Schultz, Henry (1843–1926)

By Denis Kaiser

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Denis Kaiser, Ph.D. (Andrews University, Berrien Springs, Michigan). Kaiser is an assistant professor of church history at the Seventh-day Adventist Theological Seminary, Andrews University. He has published numerous articles and book chapters. He was the annotation project editor of The Ellen G. White Letters and Manuscripts with Annotations, volume 2 (1860-1863), and is a co-editor of the Oxford Handbook of Seventh-day Adventism and of the Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventism’s history of theology and ethics section.

Henry Schultz was one of the pioneers of the Adventist work among the German-speaking Americans. He served as a pastor, evangelist, and administrator for Americans and Germans in the United States of America.

Early Years

Henry/Heinrich Schultz (also spelled Shultz) was born April 4, 1843, to Georg Friedrich Schultz (1814-1897) and Anna Elise Ferneau (1822-1881).1 The family lived in Unhausen, a little village with a population of about 300 people,2 in Hesse, Germany.3 Henry was the oldest of 11 children.4 In 1852 the family immigrated to the United States and settled in Illinois.5

At the age of 19, on July 29, 1862, Henry enlisted in the Union army. In early September he was mustered as a private into Company K, composed mostly of men from Jo Daviess County, of the 96th Regiment of the Illinois Infantry. He fought until he was mustered out on June 10, 1865.6 In the Battle of Chickamauga, fought September 18-20, 1863, Henry was wounded on the “left breast and arm,”7 and was lying “for ten days helpless and unattended on the battlefield before he was picked up”8 or, in other words, captured by the Confederates. “During this time of great suffering, [Henry] made a covenant with the Lord that if He would spare his life, he would serve Him the rest of his days.”9 That battle was the one with “the highest losses of any battle in the Western Theater during the war and, after Gettysburg, the second-highest of the war overall.”10 After the war, he returned to Rush, Illinois, and worked for some time as a tax collector.11

Marriage and Joining the Adventist Church

In 1868 Henry married Sarah Jane Rouch.12 Sarah was born March 26, 1849, to Henry and Johanna Rouch, who had emigrated from Germany about four years earlier and settled in Jo Daviess County, Illinois.13 Henry and Sarah Schultz had seven children: Abraham (1869-1869), William Frank (1870-1935), John Henry (1873-1946), Lillie May Eggleston (1876-1941), Joshua (1879-1950), George Frederick (1883-1912), and Mary Jane (1886-?).14 Around 1874,15 two Seventh-day Adventist ministers, C. L. Boyd and A. J. Cudney, held meetings at Stromsburg, Nebraska, and shared the Adventist message. Henry was a member of the local Lutheran church and the Lutheran minister urged him to show those men “and all the people that they were wrong in teaching that Saturday was the Sabbath.” Henry’s obituary describes his subsequent experience as follows, “Brother Schultz took his Bible, and after studying for a week or more was so overcome with the absence of authority for Sunday sacredness that he threw his Bible down and buried his face in his hands. His good wife said to him, ‘What is the matter?’ He said, ‘If we are going to go by the Bible, we shall have to keep Saturday, for there is not a word in it about Sunday.’ ‘Well,’ said she, ‘I want to go to heaven, so I’ll obey the Lord.’” As a result, they accepted the Sabbath and became Adventists. A church was organized and Henry was chosen as its elder.16

Work and Ministry

One year later, Henry was invited to attend the Iowa camp meeting, where he “received a license to work as an evangelist.”17 Subsequently, “the burden of caring for the family and the farm fell upon” his wife Sarah. Besides manifesting a lot of “energy and executive ability” in managing family and farm, she became known as being “liberal to the needy, sympathetic and helpful in sickness, and faithful in meeting church obligations.”18 On September 24, 1878, at the closing meeting of the camp meeting in Seward, Nebraska, Henry was ordained by Stephen Nelson Haskell.19 For the following seven years, Henry worked among the English-speaking population in the state of Nebraska. In 1882 he became the president of the Nebraska Conference.20

In the early 1880s, church leaders increasingly recognized the need to reach the fast-growing German-speaking population in the country. Although Henry was born in Germany, he had left his home country at the age of nine and had therefore almost forgotten his mother tongue. Through constant study and committed practice, he was eventually able to preach in the German language. He began holding evangelistic meetings at Columbus, Nebraska, and organized a German church there. In 1883 the young Ludwig Richard Conradi assisted Henry in his evangelistic efforts. Together they held an evangelistic tent meeting at Sutton, Nebraska.21 For 20 years (1884-1903), Henry supervised the work among the German population in the United States, a task that required much traveling.22 He also served on a number of committees. In 1887 he collaborated with B. L. Whitney, Conradi, Jakob Erzenberger, and A. Kunz in the creation of a German hymnal.23 Two years later, Henry Shultz, together with Conradi and three other ministers, outlined plans for the education of “persons of foreign nationalities for missionary work” as they served on a committee created for that purpose.24 He served on an auxiliary book committee for American German publications from 1890 to 1891,25 and on a committee for home missions in the United States.26

Although by 1904 Henry and his wife had relocated to Lockeford, California, he served the Southwestern Union Conference, which covered the territory of Arkansas, Oklahoma, and Texas, briefly as vice president in 1904 and as minister from 1904 to 1906.27 Then he began working for the California-Nevada Conference.28 He was instrumental in raising of two churches—an English church and a German church—in the nearby town of Lodi.29 In 1908 Henry and Sarah moved to Lodi where he continued to serve as a minister until 1917.30 During the last ten years he once again served on a large number of committees.31 While Henry concentrated his activities more on working in the field, he also wrote a few articles on end-time and spiritual subjects in Adventist periodicals.32

In April 1918 Henry was mentioned together with George Ide Butler, Stephen Nelson Haskell, J. O. Corliss, and a few others as one of “the old pioneers in this [Advent] message.”33 During that year he retired from active ministry but he continued to hold honorary ministerial credentials until the year of his death.34

Later Years

On April 16, 1918, Henry and his wife Sarah celebrated their golden wedding anniversary.35 Seven months later, on November 11, Sarah passed away at the age of 69.36 On January 26, 1926, Henry died at his home in Lodi.37 Both Sarah and Henry are buried at Lodi Memorial Cemetery.38

Contribution

Henry Schultz served the denomination for 51 years as a pastor, evangelist, and administrator for Americans and Germans in the United States of America. He oversaw the work among German-speaking Adventists in America for about 20 years. Together with his wife Sarah, Schultz is exemplary in his committed service to the Lord and the Church throughout his lifetime—both in leadership positions and as a pastor and church planter around the time of his retirement and beyond.

Sources

Amundsen, Wesley. “Dedication at East Cooper.” Southwestern Union Record, January 9, 1935, 4-5.

Boynton, J. W. and Wife. “Home Again.” North Pacific Union Gleaner, May 16, 1918, 3.

California. Death Index, 1905-1939. Digital images. Ancestry.com, July 31, 2017, http://ancestry.com.

California. Death Index, 1940-1997. Digital images. Ancestry.com, July 30, 2017, http://ancestry.com.

California, San Joaquin County, Elkhorn. 1930 United States Census. Digital images. Ancestry.com, July 31, 2017, http://ancestry.com.

California, San Joaquin County, Lodi, Lodi Memorial Cemetery. Find A Grave, July 30, 2017, http://www.findagrave.com.

“Charles C. Shultz.” Central Union Outlook, December 17, 1929, 7.

“Charles C. Shultz.” ARH, January 23, 1930, 28.

“Death of Elder Henry Shultz.” ARH, February 18, 1926, 24.

“Elder Henry Shultz . . .” ARH, March 23, 1905, 20.

Farnsworth, E. W. “Camp-Meeting in Nebraska.” ARH, October 17, 1878, 124.

“George Frederick Shultz.” ARH, October 31, 1912, 23.

“Henry Schultz.” ARH, March 11, 1926, 22.

Historisches Ortslexikon. Landesgeschichtliches Informationszentrum Hessen, July 30, 2017, http://www.lagis-hessen.de/de/subjects/idrec/sn/ol/id/7102.

Illinois. Deaths and Stillbirths Index, 1916-1947. Ancestry.com, July 31, 2017, http://ancestry.com.

Illinois, Jo Daviess County, Guilford. 1860 United States Census. Digital images. Ancestry.com, July 31, 2017, http://ancestry.com.

Illinois, Jo Daviess County, Nora, West Chelsea Cemetery. Find A Grave, July 30, 2017, http://www.findagrave.com.

Illinois, Jo Daviess County, Rice. 1860 United States Census. Digital images. Ancestry.com, July 30, 2017, http://ancestry.com.

Illinois, Jo Daviess County, Rush. 1870 United States Census. Digital images. Ancestry.com, July 30, 2017, http://ancestry.com.

Illinois, Jo Daviess County, Rush. 1880 United States Census. Digital images. Ancestry.com, July 30, 2017, http://ancestry.com.

Illinois, Jo Daviess County, Stockton, Ladies Union Cemetery. Find A Grave, July 30, 2017, http://www.findagrave.com.

“It has been a great pleasure . . .” ARH, April 18, 1918, 24.

“John Henry Shultz.” North Pacific Union Gleaner, September 17, 1946, 5.

Kansas, Sumner County, Geuda Springs, Geuda Springs Cemetery. Find A Grave, July 31, 2017, http://www.findagrave.com.

Nebraska, Kingfisher County, River. 1900 United States Census. Digital Images. Ancestry.com, June 16, 2017, http://ancestry.com.

Nebraska, Polk County, Stromsburg. 1880 United States Census. Digital Images. Ancestry.com, June 16, 2017, http://ancestry.com.

Nebraska, Polk County, Stromsburg. 1900 United States Census. Digital Images. Ancestry.com, June 16, 2017, http://ancestry.com.

Partridge, Charles A., ed. History of the Ninety-sixth Regiment: Illinois Volunteer Infantry. Chicago, IL: Historical Society of the Regiment, 1887.

“Receipts.” ARH, May 5, 1874, 168.

Reece, J. N. Report of the Adjutant General of the State of Illinois. Vol. 5. Rev. ed. Springfield, IL: Phillips Bros., 1901.

“Sarah Jane Rough [sic] Shultz.” ARH, January 9, 1919, 29.

Seventh-day Adventist Year Book. Battle Creek, MI: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1887, 1889-1891.

Seventh-day Adventist Year Book. Washington, D.C.: General Conference of Seventh-day Adventists, 1904.

Shultz, Henry. “The Last Message to a Dying World.” ARH, February 7, 1907, 9.

Shultz, Henry. “Praying to Christ.” ARH, August 1, 1912, 4, 5.

Spicer, W. A. “General Conference Committee in Council.” ARH, June 17, 1909, 24.

“William Benjamin Schultz.” ARH, December 20, 1945, 23.

Wikipedia. Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., July 30, 2017, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page.

Year Book of the Seventh-day Adventist Denomination. Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1905-1922, 1924-1927.

Notes

  1. “Death of Elder Henry Shultz,” ARH, February 18, 1926, 24; Find A Grave, West Chelsea Cemetery, Nora, Illinois, memorial no. 69039290, “George F. Shultz,” Find A Grave, accessed July 30, 2017, http://www.findagrave.com; Find A Grave, West Chelsea Cemetery, Nora, Illinois, memorial no. 69039301, “Anna Shultz,” Find A Grave, accessed July 30, 2017, http://www.findagrave.com;

  2. Historisches Ortslexikon, “Unhausen, Werra-Meißner-Kreis,” Landesgeschichtliches Informationszentrum Hessen, accessed July 30, 2017, http://www.lagis-hessen.de/de/subjects/idrec/sn/ol/id/7102.

  3. “Henry Schultz,” ARH, March 11, 1926, 22.

  4. 1860 U.S. census, Rice, Illinois, roll M653_189, FHL microfilm 803189, pages 263, 264, digital image, “Fredk [sic] Schults [sic],” Ancestry.com, accessed July 30, 2017, http://ancestry.com; 1870 U.S. census, Rush, Illinois, roll M593_234, FHL microfilm 545733, pages 23, 24, digital image, “Shoultz [sic], Geo. Fr.,” Ancestry.com, accessed July 30, 2017, http://ancestry.com; 1880 U.S. census, Rush, Illinois, enumeration district 61, roll 217, FHL microfilm 1254217, page 17, digital image, “George F. Shultz,” Ancestry.com, accessed July 30, 2017, http://ancestry.com. His siblings were: Wilhelm Friedrich (1846-after 1880): 1880 U.S. census, Rush, Illinois, roll 217, FHL microfilm 1254217, page 17, digital image, “Shultz, Wm. F.,” Ancestry.com, accessed July 31, 2017, http://ancestry.com. Barbara Elisabeth Nadig (1848-1939): Illinois, Deaths and Stillbirths Index, 1916-1947, FHL microfilm 1819833, “Barbara Elizabeth Nadig,” Ancestry.com, accessed July 31, 2017, http://ancestry.com; Find A Grave, Ladies Union Cemetery, Stockton, Illinois, memorial no. 80344090, “Barbara Nadig,” Find A Grave, accessed July 31, 2017, http://www.findagrave.com. Anna Elisabetha Harris (1850-1937): California, Death Index, 1905-1939, Surnames F-H, page 2886, digital image, “Annie Harris,” Ancestry.com, accessed July 31, 2017, http://ancestry.com. Margaret J. (1853-after 1930): 1930 U.S. census, Elkhorn, California, enumeration district 17, roll 210, FHL microfilm 2339945, page 16B, digital image, “Mary J. Shultz,” Ancestry.com, accessed July 31, 2017, http://ancestry.com. John F. (1855-1886): Find A Grave, West Chelsea Cemetery, Nora, Illinois, memorial no. 69039271, “John J. Shultz,” Find A Grave, accessed July 30, 2017, http://www.findagrave.com. William Benjamin (1858-1945): California, Death Index, 1940-1997, “William Benjamin Shultz,” Ancestry.com, accessed July 30, 2017, http://ancestry.com; “William Benjamin Schultz,” ARH, December 20, 1945, 23. Christina M. Breed (1859-1921): Find A Grave, Ladies Union Cemetery, Stockton, Illinois, memorial no. 80275776, “Christina Shultz Breed,” Find A Grave, accessed July 30, 2017, http://www.findagrave.com. Charles Conrad (1862-1929): 1880 U.S. census, Stromsburg, Nebraska, enumeration district 108, roll 754, FHL microfilm 1254754, page 262A, digital image, “Shultz, Charly,” Ancestry.com, accessed June 16, 2017, http://ancestry.com; “Charles C. Shultz,” ARH, January 23, 1930, 28; “Charles C. Shultz,” Central Union Outlook, December 17, 1929, 7. Leonard L. (1865-1915): Find A Grave, Ladies Union Cemetery, Stockton, Illinois, memorial no. 80344334, “Leonard L. Shultz,” Find A Grave, accessed July 31, 2017, http://www.findagrave.com.

  5. 1900 U.S. census, Stromsburg, Nebraska, enumeration district 102, roll 937, FHL microfilm 1240937, page 2B, digital image, “Sholtz, Henry,” Ancestry.com, accessed June 16, 2017, http://ancestry.com.

  6. J. N. Reece, Report of the Adjutant General of the State of Illinois, vol. 5, rev. ed. (Springfield, IL: Phillips Bros., 1901), 459.

  7. Charles A. Partridge, ed., History of the Ninety-sixth Regiment: Illinois Volunteer Infantry (Chicago, IL: Historical Society of the Regiment, 1887), 195, 893, 905.

  8. “Henry Schultz,” 22. Those details are corroborated by Charles A. Partridge, ed., History of the Ninety-sixth Regiment: Illinois Volunteer Infantry (Chicago, IL: Historical Society of the Regiment, 1887), 893, 905.

  9. “Henry Schultz,” 22.

  10. Wikipedia, “Battle of Chickamauga,” Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., accessed July 30, 2017, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Chickamauga. A history of the battle states, “Nearly all of those who survived the trying experiences of the ten days immediately following the battle, where few had either medical or surgical attendance, and where none had food either adequate to their needs or suitable for wounded men, were paroled and sent within the Union lines at Chattanooga.” Henry was one of “twenty-five men [of his company] thus paroled, all [of which] were severely wounded, nine dying within a short time, and but four of the entire number ever again joining the command.” Although disabled for “six months,” he was one of those four who “so far recovered from their wounds as to take again their places in the line.” See Charles A. Partridge, ed., History of the Ninety-sixth Regiment: Illinois Volunteer Infantry (Chicago, IL: Historical Society of the Regiment, 1887), 513, 514, 893, 905, 540.

  11. Ibid., 905.

  12. “Henry Schultz,” 22; “Sarah Jane Rough [sic] Shultz,” ARH, January 9, 1919, 29.

  13. 1860 U.S. census, Guilford, Illinois, roll M653_189, FHL microfilm 803189, page 513, digital image, “Henry Rouch,” Ancestry.com, accessed July 31, 2017, http://ancestry.com; “Sarah Jane Rough [sic] Shultz,” ARH, January 9, 1919, 29; 1900 U.S. census, Stromsburg, Nebraska, enumeration district 102, roll 937, FHL microfilm 1240937, page 2B, digital image, “Sholtz, Sarah J.,” Ancestry.com, accessed June 16, 2017, http://ancestry.com.

  14. “Henry Schultz,” ARH, March 11, 1926, 22; 1880 U.S. census, Stromsburg, Nebraska, enumeration district 108, roll 754, FHL microfilm 1254754, page 262A, digital image, “Shultz, Henry,” Ancestry.com, accessed June 16, 2017, http://ancestry.com; 1900 U.S. census, Stromsburg, Nebraska, “Sholtz, Henry;” 1900 U.S. census, River, Nebraska, enumeration district 113, roll 1338, FHL microfilm 1241338, page 7A, digital image, “Shultz, Wm. F.,” Ancestry.com, accessed June 16, 2017, http://ancestry.com; “John Henry Shultz,” North Pacific Union Gleaner, September 17, 1946, 5; Find A Grave, Geuda Springs Cemetery, Geuda Springs, Kansas, memorial no. 50984207, “Lillie May Eggleston,” Find A Grave, accessed July 31, 2017, http://www.findagrave.com; California, Death Index (1950), digital image, “Shultz, Joshua,” Ancestry.com, accessed June 16, 2017, http://ancestry.com; “George Frederick Shultz,” ARH, October 31, 1912, 23.

  15. This assumption is based on the fact that Henry Schultz’s name appeared for the first time in the ARH on May 5, 1874. See “Receipts,” ARH, May 5, 1874, 168.

  16. “Henry Schultz,” 22.

  17. Ibid.

  18. “Sarah Jane Rough [sic] Shultz,” 29.

  19. “Henry Schultz,” 22; E. W. Farnsworth, “Camp-Meeting in Nebraska,” ARH, October 17, 1878, 124.

  20. “Henry Schultz,” 22.

  21. Ibid.

  22. “Henry Schultz,” 22; Seventh-day Adventist Year Book (Battle Creek, MI: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1887), 27, 28. See also Wesley Amundsen, “Dedication at East Cooper,” Southwestern Union Record, January 9, 1935, 4, 5.

  23. Seventh-day Adventist Year Book (1887), 32.

  24. Seventh-day Adventist Year Book (Battle Creek, MI: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1889), 53.

  25. Seventh-day Adventist Year Book (Battle Creek, MI: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1890), 19; Seventh-day Adventist Year Book (Battle Creek, MI: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1891), 22.

  26. Seventh-day Adventist Year Book (Battle Creek, MI: Review and Herald Publishing Association,1890), 46.

  27. Seventh-day Adventist Year Book (Washington, D.C.: General Conference of Seventh-day Adventists, 1904), 47; Year Book of the Seventh-day Adventist Denomination (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1905), 54; Year Book of the Seventh-day Adventist Denomination (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1906), 54.

  28. Year Book of the Seventh-day Adventist Denomination (1906), 59; Year Book of the Seventh-day Adventist Denomination (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1907), 62.

  29. “Elder Henry Shultz . . .,” ARH, March 23, 1905, 20.

  30. Year Book of the Seventh-day Adventist Denomination (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1908), 68; Year Book of the Seventh-day Adventist Denomination (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1909), 68; Year Book of the Seventh-day Adventist Denomination (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1913), 60; Year Book of the Seventh-day Adventist Denomination (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1914), 68; Year Book of the Seventh-day Adventist Denomination (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1915), 70; Year Book of the Seventh-day Adventist Denomination (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1916), 72; Year Book of the Seventh-day Adventist Denomination (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1917), 76.

  31. Thus, from 1904 to 1912, he served the International Publishing Association, located in College View, Nebraska, as a counselor, and was briefly on the advisory committee of the German weekly periodical Christlicher Hausfreund. See Seventh-day Adventist Year Book (1904), 85, 89; Year Book of the Seventh-day Adventist Denomination (1905), 97, 102; Year Book of the Seventh-day Adventist Denomination (1907), 104, 121Year Book of the Seventh-day Adventist Denomination (1908), 158; Year Book of the Seventh-day Adventist Denomination (1909), 163; Year Book of the Seventh-day Adventist Denomination (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1910), 165; Year Book of the Seventh-day Adventist Denomination (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1911), 164; Year Book of the Seventh-day Adventist Denomination (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1912), 180. He also was a member of the executive committee of the California Conference from 1907 to 1910 and of the newly organized Northern California-Nevada Conference from 1911 to 1913. See Year Book of the Seventh-day Adventist Denomination (1907), 61; Year Book of the Seventh-day Adventist Denomination (1908), 68; Year Book of the Seventh-day Adventist Denomination (1909), 68; Year Book of the Seventh-day Adventist Denomination (1910), 67; Year Book of the Seventh-day Adventist Denomination (1911), 62; Year Book of the Seventh-day Adventist Denomination (1912), 66; Year Book of the Seventh-day Adventist Denomination (1913), 60. Meanwhile, he was a member of the German Department Advisory Committee in the North American Foreign Department of the General Conference of Seventh-day Adventists for three years, from 1909 to 1913. See W. A. Spicer, “General Conference Committee in Council,” ARH, June 17, 1909, 24; Year Book of the Seventh-day Adventist Denomination (1910), 17; Year Book of the Seventh-day Adventist Denomination (1912), 10; Year Book of the Seventh-day Adventist Denomination (1913), 11. During this time, he also was twice, in 1912 and 1914, on the board of the Lodi Normal Institute, established in 1908. See Year Book of the Seventh-day Adventist Denomination (1912), 166; Year Book of the Seventh-day Adventist Denomination (1914), 167.

  32. Henry Shultz, “The Last Message to a Dying World,” ARH, February 7, 1907, 9; idem, “Praying to Christ,” ARH, August 1, 1912, 4, 5.

  33. “It has been a great pleasure . . .,” ARH, April 18, 1918, 24.

  34. Year Book of the Seventh-day Adventist Denomination (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1919), 84; Year Book of the Seventh-day Adventist Denomination (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1920), 93; Year Book of the Seventh-day Adventist Denomination (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1921), 59; Year Book of the Seventh-day Adventist Denomination (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1922), 56; Year Book of the Seventh-day Adventist Denomination (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1924), 58; Year Book of the Seventh-day Adventist Denomination (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1925), 64; Year Book of the Seventh-day Adventist Denomination (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald, 1926), 66.

  35. J. W. Boynton and Wife, “Home Again,” North Pacific Union Gleaner, May 16, 1918, 3.

  36. “Sarah Jane Rough [sic] Shultz,” 29; “Henry Schultz,” 22.

  37. “Death of Elder Henry Shultz,” 24; “Henry Schultz,” 22; Year Book of the Seventh-day Adventist Denomination (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1927), 383; California, Death Index, state file number 5111 (1926), digital image, “Shultz, Henry,” Ancestry.com, accessed June 16, 2017, http://ancestry.com.

  38. Find A Grave, Lodi Memorial Cemetery, Lodi, California, memorial no. 82380324, “Henry Shultz,” Find A Grave, accessed July 30, 2017, http://www.findagrave.com; Find A Grave, Lodi Memorial Cemetery, Lodi, California, memorial no. 82380400, “Sarah J. Shultz,” Find A Grave, accessed July 30, 2017, http://www.findagrave.com.

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Kaiser, Denis. "Schultz, Henry (1843–1926)." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. November 30, 2020. Accessed December 02, 2020. https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=GAGL.

Kaiser, Denis. "Schultz, Henry (1843–1926)." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. November 30, 2020. Date of access December 02, 2020, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=GAGL.

Kaiser, Denis (2020, November 30). Schultz, Henry (1843–1926). Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. Retrieved December 02, 2020, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=GAGL.