View All Photos

Adventist Medical Center–Iligan in 2016.

Photo courtesy of Nestor V. Molleda.

Adventist Medical Center–Iligan

By Nestor Villarias Molleda

×

Nestor Villarias Molleda worked at the National Steel Corporation as quality assurance supervisor prior to his work at the Adventist Medical Center College as chemistry instructor, dean of student affairs, and human resource director at both the college and hospital. Presently, Molleda is the vice president for operations at the Adventist Medical Center-Iligan. He is a licensed chemical engineer (ChE). He holds a Masters in Environmental Management (MEM), a Doctor in Philosophy, Educational Management (MSN), and is a fellow of the Philippine College of Hospital Administrators (FPCHA).

First Published: January 5, 2021

From its humble beginnings as a rented two-story house, known as Lakeside Clinic in Marawi City, to a 130-bed capacity DOH-recognized secondary level hospital, Adventist Medical Center-Iligan has overcome many challenges to achieve its current success.1

Adventist Medical Center–Iligan is owned and operated by the Seventh-day Adventist Church, specifically under the Southern Philippine Union Conference (SPUC). The hospital board is chaired by the president of the SPUC, with the president of the hospital as the board secretary. Adventist Medical Center–Iligan is one of ten Seventh-day Adventist hospitals in the Philippines affiliated with the Adventist International Health Systems–Philippines, which is part of the Adventist International Health Systems–Asia of the Southern Asia Pacific Division of Seventh-day Adventists.

Developments That Led to the Establishment of Adventist Medical Center-Iligan

On the island of Mindanao in the Philippine archipelago, there are several ethnic groups who have long practiced Islam. Collectively known as Moros, they were closed to Christianity until 1947. Through the work of Dr. Regalado T. Santos, Adventists were able to begin a successful and pioneering medical work among the Moros.2

In 1947, while travelling to Mindanao in the interest of the medical work, Santos met a group of people speaking a strange language. They had black teeth, colorful costumes, uncouth manners, and a peculiar smell. They were Muslim Filipinos, famous in Philippine history for their piratical raids and incessant hostility to the Castillian and Fil-American governments by which they are popularly called Moros. Santos learned then that nothing had been done by the mission to bring the Adventist message to the Moros, mainly due to fear of these people. Unconsciously, he lifted up his heart in prayer that somehow the Lord would open the way and prepare someone to carry the message to them.3 After the Ingathering of that year, God graciously answered his prayers and Santos found himself at the receiving end of the answer. He was invited to lead a medical service unit for the Muslims at their own request.

In 1948, the initial medical work started in Dansalan City (now Marawi City), which is approximately 37.9 kilometers from Iligan City. The pioneers saw the great need to sow the gospel seeds among the Maranaws, one of the ethnic groups comprising the Moros, who wanted nothing to do with Christians. A two-story house, located at the heart of the city, was rented and named Lakeside Clinic and opened on March 25, 1948. The first story was utilized as the reception and consultation rooms, offices, x-ray, laboratory, and lecture room, while the operating room, living quarters for the nurses, and four small rooms holding ten to twelve beds, and ward rooms were on the second floor.4

In the short span of fifteen months, the clinic became very popular with the Moros. During that period, the clinic treated more than 4,000 patients (ninety percent of which were Muslim), of which some 200 were hospital patients. In the same length of time, Santos, now the medical secretary of Philippine Union, performed nearly 250 major and minor operations. The original staff of one doctor and two nurses increased to two doctors, three nurses, and a bookkeeper. An operating gain of almost US$3,000 was achieved at the close of December 1948. When the two-story building could no longer accommodate the large influx of patients, leaders began to contemplate moving the clinic to Iligan City.5

Pioneer Medical Missionaries

Santos, a surgeon, initially led the medical team that included three nurses. Ruby Burnett was a medical missionary nurse who volunteered for service in the interim when the Manila Sanitarium and Hospital was still under construction. Nurse Lucena Garcesa was among the Ingathering volunteers from the Mindanao Mission Academy who first contacted the Muslims and aroused their interest in Adventist medical work. The third nurse was Tarcela Torrico. Dr. Feliciano Ponce, a dentist, completed the medical staff.

In mid-March of 1952, Dr. Francisco Geslani and his family arrived in Iligan City, anticipating the construction of a new hospital. Providentially, an ideal hospital site, owned by the Shekers, which was two kilometers from the city center, was put up for sale. By April, the construction in Tibanga had begun.

Southern Mindanao Mission Clinic

Lakeside Clinic continued its operation and Geslani had to travel between Dansalan City and Iligan City every day. The daily trips became too rigorous for him, so it was decided to start a clinic in Iligan City. Southern Mindanao Mission Clinic was opened in downtown Iligan City on June 15, 1952. Two rooms were rented in a hotel owned by Alfonso Sy. The clinic in Dansalan continued to attend to the medical needs of the Muslim Moros, and more workers were called to join the medical team. God’s goodness never failed them. He provided two influential ladies, Mrs. Padilla, the wife of Atty Padilla, and Mrs. Zubiri. These ladies became effective marketers for the Southern Mission Clinic. Income from the Lakeside and Southern Mission clinics was used for the construction and labor expenses of the new hospital. Meanwhile, Santos was called to start another medical work in Cebu.

Founding of Mindanao Sanitarium and Hospital

During the years 1951 and 1952, Lakeside Clinic continued to grow, registering 9,200 out-patients. Gross receipts for the nine months of 1948 were ₱23,000, providing an operating gain of nearly ₱6,000. The first seven months of 1949 presented an even brighter picture for gross receipts reached a total of ₱26,000. The Lakeside Clinic ultimately contributed ₱25,000 to the Mindanao Sanitarium and Hospital building fund. Meanwhile, in Iligan, some twenty miles from Lakeside Clinic, the Mindanao Sanitarium and Hospital was nearing completion by 1952. Geslani was the medical director.6

After its humble beginning as Southern Mindanao Mission Clinic, its name was changed to the Mindanao Sanitarium and Hospital (MSH) in order to introduce it to the public in preparation for the opening of the hospital. The two-room clinic occupied two small rooms—one for medical consults, the other for dental services—with very limited supplies and facilities, some of which were borrowed. Geslani and Ponce worked without nurses or dental assistants. Geslani’s wife served as receptionist, bookkeeper, and medical assistant. As word spread among the friends and family of satisfied patients, Geslani soon had too many patients to manage alone, and it became necessary to assign a nurse to the clinic.7

Practically, all of the clinic’s monthly profits went into the new hospital construction. In its short lifespan, it earned approximately ₱12,000. This money was earned through clinical services as there were no surgical or hospital fees. April 1953 was the clinic’s business month of operation. More than 3,000 patient visits resulted in proceeds of ₱2,000. Eighty percent of these were non-Adventists. The clinic was responsible for generating many new contacts for the Adventist Church.8

While Geslani’s practice in Iligan City grew, construction of the new hospital building, on a half -hectare lot prominently located on a national highway two kilometers from the city limits, progressed. It took about a year to finish the hospital, as funds for its construction came from the earnings of the Dansalan and Iligan Clinics.9

Although yet unfinished, the hospital opened on May 15, 1953. In its first two months of operation, staff admitted 1,024 patients, often exceeding its twenty-five patient limit. More patients were treated through outpatient services. From the beginning the hospital was self-supporting, paying the salaries of one physician, one dentist, two graduate nurses, an accountant, four nurses’ aides, a receptionist, floor boys, ground and laundry men, and a maintenance man. Plans were soon made to add a pharmacist, another doctor and nurse, a laboratory technician, and a dietician. The hospital exerted a broad influence in the region.10

In October 1953, Mindanao Sanitarium and Hospital was still not quite finished and lacked in essential equipment. Constructed of hardwood and concrete, the upper floor contained two large wards, three private rooms, an isolation room, and the operating room. The ground floor included two doctors’ offices, treatment room, pharmacy, business office, dental clinic, physical therapy, x-ray, and laboratory rooms. Personnel and equipment from the Lakeside and Southern Mission Clinics were eventually moved to the new hospital and the clinics.11

From 1953 to 1955, a mobile clinic was operated by MSH and served the provinces of Bukidnon, Cotabato, Davao and Zamboanga del Sur. MSH quickly gained patronage in Iligan and the nearby provinces, thus, more workers were hired. Among them were Dr. Gregorio Poblador, a general practitioner, and Dr. Arturo P. Roda, an internist from Manila Sanitarium and Hospital. The increase in patient count necessitated the construction of a new wing. In 1955-1956, MSH undertook ₱40,000 expansion, which enlarged the hospital to forty beds.12

In 1956, Santos returned to MSH as medical director while Geslani was called to the Miller Sanitarium and Hospital. Under Santos’s leadership for three years, the hospital gained recognition among the citizens of Iligan, particularly the Muslim people of Marawi City.

In the later part of 1958, Roda, was appointed the new director of MSH. It was during his term that plans to expand the bed capacity yet again were laid. This new plan increased the hospital’s capacity nearly 100 beds, including pediatrics and nursery.13

MSH took over the operation of Gingoog Mission Clinic in 1962 when its medical doctor, Paterno Primero, went to the United States for residency training. Gregorio D. Poblador was sent to run the clinic.14

Roda returned Manila Sanitarium and Hospital in 1967, and Dr. Wenceslao Torres, Jr., a skilled surgeon, became the fourth medical director of Mindanao Sanitarium and Hospital.15 The sixty-bed hospital continued to grow, the building became too small to accommodate the ever-increasing clientele. Patients insisted on being admitted because they wanted to experience extraordinary care from the medical team. In 1967, a massive fund drive was conducted for another building extension. Sister institutions and benevolent doctors were tapped for financial support.

On February 4, 1969, the long-awaited expansion of the Mindanao Sanitarium and Hospital, broke ground. The contractor of this project was Wenceslao Cerezo, Jr. proprietor and manager of Davao Engineering and Construction, who signed ₱600,000 contract with South Philippine Union administrators to construct the first unit of an annex building and a nursing school building expected to be completed in eight months.16 On March 29, 1970, the first phase of the new two-story wing opened. Keeping pace with its growth, MSH adopted a new name, Iligan Adventist Hospital with seventy-five beds. However, after a year, it reverted back to its original name.

More and more improvements were evident in its facilities and equipment. Additional services were offered and operation hours were also extended to take care of the increasing populace as well as to conform to the Bureau of Private School’s requirements to open the clinical division of Mountain View College in Iligan City. In 1971, Dr. Torres answered a call for missionary work in Kenya, Africa. Dr. Willis Dick, an American physician, replaced him.17 Modern facilities and hospital supplies were donated to the hospital by Dick’s friends abroad. In 1973, the physical therapy and rehabilitation department opened.18

When Dick returned to the United States, Arthur F. Lasta served as the acting medical director during the transition period. On May 1, 1976, the hospital board elected Levi H. Pagunsan, an internist, medical director.

The construction of the hospital’s second expansion phase started on February 13, 1977, and by January 5, 1978, the new wing was inaugurated. Among its improvements, it added private rooms and nurses’ stations.

Throughout its development, MSH never abandoned its first mission to provide assistance to the Muslims of Dansalan. In 1978, Pastor Peter Donton founded HELP (Health Education for the Lanao People), a community-based health program in Tamparan, Lanao del Sur. However, the program was short-lived when Benny Consejo, a purchasing personnel for the hospital, was killed in an ambush.

On April 1, 1979, MSH passed the standards of the Ministry of Health for accreditation as a tertiary training hospital, the only one in Region XII.

In 1983, plans to start a health facility in Davao City were developed. In 1985, Davao Urgent Health Care Clinic opened under the leadership of Dr. Pagunsan, who was then also the medical director of MSH. When Pagunsan gave his full attention to the new clinic, Adelaida F. Ongpoy, a pediatrician, served as medical director from February 1, 1986, to December 31, 1987.

In 1988, the hospital for the first time experienced financial struggle. Joel Y. Dalaguan was elected the nineth president of the hospital, tasked with steering it through this challenging time. Due to a financial crisis, it laid off fifteen employees, who protested their retrenchment through litigation. Dalaguan was forced to focus on the labor case for the first six months of his administration. After several hearings, a decision was made in favor of the retrenched workers. Hospital administrators appealed to the Supreme Court, and the decision was reversed.

Hospital management also kept abreast technological development. Thus, the billing and accounting departments were computerized in 1989.

As Iligan City improved its economy, massive migrations took place. This led to the addition of more rooms. In 1990, the administration appealed to employees to donate a portion of their income for the building fund. Construction of the vegetarian fast foods cafeteria and ten additional suites was completed and opened on November 28, 1991.

The Birth of a College

On April 8, 1992, MSH employees, pioneers, guests, and friends gathered in front of the hospital to commemorate its fortieth anniversary and inaugurate the new rooms and equipment. More construction, renovation, and the addition of equipment took place between 1992 and 1995. Construction of the operating room complex, which was named in honor of Dr. Francisco T. Geslani, the hospital’s first president.19 Also in 1993, proposals were made to operate a paramedical school under the auspice of the hospital. Mindanao Sanitarium and Hospital College of Medical Arts foundations, Inc. formally opened on June 10, 1994, offering courses for Bachelor of Science degrees in physical therapy and midwifery. One hundred seven students enrolled.20

The Operation Smile International team came to Iligan in 1994 for the first time. This voluntary medical mission provided free reconstructive surgery on facial deformities.21

History and Milestones of Adventist Medical Center-Iligan

On April 12, 1997, the hospital inaugurated a new intensive care unit, which was named after Dr. and Mrs. Michael Oliverio, a very generous friend and supporter of MSH during the celebration of the hospital’s forty-fifth anniversary. The anniversary celebration’s theme, “Upholding a Tradition of Excellent Care” commemorated forty-five years of serving the medical needs of the community.22

The hospital celebrated its golden anniversary on April 7-14, 2002, with the theme, “A Golden Leap Towards Excellence.” Since 1952, the hospital had grown from a crude clinic to a modern medical edifice that continues to reflect Christ through innovative healthcare and education.23

On December 22, 2004, through much hard work, MSH became an ISO-certified institution, making it the first hospital in Northern Mindanao to earn such an accolade.24

Modernizing the hospital continued when ground was broken for the hospital annex building on April 13, 2005. This project was a testament to the MSH administration’s resolve to improve the quality of its healthcare services. The five-story, seventy-bed capacity building was much needed to provide space to accommodate more patients.25 On May 5, 2006, the first two floors were completed and utilized as offices and additional suite rooms.

Age required Dalaguan to retire and the leadership baton was passed to Dr. Edgar Claude A. Nadal on April 7, 2007. Nadal was the tenth president.

In line with the hospital’s commitment to its employees’ spiritual, social, and mental development, a retreat for staff members was held in Boracay in April and May of 2008. Department heads were also given the opportunity to visit larger hospitals in Hongkong and Bangkok, Thailand, for professional development. Department heads and middle managers were also encouraged and financially supported to complete masters and doctoral studies.26

Amidst the economic meltdown experienced by the United States and neighboring Asian countries in 2009, MSH continued to be blessed. Properties, such as the three-story College Assurance Plan building were bought on March 17, 2009, and in the following month, another three-story dormitory building was acquired in Cebu City.27

In the later part of 2010, the Department of Health granted the hospital a license to operate as a 130-bed capacity medical establishment. Modern machines and properties were acquired.

Pastor Ellizer M. Bacus was chosen to lead the hospital as the eleventh president on January 7, 2011.28

On the night of December 17, 2011, Storm Sendong struck Iligan causing massive destruction. After the giant waves toppled houses carrying victims to their death, casualties were whisked to MSH in great numbers. Throughout the night, medical workers cared for victims rushed in from time to time by army vehicles and private cars. For the first time, the MSH morgue was filled. The trauma was emotionally devastating for family members and caregivers alike.29

The hospital celebrated its 60th anniversary from April 8-15, 2012, with the theme “60 Years of Caring and Changing Lives Through God’s Grace.”30 The MSH Foundation was organized and its officers were inducted on April 9, 2012.31 Various activities and programs were initiated by the foundation. Its activities bring hope and happiness to people who are not admitted to the hospital. Various medical and dental missions, relief efforts, and feeding programs are regularly conducted in remote places, helping people with different medical needs.

Adventist Medical Center–Iligan has constantly been the hospital of choice for those in need of medical attention in Iligan City and in the surrounding provinces. The hospital addresses not only the general physical health its clients, but also their spiritual needs.

In addition to its status as a premier health facility, the hospital also aims to reach and teach others about God. Thus, the Radio Bandera 100.9 News FM was inaugurated on September 11, 2012. The coverage of the radio reaches as far as Ozamis City and Initao, Misamis Oriental.32

The Commission on Higher Education (CHED) granted MSH College a permit to offer new courses in 2012-2013. These courses included degrees in pharmacy, and nutrition and dietetics in addition to the other courses offered by the school which include medical technology, radiologic technology, nursing, physical therapy, information technology, business administration, secondary education, elementary education, and a TESDA-approved course on health care services.33

On December 6, 2015, the hospital celebrated its sixty-third anniversary with the inauguration of the hospital emergency room annex expansion, which houses additional private rooms, an isolation room for high alert communicable diseases, and the women’s health center.34

On February 16, 2016, Dr. Edgar Claude A. Nadal became the hospital’s twelfth president. In the later part of the year, the fifth floor of the annex building, oncology unit, emergency room extension, and new vehicles and equipment were added to the hospital.35

In 2017, through employee contributions, a new tennis court, additional rooms, and equipment were added to the hospital. Most significantly, reflecting its new modernity, Mindanao Sanitarium and Hospital officially changed its name to Adventist Medical Center–Iligan (AMCI).36

April 30, 2017, marked AMCI’s sixty-fifth anniversary gala night after almost a year of celebration ranging from tree and mangrove planting at Bayug Island, coastal clean-up, and community meals, to doctors’ and retirees’ nights. Hospital employees also promised to carry on their commitment to do the Lord’s ministry in this part of the globe.37

On May 23, 2017, Marawi City was under sieged as it was attacked by the ISIS-affiliated terrorists, Maute group.38 The hospital played a vital role in the five months of war as wounded soldiers and civilians were treated. The president of the Philippines visited and honored the heroes in the hospital’s conference room.39 AMCI, in cooperation with Adventist Medical Center–Bacolod, conducted medical missions and relief operations for the victims of war in Iligan at an evacuation center.

In 2018, the board of trustees approved the reckoning of the hospital date of origin to include the Lakeside Clinic in Marawi in 1948.40 Consequently, on December 9, 2018, the hospital celebrated its seventieth anniversary with the theme, “Serving with optimum care and astounding happiness for the Redeemer,” dubbed SOAR @ 70. New services, such as the eye and hearing centers were opened.41

Corporate Social/Environmental Responsibility

Adventist Medical Center-Iligan, places a high value on the cleanliness of the hospital and its surroundings, determined to provide and promote a healthy and safe environment. Being an ISO 9000:2015 certified institution, it practices and documents segregation of waste before disposal. However, feeling that it is not enough, the hospital waste management committee conducted a brainstorming activity and came up with a project dubbed “The Big Z” or the “Zero Waste Challenge.”42 It initiated the ban of single-use plastic bags and Styrofoam, and promoted the use of eco-friendly bags to all clients. Through this program, the hospital has slowly educated its customers to embrace the motto, “Save Iligan a Little Each Day.”

The social responsibility campaign was expanded outside of the hospital, kicked-off on January 18, 2019, with a motorcade that drove around the city, distributing leaflets and eco bags. City councilor Noli Pardillo was part of the event. This was followed by an interview broadcast through DXMC Hope Radio 100.1 FM, dubbed “Kapehan sa Iligan,” with the city vice mayor and councilor Jake Balanay, the city chairman on waste and environment. The interview occurred on January 27, 2019. Other programs included urban farming by Vermi, composting from biodegradable waste, eco-brick production from plastic waste, shredding and pulverizing through the use of ball mill were used for diapers and tubing. The hospital also shreds the tubing and sharps from neighboring hospital who have no shredding machines.

Other activities in line with the project was “plogging,” where plastic waste was collected around the city while jogging on February 24, 2019, then turned it over to city councilor Jake Balanay. Last April 24, 2019, the hospital promoted “plolking,” where waste was cleaned up in the coastal area while walking. For this activity, the hospital was recognized by the Brgy. Captain of Saray through a certificate of recognition. On July 26, 2019, the shoreline of Barangay Tambacan, Iligan City, was cleaned up to eradicate dengue, which is rampant in the area.43

Besides solid waste management, the hospital also conducts an annual mangrove planting, tree planting, and coastal clean-up days to green the environment. The hospital adopts a barangay (the lowest level of government in the Philippines) for community meal. The hospital purchased a fire truck to answer calls whenever there is fire in the city. On April 8, 2019, a new C-Arm scanner was purchased and a 2.6-hectare farm lot in barangay Bonbonon was acquired on May 6, 2019. A ₱6 million contract with MICU for the installation of fire sprinklers in the old building was inked on June 3, 2019. The following week, a clinic for HIV-AIDS victims, called “The Haven,” was dedicated on June 10, 2019.44

Awards

The hospital was chosen by the Department of Health as one of the ten best level two hospitals in the Philippines, dubbed “DOH30 Hospital Star Awards,” during an award ceremony on October 17, 2019.45 Earlier it received the Outstanding Fire for the contribution of AMCI Fire Brigade Volunteers during a fire event in Iligan, and for consistently winning the City Fire Olympics Competition. On September 10, 2019, the Wound Care Center was opened, followed by the Breast Care Center on September 18, 2019.46

Name Transitions

The first official name of the hospital was Lakeside Clinic, established on December 9, 1948, in Marawi City beside the famous Lake Lanao. The hospital in Iligan City was established in March 1953 and named Mindanao Sanitarium and Hospital, although it was briefly called the Iligan Mission Clinic before the hospital name was introduced. In 1970, the institution operated as Iligan Adventist Hospital for a short time as well.

To create a unified identity for all the Seventh-day Adventist Hospitals in the Philippines, the name Adventist Medical Center was adapted for all secondary and tertiary Adventist hospitals in the country, with only the last word (e. g. Iligan) as its location identifier. The name, Adventist Medical Center-Iligan, was formally adopted on April 9, 2012.

Historical Role of the Institution

Mindanao Sanitarium and Hospital, now Adventist Medical Center-Iligan, was established by the Seventh-day Adventist Church as a means for reaching the Maranaws of northern Mindanao. A the time the effort was undertaken by the South Philippine Union Conference. The hospital served the provinces of Misamis Oriental, Misamis Occidental, Lanao del Norte, Lanao Del Sur and Zamboanga del Sur. MSH quickly gained patronage in Iligan and the nearby provinces as it played a vital role in the healthcare of the people.

For many years it has been the medical arm of the gospel as it partnered with the South Philippine Union Conference conducted medical mission in conjunction with every evangelistic effort.

The hospital continually supports the national and the local government by responding to various disasters in the country such as caring for the victims of Typhoon Sendong in Northern Mindanao on December 17, 2011, Typhoon Yolanda in Tacloban City on November 13, 2013, and Typhoon Pablo in Compostela Valley on December 2, 2014. It also played a vital role in admitting wounded soldiers and civilians during the Marawi siege on May 23, 2017, and conducted relief operations and free clinics for the evacuees. MSH sent its medical and rescue teams during the earthquake in North Cotabato and Davao del Sur on November 6, 2019, distributing food and blankets, providing medical care, and conducting mental health wellness activities for the survivors.

The year 2020 was a very challenging as the hospital admitted the first COVID-19 patient in Mindanao, dubbed PH40, last March 4, 2020. Fortunately, for the hospital’s nursing staff, none of them were infected after fourteen days of quarantine, despite not knowing that the patient was positive. The staff believed that God protected them. The hospital also served the community of Iligan by doing disinfection in the streets using the hospital’s firetruck. One of its wings was converted into a COVID-19 center. Despite the pandemic, the hospital continued to purchase equipment to improve services. A pacemaker insertion, the first in Iligan, was done at AMCI on June 20, 2020.

Outlook

Adventist Medical Center–Iligan has served the wider Iligan community with commitment and faithfulness for more than seventh-two years. Its leaders praise God for His abundant goodness, which they believe has allowed the hospital to flourish despite the COVID-19 pandemic. The founders would be amazed to see how a crude clinic in 1948 turned into the present modern medical establishment.

Adventist Medical Center–Iligan has consistently been the hospital of choice among those in need of medical attention in Iligan City and in the surrounding provinces. The hospital addresses both the physical health spiritual well-being of its clientele.

Institutional Names

Lakeside Clinic (1948-1952), Southern Mission Clinic (1952-1953), Mindanao Sanitarium and Hospital (1953-1969), Iligan Adventist Hospital (1970), Mindanao Sanitarium and Hospital (1971-2012), Adventist Medical Center–Iligan (2012- ).

Hospital Presidents and Medical Directors

Regalado Santos (1948-1954), Francisco T. Geslani (1955-1958), Arturo P. Roda (1958-1967), Wenceslao M. Torres, Jr. (1967-April 1971), Willis G. Dick (May 1971-April 1975), Arthur F. Lasta (May 1975-April 1976, acting), Francis D. Solivio (April 1976-December 1976, acting), Levi H. Pagunsan (1977-1986), Adelaida, F. Ongpoy (1986-1987), Joel Y. Dalaguan (1987-2007), Edgar Claude A. Nadal (2007-2010), Eliezer M. Bacus (2011-2015), Edgar Claude A. Nadal (2016- )

Chairman of the Hospital Board

Gil De Guzman (1951-1956), Victoriano M. Montalban (1957-1968), Meliton M. Claveria (1969-1975), Paterno M. Diaz (1976-2000), Remelito A. Tabingo (2001-2003),Don Weideman (2004-2006), Wendell M. Serrano (2008-2010), Leonardo R. Asoy (2010-July 2015), Edwin C. Gulfan (August 2015-2017), Roger O. Caderma (2018- ).

Sources

Administrative Council Meeting. Adventist Medical Center-Iligan, Iligan City, Philippines.

Bachinela, Bethel. “MSH Has Chosen a New Administration.” The Clone: The Official Publication of Mindanao Sanitarium and Hospital College–Iligan, November-March 2011.

Benito, Matilde N. “AMCC Inaugurates DXMC Hope Radio FM.” The Pacemaker: Official Newsletter of Adventist Medical Center and Colleges–Iligan, April-August 2012.

Benito, Matilde N. “MSHC Opened New Courses for SY 2012-2013.” The Pacemaker: Official Newsletter of Adventist Medical Center and Colleges–Iligan, April-August 2012.

Benito, Matilde N. “What’s in a Name?” The Pacemaker: Official Newsletter of Adventist Medical Center and Colleges–Iligan, April-August 2012.

Board of Trustees. Adventist Medical Center-Iligan, Iligan City, Philippines.

Claveria, M. M. “Progress in South Philippine Union.” Far Eastern Division Outlook, April 1956.

De Guzman, Gil. “Mindanao Sanitarium and Hospital.” Far Eastern Division Outlook, December 1954.

De Guzman, Gil. “South Philippine Union.” Far Eastern Division Outlook, March 1955.

De Los Reyes, Pinky Joy. “A Golden Leap Towards Excellence.” The Pacemaker Souvenir Program, Mindanao Sanitarium and Hospital-Iligan. 50th Anniversary Edition. Iligan City: Mindanao Sanitarium and Hospital, 2002.

Egarle, Thelma D. “Ginhawa After Sendong.” The Pacemaker: Official Newsletter of Adventist Medical Center and Colleges–Iligan, April-August 2012.

Ellacer, G. U. “Mindanao Sanitarium Expansion Under Way.” Far Eastern Division Outlook, December 1969.

Ellacer, G. U. “News from Mindanao San.” Far Eastern Division Outlook, December 1973.

Generato, Cheryl. “AMCI Celebrates 65th Anniversary.” The Pacemaker: Official Publication of Adventist Medical Center-Iligan, 2017.

Geslani, F. T. “Mindanao Sanitarium and Hospital.” Far Eastern Division Outlook, May 1953.

Geslani, F. T. “Mindanao Sanitarium and Hospital.” Far Eastern Division Outlook, October 1953.

Lamera, E. L. “Mayor Officiates at Hospital Ceremony.” Far Eastern Division Outlook, December 1968.

Legaspino, Requel T. “AMCI Celebrates 63rd Anniversary.” The Pacemaker: Official Publication of Adventist Medical Center–Iligan, 2015.

Legaspino, Requel. “Making A Difference in Someone’s Life.” We Care: Official Publication of MSH Care Mindanao Foundation, Inc. of Adventist Medical Center-Iligan, 2015.

Molleda, Nestor. “Solid Waste Management Project dubbed as ‘The Big Z’ or the Zero Waste Challenge on January 2019.” Program of the Philippine Hospital Association meeting held at Manila Hotel, November 16-20, 2019.

Molleda, Nestor V. “Workers on Upgrading.” The Pacemaker 2009 Annual Report: The Official Publication of Mindanao Sanitarium and Hospital–Iligan, January-December 2009.

Nadal, Edgar Claude. “Presidents Year-End Report 2009.” The Pacemaker 2009 Annual Report: The Official Publication of Mindanao Sanitarium and Hospital–Iligan, January-December 2009.

Nermal, Luciano T., Jr. “Hopes and Dreams for the New MSH Annex Building.” The Pacemaker: The Official Newsletter of Mindanao Sanitarium and Hospital–Iligan, January-May 2005.

Ocdao, Erlina “60 Years of Caring and Changing Lives Through God’s Grace.” The Pacemaker: Adventist Medical Center-Iligan, 60th Anniversary Edition, 2012.

The Pacemaker. Adventist Medical Center-Iligan 40th Anniversary Souvenir Program. Iligan City, Adventist Medical Center-Iligan, 1992.

Santos, R. T. “Department Secretaries Tell of Progress-Medical.” Far Eastern Division Outlook, May 1953.

Santos, R. T. “The Lakeside Clinic.” Far Eastern Division Outlook, November 1949.

Santos, R. T. “Medical Pioneering Among the Moros.” Far Eastern Division Outlook, August 1949.

“Serino, Ramos, Warn of Abuse, Visit of the President and Vice President of the Philippines to AMCI to Honor Wounded Soldiers During Marawi City Siege on May 23, 2017.” Philippine Daily Inquirer, June 3, 2017.

Sonsona, Jocelyn B. “The Birth of a College.” The Pacemaker: Official Paper of Mindanao Sanitarium and Hospital–Iligan, January-April 1997.

Sonsona, Jocelyn B. “Hosting the Operation Smile.” The Pacemaker: Official Paper of Mindanao Sanitarium and Hospital-Iligan January-April 1997.

Sonsona, Jocelyn B. “More Massive Construction.” The Pacemaker: Official Paper of Mindanao Sanitarium and Hospital–Iligan, January-April 1997.

Sonsona, Jocelyn B. “Upholding a Tradition of Excellent Care.” The Pacemaker Souvenir Program, Mindanao Sanitarium and Hospital-Iligan. 45th Anniversary Edition. Iligan City, Mindanao Sanitarium and Hospital, 1997.

Torres, W. M. “SPUM News Notes.” Far Eastern Division Outlook, December 1969.

Notes

  1. Additional contributors to this article include Cheryl D. Generato, former human resource director; Jocelyn B. Sonsona, former administrative secretary; Arlene C. Mercado, quality management representative/data privacy officer; all former employees of Adventist Medical Center-Iligan.

  2. R. T. Santos, “Medical Pioneering Among the Moros,” Far Eastern Division Outlook, August 1949, 12.

  3. R. T. Santos, “The Lakeside Clinic,” Far Eastern Division Outlook, November 1949, 8.

  4. R. T. Santos, “Medical Pioneering Among the Moros,” Far Eastern Division Outlook, August 1949, 12; R. T. Santos, “The Lakeside Clinic,” Far Eastern Division Outlook, November 1949, 9.

  5. Ibid.

  6. R. T. Santos, “Department Secretaries Tell of Progress-Medical,” Far Eastern Division Outlook, May 1953, 5-6.

  7. Gil De Guzman, “Mindanao Sanitarium and Hospital,” Far Eastern Division Outlook, December 1954, 6.

  8. F. T. Geslani, “Mindanao Sanitarium and Hospital,” Far Eastern Division Outlook, May 1953, 8.

  9. Gil De Guzman, “Mindanao Sanitarium and Hospital,” Far Eastern Division Outlook, December 1954, 6; Gil De Guzman, “South Philippine Union,” Far Eastern Division Outlook, March 1955, 7.

  10. F. T. Geslani, “Mindanao Sanitarium and Hospital,” Far Eastern Division Outlook, October 1953, 6.

  11. Ibid.

  12. M. M. Claveria, “Progress in South Philippine Union,” Far Eastern Division Outlook, April 1956, 4.

  13. E. L. Lamera, “Mayor Officiates at Hospital Ceremony,” Far Eastern Division Outlook, December 1968, 10-11.

  14. W. M. Torres, “SPUM News Notes,” Far Eastern Division Outlook, December 1969, 17-18.

  15. E. L. Lamera, “Mayor Officiates at Hospital Ceremony,” Far Eastern Division Outlook, December 1968, 10-11.

  16. G. U. Ellacer, “Mindanao Sanitarium Expansion Under Way,” Far Eastern Division Outlook, December 1969, 18.

  17. E. L. Lamera, “Mayor Officiates at Hospital Ceremony,” Far Eastern Division Outlook, December 1968, 10-11; South Philippine Union Mission Executive Committee, February 15, 1971, Action Number 71-17, Bajada Drive, Davao City, Philippines.

  18. G. U. Ellacer, “News from Mindanao San,” Far Eastern Division Outlook, December 1973, 14.

  19. The Pacemaker, Adventist Medical Center-Iligan 40th Anniversary Souvenir Program (Iligan City, Adventist Medical Center–Iligan, 1992), 17-18.

  20. Jocelyn B. Sonsona, “The Birth of a College,” The Pacemaker: Official Paper of Mindanao Sanitarium and Hospital–Iligan, January-April 1997, 18.

  21. Jocelyn B. Sonsona, “Hosting the Operation Smile,” The Pacemaker: Official Paper of Mindanao Sanitarium and Hospital–Iligan January-April 1997, 19.

  22. Ibid.

  23. Pinky Joy De Los Reyes, “A Golden Leap Towards Excellence,” The Pacemaker Souvenir Program, Mindanao Sanitarium and Hospital-Iligan, 50th Anniversary Edition (Iligan City: Mindanao Sanitarium and Hospital, 2002), 1-29.

  24. Luciano T. Nermal, Jr., “MSH Receives ISO 9001:2000 Certification,” The Pacemaker: The official Newsletter of Mindanao Sanitarium and Hospital–Iligan, October-December 2004, 1.

  25. Luciano T. Nermal, Jr., “Hopes and Dreams for the New MSH Annex Building,” The Pacemaker: The Official Newsletter of Mindanao Sanitarium and Hospital-Iligan, January-May 2005, 1.

  26. Nestor V. Molleda, “Workers on Upgrading,” The Pacemaker 2009 Annual Report: The Official Publication of Mindanao Sanitarium and Hospital–Iligan, January-December 2009, 6.

  27. Edgar Claude Nadal, “Presidents Year-End Report 2009,” The Pacemaker 2009 Annual Report: The Official Publication of Mindanao Sanitarium and Hospital–Iligan, January-December 2009, 1.

  28. Bethel Bachinela, “MSH Has Chosen a New Administration,” The Clone: The Official Publication of Mindanao Sanitarium and Hospital College–Iligan, November-March 2011, 1.

  29. Thelma D. Egarle, “Ginhawa After Sendong,” The Pacemaker: Official Newsletter of Adventist Medical Center and Colleges–Iligan, April-August 2012, 9-10.

  30. Erlina Ocdao, “60 Years of Caring and Changing Lives Through God’s Grace,” The Pacemaker: Adventist Medical Center-Iligan, 60th Anniversary Edition, 2012.

  31. Requel Legaspino, “Making A Difference in Someone’s Life,” We Care: Official Publication of MSH Care Mindanao Foundation, Inc. of Adventist Medical Center-Iligan, 2015, 1-40.

  32. Matilde N. Benito, “AMCC Inaugurates DXMC Hope Radio FM,” The Pacemaker: Official Newsletter of Adventist Medical Center and Colleges–Iligan, April-August 2012, 7, 18.

  33. Matilde N. Benito, “MSHC Opened New Courses for SY 2012-2013,” The Pacemaker: Official Newsletter of Adventist Medical Center and Colleges–Iligan, April-August 2012, 7.

  34. Requel T. Legaspino, “AMCI Celebrates 63rd Anniversary,” The Pacemaker: Official Publication of Adventist Medical Center–Iligan, 2015, 27.

  35. South Philippine Union Conference Executive Committee, March 28, 2016, Action Number 2016-027, Cagayan de Oro City, Philippines.

  36. Cheryl Generato, “AMCI Celebrates 65th Anniversary,” The Pacemaker: Official Publication of Adventist Medical Center-Iligan, 2017, 1-57; Matilde N. Benito, “What’s In A Name?”, The Pacemaker: Official Newsletter of Adventist Medical Center and Colleges–Iligan, April-August 2012, 1.

  37. Cheryl Generato, “AMCI Celebrates 65th Anniversary,” The Pacemaker: Official Publication of Adventist Medical Center-Iligan, 2017, 1-57; AMCI Administrative Council Meeting, January 18, 2017, Action Mumber:2017-018, Adventist Medical Center-Iligan, Philippines.

  38. Also known as the Islamic State of Lanao.

  39. “Serino, Ramos, Warn of Abuse, Visit of the President and Vice President of the Philippines to AMCI to Honor Wounded Soldiers During Marawi City Siege on May 23, 2017,” Philippine Daily Inquirer, June 3, 2017.

  40. Adventist Medical Center-Iligan Board of Trustees, February 26, 2018, Action Number 2018-026, Davao Mission, Davao City, Philippines.

  41. Administrative Council Meeting, October 3, 2018, Action Number 2018-340, Adventist Medical Center-Iligan, Iligan City, Philippines.

  42. Nestor Molleda, “Solid Waste Management Project dubbed as ‘The Big Z’ or the Zero Waste Challenge on January 2019,” Program of the Philippine Hospital Association meeting held at Manila Hotel, November 16-20, 2019.

  43. Picture posted on the Facebook Page of Adventist Medical Center-Iligan, July 26, 2019. Certificate of Appreciation was also given by Tambacan, Barangay Captain Sale.

  44. Minutes of the Adventist Medical Center Board of Trustees meeting held at South Philippine Union Conference headquarters, Cagayan de Oro City, March 25, 2019, action numbers 2019-20 and 2019-21.

  45. Plaque from the DOH awarded to the ten Best Level 2 Hospitals in the Philippines, dubbed DOH30 Hospital Star Awards, during the awarding ceremony on October 17, 2019, Cagayan de Oro City, Philippines.

  46. Plaque from the Bureau of Fire Protection Region 10 for Outstanding Fire Brigade given September 18, 2019, at Cagayan de Oro City, Philippines.

×

Molleda, Nestor Villarias. "Adventist Medical Center–Iligan." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. January 05, 2021. Accessed November 24, 2022. https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=FCGZ.

Molleda, Nestor Villarias. "Adventist Medical Center–Iligan." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. January 05, 2021. Date of access November 24, 2022, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=FCGZ.

Molleda, Nestor Villarias (2021, January 05). Adventist Medical Center–Iligan. Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. Retrieved November 24, 2022, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=FCGZ.