Moscow Conference

By Pavel V. Gonchar, and Svyatoslav M. Muzychko

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Pavel V. Gonchar

Svyatoslav M. Muzychko

First Published: May 3, 2022

Moscow Conference is a part of the West Russian Union Conference (WRUC) in the Euro-Asia Division of Seventh-day Adventists. It was organized in 2003 and reorganized in 2007. Its headquarters is in Moscow, Russian Federation.

Territory: Moscow, and the Moscow regions of Balashihinskiy, Himkinskiy, Krasnogorskiy, Leninskiy, Luberetskiy, Mitistchenskiy, Podolskiy, Odintsovskiy, Ramenskiy, Solnechnogorskiy.

Statistics (June 30, 2021): Churches, 29; membership, 3,405; population, 13,554,517.1 

The First Adventist Community in Moscow

The Adventist message first spread among German rural settlers who belonged to different Protestant denominations (Mennonites, Baptists, etc.) in the southern regions of the Russian Empire. Based on the state-confessional policy of that time, the state did not interfere in the religious life of national communities but took care to ensure that their religious influence never reached beyond those communities. Thus, the influence of the Adventist message on the Russian-speaking population in the first decades of the history of Adventism in Russia was minimal.

The mission of the Adventist Church in Moscow began in 1905, when the first Russian ordained minister Konstantin Shamkov came to Moscow to organize the Adventist Church. That same year, as a result of the First Russian Revolution, the government issued a decree “On Strengthening the Fundamentals of Religious Tolerance,” which changed the nature of the state-confessional policy, thus leading to the recognition of Adventists by the government in 1906. These political events opened up new opportunities for the ministry of the Adventist Church in Moscow. The mayor of the city of Moscow granted the Adventists the right to "organize prayer meetings." But the first Adventist Church was founded three years later, when Otto Wildgrube came to Moscow in 1908.

In 1910 the conference of the Middle Russian Field was held in Moscow. That same year the president of the General Conference of Seventh-day Adventists, A. Daniels, on his way back from a trip to Finland, visited the Moscow Church. Due to the great importance of Moscow in the cultural, financial, and administrative life of Russia, this city became the administrative center of the Seventh-day Adventist Church in Russia.

During the First World War, Russian Adventists were associated with Germany. This triggered a wave of persecution, from which preachers and communities with a German background especially suffered. In many places Adventist meetings were banned or held with the mandatory presence of police officers.

The Church in the Early Soviet Era

The February Revolution of 1917 brought new hopes for the victory of freedom of conscience; political prisoners, including Adventist preachers, were released. Following the February Revolution, in October there was another government change, and one of the first decrees of the Soviet authorities was the decree “On the Separation of Church from State and School from the Church,” which gave a measure of hope for the continuation of the policy of freedom of conscience. Despite the civil war, inflation, hunger, cold weather, and illnesses, the ban on free movement by railways, the cessation of the publication of spiritual literature, the Moscow Adventist community continued to grow and strengthen its position as the spiritual center of Adventists in Russia.

In 1922 Moscow regained its status of the capital, and the head of the North-Russian Union of Seventh-day Adventists, H. J. Löbsack, moved to this city. The economic upturn during the New Economic Policy and the relative tolerance of the government toward Protestants in the first decade of Soviet history created openings for the development of the Seventh-day Adventist Church in Russia.

In 1924 the 5th Congress of the USSR Union of Seventh-day Adventists took place in Moscow, where the decision was made to locate the Seventh-day Adventist Church headquarters in Moscow. In 1925 the “Patmos” Publishing House was set up in Moscow to print Adventist spiritual literature.

Militant Atheists Against the Church

During the mass political repressions that started since the beginning of “collectivization” in the 1930s, many lay members and almost all ordained preachers were arrested. In Moscow the church’s publishing activities were discontinued, and five Moscow communities were merged into one. At that time, in the entire Soviet Union, there remained only one officially operating Adventist community in Moscow. The Adventist Church in the Soviet Union had to adopt a congregational type of government.

In 1942 the state-confessional relations in the USSR became perceptibly warmer. The survived leaders and members of the Adventist Church returned from prisons and exile, and the ACSDA (All-Union Council of Seventh-day Adventists) headquarters in Moscow resumed its efforts for restoration of the church organization. However, in 1960, the ACSDA ceased to exist by the decision of the government.

After the dissolution of ACSDA, the Moscow community, in fact, began to play the role of one of the Adventist Church centers, and the Soviet officials clearly disliked the strengthening of its authority. During that period, the Moscow community was constantly awaiting a ban on its activities and liquidation.

Restoring Contacts With the Global Church

Relaxation of tension between the USSR and Western countries opened up the opportunity for restoring the contacts with the global Adventist Church. In 1974 the vice president of the General Conference, Theodore Carcich, and in 1975 another GC vice president, M. S. Nigri, visited Moscow. In 1975, after a long lapse of time, seven delegates from the USSR could participate in the work of the 52nd General Conference Session in Vienna, Austria.

In 1977 the vice president of the General Conference, Alfred Lohne, came to Moscow as a tourist. This visit was the first step toward restoring the regular contacts of the Adventist Church in the Soviet Union with the General Conference. The meeting of Alf Lohne with the officials of the USSR Council for Religious Affairs made it possible for the president of the General Conference, Robert Pearson, to pay an official visit to the Soviet Union in 1978.

Resumption of ties with the world church family of Seventh-day Adventists allowed Moscow Adventists to communicate with foreign ministers, listen to their sermons, and learn firsthand about the life of Adventists around the world.

In June 1981 the president of the General Conference, Neil Wilson, and GC vice president Alfred Lohne, came to Moscow on an official visit. During the visit the meeting of the leaders of the Adventist Church in the RSFSR, held in Moscow at the Sovetskaya Hotel, adopted an appeal to all members and ministers of the Seventh-day Adventist Church in the RSFSR to unite all the communities into one organization, recognized by the General Conference and the Soviet authorities. The all-Russian Council of the Adventist Church was formed and registered as early as 1977 and was headed by Mikhail Petrovich Kulakov as a senior preacher for the RSFSR.

Publicity and Perestroika

In April 1985 the General Secretary of the CPSU Central Committee, Mikhail S. Gorbachev, announced a program of economic and democratic transformations in the USSR. The era of perestroika and publicity began. Although perestroika at first did not affect the foundations of the existing system and the religious policy of the state still remained unchanged, there were real hopes for positive changes.

In 1986, when the Adventist Church in the USSR celebrated its centenary, the Moscow community was again visited by the president of the General Conference, Neil Wilson, and senior preachers from socialist countries–Hungary, Romania, and Poland. In 1987 an exhibition of religious literature was held in Moscow, at which the Adventist Church was represented by the director of the General Conference Publishing House, Harold Otis.

In 1988 the jubilee festivities dedicated to the Millennium of the Baptism of Russia and sanctioned by the authorities, were held. Since that time the Adventist Church in the USSR was given a free hand to expand its activities in various fields such as education, book printing, outreach, and charitable works.

After years of bans on religion, the society began to take an active interest in matters of faith. Members of the Moscow community were holding meetings with the public in cultural centers, schools, institutes, and hospitals. In December 1988 a Christmas fund-raising concert of sacred music of the Adventist Church choir, conducted by Elita Alfredovna Sokolovskaya, was held on the stage of the Bolshoi Theater.

In April 1990 the All-Union Festival of Sacred Music organized by Adventists was held and attended by some 1,500 guests. At the same time well-known evangelists John Carter and Robert Spengler came to Moscow to explore the possibilities of evangelization and held the first series of sermons, gathering thousands of listeners.

At the General Conference Session, held in July 1990 in the American city of Indianapolis, a decision was taken to organize a division of the Global Seventh-day Adventist Church in the territory of the Soviet Union.

In December 1990 the Law on Religious Freedom was passed in the RSFSR, resulting in the abolishment of the USSR Council for Religious Affairs and elimination of any forms of state intervention in the life of religious organizations.

The Period of Large Evangelistic Campaigns

In 1991 a new page was opened in the history of the Adventist Church in Moscow. In the Hall of Culture of the G.V. Plekhanov Institute of National Economy, the gospel campaign of the famous Adventist preacher Mark Finley was held. His presentations, illustrated with slides, caused unprecedented interest among Muscovites, and thousands of people came to hear the sermons.

On December 8, 1991, as a result of signing the Belovezhsky Agreement, the USSR ceased to exist, and in March of the following year, 1992, Mark Finley conducted a new evangelistic campaign–-his time in the Kremlin Palace of Congresses, the hall of which, seating 6,000 people, was filled to capacity. As a result, more than twelve hundred people were baptized and two new communities were organized. The year of 1993 was the culmination of the growth of the Adventist Church in Moscow. In the summer of 1993, the third evangelistic campaign with the participation of Mark Finley was organized in the Olimpiysky sports complex. The meetings were held in two shifts, and the huge hall of the sports complex was almost full throughout the campaign. As a result of the campaign, eight new communities were set up.

Never before did so many people receive baptism in Russia in such a short time, and a new image of the Adventist Church in Moscow was forming rapidly. The ministry in the newly formed communities, in which up to 90 percent were new members who did not have any spiritual experience, was a real challenge for the church. A new reality faced by the church demanded a quick shift from the paradigm of “persecuted” church to the paradigm of “advancing” church. It was obvious that such an interest in the sermons would not last long, and it was necessary to make every effort in order to gather a “rich harvest” and lay the foundation for the development of the church in the future.

Organizational History of the Moscow Conference

By early 1994 the Adventist Church in Moscow consisted of 12 churches with the names of over four thousand members. A temporary solution to the problem of meeting places for communities was found in renting halls of cultural centers and cinemas. The problem of the lack of prayer houses was gradually becoming more acute. The rented premises were not intended for holding worship services and did not allow organizing the full-fledged life of Adventist communities.

On January 14 and15, 2003, at the 4th Session of the Central Conference of the West Russian Union, the Central Conference was reorganized, with the city of Moscow and adjacent districts of the Moscow Region united into a separate entity, Moscow Mission. The reorganization was aimed at concentrating the resources of Moscow communities to solve the problem of acquiring prayer houses and searching for new ways in the missionary service under special conditions of the metropolis.

Apart from Moscow communities (Butovskaya, Vostochnaya, Dmitrovskaya, Zamoskvoretskaya, Zapadnaya, Zelenogradskaya, Kuntsevskaya, Mezhdunarodnaya, Moskvoretskaya, Na Stremyannom, Orion, Sokol, Tushinskaya, Fakel, and Tsentralnaya), the Moscow Mission comprised the churches and companies of the Moscow vicinity located in towns of Krasnogorsk, Podolsk, Reutov, Klimovsk, Odintsovo, Lyubertsy, Khimki, Skhodnya, Mendeleevo, Lobnya, and Zheleznodorozhny. In total, the Moscow Mission comprised 26 congregations with 3,335 members. At that time there were only two congregations that had their own prayer houses—Vostochnaya church in Moscow and the church in Podolsk.

The Moscow Mission officers were appointed: A. V. Zhukov (president), S. M. Muzychko (executive secretary), and A.Ya. Shcheglov (treasurer). The following persons were elected heads of departments: A. V. Dyman’—Adventist Mission; S. M. Muzychko—Sabbath School and Personal Ministries; A. G. Muzychko-–Children’s Ministries; I. A. Zagladkina—Pathfinder Club; A. V. Zubach—Youth Ministries; T. L. Masyuk—Publishing Ministries; A. L. Gonchar-–Women’s and Family Ministries; Yu. A. Shcheglova—Health Ministries; L. N. Guseva—Musical Ministry; P. V. Gonchar—Public Affairs and Religious Liberty; A. A. Pankov– Ministerial Association; S. A. Kuzmin–Education; A. N. Klachanov—Adventist Book Center.

The Moscow Mission Executive Committee was appointed as follows: A. V. Zhukov (chair), S. M. Muzychko (secretary), A.Ya. Shcheglov, A. V. Dyman’, A. V. Zubach, A. A. Pankov, S. A. Kuzmin, P. V. Gonchar, V. V. Kosmin, and M. A. Karklina.

The Moscow Mission headquarters was located in Room #6 of the Vostochnaya church building. That room was duly equipped and became the focal point of the Moscow Mission ministry for the next four years.

The primary focus of the ministry and development of the Moscow Mission was on the acquisition of prayer houses. And as early as 2005, two prayer houses were dedicated in the towns of Lobnya and Klimovsk. The prayer house in Lobnya was purchased thanks to implementation of the ESD “300-300-300” program, and that in Klimovsk thanks to the Annual Sacrifice Offerings of church members of the Moscow Mission. The Thirteenth Sabbath Offerings that were received from the World Church allowed acquisition of land for constructing a prayer house in the town of Zheleznodorozhny. The construction began in 2005 and ended with a dedication of the building in the autumn of 2007. Another important event took place on February 11, 2006. In the presence of ESD officers, as well as representatives of the General Conference, the building of the Spiritual Center Na Nagatinskoy was dedicated and became the house of prayer for three communities—Mezhdunarodnaya, Zamoskvoretskaya, and Na Stremyannom. Although the renovation still continued, the communities were accommodated in that building and began to conduct worship services in two shifts. Later, in January 2007, the Moscow Mission headquarters was transferred to the Na Nagatinskoy Spiritual Center, as well.

At the 2nd Session of the Moscow Mission held on June 19, 2007, its status was changed, and the Moscow Mission was reorganized into the Moscow Conference. A new community, Rodnik, established as a subsidiary of the “Orion” community, was included in the conference. There were altogether 28 communities with 3,521 members in the Moscow Conference. The delegates of the session elected A. V. Zhukov as president, S. M. Muzychko as executive secretary, and A.Ya. Shcheglov as treasurer of the Moscow Conference for the new term of service. The following persons were elected the heads of departments: A. F. Kulko—Adventist Mission; S. M. Muzychko—Sabbath School and Personal Ministries, and Education; A. V. Zubach—Youth Ministries; I. A. Zagladkina—Children’s Ministries and Pathfinder Club; T. L. Masyuk—Publishing Ministries; Ya. P. Kulakov—Ministerial Association; P. V. Gonchar—Public Affairs and Religious Liberty; M. F. Kulakova, Ya. P. Kulakov—Women’s and Family Ministries; Yu. A. Shcheglova–Health Ministries; O. A. Zhukova—Shepherdess Association; T. L. Masyuk—Adventist Book Center; Ya. I. Paliy–Adventist Spiritual Heritage.

The Moscow Conference Executive Committee was appointed as follows: A. V. Zhukov (chair), S. M. Muzychko (secretary), A.Ya. Shcheglov, S. S. Barkhudaryan, P. V. Gonchar, A. V. Zubach, V. P. Kulakov, A. F. Kulko, T. L. Masyuk, Ya. I. Paliy, and N. B. Semin.

In the summer of 2008, the construction of a prayer house for the Rodnik community started at the acquired property in the village of Vysokovo, near the town of Mytischi. In January 2011 the construction work was completed and a new prayer house was dedicated. It was one more chapel owned by the community that was a part of the Moscow Conference.

On February 1, 2011, the 3rd Session of the Moscow Conference was held. It was attended by 59 delegates from 28 communities with a total of 3,732 members. At that time there were six prayer houses in the Moscow Conference: two in Moscow and four in the Moscow Region. The development strategy was chosen in the right manner, and the results were visible. But this was clearly not enough. In a short while, the Moscow Conference Executive Committee approved the program for the acquisition of prayer houses by taking account of the needs and specific situation in each community.

The session elected new Moscow Mission officers: S. M. Muzychko (president), P. V. Gonchar (executive secretary), and A.Ya. Shcheglov (treasurer). The following persons were elected the heads of departments: A. V. Zubach—Adventist Mission; S. V. Komarnitskiy—Sabbath School and Personal Ministries; S. V. Aristov—Youth Ministries; I. A. Zagladkina—Children’s Ministries and Pathfinder Club; T. L. Masyuk—Publishing Ministries; Ya. P. Kulakov—Ministerial Association; A. F. Kulko—Public Affairs and Religious Liberty; M. F. Kulakova—Women’s and Family Ministries; A. G. Muzychko–Shepherdes Association; V. A. Grinenko—Musical Ministry; G. G. Golovach—Adventist Book Center; Ya. I. Paliy–Adventist Spiritual Heritage.

The Moscow Conference Executive Committee was appointed as follows: S. M. Muzychko (chair), P. V. Gonchar (secretary), A.Ya. Scheglov, S.V. Aristov, V. A. Grinenko, A. V. Zubach, S. V. Komarnitskiy, A. F. Kulko, Ya. P. Kulakov, T. L. Masyuk, V. P. Osadchuk, and A. S. Pulukchu.

The succeeding period of the history of the Moscow Conference was marked by the acquisition and dedication of two houses of prayer to be used by the communities of the town of Khimki (October 2011) and the town of Reutov (October 2014). The prayer house for the Reutov community was purchased in Moscow, within walking distance of the Novogireevo metro station.

The Media Ministry in the Moscow Conference gained momentum thanks to the premises and equipment received from ESD. In 2013 a video studio of the Moscow Conference, later named Most (the Bridge), was opened. The staff of the studio, headed by R. P. Geiker, included five employees. During this time almost half of the communities of the Moscow Conference began to provide an online stream of their Sabbath worship services.

The 4th Session of the Moscow Conference was held on October 28, 2014. It began its work with accepting two new communities—a church in the town of Ramenskoye (Moscow Region) and a church Imya Tvoyo (Thy Name)—into the sisterhood of churches of the Moscow Conference. Meanwhile, based on the results of membership audits, two other communities—Skhodnia and Izmaylovskaya—lost their status and were expelled from the sisterhood of churches of the Moscow Conference. Thus, at that point of time the Moscow Conference comprised 28 communities with 3,286 members. The delegates to the session elected the following officers of the Moscow Conference for the new term of service: S. M. Muzychko (president), A. V. Zubach (executive secretary), and A.Ya. Shcheglov (treasurer). The following persons were elected the heads of departments: M. M. Kaminskiy—Adventist Mission; A. V. Zubach—Sabbath School and Personal Ministries; D. V. Bezpalko—Youth Ministries; I. A. Zagladkina—Children's Ministries; N. S. Cheban–Club Ministries; S. V. Semin—Public Affairs and Religious Liberty; T. L. Masyuk—Publishing Ministries; M. F. Kulakova—Women’s and Family Ministries; Ya. P. Kulakov—Stewardship Ministries; P. V. Gonchar—Ministerial Association; P. M. Bondarev–Education; Ya. I. Paliy–Adventist Spiritual Heritage; A. G. Muzychko–Shepherdes Association; R. P. Geiker—Most Video Studio Director; G. G. Golovach—Adventist Book Center.

The Moscow Conference Executive Committee was appointed as follows: S. M. Muzychko (chair), A. V. Zubach (secretary), A.Ya. Scheglov, S. V. Aristov, D. V. Bezpalko, P. V. Gonchar, P. P. Zhukov, M. M. Kaminskiy, Ya. P. Kulakov, T. L. Masyuk, S. V. Semin, E. E. Sergeyecheva, and E. N. Stepanov.

After the retirement of Ya. P. Kulakov in September 2017, A. Ya. Shcheglov was elected the Stewardship Ministries Director. At the same time, V. N. Kvashnin was elected the Sabbath School and Personal Ministries Director and a member of the Moscow Conference Executive Committee. In January 2017, S. A. Grigorash began his service as the Health Ministries director.

During this period special attention was paid not only to the acquisition of prayer houses but also to the development of evangelistic and social ministry. A special ministry to migrants from Central Asia countries began to take off thanks to the invitation of an interunion worker to serve in the Sokol community. In 2015 the management of the English Language School (ELC), headed by I. A. Zaitsev, was transferred from ESD to the Moscow Conference. In 2017 the Volonter Community Outreach Center was registered. With help from ESD, a premise was acquired in the town of Troitsk for the activities of this Community Outreach Center and the newly created community. This facility was the tenth one acquired by the Moscow Conference, and the Troitsk community became the 29th church in the sisterhood of churches of the Moscow Conference.

In late 2017 the church acquired the premise for accommodating the Center of Influence and a prayer house of the Tushinskaya and Krasnogorsk communities. In January 2018, thanks to the program of Annual Sacrifice Offerings collected in the course of two years, the premise for the community of the town of Zelenograd was acquired.

In 2018 the Moscow Conference celebrated the 15th anniversary of its existence, and six communities that were planted in 1993 (Dmitrovskaya, Kuntsevskaya, Moskvoretskaya, Orion, Tushinskaya, and Zapadnaya) marked their 25th anniversary.

The Children’s Camp Raduga (Rainbow) is a crown jewel in the activities of the Moscow Conference. In 2018 it marked its 20th anniversary. All this time Irina Aleksandrovna Zagladkina has been the permanent director of this children’s camp. During the years of its existence, the camp has annually held its sessions and traveled. Moscow Region, Kaluga Region, Crimea, Novgorod Region (Lakes Vilye and Nakhodno), Sverdlovsk Region (Olenii Ruchii Reserve), Lvov Region of Ukraine (Carpathians), Republic of Karelia (Lake Säämäjärvi), Finland (Liperi), Tver Region (Lake Seliger)—these are the places that the children have visited together with their camp counselors. And every session was memorable!

The family summer camp meetings have been organized by the Moscow Conference over the course of more than ten years. The youth camps and literature evangelists camps are also organized every year.

As of September 1, 2018, there were 29 communities with 3,453 members in the Moscow Conference. A total of 20 ordained pastors, five licensed pastors, and two interns are serving in the following churches: Butovskaya—Pastor P. P. Zhukov; Vostochnaya–Pastor V. A. Grinenko; Dmitrovskaya–Pastor S. V. Aristov; Zheleznodorozhny–Pastor I. A. Zaitsev; Zapadnaya–Pastor M. M. Kaminskiy; Zamoskvoretskaya (Nagatinskaya)—Pastor V. N. Kvashnin; Zelenogradskaya— -Pastor E. S. Petkevich; Imya Tvoyo—Pastor S. V. Komarnitskiy; Klimovsk—Pastor T. L. Masyuk; Kuntsevskaya—Pastor I. I. Kirichenko; Krasnogorsk—Pastor A. N. Roshchupkin; Lobnya—Pastor A. A. Naumov; Lyubertsy—Pastor P. M. Bondarev; Moskvoretskaya-Pastor Ya. I. Paliy; Mezhdunarodnaya-Pastor A. M. Kovalev; Mendeleevo—Pastor V. V. Levin; Na Stremyannom—Pastor A. V. Zubach; Orion—Pastor S. V. Aristov; Odintsovo—Pastor I. I. Kirichenko; Podolsk–Pastor P. P. Zhukov; Ramenskoye-–Pastor K. A. Motrevich; Reutov—Pastor S. V. Semin; Rodnik—Pastor A. N. Cherekh; Sokol—Pastor D. I. Iskhakov; Tushinskaya—Pastor A. N. Roshchupkin; Troitsk—Pastor M. M. Kaminsky; Tsentralnaya—Pastor P. V. Gonchar; Fakel—Pastor D. V. Bezpalko; Khimki—Pastor S. V. Zagladkin.

Leaders of Church Organizations That Included City of Moscow

O. I. Wildgrube—Chair of the Board of the Central Russian Field

H. J. Löbsack—Chair of the Council of the North-Russian Union

G. A. Grigoriev—Chair of the All-Union Council of Seventh-day Adventists

P. A. Matsanov—Chair of the All-Union Council of Seventh-day Adventists

S. P. Kulyzhskiy—Chair of the All-Union Council of Seventh-day Adventists

M. P. Kulakov—Senior preacher for the RSFSR

M. Murga—President of the Russian Union

F. F. Trikur—President of the Central Conference

Ya. P. Kulakov—President of the Central Conference

A. V. Zhukov—President of the Moscow Mission, 2003-2007

A. V. Zhukov—President of the Moscow Conference, 2007-2011

S. M. Muzychko—President of the Moscow Conference, 2011-Present

Sources

Gonchar, P.V. Sto let Tserkvi Khristian Adventistov Sed’mogo Dnia v Moskve. Moscow: Russkiy Pechatnyy Dom, 2005.

Grigorenko, A.Yu. Eskhatologiya, millenarizm i adventizm. Istoriya i sovremennost’. St. Petersburg: Evropeyskiy Dom, 2004.

Löbsack, H.J. Velikoye Adventistskoye dvizheniye i Adventisty Sed’mogo Dnia v Rossii. Rostov-na-Donu: Altair, 2006.

Teppone, V.V. Iz istorii Tserkvi Adventistov Sed’mogo Dnia v Rossii.  Kaliningrad: Yantarnyy Skaz, 1993.

Yunak, D.O. Istoriya Tserkvi Adventistov Sed’mogo Dnia v Rossii (1886-1981). Chto slyshali, ne skroem ot detei. Zaokskyi: Istochnik Zhizni, 2002, Vol. 1.

Yunak, D.O. Istoriya Tserkvi Adventistov Sed’mogo Dnia v Rossii (1981-2000). Chto slyshali, ne skroem ot detei. Zaokskyi: Istochnik Zhizni, 2002, Vol. 2.

4th Constituency Meeting of the Central Conference. January 15, 2003. Minutes.

1st Constituency Meeting of the Moscow Mission, January 16, 2003. Minutes.

2nd Constituency Meeting of the Moscow Mission (Conference). June 19, 2007. Minutes.

3rd Constituency Meeting of the Moscow Conference. February 1, 2011. Minutes.

4th Constituency Meeting of the Moscow Conference. October 28, 2014. Minutes.

Notes

  1. “Moscow Conference,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (2021), https://www.adventistyearbook.org/entity?EntityID=21994.

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Gonchar, Pavel V., Svyatoslav M. Muzychko. "Moscow Conference." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. May 03, 2022. Accessed May 24, 2024. https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=FDAO.

Gonchar, Pavel V., Svyatoslav M. Muzychko. "Moscow Conference." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. May 03, 2022. Date of access May 24, 2024, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=FDAO.

Gonchar, Pavel V., Svyatoslav M. Muzychko (2022, May 03). Moscow Conference. Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. Retrieved May 24, 2024, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=FDAO.