting, to nominate the board to study the possibility of creating the new Conference in northern Paraná. The committee was initially formed by USB administrators, the AP administrators, the USB Patrimonial Expansion leader, and the Paraná Conference Publications departmental leader.25

After a detailed analysis carried out at the meetings of the USB Executive Board in the city of Curitiba on October 20, 1987, it was voted to register the SAD's vote no. 87-588. This vote nominated the Study Board for the reorganization of the AP mission field. The Board was formed with the following components: the SAD administrators; the USB administrators; the AP administrators; pastors Floriano X. dos Santos, Enrique Becerra, Claudenor Mochiutti, all of them from the north of Paraná; and Itaniel Silva from the south of the state. In addition, members Édimo Martinez from northern Paraná and Elon Garcia from southern Paraná were also elected.26

During the meeting of the USB Administrative Board held on June 5, 1988, at Pênfigo Adventist Hospital in the city of Campo Grande in the state of Mato Grosso do Sul, it was voted to register the SAD vote no. 88-353. The vote approved the report of the Study Board for the reorganization of Paraná Conference mission field. According to the analyzes, the region pointed out the feasibility of creating two administrative headquarters of the SDA Paraná Conference: Southern Administrative Region, and its geographical configuration - based in the capital of Paraná, the city of Curitiba; and the new Northern Administrative Region, with the definition of its territorial limits.27 In that same meeting, it was approved that the headquarters of the new Conference would be in the city of Maringá. Thus, the new administrative structure started to be called North Paraná Conference of the Seventh-day Adventist Church (Associação Norte-Paranaense or ANP).28

The SAD vote that authorized the creation of the new Conference also recommended that the separation of the AP’s assets should be done on a proportionate basis to the number of members. During the reorganization process, it was found that in the evangelization field of the new Conference, there were several incomplete pastoral districts. For this reason, the South Brazil Union Conference decided to coordinate this process. It was decided that 53% of the operating capital was to go to the new field in the north of the state, and 47% to the southern field. In addition, the USB administration and the AP administrators coordinated and administered all the processes of separation of assets. It was defined that what corresponded to North Paraná Conference would be delivered on the basis of special grants.29

The USB also coordinated the division of materials from the departments, the acquisition of land, and the construction of the building to hold the new administrative office, among other things. The field of work was reorganized under the motto, “Divide to Multiply.” The South Paraná Conference president in that year was Pastor Luís Lindolfo Fuckner. At that time, “everyone recognized that geographic division was necessary for the good progress of the Church.”30 It is worth mentioning that the Church grew throughout the whole state. However, the northern region still needed better service in order to be able to make further progress.31

On January 2, 1989, with its provisional headquarters on 367 Manoel Ribas Square, the doors of the new administrative unit of the Church were opened to serve Adventists in northern Paraná.32 Its first president was Pastor Ivanaudo Barbosa.33 At the beginning of its activities, North Paraná Conference was responsible for serving 17,584 members who were distributed in 78 churches spread across the northern region of the state of Paraná.34 The territorial reorganization worked. So much so that just three years after the foundation of the ANP, the number of members who had already surpassed the mark of 19,000 people, and the number of churches had already reached 87. In this way, the Church’s mission to bring the Gospel to all continued to be well executed in the region covered by this Church administrative unit.35 Four years after the establishment, its headquarters were transferred to 469 Napoleão Moreira da Silva Square in the city of Maringá, Paraná. The ANP office remained at that address until 2004 when it was transferred to 1336 Carlos Corrêa Borges Avenue, which was also in Maringá, where it is currently located.36

For the continuous growth of the two fields, about four years after the transfer of the ANP headquarters to the current address, the vote no. 2008-142 was taken. In this vote, the ANP, together with South Paraná Conference (Associação Sul-Paranaense or ASP) and the USB, requested that the South American Division carry out a territorial reorganization in the field covered by the two Conferences in order to better serve the churches and encourage members to participate in mission. Thus, in the following year, 2009, as a positive response to requests, another administrative unit was created: the Central Paraná Conference (Associação Central Paranaense or ACP).37

The new Conference was headquartered at 159 Deputado João Ferreira Neves Street in the Vista Alegre neighborhood in the city of Curitiba. The ACP was responsible for meeting the demands of 108 churches and about 21,551 Adventist members in the central region of the state of Paraná.38 In order to define the mission field of this new Conference, the mission fields of the ANP and the ASP were reorganized. From the territory covered by the ANP, three pastoral districts, 22 congregations, and 1,164 members were reduced.39 At that time, the Northern field was responsible for 167 churches and about 33,216 baptized members.40

Between 2009 and 2012, several evangelistic efforts were made within the area of the ANP. At least 64 different places were reached through public evangelism. Also, at least 10,159 people were baptized. The development of the mission continued to advance throughout the northern territory of Paraná. At the end of that period, there were already at least 35,087 members linked to the ANP and 378 congregations throughout the region, showing an increase of 4.68% in relation to the period from 2005 to 2008. At that time, the average proportion was 1 Adventist per 130 inhabitants in the region.41

After studies and analyzes carried out by the SAD and the USB on the feasibility of creating a new administrative unit in the region, in February 2012, the ANP First Extraordinary Denominational Assembly was held. This assembly approved the project for the reorganization of its mission field and the creation of a new field, all aiming to better serve the church in the western region of the state of Paraná. At that time, the West Paraná Mission was created, which later was named the West Parará Conference (Associação Oeste Paranaense or AOP).42

The evangelization work in the ANP mission field, throughout its 30 years of existence, was carried out in the context of three main strategies. The first was the use of personal evangelism in partnership with the work of public evangelism teams. For many years, this strategy was greatly emphasized as the main form of missionary expansion of the Church in this region. The second strategy was related to the work of Bible workers. This method was used on a large scale, alternately with the first method. During four years, there was an emphasis on the establishment of Small Groups as the basis of all church evangelistic efforts. In the following quadrennium, the method of public evangelism stood out again, but this time with the support and help of Bible workers. In the following four years, the missionary service of Bible workers was once again the most used in the process of evangelization. This method of alternating between public evangelism and the work of Bible workers prevailed until the end of 2015.43

The third main strategy was put in place as of the end of 2015 when the ANP joined the USB Program “Cada Um Salvando Um” [“Each One Saving One”] (C1S1 - a network of people who must act as agents of transformation in the lives of other people) in harmony with the SAD’s evangelistic proposal of “Comunhão, Relacionamento e Missão” [“Communion, Relationship and Mission” or CRM]. This unity of purpose has emphasized the healthy growth of the Church, focusing on engaging members in the Gospel mission through the use of their spiritual gifts.44

Since its establishment, the North Parana Conference has developed, through various strategies, several projects for the continuous growth of the work in its mission field such as the implementation of training programs for leaders as well as projects aimed at young people. One of these projects is the “Cenáculo” [“Cenacle”] which, in 10 editions, has already guided around 1,000 leaders on the ideal of prayer as an important item of communion.45 Another project carried out in northern Paraná is the “reavivamento e reforma” [“revival and reform”], which is done through the videos of the series “Revolução mais Fiel” [“More Faithful Revolution”], which is distributed on 10,000 DVDs with spiritual messages and challenges of fidelity and are used in family services.

New generations are also part of this movement. Regarding the evangelization of the youngest, in 2018, there were 3,839 Pathfinders in 135 clubs46 in the ANP region. There has also been a remarkable growth in the Adventurers Club,47 now with about 92 clubs and 2,234 children. Teenagers were also able to have a new vision of their Sabbath School action units through the project “Geração 148 Teen” [“Generation 148 Teen”]. This project is a version of the already consolidated “Generation 148” project for youth that promotes group meetings to motivate communion through the study of Bible themes in addition to strengthening the Christian relationship and fulfilling various challenges related to the mission.48

Adventist members in the area covered by the ANP have also been actively involved in projects fostered by the South American Division. One of these projects is the “Impacto Esperança” [“Hope Impact”].49 In 2018, in the northern region of the state of Paraná, Adventists of all ages were able to hand out nearly 400,000 missionary books to local residents. In addition, during the mobilization, several health fairs were held that were attended by the ANP headquarters employees, Pathfinders, students from the Adventist Educational Network, and young Adventists. The material distributed that year was the book “O Poder da Esperança” [“The Power of Hope”].50

Another mobilizing action is the project “Quebrando o Silêncio” [“Breaking the Silence”] that alerts and makes the population aware of domestic violence and other social problems. This campaign has managed to obtain space in public schools, private schools, and other environments in addition to gaining the respect and support of public authorities. Currently, this project is part of the official activity calendar of the two largest cities in the region covered by North Paraná Conference - Londrina and Maringá - after being approved by their respective city councils.51

Other evangelistic efforts that have spread the Adventist message in the ANP territory are short/medium/long term mission projects, such as canvassing;52 the “Missão Calebe” [“Mission Caleb”] project53; and “Um Ano em Missão” [“One Year in Mission”],54 which mainly involves the strength and dynamism of youth. In parallel to these projects, the ANP leadership has sought to promote the mobilization and missionary capacitation of volunteer workers who receive theoretical and practical training on a regular basis. In addition, the Conference created two projects aimed at church leadership. One consists of regional training for all church department leaders at the beginning and the middle of the year. In turn, Sabbath School directors and teachers participate in district meetings known as “Escolas de Esperança” [“Schools of Hope”]. There is also the “Academia de Líderes” [“Academy of Leaders”] that offers inclusion classes in the distance format (through video sessions).55

Another very active evangelistic means at the ANP is the “Pequeno Grupo” [“Small Group”],56 the nucleus of missionary action that strengthens the relationship between members and contributes to the spread of the message to specific audiences. An important highlight is that the basis for relationships in these meetings, which take place inside and outside the Church, is centered on the Sabbath School’s action units. In order for these units be efficient in carrying out their activities, leaders receive constant training and increasingly personalized guidance.57

This attention to discipling also occurs within the sphere of leadership. The administrators of North Paraná Conference work with a regular training network for the leaders of the churches and groups in the field through the Small Groups of Leaders (Pequeno Grupo de Líderes or PGL) meetings. These meetings are directed by district pastors, who in turn receive training for this task in the monthly meetings of the Small Groups of Pastors (Pequeno Grupo de Pastores or PGPs). Furthermore, they are promoted and carried out by the Conferences’ administration and mission departments. In addition, district pastors also regularly participate in councils where they receive administrative, missional, and leadership guidance for better missionary development in their districts. The field leadership also promotes the “Escola de Evangelistas Voluntários” [“School of Volunteer Evangelists”] with the purpose of teaching students to be local evangelists. The project has already instructed about 420 students in the 2017 and 2018 editions only.58

Other special projects also have the attention of the Conference such as the evangelistic work that has been developed in prisons for more than 20 years. Coordinated by Sister Ruth Anita Schneider (Mother Ruth, as she is called by inmates and authorities in the judicial system), this work enjoys the respect, prestige, and unanimous admiration both of the prison population and authorities as well as of the Church and society of Maringá. As a result of the work done, thousands of inmates in the region’s prisons have been reached with the Gospel message, and hundreds of them have already been baptized. In addition, there is a lively church functioning in the prison system.59 Through these and other missionary actions, the ANP has fulfilled the mission established by Christ in the context of the Great Commission of Matthew 28:18-20.

However, reflection on the history of the development of the Church in the region covered by the ANP can provide some learning. The administrative leadership of the North Paraná Conference recognizes that, despite the success achieved in the growth of the Church during its 30 years of history and the many missionary activities carried out today, there are still great challenges to be overcome. The main one is to increase the engagement and the rate of effective participation of members in missionary work, which can still be improved. In order to do this, it is important to find ways to strengthen the vision of the “priesthood of all believers” in the management of local churches administrators, pastors, and leaders.60 In this context, one of its greatest needs is to put into practice the discipleship plan taught by Jesus. Although it seems to be a slow method, it is proven that the Church grows in a healthy and more sustainable way.

Another challenge of the North Paraná Conference is to increase the number of Adventists in large cities, such as Apucarana, Arapongas, Paranavaí, and especially Londrina. Nowadays, the most evangelized region in the ANP field is Maringá. There is a large number of churches full of members in this region.61 However, there are still major evangelistic challenges in other regions of the ANP mission field, with progress in evangelizing the city of Londrina being the main focus. Londrina is the largest city in the region covered by the ANP, but the number of Adventists does not match the demographics of the region.62

One of the plans being implemented for the growth of the church in Londrina, for instance, is the acquisition of a television channel, which is already at an advanced stage in negotiation. The purpose is that, through this communication channel, it is possible to reach the entire population of Londrina and the region by spreading the Gospel 24 hours a day. The Conference’s leadership also believes in the missionary potential of Adventist education. For this reason, a large plot of land was purchased near Londrina Airport, a region considered to be rich for the establishment of a second school unit with a capacity for 1,500 students. The beginning of the works currently awaits the approval of the projects and the adaptation to the municipal laws.63

Within the context of the Global Mission64, permanent efforts are being made and will continue to be made so that in the ANP territory, very soon there will be at least one Adventist Church established in all cities of the region covered by the Conference – a goal that is almost achieved when you take into account that, in the 146 cities of the ANP mission field, there are only five that have not yet been reached.65 For this, the objective is to permanently improve the pasturing of the church through the structure of the Sabbath School and other missionary fronts with a focus on strengthening the growth rates of the church in Communion, Relationship, and Mission.66

Chronology of Administrative Leaders67

Presidents: Ivanaudo Barbosa de Oliveira (1989-1995); Valdilho Quadrado (1996-2004); Élbio Menezes (2004-2008); Ronaldo Bertazzo (2009-2014); Josias F. da Fonseca (2014-2016); Montano de Barros Netto (2016-Present).

Secretaries: Melchiades Soares (1989-1995); Eucir Romero de Lima (1996-2008); Elieser Canto Vargas (2009-2010); Milton L.P. de Andrade (2011); Josias F. da Fonseca (2012-2014); Eronildes Oliveira Chagas (2015-Present).

Treasurers: Paulo C. Dos Reis (1989); Homero Ribas Nemes (1990-2000); Davi Contri (2001-2004); João Adilson Rodrigues (2004-2008); Marcelo Cristiano Bif (2009-2014); Everson Teixeira Braga (2015-Present).68

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Schmidt, S. “A primeira flâmula da União Sul Brasileira” [“The first pennant of the South Brazil Union Conference”]. Revista Adventista 34, no. 4 (April 1939).

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“Secretaria” [“Secretariat”]. Reavivados na Grande Esperança – VII Assembleia Geral Ordinária da Associação Norte Paranaense [Revived in the Great Hope - VII Ordinary General Assembly of North Paraná Conference], December 2, 2012.

Seventh-day Adventist Church (Brazil) website. http://www.adventistas.org/pt/.

Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook. Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association. Various years. https://www.adventistyearbook.org/.

South American Division Minutes, February 12, 2009, vote no. 2008-142.

Weber, W. A. “Inauguração e dedicação do novo templo de Londrina, norte do Paraná” [“Inauguration and dedication of the new temple in Londrina, northern Paraná”]. Revista Adventista 46, no. 9 (September 1951).

Wons, I. “Geografia do Paraná: com fundamentos de geografia geral” [“Paraná Geography: with general geography fundamentals”]. Curitiba, PR: Ensino Renovado, 1974.

Notes

  1. Seventh-day Adventist Online Yearbook, “North Parana Conference,” accessed on July 31, 2019, http://bit.ly/2GDQFKr.

  2. Ibid.

  3. Deisy Battistel Oliveira (Assistant of ANP secretary), email message to Gustavo dos Santos Cidral (ANP communication advisor), September 21, 2016.

  4. Francieli Erthal (Assistant of ANP secretary), email message to Gustavo dos Santos Cidral (ANP communication advisor), September 21, 2016.

  5. Instituto Adventista Paranaense [Paraná Adventist Academy (Brazil) website], “Graduação” [“Graduation”], accessed February 13, 2020, http://bit.ly/2uKLm9b.

  6. Francieli Erthal (Assistant of ANP secretary), email message to Gustavo dos Santos Cidral (ANP communication advisor), September 22, 2016.

  7. E. R. de Azevedo, “Terra da Promissão” [“Land of Promise”], Revista Adventista 34, no. 6 (June 1939): 12.

  8. Ibid.

  9. Minutes of the Organization of the Seventh-day Adventist Church in Sertanópolis, Paraná, November 25, 1946, 1-2.

  10. Nelson Capucho, “Fazenda luminosa” [“Luminous farm”], Revista Helena [Helena Review] 1, no. 1 (October 2012): 105.

  11. S. Schmidt, “A primeira flâmula da União Sul Brasileira” [“The first pennant of the South Brazil Union Conference”], Revista Adventista 34, no. 4 (April 1939): 11; E. R. de Azevedo, “Terra da Promissão” [“Land of Promise”], Revista Adventista 34, no. 6 (June 1939): 11-12.

  12. Arnoldo Rutz, “Memórias autobiográficas” [“Autobiographical Memories”], Manuscritos “[Manuscripts”], originally held by Professor Sílvia Pires de Araújo Trovon from Curitiba. Photocopy in this author's personal file.

  13. Ibid.

  14. An evangelist canvasser of the Seventh-day Adventist Church is the missionary who “develops his ministry by acquiring and selling to the public the publications edited and approved by the Church, to transmit to his fellow-men the eternal Gospel that brings salvation and physical and spiritual well-being.” Seventh-day Adventist Church (Brazil) website, “Colportagem” [“Canvassing”], accessed February 4, 2020, http://bit.ly/2J6tY1I.

  15. “The Sabbath School Branch consists of a Sabbath School class that operates in a region, city or neighborhood that doesn’t have an Adventist presence. In this place, members of this class develop social, community and missionary work. Its main purpose is to carry the Adventist message to places not yet reached.” Adventistas Sul Paranaense [South Paraná Adventists], “#16 - Escola Sabatina Filial - Pr. Clemente” [“#16 - Sabbath School Branch - Pr. Clemente”] (presentation video, Sabbath School Branch, pastor Clemente Ramos, April 8, 2019), accessed January 30, 2020, https://bit.ly/2t6I5jI.

  16. Rutz, “Memórias autobiográficas” [“Autobiographical Memories”].Photocopy in this author's personal file.

  17. W. A. Weber, “Inauguração e dedicação do novo templo de Londrina, norte do Paraná” [“Inauguration and dedication of the new temple in Londrina, northern Paraná”], Revista Adventista 46, no. (September 1951): 10-11.

  18. Paulo G. de Freitas, “Mais uma Vitória em Maringá” [“One more victory in Maringá”], Revista Adventista 46, no. 9 (September 1951): 13-14.

  19. Ibid.

  20. J. T. de Burgo, “Notas e notícias do 6º Distrito da Associação Paraná – Sta. Catarina” [“Notes and news from the 6th district of Paraná-Santa Catarina Conference”], Revista Adventista 47, no. 5 (May 1952): 14.

  21. José Darci de Carvalho, “Nova igreja organizada em Maringá” [“New church organized in Maringá”], Revista Adventista 48, no. 4 (April 1953): 11.

  22. Weber, “Inauguração e dedicação do novo templo de Londrina, norte do Paraná” [“Inauguration and dedication of the new temple in Londrina, northern Paraná”], 10-11.

  23. R. Gross, “Instituto Adventista Paranaense: uma história em três tempos – 1939 – 2009” [“Paraná Adventist Academy: a history in three times – 1939 – 2009”] (Ivatuba, PR: Paraná Adventist Academy, 2009), passim.

  24. Minutes of the Meeting of the Administrative Board of the Corporation of South Brazil Union Conference of SDA, August 11, 1987, vote no. 87-133.

  25. Ibid.

  26. Minutes of the Meeting of the Administrative Board of the Corporation of South Brazil Union Conference of SDA, October 20, 1987, 147.

  27. Minutes of the Meeting of the Administrative Board of the Corporation of South Brazil Union Conference of SDA, October 5, 1988, 148.

  28. Ibid., 147-149.

  29. Ibid.

  30. “Paraná é Dividido em dois Campos” [“Paraná is divided into two Fields”], Revista Adventista, November 1988, 22.

  31. Eronildes Oliveira Chagas (ANP secretary), e-mail message to Gustavo dos Santos Cidral (ANP communication advisor), September 12, 2016; “Paraná é Dividido em dois Campos” [“Paraná is divided into two Fields”], 22.

  32. “Histórico da Associação Norte Paranaense” [“History of the North Paraná Conference”], recorded in the ANP Minutes Book, 2004.

  33. Eronildes Oliveira Chagas (ANP secretary), interviewed by Gustavo dos Santos Cidral (ANP communication advisor), September 14, 2016.

  34. “North Parana Conference,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Hagerstown, MD.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1990), 279.

  35. “North Parana Conference,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Hagerstown, MD.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1993), 270.

  36. Eronildes Oliveira Chagas (ANP secretary), interviewed by Gustavo dos Santos Cidral (ANP communication advisor), September 14, 2016.

  37. South American Division Minutes, February 12, 2009, vote no. 2008-142.

  38. “Central Parana Conference,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Hagerstown, MD.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 2011), 302.

  39. “Presidência” [“Presidency”], Reavivados na Grande Esperança – VII Assembleia Geral Ordinária da Associação Norte Paranaense [Revived in the Great Hope - VII Ordinary General Assembly of North Paraná Conference], December 2, 2012, 7.

  40. “North Parana Conference,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Hagerstown, MD.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 2011), 304.

  41. “Presidência” [“Presidency”], 7. “Secretaria” [“Secretariat”], Reavivados na Grande Esperança – VII Assembleia Geral Ordinária da Associação Norte Paranaense [Revived in the Great Hope - VII Ordinary General Assembly of North Paraná Conference], December 2, 2012, 13-14.

  42. Analysis made in the history of North Paraná Conference, September 12, 2016.

  43. Ibid.

  44. Ibid.

  45. Presidency Report for the VIII ANP Assembly; Deisy Battistel Oliveira (Assistant of ANP Secretary), email message to Gustavo dos Santos Cidral (ANP communication advisor), September 21, 2016.

  46. The Pathfinders Club is made up of “boys and girls aged 10 to 15 years old, from different social classes, color, religion. They meet, in general, once a week to learn to develop talents, skills, perceptions and a taste for nature.” These boys and girls “are thrilled with outdoor activities. They like camping, hiking, climbing, exploring the woods and caves. They know how to cook outdoors, making a fire without matches.” Besides, they demonstrate “skill with discipline through drill commands and have their creativity awakened by manual arts. They also fight the use of tobacco, alcohol, and drugs.” Seventh-day Adventist Church (Brazil) website, “Quem somos” [“Who we are”], accessed February 4, 2020, http://bit.ly/2FDRqTh

  47. The Adventurers Club is a program for children from 6 to 9 years old, created by the Seventh-day Adventist Church, in 1972. It aims to “facilitate the child to share his faith, to prepare for this life and eternal life”. Seventh-Day Adventist Church (Brasil) Website, “Aventureiros: Sobre nós” [“Adventurers Club: About us”], accessed February 4, 2020, https://www.adventistas.org/pt/aventureiros/sobre-nos/.

  48. The ANP Pathfinders and Adventurers Ministries Report, December 12, 2018.

  49. The project “Hope Impact is a program that encourages the practice of reading and provides a mass annual distribution of books on the part of the Seventh-day Adventist in the South American territory.” Seventh-day Adventist Church (Brazil) website, “Impacto Esperança” [“Hope Impact”], accessed February 4, 2020, https://bit.ly/34dZROO.

  50. Gustavo Cidral, “Adventistas entregam 400 mil livros no norte do Paraná” [“Adventists hand out 400 thousand books in northern Paraná”], Notícias Adventistas [Adventist News], May 28, 2018, accessed August 2, 2019, http://bit.ly/2OCdS69.

  51. Vânia Lopes (Assistant of ANP secretary), email message to Gustavo dos Santos Cidral (ANP communication advisor), September 21, 2016.

  52. Canvassing work is a “voluntary distribution activity and independent of religious publishing and themes related to health and family quality of life.” Those who work in canvassing works are known as canvassers. Seventh-day Adventist Church (Brazil) website, “Colportagem” [“Canvassing Work”], accessed February 14, 2020, https://bit.ly/2RQirbB.  

  53. “The project One Year in Mission promotes the participation of young Adventists in the mission to evangelize urban centers in eight countries in South America, uniting their talents, resources and professional knowledge with the needs of the community.” Seventh-day Adventist Church (Brazil) website, “Um Ano Em Missão” [“One Year in Mission”], accessed February 4, 2020, https://bit.ly/2sCFyNL.

  54. “Caleb Mission project is a volunteer program, social service, and a witnessing that challenges the Adventist youth to dedicate their vacations to evangelism in places where there’s no Adventist presence, to strengthen the small congregations and gain new people for the kingdom of God.” Seventh-day Adventist Church (Brazil) website, “Missão Calebe 2020” [“Caleb Mission 2020”], accessed February 4, 2020, http://bit.ly/2HRpvRi.

  55. Vânia Lopes (Assistant of ANP secretary), email message to Gustavo dos Santos Cidral (ANP communication advisor), September 21, 2016.

  56. “Small Group is a weekly gathering of people who, under coordination of a leader, seek spiritual, relational and evangelistic growth, aiming at its multiplication.” Seventh-day Adventist Church Portal, “Pequenos Grupos” [“Small Groups”], accessed February 4, 2020, https://bit.ly/2NtcXj7

  57. Vânia Lopes (Assistant of ANP secretary), email message to Gustavo dos Santos Cidral (ANP communication advisor), September 21, 2016.

  58. Ibid.

  59. Ibid.

  60. Ibid.

  61. Ibid.

  62. Ibid.

  63. Ibid.

  64. “Global Mission is a branch of the Adventist Mission front line, a department of the world Seventh-day Adventist headquarters. The projects of the Global Mission start as local initiatives. The Global Mission supports the front line ministry local initiatives in unreached areas [by the Adventist Church] and helps to integrate all church departments in this task.” Seventh-day Adventist Church (Brazil) website, “O que é Missão Global” [“What is Global Mission”], accessed February 4, 2020, http://bit.ly/35Wz9e0

  65. Vânia Lopes (Assistant of ANP secretary), email message to Gustavo dos Santos Cidral (ANP communication advisor), September 21, 2016.

  66. Ibid.

  67. Vânia Lopes (Assistant of ANP secretary), email message to Gustavo dos Santos Cidral (ANP communication advisor), September 21, 2016; “North Parana Conference,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Hagerstown, MD.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1990), 279; “North Parana Conference,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Nampa, ID.: Pacific Press Publishing Association, 2018), 253. For more details about all administrative leaders of North Paraná Conference, see the Seventh-day Adventist Yearbooks from 1990 to 2018.

  68. For more information about North Paraná Conference, access their website at http://anp.adventistas.org/ or their social media on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter: @AdventistasANP and Youtube: Adventistas ANP [ANP Adventists].

×

Chagas, Eronildes Oliveira, Renato Gross. "North Parana Conference." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. January 10, 2021. Accessed March 04, 2021. https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=EGE8.

Chagas, Eronildes Oliveira, Renato Gross. "North Parana Conference." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. January 10, 2021. Date of access March 04, 2021, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=EGE8.

Chagas, Eronildes Oliveira, Renato Gross (2021, January 10). North Parana Conference. Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. Retrieved March 04, 2021, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=EGE8.