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Central Pernambuco Conference headquarters, 2019.

Photo courtesy of Central Pernambuco Conference Archives.

Central Pernambuco Conference

By Rodolfo Figueiredo de Sousa

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Rodolfo Figueiredo de Sousa lives in the State of Goiás, Brazil. He holds a degree in theology, languages and history from Brazil Adventist University. For a time he served as a writing assistant on the editorial team of the Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists at the South American Division.

First Published: June 4, 2021

The Central Pernambuco Conference is an administrative unit of the Seventh-day Adventist Church located in the territory of Northeast Brazil Union Mission. It is currently headquartered at Av. Compositor Limeira Tejó, no. 53, ZIP code 55016-700, Universitário district, in the state of Pernambuco, Brazil.

Territory and Statistics

The conference operates in 131 municipalities in the central part of Pernambuco, in a 94,851,759 square kilometer territory with 4,479,308 inhabitants. Of this population, about 38,062 are Adventists, distributed among congregations,1 a ratio of one Adventist per 117 inhabitants. The conference has 238 Pathfinder Clubs,2 totaling 6,469 members, and 118 Adventurer Clubs,3 serving 3,021 participants.4

The conference has three educational institutions: Caruaru Adventist Academy, in the city of Caruaru, with 1,626 students; Garanhuns Adventist Academy, located in Garanhuns, with 291 students; and the Belo Jardim Adventist Academy, in Belo Jardim, with 651 students.5

In some municipalities, the Adventist message is spread also through Hope Channel Brazil. In the municipality of Toritama (channel 33), the potential reach is 43,174 people; in the municipality of Santa Cruz do Capibaribe (channel 42), about 105,761 people can watch the Hope Channel Brazil program; in the municipality of Pesqueira (channel 44), the potential reach is 66,881 people; and in the municipality of Lagoa dos Gatos (channel 214), the estimated population reached is 16,131 people. In total, about 231,947 people have access to Hope Channel Brazil programming. A new TV transmitter will soon be installed in Petrolina, with a potential range of 343,865 people.6

The Central Pernambuco Conference has 47 ordained and nine licensed ministers, five accredited and two licensed workers, and 42 more employees in various functions.7

Origin of Seventh-day Adventist Work in the Territory of the Conference

Human history sometimes bears witness to a relationship between natural disasters and manifestations of faith. For many, instability is the context in which they express their religious fervor most intensely. Such is the faith of many in northeast Brazil. The portion of land that corresponds to the Central Pernambuco Conference is part of the so-called “Polígono das Secas.” This is an area subject to repeated and worrying crises of prolonged droughts and, for this reason, in 1946 it became the target of special measures by the Brazilian government.8 In this arid land, the predominant religiosity has expanded since colonization, and for four centuries it has spread its education and carried out relief work.9 The Northeast Region became a stronghold of the Catholic faith and, for this reason, it received from the evangelicals the title of “10x40 Brazilian window.”10 It is common to find historical reports of religious intolerance, by clergy and their faithful, against Protestant and evangelical missionaries.11

In 1900, religious persecution against Protestants in several cities in the countryside of Pernambuco was denounced. In the city of Bonito, a Protestant church was invaded at the time of prayer. Three people were killed and many were injured. On another occasion, in the city of Glória de Goitá, a Protestant group was meeting in the house of a man named Joaquim José da Costa. During the worship, 30 armed men broke into the meeting, raped the women, and beat whoever was on the scene. Even the children were seriously injured. After that, they burned the furniture in the house and destroyed crops and flour houses.12

To the unstable climate and religious persecution, political and economic factors were added. The region was forgotten during the period known as the First Republic or the “Coffee with milk policy” (1889-1930).13 During this period, the federal government favored the states of São Paulo and Minas Gerais, alternating their candidates for the presidency. They thus controlled the elections and enjoyed the support of Brazil’s agrarian elite.14 These and other factors contributed to the northeast region having the lowest levels of literacy, urbanization, and life expectancy in the country at the time.15

Soon parallel powers emerged, making guerrilla warfare among themselves for control of the region. Police corruption, coronelismo16 (use of economic, social and political power by large landowners), and the Cangaço17 (nomadic bandits) stand out as examples of the social unrest of that era. In this environment of poverty, illiteracy, superstition, religious persecution, and violence, Adventism arrived in Pernambuco.18 In 1911, Pastors F. W. Spies19 and John Lipke20 traveled on a steam train from Rio de Janeiro to the city of Caruaru, in the state of Pernambuco, to conduct an evangelistic campaign. They baptized ten people.21

During the early years of the twentieth century, the Pernambuco mission field was assisted by several Adventist administrative units, but progress remained slow. Initial evangelism in this region was under the responsibility of some pastors, canvassers,22 and other Adventists who had moved to the state. Some became renowned for their audacious way of preaching the gospel, as in the case of canvasser Luís Calebe Rodrigues, one of the pioneers in the states of Pernambuco, Paraíba and Rio Grande do Norte. This man preached the gospel to many people and started several Adventist groups. His trips were made with his little donkeys, named Borboleta (Butterfly) and Bolacha (Biscuit).23

Luís Calebe Rodrigues was an illiterate with a hearing impairment. Notwithstanding, he worked tirelessly until his old age. He liked to sell books such as “Life of Jesus” and the review “O Atalaia” [The Watchmen].24 The work done by him and other men and women contributed to the birth of Pernambuco Mission in 1916. This mission was responsible for the advancement of the Adventist work in many states, such as Pernambuco, Alagoas, Paraíba, and Rio Grande do Norte.25

In 1932, as a result of the Great Depression26 (among other factors), the state of Pernambuco came under the management of the Northeast Mission, which was the result of the merging of two mission fields, Bahia Mission and Pernambuco Mission.27 As a result, six Brazilian states (Bahia, Sergipe, Alagoas, Pernambuco, Paraíba, and Rio Grande do Norte) were brought together under a single administrative unit of the church,28 headquartered where the Pernambuco Mission had formerly been.29 The mission has since been reorganized in 1937, 1965, 1980, and 1999. The Northeast Mission is currently responsible for advancing Adventist work only in the states of Paraíba and Rio Grande do Norte.30

Soon the first Adventist School in Caruaru was founded. This school was created through the Board of Directors of the Education Department of Brazil East Union. In the beginning, the institution had the following teachers: Natan Florêncio and his wife, Dulce Pessoa, Carmelita Patrício, Percides Barbosa, Eronita Laurentino, Mozelita Gomes Laurentino, Lenilde Laurentino, and Rute Alves.31

In 1939, an Adventist was reading the New Testament to some people in a public square of a city in the countryside of Pernambuco. Soon a large gathering formed around him, listening intently. It was then that, unexpectedly, the city priest began to shout, “Die Protestants and long live the Catholic Church! Die Protestants!” Upon hearing this, the crowd threw themselves at the speaker with violence. While the preacher survived, no Protestants were allowed to live there.32

The next year, another large number of listeners gathered in that same city. The meeting happened in a house and, while the Bible was being opened by Pastor Jerônimo G. Garcia,33 then president of Northeast Mission, a priest accompanied by a crowd armed with sticks and knives was seen through the window. The crowd soon surrounded the meeting place. Pastor Jerônimo ordered all windows and doors to be opened and began to preach with all enthusiasm. The priest did his best to keep the crowd from hearing what the pastor was saying, but the people calmed down. Many families left with an interest in the Adventist message, but there was no one to prepare all those people for baptism, as there were only two evangelists to support the states of Alagoas, Pernambuco, Paraíba, and Rio Grande do Norte.34

Aware of the existence of the small and only school in Caruaru, Pastor Jerônimo presented the needs of that mission field to the readers of Revista Adventista [Adventist Review]: “more workers and more schools for children and young people.” His cry was heard. Jerônimo started the Arruda Adventist School, located at Street Zeferino Agra, no. 268, Arruda district, Recife.35

Missionary trips to the Northeast were made by men and women who did not shy away from sacrifices. The path was traveled by trucks or on foot, on dirt roads, under the sun in rain, to share the Adventist message with those in poverty and need.36

By October 1946, 45 students enrolled in the Sabbath School in Caruaru. Adventist members in that city gathered to pray, send missionary correspondence, and distribute literature. Soon six families became interested in learning more about the Adventist message. An organized group of Adventists was established in the municipality of Bezerros, and at least 50 people from across the region awaited baptism.37

On October 24, 1954, Pastor José Bacarat and his wife, Maria Bacarat, started a series of evangelistic conferences in Caruaru. The media of the time stated that the event made the city go through “a truly fantastic experience” and that the city was “truly shaken.” As a result of this missionary experience, many people were reached by the good news of the gospel.38 Due to this and other evangelistic campaigns, Adventist membership increased so much that, during the Third Biennial Assembly of the Northeast Brazil Mission, it was formally requested that a new church be built.39

In 1960 another series of evangelistic was initiated in Caruaru,40 and in October 1961, the new Adventist church was finally inaugurated. Pastor D. Peixoto da Silva preached and the Northeast Brazil Junior College Choir performed for the inaugural service.41 The mission began to see marked growth. In the first quarter of 1962 alone, the number of new converts tripled and, in Caruaru, 27 people were baptized.42

About two years later, there were at least 20 Adventist families in Serra de Condessa, twelve kilometers from Caruaru. Adventism’s roots in Caruaru go back to pioneers who preached there around 1923. By mid-1964, an Adventist church and school served the surrounding region.43

Several ardent missionaries came out of this region to preach the gospel. Once, during the 1971 vacation period, two young student canvassers left Caruaru State School to canvass in a city called Alagoinhas, in the state of Bahia. The young women distributed literature with great dedication and missionary enthusiasm, leaving a good impression on the inhabitants. On December 10, 1971, through the legislative branch, the city’s residents sent “congratulatory votes to the Dean of ‘Caruaru State School’ and to the noble colleagues, for the great event [achievement].”44

In October 1976 the city hall of Caruaru donated an area of 900 square meters to the Northeast Mission for the construction of an Adventist elementary school.45 The land was located in a good region, in the center of the city, and “in the richest and most culturally developed sector.” The land was bought at a high price and donated to the church, which received it cordially.46 The foundation stone was laid the following year at an event attended by municipal, state, and denominational authorities. The Northeast Brazil Junior College Choir brightened the party with the presentation of beautiful music.47

On September 12, 1981, a new evangelistic campaign started in the region. Back then, Caruaru had about 170,000 inhabitants and was considered the second largest city in the entire state of Pernambuco.48 Theology students from Northeast Brazil Junior College actively participated in missionary work.49

The state of Pernambuco remained under the care of the Northeast Brazil Mission until December 1999, when the region became the Pernambuco Conference.50 The new conference had 36,221 members, four schools, 25 pastoral districts, and 110 churches. Its administrative headquarters was located at Estrada de Belém, nº 885, in Campo Grande neighborhood, in Recife. Later, for its good development, the Pernambuco Conference gave rise to Pernambuco Central Mission.51

Organizational History of the Conference

The Pernambuco Central Mission was organized in a Steering Committee held on April 24, 2007. On November 21, 2007,52 at the Central Caruaru church, an assembly elected administrators, received the new churches created in the period, and planned the mission’s activities for its territory.53

The first headquarters of Central Pernambuco Mission was located on Rua Varsovia, ZIP Code 55016-417, block 34, Jardim Europa subdivision, in the University district, in the municipality of Caruaru.54 The next year the headquarters moved to Av. Limeira Tejó, nº 53, ZIP Code 55016-700, in the Universitário neighborhood, also in the municipality of Caruaru, in the state of Pernambuco.55 The mission started with only ten pastoral districts, with 8,357 baptized members and 92 churches. The mission baptized 1,066 people in its first year.56

The Central Pernambuco Mission was created to communicate the Adventist message to all the people who live in its territory. Its stated mission is, “To communicate to all people who live in its territory the eternal gospel of the love of God, in the context of the three angels’ messages of Revelation 14:6-12, as revealed in the life, death, resurrection, and priestly ministry of Jesus Christ, inviting them, assisting them. and building them up spiritually in preparation for His soon return.” The mission was founded in the territory of the Northeast Brazil Union Mission, and served 131 municipalities which are not part of the metropolitan region of Recife.57

The first mission leaders were Jurandi Januário dos Reis, president; Gilberto Nunes Ludugerio, secretary, ministerial and department leader of the Adventist Development and Relief Agency (ADRA); Laercio Silva Costa, treasurer; Israel Messias Rodrigues, responsible for Personal Ministry, Evangelism and Global Mission; André Luiz Lima, overseeing Youth, Pathfinders, Adventurers, Music and University students; Francisco Lino de Oliveira, leader of Stewardship, Home and Family, and Health; Lindete Oliveira dos Reis, responsible for the Ministries of Women, Children and Adolescents, and the Women’s Area of the Ministerial Association (AFAM); and Francisco Francineudo Françuelo, Publishing Ministry director.58

A number of missionary projects have been developed in the mission. They include camp meeting, Caleb Mission,59 Small Group,60 ADRA programs, Hope Impact,61 One Year in Mission,62 coordination of Brazil Hope Channel stakeholders; and short-term missions, such as literature evangelism. The mission field baptized 3,488 people in 2008, 4,486 in 2009, and 3,931 in 2010. In 2011, baptisms reached 3,710, and, in 2012, 3,621 people were baptized. The steady growth allowed Central Pernambuco Mission to become Central Pernambuco Conference in 2013.63 64 As of 2019, the conference has 38,062 baptized members in 202 churches.65

Conference leadership has encouraged members to participate in Hope Impact. Annually, about 300,000 thousand missionary books are distributed throughout the territory of Central Pernambuco Conference. Some of the congregations existing today are the fruits of this project, including churches in Tabuleiro, Angelim, and Santa Filomena.66

Another evangelistic program is the One Year in Mission Project. In 2018, two teams of twenty volunteers, in Caruaru and Garanhuns, taught Bible studies, music workshops, cooking, English classes, and Libras (Brazilian Sign Language) classes. In 2019 the city chosen to carry out the project was Petrolina, where about 37 young people were organized into the two teams formed.67

The Valentes de Davi (The Valiants of David) evangelistic project has the participation of men and women dedicated to doing evangelism of 15 to 30 days during the holidays. Volunteers participate in weekend training where they receive all the material needed for evangelism. In 2019, about 400 volunteers participated in the project, which resulted in almost 700 baptisms.68

Another evangelistic program is Esperança Nordeste [Northeast Hope]. The 10-day project was first held in 2018 in the city of Garanhuns. About 70 people volunteered to participate in activities such as health fairs, sports schools, guitar lessons, cooking classes, home gardening, and home renovation. In 2019 the project was carried out in the city of Petrolina and had about 105 volunteers.69

Given the wide reach of Hope Channel Brazil, a program has been initiated to reach interested viewers. Started in 2019 in the municipality of Caruaru, the project has pastors, district and local coordinators who are trained and motivated for the work. Since then, good results have been obtained through this missionary front.70

The Central Pernambuco Conference has a strong emphasis on discipleship through the Small Group structure. The discipleship network starts inside the headquarters, where the president of the conference is the leader of the PGP (Small Groups of Pastors). In addition, there are periodic meetings between the team of department pastors and administrators.71

The same happens to other administrative departments. Each pastor leads a region, and the followers do the same in their district, and so on, until they reach church members. In addition, specific meetings are held with the Small Group coordinators of the churches, and the coordinators hold meetings with the leaders of the congregation’s groups. One of the advantages of this program is that it thus makes it possible to pastor church members more closely, strengthening and motivating them for the mission.72

In partnership with the conference, Northeast ADRA develops humanitarian aid projects in cities that experiencing emergencies. In 2018 and 2019 ADRA served flood victims and built artesian wells in the villages of Salgueiro, in addition to providing various services in such cities as Calumbi, Bodocó, Belém de Maria, Garanhuns, and Petrolina.73

In 2019 about 2,500 volunteers participated in the Caleb Mission Project, resulting in nearly a thousand baptized people. Literature evangelism remains active, reaching people in the most distant places in the territory. The conference has 20 full-time canvassers.74

One of the conference’s biggest difficulties is working in an area with little rainfall. It has been challenging also purchasing land for the Central Church of Caruaru (to expand from 300 square meters to 1,200 square meters); a new property for the Central Church of Petrolina (which should be expanded from 300 square meters to 600 square meters); and Caruaru Adventist Academy (which will expand to more than 2,000 square meters).75

Nevertheless, the church in this region has learned to act boldly. The countless obstacles become less important in the face of a united and active church. Plans for the future involve the construction of the new Central Church of Petrolina, and the new Central Church in Caruaru; the construction of Adventist schools in the cities of Petrolina and Garanhuns, as well as the expansion of Adventist Schools already existing in Garanhuns and Caruaru; and the installation of Hope Channel Brazil in the cities of Petrolina and Caruaru.76

Future camp meetings are expected to be fully connected with the Small Group structures. Members will go in the form of caravans, but the criterion for participating is regular registration and active participation in some small groups. The event will feature community services, lectures, music, and baptisms. Finally, in view of the advancement of the preaching of the gospel in the region, a reconfiguration in the conference’s mission field is expected soon.77

Chronology of Administrative Managers78

Presidents: Jurandi Januário dos Reis (2008-current).

Secretaries: Gilberto Nunes Ludugerio (2008-2010); Jonatan Bezerra de Souza (2011-2012); Nilton de Souza Lima (2013); Alexandre Aciole Salustiano (2014-2015); Flávio Henrique de Oliveira (2016-current).

Treasurers: Laercio Silva Costa (2008-2010); Railson Silva Neves (2011-2012); Euzébio Gomes Neto (2013-current).79

Sources

Adauto, José. “O Testemunho de Duas Jovens” [The testimony of two young ladies]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], February 1973.

Almeida, Antonio Moisés de. “Construindo o futuro sem demolir o passado” [Building the future without demolishing the past]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], November 1976.

Amorim de Angelo, Vitor. “Política do café-com-leite - Acordo marcou a República Velha” [Coffee-with-milk policy - Agreement marked the Old Republic]. Educação UOL [UOL Education] (Online), s/d.

“Atividades Espirituais e Culturais” [Spiritual and Cultural Activities]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], November 1981.

Barroso, Gustavo, Heróes e Bandidos [Heroes and outlaws]. São Paulo, SP: Livraria Francisco Alves, 1917.

Belz, Rodolpho. “Nótulas do Este” [Notes from the East]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], January 1960.

Belz, Rodolpho. “Nótulas do Este” [Notes from the East]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], October 1961.

Belz, Rodolpho. “Nótulas do Este” [Notes from the East]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], August 1962.

Centro Nacional da Memória Adventista [National Center of Adventist Memory], “Lipke, John,” https://bit.ly/2NOdpep.

“Destaque Para o Evangelismo” [Highlight for Evangelism]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], November 1981.

Florêncio, Natã. “O Evangelismo na Zona Central e Sertão de Pernambuco” [Evangelism in the Central Zone and the Sertão of Pernambuco]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], October 1946.

Francisco, Wagner de Cerqueria e. “Cangaço.” UOL: Brasil Escola [Brazil School] (Online), no date.

Garcia, Ana Araújo, Jerônimo era assim [Jerônimo was like that]. Santo André, SP: Brazil Publishing House, 1984.

Garcia, Jerônimo. “Até Quando...?” [Until When...?]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], February 1939.

Greenleaf, Floyd, Terra de Esperança [Land of Hope]. Tatuí, SP: Brazil Publishing House, 2011.

Hobsbawn, Eric. Era dos Extremos: o breve século XX 1914-1991 [Age of Extremes: the brief 20th century 1914-1991]. São Paulo, SP: Companhia das Letras, 1995.

Igreja Adventista do Sétimo Dia [SDA Church] – Central Caxias do Sul – RS. https://bit.ly/2TuuQUI.

Janotti, Maria de Lourdes, O Coronelismo uma Política de Compromissos [Coronelismo: a Politic of Commitments]. São Paulo, SP: Brasiliense, 1992.

Landim, Leilah. “Associações filantrópicas, ou de assistência” [Philanthropic or assistance associations]. In: Estatísticas do Século XX [XX Century Statistics], no ed. Rio de Janeiro, RJ: IBGE, 2006.

Lira, Severino. “Todos Cantam Sua Terra” [Everyone sings their land]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], April 1955.

Machado, Domingos Gonçalves Oswaldo and Alfredo Vauthier, “Perseguição Religiosa” [Religious Persecution]. Jornal do Recife XLIII [Recife Newspaper XLIII], May 27, 1900.

Mendes, Alfredo Pereira. “Terceira Assembleia Bienal da Missão Nordeste” [Third Biennial Assembly of the Northeast Brazil Mission]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], June 1959.

Minutes of the Central Pernambuco Mission, November 21, 2007. Central Pernambuco Mission archives, Caruaru, PE, Brazil.

Neves, Daniel. “Crise de 1929” [1929 Crisis]. UOL: Brasil Escola [Brazil School] (Online), no date.

Pita, Plácido da Rocha. Por que Mudei de Exército: a saga do homem que caçava Lampião e encontrou a verdadeira Luz [Why I changed army: the saga of the man who hunted Lampião and found the true Light]. Tatuí, SP: Brazil Publishing House, 2018.

Prestes Filho, Ubirajara de Farias. “A imagem do índio no Centro-Oeste: representações de missionários adventistas na década de 1920” [The image of the Indian in the Midwest: representations of Adventist missionaries in the 1920s]. In: Territórios e Fronteiras - Revista do Programa de Pós-graduação em História da Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso 6 [Territories and Borders - Journal of the Graduate Program in History at the Federal University of Mato Grosso 6], January-June 2005.

Ramos, José Carlos. “U.E.B. Notícias” [U.E.B. News]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], October 1976.

Rocha, Zirnaldo F. “Caruaru Terá Escola Adventista” [Caruaru will have an Adventist School]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], December 1977.

Sales, Iracema. “Seca no Ceará: da curiosidade científica ao flagelo humano” [Drought in Ceará: from scientific curiosity to the human scourge]. Diário do Nordeste [Northeast Newspaper], July 20, 2015.

Santana, Heron. “A ‘Janela 10/40’ brasileira” [Brazilian 10/40 Window]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review] January 2010.

Santana, Heron. “Força Espiritual” [Spiritual Strenght]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review] April 2006.

Santana, Heron. “Igreja militante” [Militant Church]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review] February 1999.

Seventh-day Adventist Pathfinders and Adventurers Ministry, https://clubes.adventistas.org/br/.

Seventh-day Adventist Church Website. http://www.adventistas.org/pt/.

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Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook. Washington, D.C./Hagerstown, MD: Review and Herald Publishing Association. Various years.

Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook. Nampa, ID: Pacific Press, 2018 and 2019.

Silva, Adiel Deó da. “Construída Sôbre a Rocha” [Built on the Rock]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], March 1964.

Silva, Nelson do Valle, and Maria Ligia de O. Barbosa, “População e Estatísticas Vitais” [Population and Vital Statistics], in Estatísticas do Século XX [XX Century Statistics], no ed. Rio de Janeiro, RJ: IBGE, 2006.

Spies, F. W. “Missão Este-Brasileira” [East Brazil Mission]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review] January 1912.

Storch, Gustavo S. “Um Homem de Deus” [A Man of God]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], July 1966.

Westcott, H. B. “União Éste-Brasileira” [Brazil East Union]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], March 1932.

Notes

  1. Seventh-day Adventist Online Yearbook, “Central Pernambuco Conference.” Accessed January 21, 2020, https://bit.ly/30F7nBU.

  2. The Pathfinders Club is made up of “boys and girls aged 10 to 15 years old, from different social classes, color, religion. They meet, in general, once a week to learn to develop talents, skills, perceptions and a taste for nature.” These boys and girls “are thrilled with outdoor activities. They like camping, hiking, climbing, exploring the woods and caves. They know how to cook outdoors, make a fire without matches.” Besides, they demonstrate “skill with discipline through drill commands and have their creativity awakened by crafts. They also fight the use of tobacco, alcohol, and drugs.” Accessed October 9, 2019, http://bit.ly/2FDRqTh.

  3. “The Adventurers Club is a program for children from 6 to 9 years old, created by the Seventh-day Adventist Church, in 1972. [...] At the meetings, children carry out activities with a focus on physical, mental and spiritual development.” Accessed January 16, 2020, https://bit.ly/389AQGG.

  4. UNeB Pathfinders and Adventurers Ministry, “Estatísticas - União Nordeste Brasileira” [Statistics - Northeast Brazil Union Mission]. Accessed January 24, 2020, https://bit.ly/2W4NRg3.

  5. Vilma Nascimento (APeC Ministerial Secretary), email message to the author, July 8, 2019.

  6. Ibid.

  7. Ibid.

  8. Iracema Sales, “Seca no Ceará: da curiosidade científica ao flagelo humano” [Drought in Ceará: from scientific curiosity to the human scourge], Diário do Nordeste [Northeast Newspaper], July 20, 2015. Accessed July 4, 2019, https://bit.ly/2YvKrXR.

  9. Leilah Landim, “Associações filantrópicas, ou de assistência” [Philanthropic or assistance associations], in Estatísticas do Século XX [XX Century Statistics], no ed. (Rio de Janeiro, RJ: IBGE, 2006), 65.

  10. Heron Santana, “A ‘Janela 10/40’ brasileira” [Brazilian 10/40 Window], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review] January 2010, 25.

  11. Heron Santana, “A ‘Janela 10/40’ brasileira” [Brazilian 10/40 Window], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], January 2010, 25.

  12. Machado, Domingos Gonçalves Oswaldo and Alfredo Vauthier, “Perseguição Religiosa” [Religious Persecution], Jornal do Recife XLIII [Recife Newspaper XLIII], May 27, 1900, 2.

  13. “The coffee-with-milk policy was an agreement signed between the state oligarchies and the federal government during the Old Republic for the presidents of the Republic to be chosen from among the politicians of São Paulo and Minas Gerais. So, sometimes the president would be from São Paulo, sometimes from Minas Gerais.” Vitor Amorim de Angelo, “Política do café-com-leite - Acordo marcou a República Velha” [Coffee-with-milk policy - Agreement marked the Old Republic], Educação UOL [UOL Education], undated. Accessed January 22, 2020, https://bit.ly/37dWERo.

  14. Gustavo Barroso, Heróes e Bandidos [Heroes and outlaws]. São Paulo, SP: Livraria Francisco Alves, 1917, 73-74.

  15. Nelson do Valle Silva and Maria Ligia de O. Barbosa, “População e Estatísticas Vitais” [Population and Vital Statistics], in Estatísticas do Século XX [XX Century Statistics], no ed., Rio de Janeiro, RJ: IBGE, 2006, 39.

  16. Maria de Lourdes Janotti, O Coronelismo: uma Política de Compromisso [Coronelismo: a Policy of Commitments], São Paulo, SP: Brasiliense, 1992, 41-42.

  17. The Cangaço is “a social movement that took place in the northeastern hinterland during the end of the 19th century and the beginning of the 20th century [...] Cangaceiros terrorized cities, carrying out robberies, extorting money from the population, kidnapping important figures, in addition to looting farms. [...] Virgulino Ferreira da Silva, better known as Lampião, was the most prominent cangaceiro.” Accessed in January 2020, https://bit.ly/2NGOv0b .

  18. Plácido da Rocha Pita, Por que Mudei de Exército: a saga do homem que caçava Lampião e encontrou a verdadeira Luz [Why I changed army: the saga of the man who hunted Lampião and found the true Light], Tatuí, SP: Brazil Publishing House, 2018, 13-14.

  19. Centro Nacional da Memória Adventista [National Center of Adventist History], “Spies, Frederico Weber.” Accessed January 21, 2020, https://bit.ly/2sJpiuD.

  20. Centro Nacional da Memória Adventista [National Center of Adventist History], “Lipke, John.” Accessed January 21, 2020, https://bit.ly/2RcYHja.

  21. F. W. Spies, “Missão Este-Brasileira,” [East Brazil Mission] Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], January 1912, 4.

  22. A canvasser, or literature evangelist, “develops his ministry by acquiring and selling to the public the publications edited and approved by the Church, to transmit to his fellow-men the eternal Gospel that brings salvation and physical and spiritual well-being.” Seventh-day Adventist Church (Brazil) website, “Colportagem” [Canvassing], February 4, 2020, http://bit.ly/2J6tY1I.

  23. Gustavo S. Storch, “Um Homem de Deus” [A Man of God], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], July 1966, 27.

  24. Ibid.

  25. “Pernambuco Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1917), 163.

  26. “The 1929 Crisis, also known as the Great Depression, was a severe economic recession that hit international capitalism in the late 1920s.” Its effects were felt by the Adventist Church in Brazil in 1931. The effects of this crisis lasted a decade and had social and political consequences. Accessed January 21, 2020, https://bit.ly/2RDnRGt.

  27. Floyd Greenleaf, Terra de Esperança [Land of Hope], Tatuí, SP: Brazil Publishing House, 2011, 298-303.

  28. H. B. Westcott, “União Éste-Brasileira” [Brazil East Union], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], March 1932, 10.

  29. “North East Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1933), 164.

  30. “Northeast Brazil Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Nampa, ID: Pacific Press, 2018), 247.

  31. Vilma Nascimento (APeC Ministerial Secretary), email message to the author, July 8, 2019.

  32. Jerônimo Garcia, “Até Quando...?” [Until When...?], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], February 1939, 5.

  33. Centro Nacional da Memória Adventista [National Center of Adventist Memory], “Jerônimo Granero Garcia.” Accessed January 21, 2019, https://bit.ly/2GeVWr2.

  34. Jerônimo Garcia, “Até Quando...?” [Until When...?], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], February 1939, 5.

  35. Ibid.

  36. Ana Araújo Garcia, Jerônimo era assim [Jerônimo was like that], Santo André, SP: Brazil Publishing House, 1984, 89.

  37. Natã Florêncio, “O Evangelismo na Zona Central e Sertão de Pernambuco” [Evangelism in the Central Zone and the Sertão of Pernambuco], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], October 1946, 12.

  38. Severino Lira, “Todos Cantam Sua Terra” [Everyone sings their land], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], April 1955, 11.

  39. Alfredo Pereira Mendes, “Terceira Assembleia Bienal da Missão Nordeste” [Third Biennial Assembly of the Northeast Brazil Mission], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], June 1959, 28.

  40. Rodolpho Belz, “Nótulas do Este” [Notes from the East], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], January 1960, 35.

  41. Read more about this in the article entitled “Instituto Adventista Pernambucano – IAPE” [Pernambuco Adventist Academy] in this Encyclopedia; Rodolpho Belz, “Nótulas do Este” [Notes from the East], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], October 1961, 37.

  42. Rodolpho Belz, “Nótulas do Este” [Notes from the East], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], August 1962, 30.

  43. Adiel Deó da Silva, “Construída Sôbre a Rocha” [Built on the Rock], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], March 1964, 19.

  44. José Adauto, “O Testemunho de Duas Jovens” [The testimony of two young ladies], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], February 1973, 19, 20.

  45. José Carlos Ramos, “U.E.B. Notícias” [U.E.B. News], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], October 1976, 19.

  46. Antonio Moisés de Almeida, “Construindo o futuro sem demolir o passado” [Building the future without demolishing the past], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], November 1976, 8.

  47. Zirnaldo F. Rocha, “Caruaru Terá Escola Adventista” [Caruaru will have an Adventist School], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], December 1977, 17.

  48. “Atividades Espirituais e Culturais” [Spiritual and Cultural Activities], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], November 1981, 29, 30.

  49. “Destaque Para o Evangelismo” [Highlight for Evangelism], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], November 1981, 27.

  50. Heron Santana, “Igreja militante” [Militant Church], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review] February 1999, 14.

  51. “Northeast Brazil Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook, Hagerstown, MD: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1998, 267; “Pernambuco Conference,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Hagerstown, MD: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1999), 269.

  52. Minutes of the Central Pernambuco Mission of the Seventh-day Adventist Church, November 21, 2007.

  53. Vilma Nascimento (Central Pernambuco Conference Ministerial Secretary), emai to the author, July 8, 2019.

  54. “Central Pernambuco Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Hagerstown, MD: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 2009), 281.

  55. “Central Pernambuco Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Hagerstown, MD: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 2010), 283.

  56. Vilma Nascimento (Central Pernambuco Conference Conference Ministerial Secretary), email to the author, July 8, 2019.

  57. Minutes of the Central Pernambuco Mission of the Seventh-day Adventist Church, November 21, 2007.

  58. Vilma Nascimento (Central Pernambuco Conference Ministerial Secretary), email to the author, July 8, 2019.

  59. “Caleb Mission project is a volunteer program, social service, and a witnessing program that challenges Adventist youth to dedicate their vacations to evangelism in places where there’s no Adventist presence, to strengthen the small congregations and gain new people for the kingdom of God.” Portal da Igreja Adventista do Sétimo Dia [Seventh-day Adventist Website], “Missão Calebe 2020” [Caleb Mission 2020]. Accessed February 4, 2020, http://bit.ly/2HRpvRi.

  60. “The project One Year in Mission promotes the participation of young Adventists in the mission to evangelize urban centers in eight countries in South America, uniting their talents, resources and professional knowledge with the needs of the community.” Portal da Igreja Adventista do Sétimo Dia [Seventh-day Adventist Church Website], “Um Ano Em Missão” [One Year in Mission]. Accessed February 4, 2020, https://bit.ly/2sCFyNL.

  61. “Small Group is a weekly gathering of people who, under the coordination of a leader, seek spiritual, relational and evangelistic growth.” Seventh-day Adventist Church (Brazil) website, “Pequenos Grupos” [Small Groups]. Accessed February 4, 2020, https://bit.ly/2NtcXj7.

  62. “Impacto Esperança [Hope Impact] is a program that encourages the practice of reading and provides a mass annual distribution of books on the part of the Seventh-day Adventist in the South American territory.” Seventh-day Adventist Church (Brazil) website, “Impacto Esperança” [Hope Impact]. Accessed February 4, 2020, https://bit.ly/34dZROO.

  63. “Central Pernambuco Conference,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Hagerstown, MD: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 2014), 285.

  64. Vilma Nascimento (APeC Ministerial Secretary), email to the author, July 8, 2019.

  65. Seventh-day Adventist Online Yearbook, “Central Pernambuco Conference.” Accessed January 21, 2020, https://bit.ly/30F7nBU.

  66. Vilma Nascimento (Central Pernambuco Conference Ministerial Secretary), email to the author, July 8, 2019.

  67. Ibid.

  68. Ibid.

  69. Ibid.

  70. Ibid.

  71. Ibid.

  72. Ibid.

  73. Ibid.

  74. Ibid.

  75. Ibid.

  76. Ibid.

  77. Ibid.

  78. “Central Pernambuco Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (2009), 281; “Pernambuco Conference,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (2018), 247. For more details about this organization, consult the Yearbooks from 2009 to 2018.

  79. For more information about Central Pernambuco Conference (APeC), access the website: apec.adventistas.org/, or social media: Facebook and Instagram: @adventistaspernambuco, and Twitter: @adventistasPE.

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Sousa, Rodolfo Figueiredo de. "Central Pernambuco Conference." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. June 04, 2021. Accessed June 18, 2024. https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=GGEI.

Sousa, Rodolfo Figueiredo de. "Central Pernambuco Conference." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. June 04, 2021. Date of access June 18, 2024, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=GGEI.

Sousa, Rodolfo Figueiredo de (2021, June 04). Central Pernambuco Conference. Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. Retrieved June 18, 2024, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=GGEI.