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Allum couple in China costume, 1906.

Photo courtesy of Julie and Barry Oliver.

Allum, Francis Arthur (1883–1948) and Evaline (Osborne) (1883–1961)

By Barry Oliver

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Barry Oliver, Ph.D., retired in 2015 as president of the South Pacific Division of Seventh-day Adventists, Sydney, Australia. An Australian by birth Oliver has served the Church as a pastor, evangelist, college teacher, and administrator. In retirement, he is a conjoint associate professor at Avondale College of Higher Education. He has authored over 106 significant publications and 192 magazine articles. He is married to Julie with three adult sons and three grandchildren.

Arthur Allum was the first Australian Seventh-day Adventist minister to be sent by the Church to China. Arthur and Eva spent 17 years there. Arthur had a particular burden for Western China and traveled up the Yangtze River to establish a Seventh-day Adventist presence in the Szechuan Province. He was distinguished by his ability to use Mandarin and to dress in Chinese clothing. Poor health eventually saw the family return to Australia where Allum held a number of key, senior positions in the Church.

Early Life

Francis Arthur Allum was born June 25, 1883 in Tamworth, Warwickshire (now Staffordshire), England.1 His parents were Francis Allum (1831-1900), a nurseryman and Helen Booth Allum (Carter) (1847-1921).2 Early in his life Francis was called by his second name “Arthur” so as not to be confused with his father. Arthur had a sister Nellie Constance Allum and a half brother and sister from his father’s previous marriage. The family immigrated to Australia in June 1886.

Evaline Allum [Osborne] was born on August 8, 1883 in Stanghow, a small hamlet near Guisbrough, Yorkshire, England.3 Her parents were Henry Osborne, an ironstone miner, and Mary Elisabeth Osborne [Bennison].4 With her parents and younger sister, Harriet, Evaline [Eva] immigrated to Australia in December 1885. After their arrival in Australia, five more children were born: George, Henry, Margaret (died in infancy), Olive, and Bennison.

Conversion and Education

With his mother and sister Arthur joined the Seventh-day Adventist Church in 1901 while’ the family was living at Pennant Hills. A year later,19-year old Arthur decided to attend Avondale College. The decision came about as a result of what he described as a call to go to China. He reflected that “just as definite as the call to keep the Sabbath, came a call to go to China. I well remember kneeling down in the orchard at Pennant Hills and dedicating my life to that field.”5

Arthur attended Avondale from 1903 until 1905 when he graduated from the Missionary Course.6 While a student he spent time assisting in tent evangelistic work. During 1904 in Bathurst, for example, he wrote that “four precious souls have been added to the number who have already taken their stand.”7

Eva attended Avondale between 1901 and 1904. Her academic record indicates that she did not complete any classes in 1902 and only one class (Empires of Prophecy) in 1903.8 However, she did manage to graduate from the Business course at the end of 1903.9 Work at the Avondale Press helped Eva to support her way through at Avondale. Reflecting on her Avondale experience much later she said, “to our minds there is no place like Avondale to get a preparation for the work. I am indeed glad that I had the privilege of being there for some time.”10

While at Avondale, Arthur had made contact with Dr. Harry Willis Miller, a pioneer Adventist missionary to China. Dr. Miller wrote to Arthur describing the work in China and encouraged him to come to China.11 Before graduating from Avondale Arthur wrote to the General Conference offering his services in China. He was told that there were no available funds at that time. In order to raise funds for passage Arthur took up canvassing in New Zealand as soon as the College year was over. Apparently Dr. Miller persuaded the General Conference also to raise some funds for their passage.12

Marriage and Journey to China

Arthur and Eva were married March 12, 1906 at Epping, New South Wales.13 Their Bible teacher John H. Fulton at Avondale solemnized the wedding.14

The couple were to have 6 children: Wallace Arthur Allum (born Siang Cheng, Honan, China, 2 January, 1908); Harold Lawrence Allum (born Mokanshan, China, 4 May, 1910); Elwyn Albert Allum (born Shanghai, China, 28 May, 1914); Wilma Eva Allum (born Shanghai, China, 18 January, 1917); Myrtle Marie Allum (born Shanghai China, 4 May, 1919); Dorothy Ferne Allum (born Wahroonga, NSW, Australia, 28 September, 1922).15

Arthur and Eva Allum sailed for China on the S.S Willehad on Sunday April 15, 1906.16 “A large number of friends gathered at the boat to bid our beloved brother and sister farewell, and to wish them God-speed in the work to which God has called them.”17

The journey took them via New Britain (April 22), New Guinea (April 24), Manila (May 2), arriving in Hong Kong on May 6 where they were met by Australian literature evangelist Robert Caldwell.18 From Hong Kong to Shanghai the family travelled aboard the S.S Roon.19 They then travelled by river boat up the Yangtze River to Hankow arriving on May 29, 1906. From there they travelled 180 miles by train and then all night on 3 donkey carts to arrive at Shang Tsai Hsien, their first mission station.20

Service in China

Shang Tsai Hsien, 1906

The couple’s first assignment in China was in connection with the dispensary and the printing office at Shang Tsai Hsien. This mission station, overseen by Dr. Harry Miller,21 was located in Honan Province, a central province of China with a population of approximately thirty-five million. At Shang Tsai Hsien the Allums immediately adopted two practices that were to have long-lasting effects on their missionary service. They adopted Chinese dress including the queue or pigtail;22 and they commenced language study. With respect to language study, Arthur commented: “We have made a good start on the language. This is the most difficult study we have ever undertaken, but the Lord is with us, and we believe He will give us success.”23

For a short time after their arrival, the mission station at Shang Tsai Hsien was the hub of the fledgling publishing work in China. A Chinese edition of Signs of the Times was produced. Dr. Harry Miller was the editor, Arthur was the manager and Eva was the proof-reader. However, soon it was realized that the facilities at Shang Tsai Hsien were inadequate, and the General Meeting held in Shanghai February 10-20, 2007, decided to relocate the press to Sin Yang Cheo, still in Honan Province. A publishing committee comprising H. W. Miller (Chairman), F. A. Allum, J. N. Anderson, W. C. Hankins, and A. Q. Selmon was established.24

Sin Yang Cheo, 1907

In anticipation of the action of the General Meeting, the Allums with Dr. Miller had in September 1906 established a new mission station at Sin Yang Cheo.25 While there, some of the health issues that later proved so determinative of the tenure of the Allums in China became apparent. Eva wrote: “Malaria is very prevalent in Honan just now, and we have not escaped it. Dr. Miller was the first to contract it. Then Arthur took it while he was nursing the doctor. Arthur is just recovering from the third attack. He has been in quite a serious condition this last time, but the Lord has raised him up, and he is now much better. I had just a slight touch of it for one day.”26

During this period a number of enduring facets of the Allums’ service in China were emerging. First, they were determined to learn to speak Mandarin. Eva wrote: “We are now getting some hold on the language, and every day brings us nearer to the time when we will be able to work for this people, and we do so long for that time.”27 They succeeded in becoming fluent speakers to the extent that Arthur was often utilized as a translator at significant meetings. In 1915 he demonstrated his grasp of the language by writing an article in the Advent Review and Sabbath Herald showing how the gospel could be taught using Chinese characters.28

Second, the couple recognized the need for education. Again Eva wrote: “The educational work appeals to us the most strongly. China is waking up, and there is a great demand for schools.”29

Third, they shared a strong burden for the women of China. Soon after arriving in China, Eva observed: “It is impossible for the men to work for the women to any extent. . . How I long to be an effective worker in this field, and nothing would give us more rejoicing than to see some of these people around us trusting in God as their Father.”30

Fourth, they had a particular affinity for publishing. Before the work on the printing office at Sin Yang Cheo was completed in 1907, Dr. Miller left for furlough in the United States. Arthur managed the day-to-day supervision of the press,31 and throughout his remaining ministry he strongly supported publishing ministry and literature evangelists. When the family later returned home for furlough in 1913, Arthur selected two young men to go to China to engage in literature ministry; Harry Stacey and Arthur Mountain Jr. Later Stacey went to Japan, and his place in China was taken by Harold Blunden.32

Cheo-Chia-K’Ou [Chowkiakow], 1908-1912

At the end of 1907 the Allums were appointed to set up a station at Cheo-Chia-K’Ou, the largest city in Honan Province and the commercial center of Honan’s 35,000,000 people.33 For a time they were joined at Cheo-Chia-K’Ou by Dr. Arthur Selmon, Mrs. Bertha Selmon, and Esta Miller.34 John J. Westrup and his wife who were located at the Shang Tsai Hsien station were the only other foreign missionaries in Honan Province.35 While at Cheo-Chia-K’Ou, the Allums often ventured out into the surrounding country side. Accounts of their trips during 1908 and 1909 can be found in reports printed in The Advent Review and Sabbath Herald, and the Union Conference Record.36 Noteworthy was the fact that they often travelled as a family with their baby son Wallace. On one of their trips, Eva reported that “we would have been comfortable . . . if it had not been for the rats, which took advantage of the darkness to scamper in and out of the bins, and then across our bed and up the wall.”37

In October 1908 meetings for all the workers in Honan were held at the mission station at Cheo-Chia-K’Ou.38 At those meetings Eva and Mrs. Westrup held meetings for the wives of mission employees. The women valued these meetings greatly as “they felt free to express their feelings of joy and appreciation.”39 This was to be an established pattern with Eva leading out in meetings for women at many times in many places.40

Between January 12-22, 1909, a General Meeting of the China Union was convened in Shanghai. The session voted a number of significant actions, including the division of China into 10 mission fields; the appointment of Arthur Allum as the first superintendent of the Western China Mission comprising “Sze Chuen, Yuunan and Quei Chow;”41 and the ordination of Arthur Allum by I. H. Evans.42

While Arthur had a burden for Western China and desired to move to Szechuan Province, the family remained in Cheo-Chia-K’Ou (also spelt Cheo Chia Ko, Cheo Chia K’eo and Chowkiakow.) It was to be another five years before there would be opportunity to travel to Western China. In March 1909 Arthur and a Chinese evangelist named Lui, together with their cook, travelled eight days through snow and wind to visit a Pastor Han in Anhwei Province. He was the district leader of the Church of Christ, a Chinese self-governing Church with headquarters in Shanghai. On arriving in the evening, they held a meeting and studied with Pastor Han until three o'clock in the morning. Han was baptized and through him many of his friends also became Seventh-day Adventists. Arthur expressed his delight that many educated Chinese were joining the Church.43

During 1910 the fledgling Bible School at Cheo-Chia-K’Ou gained momentum.44 It was on May 4, 1910 that the Allums’ second son, Harold Lawrence, was born at Mokanshan. Mokanshan, about 200 kilometres from Shanghai, had become a retreat for the missionary families in China.45 On visiting, I. H. Evans observed, “Mokanshan is a low mountain, the highest point reaching some twenty-four hundred feet above sea-level. . . About one hundred families of missionaries spend from six weeks to three months on this mountain each year. Many of these are very glad for the prospect of good treatment-rooms, where they can come another year.”46

Toward the end of 1910 Dr. Miller (who was by now superintendent of the North China Mission) came for a short time to Cheo Chia K’ou to help with the school and run the dispensary together with Elder O.A.Hall and Esta Miller. This was the beginning of the China Training Institute or Mandarin Institute.47

In September 1910 when it was obvious that the Allum family would not be able to proceed to Szechuan Province in the near future,48 action was taken at the general meeting at Mokanshan to appoint Arthur as superintendent of North Central China Mission, with headquarters at Cheo-Chia-K’Ou.49 Their heart was still very much in Szechuan, however. Writing in late November 1910, Arthur reported that “for two years now the writer has been under appointment for Szechuan to open that province to the message, but I am unable to proceed because we are unable to man properly the stations we have already opened.”50

In August 1911 Arthur reported that “at the close of 1910 we had sixty-four church-members in the North Central China Mission. Now, August 16, we have one hundred four, and expect to have more before the end of the year. In a work like this there is no room for discouragement."51 These gains were made in difficult circumstances. In a letter dated October 27, 1911, Dr. Arthur Selmon reported that “The consul there [Hankow] has ordered all women and children to leave. . . . We wired our brethren in Chowkiakow, Honan [F. A. Allum and O. A. Hall], four days ago, and have just received word back by wire that all is well with them, but that there are many wild rumours.”52

A further report on the dangerous situation was given in The Advent Review and Sabbath Herald. “A telegram received last night reports that our workers in Honan, with the exception of F. A. Allum, have fled, by way of Peking and Tientsin, and will soon arrive in Shanghai. . . . All our workers were compelled to flee from Hankow some time ago. So far our only property loss has been the burning of our chapel at Hankow . . . We are grateful that in these troublous times the lives of all our workers thus far have been spared.”53

By 1912 it was becoming increasingly obvious that the challenges of living and working in such difficult circumstances was having an impact on Arthur’s health. In a report in August 1912, Dr. Arthur Selmon observed that “Brother Allum was very tired and worn at the close of the Honan meeting, but he accompanied me to Anhwei, to help in the Ying-shan meeting. It requires four days to make this trip, and while we were on the way Brother Allum became ill. After reaching the meeting he was able to preach only one sermon, and then was forced to give up and return home.”54

General Conference Session and Furlough, 1913

In 1913 the family was granted a much needed furlough of one year.55 Eva and the two children, Wallace and Lawrence, arrived in Sydney, Australia, on March 18, 1913.56 Arthur, after attending the General Conference Session in Washington D.C., joined the family in Sydney on July 21.57

At the Session, Arthur gave a report on the work in the North Central China Mission of which he had been superintendent.58 I.H. Evans, the General Superintendent of the Asiatic Division of the General Conference gave a comprehensive report of the state of the Church in the Division as at the end of 1912.59 He reported that there were “1886 Sabbath keepers” and “104 Sabbath Schools with a membership of 2473.” He listed the countries in the Division as “Japan, Korea, China with her dependencies, Formosa, Hainan, Indo-China, Siam, the Federated Malay States, the Straits Settlements, the Dutch East Indies, and the Philippines.” The Church was still in its infancy. Evans further reported that “in the great empire of China we have undertaken work in only seven of the eighteen provinces, to say nothing of the four dependencies. In the western part of China is one province with a population of seventy million, in which so far as we know not a foreigner who believes this message has ever put foot. Yet this very province is one of the great provinces of China, having a larger population than any country in Europe outside of Russia, and only thirty-one million less than the population of the United States. For four years we have been hoping and planning each coming year to enter this promising field, but so far we have been unable to send a worker.”60 Arthur and Eva Allum together with Merritt C. Warren and his wife Wilma L. L. Warren were within a year to be the first to enter that “promising field.”

While on furlough the Allum family regained their health. They built a home in Cooranbong, New South Wales, just across the creek from Avondale College.61 Furlough over, the family left Sydney on December 17, 1913,62 and arrived in Shanghai on January 26, 1914.63

Szechuan Province Western China, 1914-1916

Returning from furlough Arthur learnt that his dream to reach western China was to be realized. He gained release from the Central China Mission, and took up his earlier appointment as superintendent of the West China Mission. With Merritt Warren he began the journey from Shanghai up the Yangtze River to Chungking the capital of Szechuan Province on March 3, 1914.64 The journey anticipated to take 2 months actually took 44 days, ending on April 16.65

Arthur and Merritt remained in Chungking for approximately six months and then made the arduous journey back to Shanghai to bring their families. They then left Shanghai in the middle of October 1914. The Allums travelled with their children, Wallace, Lawrence and Elwyn. Elwyn was born just a few months earlier while Arthur was away in Chungking.66

In Chungking, Eva continued to be involved in the work of the Church as much as she possibly could. She had three young boys to care for. But Arthur reported that, "Mrs. Allum is holding a Bible class with the women twice a week and has interested. She also teaches in the Sabbath-school, and has charge of the young people's society."67

Arthur continued his work unrelentingly. The first Szechuan convert was welcomed in January 1915. By September 1916 Arthur could report that the membership in Chungking was “30 and 110 [are] attending day schools (4 sites).”68 He was not satisfied, however. His eyes were always fixed on new territories further beyond. Now Tibet captured his imagination. He wrote: “To-day we have had a new experience. Three Tibetan priests came to our chapel. . . . We spoke to them about the message and gave them a liberal supply of tracts to take back to their people. . . This is interesting in that it is the first time as far as I know that the message has touched that people.”69

Ill health intervened in Allum’s tenure in Chungking and towards the end of 1916 Arthur was invited back to Shanghai to become the principal of the Chinese Training School, a school that had developed from the small beginnings in Chowkiakow in 1909.70

Wang Gia Dun, Hankow, 1917-1922

Shortly after the Allums arrived back in Shanghai from Chungking, the Asiatic Division Session convened. At that session, major reorganization took place and Arthur was appointed as the first president of the North China Union Conference.71 The North China Union had a population 290 million (nearly 1/5 earth’s population in 1917). It had 1,296 members in nine provinces: Anhwei, Honan, Hunan, Hupeh, Kiangsai, Shandung, Shensi, South Kiangsai and Szechuan.72 The union office was in Wang Gia Dun, Hankow.73

In April 1919 the administrative structure of the Division underwent another reorganization. Arthur was elected as Superintendent of the Central China Union Mission, with headquarters at the former North China Union--Wang Gia Dun, Hankow. The new union mission comprised the provinces of Kiangsi, Hunan, Hupeh, and Honan, which together had a population of 120 million. Added to this were the two mission provinces of Shensi and Kansu, with a population of 15 million.74

Meanwhile the Allum family expanded with the arrival of Wilma (1917) and Myrtle (1919). While carrying for her husband and five children, Eva continued to be conscious of her responsibilities to the Church. Eva wrote that “we should not be content to be merely ' missionaries' wives,' and not ' missionary wives.' It is true that . . . we often feel helpless, and miss many opportunities that come to us each day. I believe the Lord has a special care over our little ones when we strive to do our duty. When we were in Honan, I accompanied Mr. Allum on most of his itinerating trips, taking the babies with us, and we greatly enjoyed the work together.”75 That commitment was demonstrated when, from 1920-1922 Eva Allum accepted responsibility as the Central China Union Sabbath School Secretary. For the duration of their stay in China, the Church gave Eva a Missionary Licence.76

1920 saw the family on furlough. They arrived in Sydney on January 13, 1920,77 and lived in their Cooranbong house near Avondale College.78 While on furlough Arthur visited the Solomon Islands from August 11 to Sept 24.79 With Arthur feeling much better,80 the family sailed back to Shanghai on January 26, 1921.

In 1922, Arthur again attended the General Conference Session, this time in San Francisco. His report to the delegates on the Church in China concluded with a note of hope and praise: "We long for power to stir the multitudes of China as they have never been stirred in days past. We are seeking with you for a fresh baptism of the Holy Spirit for service; and with you we unite today in earnest supplication to the Lord Jesus, while magnifying His name for mercies already received."81

After the session Arthur returned to China, but his health could not be sustained. The China Division Executive Committee voted to repatriate the family.82

Australia, 1922 -

The family returned permanently to Australia arriving in Sydney on September 21, 1922.83 Their youngest daughter Dorothy was born just a week after they arrived back.84 They were located in Wahroonga, New South Wales, where Arthur was appointed as Secretary of the Australasian Union Conference.85 A few months later he was appointed as Vice-president of the Union Conference.86

Towards the end of 1923 an urgent need arose for a senior pastor to oversee the work of the Church in Victoria and Tasmania. Arthur accepted the challenge and moved his family to Melbourne. The Australasian Record reported that “the brethren voted to release Pastor F. A. Allum, who is a Vice- President of the Union Conference. Brother Allum will retain his position as a Vice-President while being local President of the Victoria-Tasmanian Conference. We regretted that it was necessary to take this step. . . We are hopeful that from time to time he may still be able to give some service to the Union Conference in this way.”87

However, after just three years, Arthur found it necessary to resign his position in Melbourne due to ill health, and move his family to a dairy farm at King Creek, just outside Wauchope, New South Wales.88 During the years at Kings Creek, the Allums, together with a number of other families including the Rosendahls and the Hansfords, pioneered the establishment of Seventh-day Adventist congregations at Wauchope and Port Macquarie, New South Wales. Arthur Allum was the first minister of the Wauchope Seventh-day Adventist Church and presided at its opening on the last Sabbath of December 1926.89

Later Life

The beginning of 1942 saw the Allums leaving the Wauchope-Port Macquarie district and transferring to Warrawee in Sydney.90 In 1945 just 3 years before his death Arthur wrote an article for the Review and Herald, “Facing Life and Death with Christ.” He said, “I have been in China for many years and hope to return someday. I can bear witness to the joyous experience it is to face life and sickness and threat of death with Christ. . . After years of trial and affliction I wish to bear witness to the Saviour's love. Christ has been near and dear.”91

Arthur and Eva accomplished everything together: Arthur wrote:

In the sixteen years that we were over there [China], in spite of severe sickness which brought us both nigh unto death, brigands, and the many other exciting events of a missionary’s life in China, not for one moment did my wife keep me back from the path of duty; and that which has been accomplished as a result of my labours there was a result of her faithful cooperation.92

Pastor Arthur Allum died on August 8, 1948 at Warrawee (3 Marshall Av), New South Wales, Australia.93 Pastors H. E. Piper, A. H. Piper, A.W. Anderson and G. Branster conducted the funeral.94 Evaline Allum died on May 4, 1961 at Wahroonga, New South Wales.95 Her service was conducted by Pastors C. S Palmer, A. G Stewart and E. J. Johanson.96 Arthur and Eva, a formidable missionary couple lay buried in the Macquarie Park Cemetery, North Ryde, New South Wales Australia, #C17.97

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“It is now seven years . . .” Australasian Record, February 17, 1913.

Johanson, E. J. “Evaline Allum obituary.” Australasian Record and Advent World Survey, June 5, 1961.

“Life Sketch of Harold Lawrence Allum.” Seventh-day Adventist Heritage Centre, Avondale College of Higher Education, Australia. Francis Arthur Allum file.

“Life Sketch of Elwyn Albert Allum.” Seventh-day Adventist Heritage Centre, Avondale College of Higher Education, Australia. Francis Arthur Allum file.

List of Immigrants including the Osborn family. Seventh-day Adventist Heritage Centre, Avondale College of Higher Education, Australia. Francis Arthur Allum File.

“Medical Work in China.” ARH, May 27, 1909.

Meyers, Cecil K. “Subject for Special Prayer: Our Work in the Solomon Islands.” Australasian Record, August 23, 1920.

Miller, H. W. “China.” ARH, November 1, 1906.

Miller, H. W. “Greetings from Inland China.” Union Conference Record, September 17, 1906.

Mills, J. “A Pleasant Gathering.” Union Conference Record, April 2, 1906.

Moore, Raymond S. China Doctor: The Life story of Harry Willis Miller. New York: Harper and Brothers, 1961.

“Nominations,” Australasian Record, October 16, 1922.

“On March 16 Sister Olive Osborne. . .” Australasian Record, April 10, 1911.

“Openings in China.” Union Conference Record, March 1, 1905.

Osbourne, Olive Dixon. “Shells from Many Shores: Aunty Ollie’s Memoirs.” Seventh-day Adventist Heritage Centre, Avondale College of Higher Education, Australia. Unpublished manuscript in the Francis Arthur Allum file.

Osbourne, Olive. “What the Revolution in China Did for Us.” Australasian Record, May 6, 1912.

“Our readers will be sorry . . .” Australasian Record, September 18, 1922.

“Passengers by the Willehad.” Sydney Morning Herald, April 13, 1906.

“Pastor Allum and family sailed . . .” Australasian Record, January 5, 1914.

“Pastor Allum arrived in Sydney . . .” Australasian Record, August 4, 1913.

“Pastor F. A. Allum and family . . .” Australasian Record, February 7, 1921.

Permanent academic record of Arthur Allum. Academic office, Avondale College of Higher Education, Cooranbong, New South Wales, Australia.

Permanent academic record of Evaline Osborne. Academic office, Avondale College of Higher Education, Cooranbong, New South Wales, Australia.

Permanent academic record of Olive Osborne. Academic office, Avondale College of Higher Education, Cooranbong, New South Wales, Australia.

Petersen, Bernhard. “Entering Manchuria.” ARH, December 31, 1914.

Piper, A. H. “Francis Arthur Allum obituary.” Australasian Record, November 1, 1948.

Piper, A. H. “Life Sketch: Francis Arthur Allum.” Australasian Record, November 1, 1948.

Richardson, Colin. “The Book of Descendants.” Seventh-day Adventist Heritage Centre, Avondale College of Higher Education, Australia. Unpublished manuscript prepared by Colin Richardson tracing five generations of the Allum family tree. Francis Arthur Allum file.

Selmon, A. C. “General Meetings in China.” ARH, August 15, 1912.

Selmon, A. C. “Medical work in China.” ARH, May 27, 1909.

“Seventh Day (sic) Adventist C17 Grave 0002 . . . Evaline Allum (Ref: 27906) Francis Allum (Ref 27907).” https://northerncemeteries.com.au/macquarie-park/deceased-search/

Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook. Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1918.

Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook. Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1920.

Shultz, James E. “Another Worker Fallen.” Australasian Record, January 31, 1916.

“Sixth Meeting September 19, 11.00 am.” Australasian Record, October 4, 1926.

“Some Important Changes.” Advent Review and Sabbath Herald, November 7, 1923.

“Some of the Testimonies Given at the Closing Meeting.” Australasian Record, October 18, 1926.

Stafford, F. E. “Mokanshan.” In With Our Missionaries in China, edited by Emma Anderson, 323-330. Mountain View, California: Pacific Press Publishing Association, 1920.

Stanghow, Yorkshire. Certificate of birth, book 32, page 61, no. 304, August 8, 1883. Evaline Osborne. District of Marske, County of York, England.

Stewart, A. G. “One of God’s Best Women.” Australasian Record and Advent World Survey, June 5, 1961.

Tamworth, Counties of Stafford, Warwick and Derby, England. Certified Copy of an Entry of Birth, no. BB 819247 (June 25, 1883). Francis Arthur Allum. General Register Office, Somerset House, London, England.

“The S. S. Mindini arrived in Sydney . . .” Australasian Record, October 4, 1920.

“The Tango Maru, which arrived . . .” Australasian Record, February 9, 1920.

Town, N. Z. “Progress in China.” ARH, November 15, 1917.

“Valedictory.” Australasian Record, March 2, 1942.

“We know that. . .” Advent Review and Sabbath Herald, December 7, 1911.

“We learn from . . .” Australasian Record, March 9, 1914.

Westrup, J. J. “General Meeting in Honan, China.” ARH, January 28, 1909.

White, J. G. “Workers Institute Shanghai.” ARH, September 12, 1918.

Woodward, C. N. “An Advance in China.” ARH, June 11, 1914.

Notes

  1. Tamworth, Counties of Stafford, Warwick and Derby, England, Certified Copy of an Entry of Birth, no. BB 819247 (June 25, 1883), Francis Arthur Allum, General Register Office, Somerset House, London, England.

  2. Ibid.

  3. Stanghow, Yorkshire, Certificate of birth, book 32, page 61, no. 304, August 8, 1883, Evaline Osborne, District of Marske, County of York, England

  4. Ibid.

  5. F. A. Allum, “The Call of the Mission Field,” Australasian Record, June 26, 1940, 5.

  6. Permanent academic record of Arthur Allum. Academic office, Avondale College of Higher Education, Cooranbong, New South Wales, Australia; “After Seventy-Five Years: Names of Students who have Completed Courses,” Australasian Record, November 20, 1972, 12.

  7. F. A. Allum, “Bathurst,” Union Conference Record, January 1, 1905, 6.

  8. Permanent academic record of Evaline Osborne, Academic office, Avondale College of Higher Education, Cooranbong, New South Wales, Australia.

  9. “After Seventy-Five Years: Names of Students who have Completed Courses,” Australasian Record, November 20, 1972, 12.

  10. Evaline Allum, “A Letter from China,” Union Conference Record, July 1, 1907, 1 – 2.

  11. “Openings in China,”Union Conference Record, March 1, 1905, 3.

  12. James E. Shultz, “Another Worker Fallen,” Australasian Record, January 31, 1916, 3.

  13. J. Mills, “A Pleasant Gathering,” Union Conference Record, April 2, 1906, 7.

  14. Ibid., 7.

  15. F. A. Allum Biographical Information Blank, South Pacific Division of the General Conference Archives, Folder: “F. A. Allum,” Document: “Biographical Information Blank.”

  16. “Passengers by the Willehad,” Sydney Morning Herald, 13 April 1906, 6.

  17. “Brother and Sister Arthur Allum . . .,” Union Conference Record, April 30, 1906, 7.

  18. F. A. Allum, “En Route to Honan, China,” Union Conference Record, July 23, 1906, 3 – 5.

  19. Ibid.

  20. F. A. Allum, “Shang Tsai Hsein, Honan, China,” Union Conference Record, August Ī20, 1906, 2 – 4.

  21. H. W. Miller, “Greetings from Inland China,” Union Conference Record, September 17, 1906, 2 – 3.

  22. Ibid., 3.

  23. F. A. Allum, “Shang Tsai Hsein,” Union Conference Record, August 20, 1906, 2 – 4.

  24. J. N. Anderson, “The General Meeting for China,” ARH, May 30, 1907, 13.

  25. F. A. Allum, “The Honan, China, Council Meeting,” Union Conference Record, May 6, 1907, 3.

  26. Evaline Allum, “Our Missionaries in China,” Union Conference Record, January 7, 1907, 3 – 4.

  27. Ibid., 3.

  28. F. A. Allum, “Teaching the Gospel through the Chinese Character,” ARH, June 17, 1915, 11 – 13; F. A. Allum, “Teaching the Gospel through Chinese Characters,” in With Our Missionaries in China, ed., Emma Anderson (Mountain View, California: Pacific Press Publishing Association, 1920), 313-319

  29. Evaline Allum, “Our Missionaries in China,” Union Conference Record, January 7, 1907, 3 – 4.

  30. Evaline Allum, “A Letter from China,” Australasian Record, July 1, 1907, 2.

  31. Evaline Allum, “A Letter from China,” Union Conference Record, March 11, 1907, 3.

  32. “In response to an urgent call . . .,” Australasian Record, January 5, 1914, 8.

  33. F. A. Allum, “China,” ARH, November 19, 1908, 21 -22.

  34. Ibid., 21.

  35. Ibid., 22.

  36. F. A. Allum and Eva Allum, “Experiences in Honan, China – No 2,” Union Conference Record, March 8, 1909, 2.

  37. F. A. Allum and Eva Allum, “Experiences in Honan, China – No. 1,” Union Conference Record, March 1, 1909, 2.

  38. J. J. Westrup, “General Meeting in Honan, China,” ARH, January 28, 1909, 13 -14.

  39. Ibid. 13.

  40. F. A. Allum, “Notes on Progress from the North-Central China Mission,” Australasian Record, August 12, 1912, 3.

  41. F. A. Allum, “Aggressive Plans for China,” Union Conference Record, June 14, 1909, 2.

  42. R. F. Cottrell, “East China Mission,” ARH, October 20, 1910. 6.

  43. F. A. Allum, “Accessions to the Faith in China,” Union Conference Record, June 21, 1909, 3.

  44. F. A. Allum “Progress of the Work in Honan, China,” Australasian Record, January 30, 1911, 3 – 4.

  45. F. A. Allum Biographical Information Blank, South Pacific Division of the General Conference Archives, Folder: “F. A. Allum,” Document: “Biographical Information Blank.”

  46. I. H. Evans, “The Council at Mokanshan China,” ARH, December 1, 1910, 10; see also F. E. Stafford, “Mokanshan,” in With Our Missionaries in China, ed. Emma Anderson, (Mountain View, California: Pacific Press Publishing Association, 1920), 323 – 330.

  47. I. H. Evans, “The Council at Mokanshan China,” ARH, December 1, 1910, 10.

  48. F. A. Allum, “Encouraging Word from China,” Union Conference Record, November 28, 1910, 3.

  49. I. H. Evans, “The Council at Mokanshan China,” ARH, December 1, 1910, 10 – 11.

  50. F. A. Allum, “Progress of the Work in Honan, China,” Australasian Record, January 30, 1911, 3 – 4.

  51. “Brother F.A. Allum of Honan, China . . .,” ARH, October 5, 1911, 24.

  52. “We know that . . .,” ARH, December 7, 1911, 24.

  53. “From Troubled China,” ARH, December 21, 1911, 24

  54. A. C. Selmon, “General Meetings in China. ARH, August 15, 1912, 10 – 11.

  55. “It is now seven years . . .,” Australasian Record, February 17, 1913, 8.

  56. “Arriving in Sydney . . .,” Australasian Record, March 31, 1913, 8.

  57. “Pastor Allum arrived in Sydney . . .,” Australasian Record, August 4, 1913, 8

  58. F. A. Allum, “Experiences of the Gospel’s Power in China,” The General Conference Bulletin, May 22, 1913, 89 – 91.

  59. I. H. Evans, “The Asiatic Division of the General Conference,” ARH, May 29, 1913, 10.

  60. Ibid, 8-10.

  61. Personal knowledge of the author whose wife is a granddaughter of F. A. Allum.

  62. “Pastor Allum and family sailed . . .,” Australasian Record, January 5, 1914, 8.

  63. “We learn from . . .,” Australasian Record, March 9, 1914, 8.

  64. F. A. Allum, “West China Mission,” Australasian Record, June 8, 1914, 3.

  65. F. A. Allum, “En Route to Szechuan, Through the Yangtze Gorges,” ARH, August 27, 1914, 10.p

  66. F. A. Allum Biographical Information Blank, South Pacific Division of the General Conference Archives, Folder: “F. A. Allum,” Document: “Biographical Information Blank.”

  67. F. A. Allum, “Letters from Pastor Allum,” Australasian Record, March 29, 1915, 4 – 5.

  68. F. A. Allum, “The Beginning of the Harvest in Szechuan China,” ARH, August 10, 1916, 11.

  69. Ibid.

  70. “At a meeting of the Asiatic . . .,” Australasian Record, November 20, 1916, 8.

  71. F. A. Allum, “North China Union Conference,” ARH, September 27, 1917, 12-13.

  72. Ibid.

  73. “Asiatic Division Conference,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D. C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1918), 138.

  74. “Central China Union Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington D. C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1920), 155.

  75. Mrs I. H. Evans, “’Missionary Wives’ or ‘Missionary Wives?’” ARH, July 20, 1916, 12.

  76. “Central China Union Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D. C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1920), 156.

  77. “The Tango Maru, which arrived . . .,” Australasian Record, February 9, 1920, 8.

  78. Personal knowledge of the author whose wife is a granddaughter of Pastor and Mrs Allum.

  79. Cecil K. Meyers, “Subject for Special Prayer: Our Work in the Solomon Islands,” Australasian Record, August 23, 1920, 8; “The S. S. Mindini arrived in Sydney . . .,” Australasian Record, October 4, 1920, 8.

  80. “Pastor F. A. Allum and family . . .,” Australasian Record, February 7, 1921, 8.

  81. Clarence C. Crisler, “The Conference through Far Eastern Eyes,” ARH, June 1, 1922, 3-5.

  82. “Our readers will be sorry . . .,” Australasian Record, September 18, 1922, 8.

  83. Ibid.

  84. F. A. Allum Biographical Information Blank, South Pacific Division of the General Conference Archives, Folder: “F. A. Allum,” Document: “Biographical Information Blank.”

  85. “Nominations,” Australasian Record, October 16, 1922, 61.

  86. “Digest of the Business of the Annual Council,” Australasian Record, October 29, 1923, 3-4.

  87. “Some Important Changes,” ARH, November 7, 1923, 7.

  88. “Sixth Meeting September 19, 11.00 am,” Australasian Record, October 4, 1926, 27; “Some of the Testimonies Given at the Closing Meeting,” Australasian Record, October 18, 1926, 40.

  89. Eva Allum, “Record of Meetings: Organisation of the Wauchope Church,” unpublished document, personal collection of Valmae Julie Oliver, granddaughter of Arthur and Eva Allum.

  90. “Valedictory,” Australasian Record, March 2, 1942, 4.

  91. F. A. Allum, “Facing Life and Death with Christ,” ARH, July 12, 1945, 7 – 8.

  92. F. A. Allum, “The Call of the Mission Field,” Australasian Record, June 26, 1940, 5.

  93. A. H. Piper, “Francis Arthur Allum obituary,” Australasian Record, November 1, 1948, 7.

  94. Ibid.

  95. E. J. Johanson, “Evaline Allum obituary,” Australasian Record and Advent World Survey, June 5, 1961, 14.

  96. Ibid.

  97. “Seventh Day (sic) Adventist C17 Grave 0002 . . . Evaline Allum (Ref: 27906) Francis Allum (Ref 27907),” https://northerncemeteries.com.au/macquarie-park/deceased-search/

×

Oliver, Barry. "Allum, Francis Arthur (1883–1948) and Evaline (Osborne) (1883–1961)." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. June 01, 2020. Accessed October 22, 2020. https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=H7S1.

Oliver, Barry. "Allum, Francis Arthur (1883–1948) and Evaline (Osborne) (1883–1961)." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. June 01, 2020. Date of access October 22, 2020, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=H7S1.

Oliver, Barry (2020, June 01). Allum, Francis Arthur (1883–1948) and Evaline (Osborne) (1883–1961). Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. Retrieved October 22, 2020, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=H7S1.