De Guzman, Gil (1903–1993)

By Mary Grace Ladion-De Guzman

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Mary Grace Ladion-De Guzman taught at Lipa Adventist Academy for eleven years, the first established academy within the territory of South Central Luzon Conference. She is a licensed science teacher and holds a master's degree in Science Education. She is particularly interested in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education and staff development. Her husband, Marlon De Guzman, is a senior auditor for the South Central Luzon Conference. They have two children. Guzman is currently pursuing a Ph.D. in Education with a specialization in Curriculum and Instruction from the Adventist International Institute of Advanced Studies.

Gil De Guzman was a teacher, evangelist, and administrator from the Philippines.

Early Life

Gil de Guzman was born September 1, 1903, to Mr. Sergio de Guzman and Mrs. Modesta Jurado-de Guzman in Meycawayan, Bulacan, Philippines. His mother died just fifteen days later. He was adopted by Engracia Jurado, his mother’s first cousin, who was a widow herself with no child of her own. Later, Engracia married a widower named Andres Ferrer who had a baby girl named Lucia whose mother also died due to childbirth. After several years, another baby boy named Eleazar came to the life of Andres and Engracia when another relative died of childbirth. The couple had been blessed with three children to take care of and they loved them as their own. They grew up together as brothers and sisters1.

Gil had an older sister with his biological parents named Emiliana de Guzman-Cordova. She supported Gil’s needs, including his education. She assisted the needs of the couple in rearing Gil. She was a devoted Catholic and had no children of her own. She acquired several properties in Pasay and Laguna, including a house and lot near the Philippine Publishing House, where Gil came to stay while attending the Philippine Seventh-day Adventist (SDA) Academy2. She bequeathed all her properties to Gil before she died in March 19373.

Gil de Guzman learned of Adventism from Engracia Jurado’s cousin Esteban, a preacher, and his wife Victoria, a Bible worker. Engracia, together with the three children, was baptized into the Adventist church. Gil was only eight years old when he was baptized by Pastor Emilio Manalaysay in 1911. They became regular members of Trozo Adventist Church, near Bambang, Manila. Although later on Esteban and Victoria left the Adventist church and established a new church, Engracia and the children remained Seventh-day Adventists4.

Education

Gil de Guzman attended Pritil Elementary School, Guiguinto, Bulacan, Philippines. In 1917 he enrolled at Pasay Adventist Academy. Elder Jackson saw a special talent in the young boy and often took him on his preaching appointments and tent efforts serving as an interpreter. Also, while a student, he worked in the bindery of the Philippine Publishing House (PPH). He worked four to five hours on weekdays and eight hours on Sundays. This allowed him to be trained in other areas of publishing jobs, including linotype operator. However, he felt that living in the dormitory kept him from working and studying at night due to dormitory rules, and his job as a linotypist required him to work full-time.

In 1921, when his sister Emiliana and their aunt purchased their property near the academy, de Guzman moved out of the dormitory. He now accepted the offer of Anderson, the factory superintendent, and Moon, the manager, to work as a full-time linotypist while studying. During school holidays, he ran the linotype from six in the evening until six in the morning.

Marriage

Gil met his future wife Monica Bayocot before his high school graduation. They married on December 19, 1925. The ceremony was officiated by Elder L.V. Finster. Monica joined him in various church endeavors, such as the tent meetings in Santa Cruz, Laguna from March to April 1926, with Pastor Dalisay and Mrs. Soberano as a Bible worker. This was followed by another tent effort in Siniloan, Laguna, and several evangelistic meetings with Pastor Vidal Jabola in Central Luzon Mission5.

Gil and Monica had four children. Elnora, the firstborn, was born in Singapore while the couple was serving as elementary school teachers. She grew up to be a dentist. Herminia, the second child, became a nurse and a physical therapist. She wrote many health books, including Healing Wonders of Herbs and Healing Wonders of Water. She married Dr. Samuel Ladion, who served as president of the Adventist University of the Philippines (AUP). The third child was Leslie who was a medical technologist. The de Guzman’s fourth child, Sophia, died in childhood.

Ministry

As soon as Gil de Guzman graduated high school in 19246, he became a church school teacher in San Pablo City, Laguna. From 1925 to 1926 he served as an evangelist in the province of Laguna, working with Pastor Dalisay and Pastor Jabola. The de Guzmans then accepted a call to teach elementary school at the Malayan Seminary in Singapore, where Gil also served as a missionary volunteer secretary in the Singapore Mission. The couple sailed to Singapore in February 1927. They were welcomed by the principal, Vernon Hendershot. Gil taught in the morning and studied bookkeeping in the afternoon. The de Guzmans stayed in Singapore for four years and returned to the Philippines in 19317.

Gil de Guzman was assigned to work as the boys’ preceptor at the newly established Philippine Union College (PUC). When the Central Luzon Mission divided into two missions, however, he was sent to the new one South-Central Luzon Mission headquarters to serve as the departmental secretary of the Sabbath school, Youth, and Education from 1931 to 1936. It was also this time that he was ordained as a minister8.

In 1937, de Guzman answered the call to West Visayan Mission. He came to work with Elder Forrest Pratt who later on became the president. Soon, the Far Eastern Division and the union gave a warning that in case of war, de Guzman should assume the presidency. In 1941, World War II broke out in the Philippine archipelago, bringing struggles for food and safety, and making work difficult. Despite the hardship, de Guzman didn’t lose hope.

On January 29, 1946, Pastor de Guzman was appointed as assistant superintendent of the Philippine Mission Council. The church faced major problems after the tumult of war. The union and the six mission offices were destroyed, as well as fourteen mission homes. The three academies, the publishing house, 117 church buildings, and the sanitarium were in ruins. The various equipment in PPH and the sanitarium were completely ruined. Many of the workers and church members also lost their homes and properties. However, some equipment in the union office and PUC were spared.9

The time was characterized as a real struggle. Many were homeless and hungry. Despite the hardship, more than 7,000 joined the church after the war. The mission work was growing and some workers risked their lives to visit churches, church members, and victims of war. There were long periods spent away from their families due to difficulty in transportation and continued dangers. The prices of goods and rentals were high, but the Philippine Mission Council was never disheartened. The leaders took courage and advanced the work despite hostile conditions.10

De Guzman served as an assistant union president from 1946 to 1947. M.E. Loewen described him as the man who held the lines of the mission until the arrival of new leadership after the war.11

From 1947 to 1950, de Guzman served as president of the Central Luzon Mission, the buildings of which had survived the war without serious damage.12 At this time, church leadership sought a more accessible site for the mission. A new site was found at Isabel Avenue in Manila called Grace Park. The new CLM headquarters was completed in November 1949, and dedicated March 24, 1951.13

Under de Guzman’s leadership, the gospel activities in the territory of CLM expanded to unentered areas in Zambales, Tarlac, and Rizal. The effort to bring young people to the church paid off as well. Many young people were baptized and experienced persecution from their own families, but stood firm and caused their family members to inquire of their faith.14

On January 1, 1951, the Philippine Union Mission reorganized and established two unions – The North and South Philippine Union Missions.15 Pastor de Guzman was appointed as the president16 of the newly organized union in the south.17 He took office at Gorordo Avenue, Lahug, Cebu City.18

Gil de Guzman was also appointed as the Ministerial and Religious Liberty secretary of the Philippine Union Mission.19 This department was organized to speak out against “the adoption of the World Calendar.”20 R. L. Odom, Gil de Guzman, and other religious liberty leaders of the denomination visited Philippines' Secretary of Foreign Affairs Felino Neri to address how adopting the World Calendar would impede religious freedom. They visited and discussed the issue with other religious leaders, sharing reading materials. Protestant leaders worked together to ensure religious liberty was preserved.

Pastor de Guzman’s spirit of resilience in hard times won respect among his counterparts in the Far Eastern Division and leaders in the General Conference. He was entrusted with other responsibilities, from his appointment as a member of the union executive committee to being the inter-union liaison committee member, and as an executive council member of the Philippine Temperance Society.21

In early 1951, two strong typhoons, Wanda and Amy, devastated the Visayan islands of the Philippines.22 In 1953 Mt. Hibok-Hibok23 erupted on Camiguin Island, Northern Mindanao. These challenges confronted Pastor de Guzman as soon as he was seated as president. However, he described the financial condition of the union as satisfied because of God’s blessings. Although many church properties were damaged and the livelihood of church members affected, resulting in a decrease of tithe income, with closer monitoring and supervision, church members increased, and tithes and offerings grew.24 All the workers, ministers, colporteurs, Bible instructors, teachers, and laypeople made a significant joint effort in the gospel work.25

The SPUM territories were scattered due to the geographical characteristics of many islands. This made travel quite expensive. Some churches could only be visited once in a quarter, while others in isolated areas were visited once in a year. The territories were home to a wide range of religious practices, including Christians, Muslims, and numerous tribes practicing animism.

On January 12, 1952, Pastor de Guzman organized a major evangelistic meeting in Cebu City that lasted for 70 nights. Called the Voice of Hope Tabernacle, it was a joint effort of Pastor C. M. Basconcillo and Pastor M. G. Yorac, with the assistance of Bible instructors Milagros Velez and Ruth Chiong. The program culminated on March 22, 1952, with 48 people baptized. On May 3, 1952, a similar event was conducted in another area of the city.26 The East Visayan Academy choir led by Sisters Diaz, Manatad, Hilaso, and Hechanoca, Jr. contributed to the uniqueness of the Voice of Hope Tabernacle program – a blend of music and God’s word. This ministry attracted many who attended the nightly meetings.27

Pastor De Guzman’s time in the South Pacific Union Mission saw the enrichment of the facilities of the newly established Mountain View College in Bukidnon and Mindanao Mission Academy in Misamis Oriental,28 Mindanao Sanitarium and Hospital,29 and the establishment of Miller Sanitarium and Hospital in Cebu City.30 Several laypeople were also ordained into the ministry due to their zeal for the gospel work.31

In 1951, when the Eastern and Western Visayan Missions suffered much loss due to devastating typhoons, a cut off of P1000 from their annual budget was proposed for the union to manage its expenses and go with its annual budget. However, the leaders of the Northern and Southern Mindanao Missions offered financial help. Pastor Capobres of the Northern Mindanao Mission offered a P1000 help to each mission, while Pastor Roda from the Southern Mindanao Mission offered P500. East Visayan Academy and West Visayan Academy received typhoon relief allocation from the General Conference and the Far Eastern Division.32

The first Publishing Council of the SPUM happened in Cebu Central Church from March 5-9, 1952. Wonderful stories of God’s guidance and conversion through the printed media were relayed by the colporteurs.33

Another remarkable report of the Northern Mindanao Mission (NMM) ministries also proved an increase in baptism, Sabbath school offerings, tithes, and entered mission fields. Pastor de Guzman expressed his desire to add more pastors to the mission field to minister to the growing number of members.34 A similar report of the increase was experienced in East Visayan Mission.35

With the inspiring reports of the different missions in his territory, Pastor de Guzman amplified his support to the workers. During the joint council of the North Philippine and South Philippine publishing department in PPH on March 3 to 5, 1953, de Guzman and F. M. Bayona sailed to Manila where they were warmly welcomed by the PPH people.36 The two missions shared their stories of success and dreams of the publishing work. Indeed, it was declared “there is room for many more in the colporteur work.”37 On December 19, 1953, de Guzman traveled to the Malayan State to preach on “unity of the house of God”38 to encourage church members to remain faithful.

Pastor de Guzman’s term as mission president ended in 1955 during the fifteenth biennial session of the Far Eastern Division held in Hong Kong. He was then appointed as the editor-in-chief of the Philippine Publishing House39 under the North Philippine Union Mission (NPUM).40 His new field of work allowed him to labor with Pastor W. J. Hackett, the new union president, and H. L. Dyer, the union secretary-treasurer.41

From 1957 to 1962 de Guzman served as president of the Southern Luzon Mission (SLM). He was characterized by the brethren as a wise leader who planned well, which resulted in the rapid progress in the mission.42 His experiences as a leader in various capacities and places all over the Philippines gave him the chance to exercise good management.

In March 1957, with Pastor P. R. Diaz leading the team touring around the NPUM territory, Pastor de Guzman welcomed attendees of the Sabbath School Laymen’s Convention to SLM headquarters. The meeting tackled various instructions on Sabbath school, home missionary work, and Dorcas welfare work. Church workers went home equipped with additional knowledge and skills for soul-winning.43

On April 8, 1957, Pastor de Guzman and Pastor T. V. Barizo led the youth delegates from SLM to the North Philippine Union Mission Youth Congress at PUC. Pastor de Guzman preached about asking for God’s guidance in “choosing a life career.”44 The next years were spent in labor for winning precious souls of the Albayanos for the Savior.

To encourage and strengthen his fellow workers, Pastor de Guzman invited visitors from the union to deliver inspirational messages during the workers’ retreat on September 6-8, 1960. Pastor L. E. Tucker, the ministerial secretary, delivered a message on the importance of the Holy Spirit’s guidance in a successful ministry. Pastor H. W. Bedwell highlighted the importance of a “life of pure living, a life of prayer, and active life of service.”45 He spoke about how the Holy Spirit worked in every worker as long as each one is willing to obey God’s command.

In May 1961, SLM held its biennial session, attended by ministers, evangelists, teachers, colporteurs, department secretaries and their wives, visitors, and friends. The year before this session was characterized by Pastor de Guzman as the “period of precious blessings from God on the work of SLM.”46 The reports of mission leaders on church membership, colporteurs’ sales, Sabbath love offerings and pledges, Bible interests, and Pathfinders and Master Guides showed a significant increase.47

On July 9, 1961, the long-envisioned Health and Welfare Center was opened and attended by the prominent public leaders in Albay, headed by Mrs. Estevez, the wife of the vice-governer and a social welfare administrator, and assisted by Mrs. P. Miranda, the Albay Dorcas Welfare Federation president. Dr. C. L. Miranda and Dr. P. L. Miranda, Pastor M. P. Arevalo, the welfare development secretary of the mission, the Dorcas members, and others were also present. Pastor de Guzman declared the opening of the welfare center to the public, while Pastor Arevalo announced the regular rations of rice, cornmeal, flour, and milk to the 50 indigent families every Sunday. This development of the Adventist work in SLM impressed the hearts of the visitors and opened doors for evangelism.48

In 1963, de Guzman was called to serve as president of South-Central Luzon Mission. SCLM has a wide territory with several islands. One of the islands in the territory is Mindoro and just like in SPUM, visiting churches was a challenge due to the limitation of transportation. Despite the challenges of traveling to an isolated area in the Mangyan tribe in Occidental Mindoro, Pastor de Guzman visited Lamont Mangyan School, baptized many students, and “conducted the first foot–washing and communion service.”49 He stayed at SCLM for a year and answered another call as a full-time church pastor at the Philippine Union College in 1964.50 He culminated his pastoral work in the missions and union and retired in 1965.

Throughout his life, de Guzman served the Lord and the church in various capacities. Most of his years were spent as an administrator in various missions throughout the Philippine archipelago as well as in the union. He dedicated 42 years in service.

Later Life and Contribution

After his 42 years of active denominational service, de Guzman pastored many churches in CLM including Caloocan, Sampaloc, Manila Central Church, PUC, Pasay English Church, and others. On January 25, 1993, Pastor de Guzman died in Sucat, Paranaque City, Metro Manila, Philippines. Monica de Guzman died in July 2003.

Pastor Gil de Guzman is remembered as a man of faith and action. His life is an example of enthusiastic leadership and willingness to serve wherever God leads. He made a deep impression of service to God and service to humanity. He was a visionary and an able minister who sat among the world church leaders in guiding the mission work in the Philippines.

Sources

Abaway, A. J. “In Retrospect.” An excerpt from the report of Southern Luzon Mission secretary. Far Eastern Division Outlook, December 1961.

Adams, E. M. “The President’s Report,” Far Eastern Division Outlook, June 1951.

Afenir, J. “Greeting to the New Union Officers,” Far Eastern Division Outlook, February 1956.

Alcaraz, A. A. “Religious Liberty,” Far Eastern Division Outlook, June 1951.

Alsaybar, B. B. “A Full-Time Pastor for PUC,” Far Eastern Division Outlook, October 1964.

Arceo, A. G. “North Philippine Union Youth Congress,” Far Eastern Division Outlook, June 1957.

Arevalo, M. P. “Health and Welfare Center Opened,” Far Eastern Division Outlook, December 1961.

Armstrong, V. T. “Philippine Union Council,” Far Eastern Division Outlook, March 1946.

Armstrong, V. T. “Two Union Missions in the Philippine Islands,” Far Eastern Division Outlook, June 1951.

Barlett, V. L. “Introducing Two New Institutions,” Far Eastern Division Outlook, May 1953.

Basconcillo, C. M. “Cebu City Tabernacle Effort,” Far Eastern Division Outlook, July 1952.

Chu, S. F. “Good News from Pontian Kechil,” The Messenger, March to April 1954.

De Chavez, D. B., Cordero at all. Celebrating 75 years of God’s blessings and guidance: South-Central Luzon Conference. San Pablo City, Laguna: SCLC Printing Press, 2006.

Diaz, P. R. “Sabbath School Laymen’s Convention,” Far Eastern Division Outlook, June 1957.

G. de. Guzman’s Service Record, Southern-Asia Pacific Division Archive, Silang, Cavite, Philippines.

Geniblazo, A. “Southern Luzon Mission Holds Biennial Meeting,” Far Eastern Division Outlook, June 1959.

Geslani, F. T. “Mindanao Sanitarium and Hospital,” Far Eastern Division Outlook, May 1953.

Guzman, G. de. “Central Luzon Mission President’s Report,” Far Eastern Division Outlook, June 1951.

Guzman, G. de. “Dedication of the Central Luzon Mission Headquarters,” Far Eastern Division Outlook, June 1951.

Guzman, G. de. “East Visayan Mission Session,” Far Eastern Division Outlook, July 1952.

Guzman, G. de. “Looking Back two Years,” Far Eastern Division Outlook, May 1953.

Guzman, G. de. “Northern Mindanao Mission Meetings,” Far Eastern Division Outlook, July 1952.

Guzman, G. de. “Ordination Service.” Far Eastern Division Outlook, May 1953.

Guzman, G. de. “Publishing Council in Cebu City,” Far Eastern Division Outlook, April 1952.

Guzman, Gil de. “Southern Luzon Mission Workers’ Retreat,” Far Eastern Division Outlook, November 1960.

Guzman, G. de. “South Philippine Union Annual Meeting,” Far Eastern Division Outlook, April 1952.

Loewen, M. E. "Superintendent’s Report to the Biennial Session”. Far Eastern Division Outlook, October 1947.

Montalban, V. M. “Appointments,” Far Eastern Division Outlook, May 1953.

Montalban, V. M. “Report of the Secretary-Treasurer,” Far Eastern Division Outlook, May 1953.

Obregon, J. R. “The First Year,” Far Eastern Division Outlook, April 1952.

Sorensen, C. P. “A Life Dedicated to Service in the Philippines,” Far Eastern Division Outlook, June 1951.

Sorensen, C. P. “Come Follow Me,” Far Eastern Division Outlook, February 1956.

Wickwire, B. M. “With our Bookmen,” Far Eastern Division Outlook, July 1953.

Abaway, A. J. “In Retrospect.” An excerpt from the report of Southern Luzon Mission secretary. Far Eastern Division Outlook, December 1961.

Notes

  1. Interview with Elnora de Guzman-Sparks, the daughter of Pastor Gil de Guzman on January 12, 2020, via email.

  2. Southern Asia Pacific Division (SSD) Archive. Silang, Cavite, Philippines. Retrieved on October 17, 2019

  3. Ibid. Interview with Elnora de Guzman-Sparks.

  4. Ibid.

  5. Ibid. Interview with Elnora de Guzman-Sparks.

  6. B. B. Alsaybar, “A Full-Time Pastor for PUC,” Far Eastern Division Outlook, October 1964, 10.

  7. Ibid. Interview with Elnora de Guzman-Sparks.

  8. Ibid.

  9. V. T. Armstrong, “Philippine Union Council,” Far Eastern Division Outlook, March 1946, 2.

  10. Ibid.

  11. M. E. Loewen, "Superintendent’s Report to the Biennial Session,” Far Eastern Division Outlook, October 1947, 1-2.

  12. Service Record, Southern-Asia Pacific Division Archive. Retrieved on October 17, 2019.

  13. G. de Guzman, “Dedication of the Central Luzon Mission Headquarters,” Far Eastern Division Outlook, June 1951, 16-17

  14. G. de Guzman, “Central Luzon Mission President’s Report,” Far Eastern Division Outlook, June 1951, 4-5.

  15. V. M. Montalban, “Report of the Secretary-Treasurer,” Far Eastern Division Outlook, May 1953, 3.

  16. C. P. Sorensen, “A Life Dedicated to Service in the Philippines,” Far Eastern Division Outlook, June 1951, 19.

  17. E. M. Adams, “The President’s Report,” Far Eastern Division Outlook, June 1951, 3.

  18. South Philippine Union Mission President Gil de Guzman, Far Eastern Division Outlook, May 1953, 11.

  19. V. M. Montalban, “Appointments,” Far Eastern Division Outlook, May 1953, 9.

  20. A. A. Alcaraz, “Religious Liberty,” Far Eastern Division Outlook, June 1951, 13-14.

  21. V. T. Armstrong, “Two Union Missions in the Philippine Islands,” Far Eastern Division Outlook, June 1951, 18-19.

  22. Ibid. V. M. Montalban, “Report of the Secretary-Treasurer.”

  23. J. R. Obregon, “The First Year,” Far Eastern Division Outlook, April 1952, 5-6.

  24. G. de Guzman, “Looking Back two Years,” Far Eastern Division Outlook, May 1953, 2-3.

  25. Ibid. J. R. Obregon, “The First Year.”

  26. C. M. Basconcillo, “Cebu City Tabernacle Effort,” Far Eastern Division Outlook, July 1952, 9-10.

  27. Ibid.

  28. V. L. Barlett, “ Introducing Two New Institutions,” Far Eastern Division Outlook, May 1953, 7-8.

  29. F. T. Geslani, “Mindanao Sanitarium and Hospital,” Far Eastern Division Outlook, May 1953, 8.

  30. Ibid. Interview with Elnora de Guzman-Sparks.

  31. G. de Guzman, “Ordination Service.” Far Eastern Division Outlook, May 1953, 9-10

  32. G. de Guzman, “South Philippine Union Annual Meeting,” Far Eastern Division Outlook, April 1952, 4-5.

  33. G. de Guzman,”Publishing Council in Cebu City,” Far Eastern Division Outlook, April 1952, 6-7.

  34. G. de Guzman, “Northern Mindanao Mission Meetings,” Far Eastern Division Outlook, July 1952, 10-11.

  35. G. de Guzman, “East Visayan Mission Session,” Far Eastern Division Outlook, July 1952, 11-12.

  36. B.M. Wickwire, “With our Bookmen,” Far Eastern Division Outlook, July 1953, 3-4.

  37. Ibid.,4.

  38. S.F. Chu, “Good News from Pontian Kechil,” The Messenger, March to April 1954, 2.

  39. C. P. Sorensen, “Come Follow Me,” Far Eastern Division Outlook, February 1956, 1-2

  40. J. Afenir, “Greeting to the New Union Officers,” Far Eastern Division Outlook, February 1956, 13-14.

  41. J. Afenir, “Greeting to the New Union Officers,” Far Eastern Division Outlook, February 1956, p. 13-14.

  42. A. Geniblazo, “Southern Luzon Mission Holds Biennial Meeting,” Far Eastern Division Outlook, June 1959, 7-8.

  43. P. R. Diaz, “Sabbath School Laymen’s Convention,” Far Eastern Division Outlook, June 1957, 7-8.

  44. A. G. Arceo, “North Philippine Union Youth Congress,” Far Eastern Division Outlook, June 1957, 5-7.

  45. Gil de Guzman, “Southern Luzon Mission Workers’ Retreat,” Far Eastern Division Outlook, November 1960, p. 10

  46. A. J. Abaway, “In Retrospect,” An excerpt from the report of Southern Luzon Mission secretary, Far Eastern Division Outlook, December 1961, 7.

  47. Ibid.

  48. M. P. Arevalo, “Health and Welfare Center Opened,” Far Eastern Division Outlook, December 1961, 8-9.

  49. D. B. De Chavez at all, Celebrating 75 years of God’s blessings and guidance: South-Central Luzon Conference (San Pablo City, Laguna: SCLC Printing Press, 2006), 9-14.

  50. Ibid. B. B. Alsaybar. “A Full-Time Pastor for PUC.”

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Guzman, Mary Grace Ladion-De. "De Guzman, Gil (1903–1993)." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. April 28, 2021. Accessed January 19, 2022. https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=GAUT.

Guzman, Mary Grace Ladion-De. "De Guzman, Gil (1903–1993)." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. April 28, 2021. Date of access January 19, 2022, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=GAUT.

Guzman, Mary Grace Ladion-De (2021, April 28). De Guzman, Gil (1903–1993). Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. Retrieved January 19, 2022, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=GAUT.