Northeast Peru Mission

By Antonio Manzanares, and Dálcio da Silva Paiva

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Antonio Manzanares

Dálcio da Silva Paiva

First Published: July 4, 2021

Northeast Peru Mission (Misión Nor Oriental or MNO) is an administrative unit of the Seventh-day Adventist Church, located in the territory of North Peru Union Mission (Unión del Norte del Perú or UPN). Its headquarters is at Jirón Ramírez Hurtado, 321, Zip Code 22202, in the city of Tarapoto, Province of San Martín, Department of San Martín, Republic of Peru.1

Territory and Statistics

MNO comprises of the following territories: the department of San Martín; the province of Alto Amazonas in the department of Loreto; and the provinces of Bongará, Chachapoyas, Luya, and Rodríguez de Mendoza in the department of Amazonas. The general population in this territory is 2,092,096 and the number of Adventists is 37,560 (one Adventist per 56 inhabitants). MNO has 627 congregations (271 organized churches and 356 groups).2

The Adventist Education Organization of North Peru (Asociación Educativa Adventista Nor Oriental or ASEANOR) runs four educational institutions: Institución Educativa Adventista José de San Martin [Jose de San Martin Adventist Academy], located at Jr. Augusto B. Leguía, 129 and 1219, Tarapoto, San Martín; Institución Educativa Adventista Moyobamaba [Moyobamaba Adventist Academy], located at Jr. Serafín Filomeno, 448, Moyobamba, San Martín; Institución Educativa Adventista Nueva Cajamarca [Nueva Cajamarca Adventist Academy], located at Jr. Martín, 540, Nueva Cajamarca, San Martín; and Institución Educativa Adventista Alto Mayo [Alto Mayo Adventist Academy], located at Jr. Santo Toribio, 1166, San Martín.3 All these institutions have as their mission to “promote the full development of students, to educate autonomous citizens, committed to the well-being of the community, to the country and to God.”4

Northeast Peru Mission employs 325 workers. Of these, 43 are ministers (23 credentialed and 20 licensed), four are workers with missionary credentials and the other 227 employees perform various functions in administration and education.5

The Origins of the Adventist Work in the Territory of the Mission

The origin of Adventism in Peru dates to the late 19th century thanks to the efforts of volunteer missionaries and canvassers from abroad. In 1914, the Adventist church had already established Inca Union Mission (Unión Misión Incaica), which is the present South Peru Union Mission (Unión Peruana del Sur), to direct the missionary work in the territories of Bolivia, Ecuador, and Peru.6

Not long after 1914, the Adventist work was developed in the Peruvian jungle through the efforts of Pastor Ferdinand Stahl and his wife Ana. After working as missionary doctors for several years among the Indians of the Peruvian Andes, they decided to serve the Campas Indians7 (currently called Asháninkas).8 In November 1926, the Inca Union Mission Board of Directors decided to establish Upper Amazon Mission (Alto Amazonas Mission), presently known as East Peru Mission (Misión del Oriente Peruano - MNO).9 The Upper Amazon Mission was organized between 1927 and 1929.10 Following the Inca Union Mission meeting, the Stahls made a trip to San Roque de Cumbaza district in Tarapoto. As a result of their work, the first Adventist congregation was organized in the department of San Martín.

About the same time, around 1930, the Adventist message reached the village of Morales in an unusual way. God used a flooding river flood that devastated the house of a canvasser in San Roque.11 That canvasser was Manuel Panduro. As usual, he and his wife went out to visit some small farms in another village and offer evangelistic books. Upon learning that the Cumbaza River was flooded, they rushed to return home. Then they saw that the house, with all their books and other belongings, had been destroyed by the flooding river. After the waters of the river calmed, Panduro searched carefully along the riverbank for his books and other possessions, but his search was in vain.12 One day, soon after the flood incident, a half-drunk farmer walked along the sandy shore of the riverbed and spotted what appeared to be a shiny piece of gold in the stream. When he bent down to pick it up, he discovered that the object in the water was a book, partly covered in mud and sand, with the title in golden letters Hacia La Edad de Oro [Towards the Golden Age], by Marcelo Fayard. After carefully drying and cleaning the pages of the book, this farmer, whose name was Humberto Pinedo Pezo, read the book along with his family and some of his friends.13 When Manuel Panduro later met Humberto Pinedo Pezo, he was ready to study the Bible. Very soon Pezo was converted, began to keep the Sabbath, and was baptized by Pastor Bernabé Chávez. Pastor Chávez assisted the church of San Roque de Cumbaza, all the way from Yurimaguas, the capital of the Alto Amazonas province in the department of Loreto.

About ten years later in 1940, radio became one of the most efficient evangelistic instruments for preaching the gospel in the region. Thanks to radio programs, the dissemination of the message to the population in the most distant parts of the Amazon jungle was finally possible. At the time, many tuned in and listened to the program “La Voz de la Profecía” [The Voice of Prophecy], which was broadcasted on local stations.14 One of the main objectives of the radio was to enroll listeners in Bible correspondence studies.15 In 1954, the Bible correspondence school had a hundred-year-old woman among its students, in the town of San Roque, in the province of Huallaga, department of San Martín. This woman, Úrsula Solsol, was a faithful listener who attended the Sabbath School and shared the gospel among her relatives.16

The Adventist work continued to grow in that region and several churches were organized. By 1956, a small group of believers in Tarapoto decided to build a church with enough space to receive more people interested in studying the Bible. Hence, as soon as the building construction was completed, the church was dedicated to the Lord. Pastor W. E. Murray, the South American Division president was present at the dedication service. Pastor Francisco Scarcella and his team of Bible instructors began to hold evangelist series in Tarapoto and its vicinity.17 Three years later, around 1959, the Adventist congregation in Tarapoto faced serious difficulties. The main priest of Tarapoto spoke in the public square against the Seventh-day Adventists, saying: “These people will have to return to Catholicism, or they will have to die.”18

However, the faith and the desire to continue preaching and taking the truth to all parts of the Peruvian Amazon kept MNO growth constant. Thus, between 1968 and 1975, the Mission went from 16 to 26 congregations. At the end of those eight years, it achieved progress of more than 100 percent in the membership growth, reaching up to 6,715 Adventists.19

In the following three decades, a gradual increase was recorded each year. As a result, in June 2001, Peru Union Mission (Unión Peruana or UP) agreed to authorize the process of dividing the territory of East Peru Mission. 20 By November 2001, UP Plenary Board requested the South American Division to name a special committee to study the viability of dividing the territory of the East Peru Mission, which would give rise to a new Mission.21 The proposal was that this mission would be called Altomayo Mission (Misión del Altomayo), whose headquarters would be established in the city of Tarapoto and would have 15 missionary districts.22

Finally, in December 2001, the South American Division voted the creation of the “Investigation Committee” to study the division of MNO’s territory.23 The committee was comprised of the South American Division, the Peru Union Mission, and the MNO administrators, a district pastor and a lay member.

The Mission’s Organizational History

In August 2002, Peru Union Mission Board of Directors registered the report of the MNO commission Survey, which contained a favorable opinion for the creation of the new Mission. The new institution received the name of Northeast Peru Mission (Misión Nor Oriental or MNO).24 Northeast Peru Mission’s headquarters was in the city of Tarapoto. Northeast Peru Mission began operating on January 1, 2003.25 Its territory comprised of Alto Amazonas province, department of Loreto, and department of San Martín, except the province of Tocache. The new field was organized into 17 missionary districts, with 97 organized churches and 357 groups, with a total of 72,899 members.‎26

During this organizational period, the Peru Union Mission administration promised to purchase a place for the MNO headquarters. The land was located at Jr. Los Mártires, 218, Santa Lucía neighborhood, Morales district. With the purchase of this property, the construction of the first rooms for the mission headquarters began. In late 2002, Peru Union Mission appointed the first MNO27 administrators and approved the statute of the new administrative unit.28 In addition, the date was set for the first MNO congress, which was held in that same year, and assigned the baptism goal for the following year.29

With the first headquarters ready, the MNO first Administrative congress took place from December 12 to 14, 2002.30 This congress took place in the Global 2000 church and the administrations of Peru Union Mission, MNO, Ana Stahl Adventist Clinic, Good Hope Clinic, ADRA, Peruvian Union University participated.31 At the end of the congress, MNO had 17 missionary districts, two schools and an ADRA office. The first administrative leaders of the new Mission were Pastors Salomón Arana and Abel Guevara, president and secretary-treasurer, respectively.32

In 2004, in order to strengthen the faith of the brethren and motivate them to fulfill the mission, Peru Union Mission and MNO carried out the evangelistic program “Caravana de Poder” (The Caravan of Power).33 This program crowned the missionary work of the volunteer Bible instructors known as “Gedeones” (Gideons). The goal of these volunteers and district pastors was to instruct the people who were interested in learning more about Jesus and the Adventist Christian faith.34

In that same year (2004), Peru Union Mission subsidized a construction that expanded the facilities of its headquarters. However, the projects had to be altered and the construction works were not completed because the land previously designated to MNO and its already built facilities were donated to house the new Peruvian Union University branch in Tarapoto. The Peruvian Union University branch began its activities on April 1, 2005.35 Thus, that year, MNO headquarters was transferred to a new location at Ramirez Hurtado Jiron, 321, also in Tarapoto.36

In 2008, the provinces of the Amazonas department were added to the MNO territory: Chachapoyas, Bongará, Condorcanqui, Luya, and Rodríguez de Mendoza, which came from North Peru Mission. Thus, there was an increase in congregations, and by 2009, MNO had 212 organized churches and 308 groups under its care, that is, 26 organized churches and 177 groups more than the previous year. At that time, the total of number of Adventists in the mission reached 40,621 and the general population was c. 79.7626. Therefore, in MNO’s territory, there was one Adventist per 20 inhabitants.37

With that territorial expansion, new challenges arose. In response, the MNO remained focused on carrying out various projects that helped rural churches preach the Word of God. “Misión Caleb” [Caleb Mission Project], an Adventist church program that had its first Peruvian edition in the MNO territory, was one of them. In 2015, the “Youth Ministries” of the North Peru Union Mission and of MNO launched the “Misión Caleb 7.0 Tarapoto ‘Tierra de Esperanza’” [Caleb Mission Project 7.0 Tarapoto ‘Land of Hope’]. In that edition, hundreds of young people shared the gospel in various places in the countryside, such as Tarapoto, Yurimaguas, Moyobamba, Huallaga, and Chachapoyas.38 Another missionary front that has promoted the preaching of the gospel in MNO’s territory is the Adventist Development and Relief Agency International (ADRA). With more than 30 years of operation, this agency has been a constant testimony of the goodness of God, operating in more than 125 countries around the world, including Peru.39 ADRA facilitates the work of many Adventist volunteer missionaries in Peru.

The year 2015 registered other missionary achievements. For the first time in the MNO’s history, Adventist missionaries were welcomed by the Chayahuitas native community.40 The Chayahuitas community lives in the heart of the Peruvian jungle, on the banks of the Paranapura River, which is part of the Amazon River basin. They speak the Chawi41 dialect and Spanish. They participated in the evangelistic week entitled: “Esperanza Viva” [Living Hope] which happened from November 21 to 28. Around 450 people, including adults, youth, and children, listened carefully to the lessons given by the missionaries every day. At the end of that week, 28 people were baptized.42

God has guided and blessed the work done in the MNO’s territory as it can be seen in the steady growth of the mission. For example, in 2016 the Mission had 34 missionary districts, organized in six work zones. These districts extended from Yurimaguas, in the extreme east, to the Amazon, in the west. In addition, in this same year, MNO administered 258 churches and had a membership of 40,299, five Adventist schools, and a branch of the Peruvian Union University in the city of Tarapoto. From 2017 to 2018 MNO reached a total of 6.775 new believers and its growth rate in tithes and offerings increased by 9,7 percent.43 To carry out a more effective work, in 2019, MNO administration decided to create regions comprised of missionary districts, according to their geographical area. Hence, today each missionary district is part of a larger area to which evangelistic strategies are dedicated.

Today, MNO continues to advance in the preaching of the everlasting gospel through serving others. The Church is making every effort to alleviate the suffering caused by the world pandemic of COVID-19 and help those most in need. Thus, in collaboration with ADRA Peru, the Church has developed several projects, such as donating food, masks, and other essential supplies.44 In face of the Peruvian Government's decision to restrict the circulation of its citizens as a preventive measure, church attendance, Bible studies, and other face-to-face ecclesiastical activities were suspended. Thus, MNO uses digital technologies to preach the truth, promoted in May 2020 the “Convención de Misioneros Digitales” [Convention of Digital Missionaries].45

In conclusion, the MNO remains committed to the mission of proclaiming the everlasting gospel and preparing people for the second coming of Jesus Christ. Thus, it has developed an evangelizing strategy that seeks to involve all its members. This plan is known as CRM (Communion, Relationship, and Mission). Each believer, through the study of the Word and prayer, and friendship and service to their neighbors becomes a true agent of hope.

Chronology of Administrative Leaders46

Presidents: Salomón Arana (2003-2006); Elard Cabrera (2007-2010); Lucio Acuña (2010-2012); Gideón Herrera (2013-2014), Juan Sánchez (2015); Daniel Montalván (2016-June 2017); Heber Bendezú (July-December 2017); David Chilón (2018); Heber Bendezú (2019); David Chilón (2020-present).

Secretaries: Abel Guevara (2004); David Chávez (2005); Cesar Palacios (2006-2007); Isaac Mansilla (2008-2009); Ever Rojas (2010-2012); Víctor Vázquez (2013); Jorge Reyes (2014-2015); David Chilón (2016-2017); Juan Livaque Quintana (2018); David Chilón (2019); Juan Livaque (2020-present).

Treasurers: Abel Guevara (2004); David Chávez (2005); Cesar Palacios (2006-2008); José Meza (2009-2012); Rufo Atamari (2013-2016); Alex Cutipa (2017-present).47

Sources

2019 Annual Statistical Report. Silver Spring, MD.: Seventh-day Adventist Church, 2019.

Adventist Education Website. https://www.educacionadventista.com/.

Adventistas - MNO [Adventists - MNO]. Twitter post, April 28, 2020. https://twitter.com/.

BDPI - Base de datos de Pueblos Indígenas u Originarios [BDPI - Indigenous or Originating Peoples Database]. https://bdpi.cultura.gob.pe/.

CARE - Central Ashaninka del Río Ene [CARE - Central Ashaninka of the Ene River]. https://careashaninka.org/.

Cruzado, Samuel. “ADRA Perú hace frente al Covid-19” [ADRA Peru Faces Covid-19]. Noticias Adventistas [Adventist News] (Online), April 7, 2020.

Fontella, Jéssica. “Agencia Humanitaria celebró 30 años de actuación en el mundo” [Humanitarian Agency celebrated 30 years of actions in the world]. Noticias Adventistas [Adventist News] (Online), May 16, 2014.

Garcia, J.G. “Radio Spearhead Efforts,” South American Bulletin 30, no. 1 (January-February 1955).

Greenleaf, Floyd. Terra de Esperança: o crescimento da Igreja Adventista na América do Sul‎ [A Land of Hope: The Growth of the Seventh-day Adventist church in South America]. Tatuí, SP: Brazil Publishing House, 2011.

Haynes, Carlyle B. “Opening New Mission Stations.” South America Bulletin 3, no. 6 (June 1927).

Jacobs, Ray L. “Branch Sabbath Schools Win Souls.” South America Bulletin 18, no. 4 (April 1942).

Minutes of the Inca Union Mission Board of Directors, Harvest Ingathering Goal - 1929, March 25, 1929, vote no. 1420.

Minutes of the Inca Union Mission Board of Directors, Amazon Committee, March 24, 1929, vote no. 1368.

Minutes of the Inca Union Mission Board of Directors, Amazon Mission, May 1, 1927, vote no. 1069.

Minutes of the Inca Union Mission Board of Directors, Memorial - Upper Amazon Work, February 22, 1926, vote no. 872.

Minutes of the Inca Union Mission Board of Directors, Upper Amazon Mission, November 18, 1926, vote no. 965.

Minutes of the Peru Union Mission Board of Directors, Appointments - various, November 19-21, 2002, vote no. 2002-247.

Minutes of the Peru Union Mission Board of Directors, Baptism Target 2003 - Peru Union Mission, November 19-21, 2002, vote no. 2002-266.

Minutes of the Peru Union Mission Board of Directors, MOP Territory Division - Start process, June 26-28, 2001, vote no. 2001-144.

Minutes of the Peru Union Mission Board of Directors, Special Subsidy - MNO, September 24, 2003, vote no. 2003-215.

Minutes of the Peru Union Mission Board of Directors, Statute approval, November 19-21, 2002, vote no. 2002-250.

Minutes of the Peru Union Mission Board of Directors, Survey Commission, MOP Division - Members, December 17, 2001, vote no. 2001-269.

Minutes of the Peru Union Mission Board of Directors, Survey - MOP Division - Start process, November 20-22, 2001, vote no. 2001-228.

Minutes of the Peru Union Mission Board of Directors, UP-Register - Report of the MOP Survey commission, August 20, 2002, vote no. 2002-187.

Minutes of the Peru Union Mission Board of Directors, UP - Request the SAD approval for the creation of a new administrative unit in the MOP territory, August 20, 2002, vote no. 2002-188.

Minutes of the Northeast Peru Mission, I Administrative Congress of the Northeast Peru Mission, December 13, 2002, vote no. 2002-005.

Muñoz, Julio C. “Peru: ‘Caravana de la Esperanza’ Outreach apunta a 24 ciudades en 13 días” [Peru: ‘Caravan of Hope’ Outreach targets 24 cities in 13 days]. Red de Noticias Adventistas [Adventist News Network] (Online), July 5, 2004.

Murray, E. W. “A Review of 1955.” South American Bulletin 31, no. 1 (January-February, ‎‎1956).‎

Pezo, Mirtha. “Comunidad nativa recibe misioneros adventistas por primera vez” [Native Community Receives Adventist Missionaries for the First Time]. Noticias Adventistas [Adventist News] (Online), November 27, 2015.

Plataforma Digital Única del Gobierno Peruano [Peruvian Government Unique Digital Plataform], https://www.gob.pe/.

Plenc, Daniel O., Misioneros en Sudamérica: pioneros del adventismo en Latinoamérica [Missionaries in South America: Latin America Adventism pioneers]. Buenos Aires, Argentina South American Spanish Publishing House, 2013.

Pritchard, S. C. “New Church in Tarapoto, Peru.” ARH, January ‎‎19, 1956.

Rudy, H. L. “Opposition Brings Progress in South America.” ARH, March 19, 1959.

Seventh-day Adventist Church - Peru (North Peru Union Mission). “Spot Caleb 7.0 en Tarapoto” [Spot Caleb 7.0 in Tarapoto] (video). Spot of the Caleb Mission Project 7.0 of 2015, June 29, 2015. Accessed on June 02, 2020, https://bit.ly/2Mn4oHZ.

Seventh-day Adventist Church (Peru) Website. https://www.adventistas.org/es/.

Seventh-day Adventist Online Statistics. http://www.adventiststatistics.org/.

Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook. https://www.adventistyearbook.org/.

Universidad Peruana Unión - Tarapoto [Peruvian Union University - Tarapoto] Website. https://tarapoto.upeu.edu.pe/.

Notes

  1. “Northeast Peru Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Nampa, ID: Pacific Press Publishing Association, 2018), 245.

  2. Seventh-day Adventist Online Yearbook, “Northeast Peru Mission,” accessed on April 20, 2020, https://bit.ly/300QNyf.

  3. Seventh-day Adventist Church Website “Educación: Colegios - MNO” [Education: Schools - MNO], accessed on April 20, 2020, https://bit.ly/2XtsSpT.

  4. Adventist Education Website, “EA en el mundo” [AE in the World], accessed on May 31, 2020, https://bit.ly/385ggaV.

  5. “South American Division,” 2019 Annual Statistical Report (Silver Spring, MD: Seventh-day ‎

    Adventist Church, 2019), 43.

  6. Daniel Oscar Plenc, Misioneros en Sudamérica: pioneros del adventismo en Latinoamérica [Missionaries in South America: Latin America Adventism pioneers], Florida, Argentina: South American Spanish Publishing House, 2013, 83.

  7. Minutes of the Inca Union Mission Board of Directors, Memorial - Upper Amazon Work, February 22, 1926, vote no. 872.

  8. The Asháninka people, in ancient times, have also been known by the term campa. The Asháninka, “with approximately 97,000 members, are the largest indigenous people in the Peruvian Amazon. The Asháninka territory expands throughout the Central Jungle, with presence in the jungle of the departments of Cusco, Ayacucho, Junín, Pasco, Huánuco, and Ucayali. The Asháninka are part of the Arawak (or Arahuaco) linguistic family and have a linguistic and cultural affinity with the Machiguenga, Nomatsiguenka, Kakinte and Yanesha peoples”. CARE - Central Ashaninka del Río Ene [CARE - Central Ashaninka of the Ene River], “¿Quiénes son los Ashaninkas?” [Who are the Ashaninkas?], accessed on June 01, 2020, https://bit.ly/3gGd36g.

  9. Minutes of the Inca Union Mission Board of Directors, Upper Amazon, November 18, 1926, vote no. 965; Minutes of the Inca Union Mission Board of Directors, Amazon Mission, May 1, 1927, vote no. 1069.

  10. Minutes of the Inca Union Mission Board of Directors, Amazon Committee, March 24, 1929, vote no. 1368; Minutes of the Inca Union Mission Board of Directors, Harvest Ingathering Goal - 1929, March 25, 1929, vote no. 1420; Daniel O. Plenc, Misioneros en Sudamérica: pioneros del adventismo en Latinoamérica [Missionaries in South America: Latin America Adventism pioneers], Buenos Aires, Argentina: South American Spanish Publishing House, 2013, 83; Carlyle B. Haynes, “Opening New Mission Stations,” South America Bulletin 3, no. 6 (June, 1927): 8.

  11. Ray L. Jacobs, “Branch Sabbath Schools Win Souls,” South America Bulletin 18, no. 4 (April 1942): 3.

  12. S.C. Pritchard, “New Church in Tarapoto, Peru,” ARH, January 19, 1956, 23.

  13. Ibid.

  14. Floyd Greenleaf, Terra de Esperança: o crescimento da Igreja Adventista na América do Sul [A Land of Hope: The Growth of the Seventh-day Adventist church in South America], Tatuí, SP: Brazil Publishing House, 2011, 446.

  15. Ibid., 445.

  16. J.G. Garcia, “Radio Spearhead Efforts,South American Bulletin 30, no. 1 (January-February 1955): 5.

  17. S.C. Pritchard, “New Church in Tarapoto, Peru,” ARH, January 19, 1956, 23; E.W. Murray, “A Review of 1955,” South American Bulletin 31, no. 1 (January-February 1956): 1.

  18. H.L. Rudy, “Opposition Brings Progress in South America,” ARH, March 19, 1959, 32.

  19. Seventh-day Adventist Online Statistics, “East Peru Mission, Yearly Statistics (1968-1975),” accessed on April 24, 2020, https://bit.ly/2xVnYaI.

  20. Minutes of the Peru Union Mission Board of Directors, MOP Territory Division - Start process, June 26-28, 2001, vote no. 2001-144.

  21. Minutes of the Peru Union Mission Board of Directors, Survey - MOP Division - Start process, November 22, 2001, vote no. 2001-228.

  22. Ibid.

  23. Minutes of the Peru Union Mission Board of Directors, Survey Commission, MOP Territory Division - Members, December 17, 2001, vote no. 2001-269.

  24. Minutes of the Peru Union Mission Board of Directors, UP - Register - Report of the MOP Survey commission, August 20, 2002, vote no. 2002-187.

  25. Minutes of the Peru Union Mission Board of Directors, UP - Request the SAD approval for the creation of a new administrative unit in the MOP territory, August 20, 2002, vote no. 2002-188.

  26. Ibid.

  27. Minutes of the Peru Union Mission Board of Directors, Appointments - various, November 19-21, 2002, vote no. 2002-247.

  28. Minutes of the Peru Union Mission Board of Directors, Statute approval, November 19-21, 2002, vote no. 2002-250.

  29. Minutes of the Peru Union Mission Board of Directors, Baptism Target 2003 - Peru Union Mission, November 19-21, 2002, vote no. 2002-266.

  30. Minutes of the Northeast Peru Mission, I Administrative Congress of the Northeast Peru Mission, December 13, 2002, vote no. 2002-005.

  31. Ibid.

  32. “North East Peru Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Hagerstown, MD: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 2004), 256.

  33. Minutes of the Peru Union Mission Board of Directors, Special Subsidy - MNO, September 24, 2003, vote no. 2003-215.

  34. Julio C. Muñoz, “Peru: ‘Caravana de la Esperanza’ Outreach apunta a 24 ciudades en 13 días” [Peru: ‘Caravan of Hope’ Outreach targets 24 cities in 13 days], Red de Noticias Adventistas [Adventist News Network], July 5, 2004, accessed on June 2, 2020, https://bit.ly/2ShP9Ub.

  35. Sitio de la Universidad Peruana Unión - Tarapoto [Site of the Peruvian Union University - Tarapoto], “Reseña Histórica” [Historical review], accessed on June 2, 2020, https://bit.ly/36QLWB4.

  36. “Northeast Peru Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Hagerstown, MD: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 2006), 272.

  37. “Northeast Peru Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Hagerstown, MD: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 2010), 281.

  38. Seventh-day Adventist Church - Peru (North Peru Union Mission), “Spot Caleb 7.0 en Tarapoto” [Spot Caleb 7.0 in Tarapoto] (promotional video of the Caleb Mission Project 7.0 of 2015, June 29, 2015), accessed on June 2, 2020, https://bit.ly/2Mn4oHZ.

  39. Jéssica Fontella, “Agencia Humanitaria celebró 30 años de actuación en el mundo” [Humanitarian Agency celebrated 30 years of actions in the world], Noticias Adventistas [Adventist News], May 16, 2014, accessed on April 22, 2020, https://bit.ly/2yx4JEu.

  40. The Chayahuita people “is also known as Shawi. “The Shawi people live mainly in the departments of Loreto and San Martín.” BDPI - Base de datos de Pueblos Indígenas u Originarios [BDPI - Indigenous or Originating Peoples Database], “Shawi,” accessed on June 2, 2020, https://bit.ly/3coCKox.

  41. “The Shawi language (ISO: cbt) belongs to the Cahuapana language family and it is spoken by the people of the same name in the Alto Amazonas province in the Loreto region, and in Moyobamba and Lamas, San Martín region.” BDPI - Base de datos de Pueblos Indígenas u Originarios [BDPI - Indigenous or Originating Peoples Database], “Shawi,” accessed on June 2, 2020, https://bit.ly/3coCKox.

  42. Mirtha Pezo, “Comunidad nativa recibe misioneros adventistas por primera vez” [Native Community Receives Adventist Missionaries for the First Time], Noticias Adventistas [Adventist News], November 27, 2015, accessed on June 02, 2020, https://bit.ly/2MpDWO6.

  43. “South American Division,” 2019 Annual Statistical Report (Silver Spring, MD: Seventh-day Adventist Church, 2019), 43.

  44. Coronavirus “is a large family of viruses that cause diseases ranging from the common cold to more serious diseases such as the Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) or a severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). They can be transmitted between animals and people. The new coronavirus (COVID-19) is a previously unidentified variety in humans, which spreads from person to person, through droplets or aqueous particles that remain in the environment when coughing or sneezing. You could also become infected if you maintain physical contact with an infected person.” Plataforma Digital Única del Gobierno Peruano [Peruvian Government Unique Digital Plataform], “¿Qué son los coronavirus?” [What is the coronavirus?], accessed on June 02, 2020, https://bit.ly/3clQvo4; Samuel Cruzado, “ADRA Perú hace frente al Covid-19” [ADRA Peru Faces Covid-19], Noticias Adventistas [Adventist News], April 7, 2020, accessed on April 24, 2020, https://bit.ly/2zUYH1l.

  45. Adventists - MNO, Twitter post, April 28, 2020 (05:35 pm), accessed on June 02, 2020, https://bit.ly/2yWQ4D3.

  46. Seventh-day Adventist Online Yearbook, “Northeast Peru Mission,” accessed on April 20, 2020, https://bit.ly/300QNyf; “North East Peru Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Hagerstown, MD: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 2004), 256; “Northeast Peru Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Nampa, ID: Pacific Press Publishing Association, 2018), 245. For more detailed verification on all Northeast Peru Mission administrative leaders, see Seventh-day Adventist Yearbooks from 2004 to 2019.

  47. More information about the MNO can be found on the website: http://mno.adventistas.org/, and on social networks - Facebook: @mno.adventistas, Instagram:@adventistasmno, Twitter: @adventistasmno and YouTube: Misión Nor Oriental Oficial [Northeast Peru Mission Official].

×

Manzanares, Antonio, Dálcio da Silva Paiva. "Northeast Peru Mission." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. July 04, 2021. Accessed May 21, 2022. https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=HGLE.

Manzanares, Antonio, Dálcio da Silva Paiva. "Northeast Peru Mission." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. July 04, 2021. Date of access May 21, 2022, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=HGLE.

Manzanares, Antonio, Dálcio da Silva Paiva (2021, July 04). Northeast Peru Mission. Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. Retrieved May 21, 2022, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=HGLE.