North Peru Mission

By Dálcio da Silva Paiva, and Eduardo Bailón Azurín

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Dálcio da Silva Paiva

Eduardo Bailón Azurín

The North Peru Mission (Misión Peruana del Norte or MPN) is an administrative unit of the Seventh-day Adventist Church, within the territory of North Peru Union Mission (Unión Peruana del Norte or UPN). It is headquartered at 235 La Pinta Street, Zip Code 14007, La Victoria district, in the city of Chiclayo, province of Chiclayo, department of Lambayeque, republic of Peru.1

Territory and Statistics

The North Peru Mission is responsible for the Adventist work in the departments of Lambayeque, Piura, and Tumbes, as well as portions of the departments of Amazonas and Cajamarca. In the entire MPN territory there are 3,875,654 inhabitants, of whom 53,426 are Adventists.2 These members are distributed in 879 congregations (374 churches and 505 organized groups)3 and 54 pastoral districts, which are organized into seven zones according to their geographic location. The ratio is one Adventist per 73 inhabitants.4

MPN manages eight educational units that are part of the North Peruvian Adventist Educational Association.5 These institutions instruct children, adolescents, and young people through an education based on Christian principles. The schools are: Colegio Adventista Bagua (Bagua Adventist Academy), located in Bagua, Bagua Grande, in the department of Amazonas;6 Institución Educativa Adventista Pimentel (Pimentel Adventist Academy), located in Paraje Los Arenales, Pimentel, in Lambayeque;7 and Colegio Adventista Chiclayo (Chiclayo Adventist Academy), located in Chiclayo, in Lambayeque.8

Additional schools include: Colegio Adventista Sullana (Sullana Adventist Academy), located in Sullana, Piura;9 Colegio Adventista Piura (Piura Adventist Academy), in Piura, Cercado, also in Piura;10 Institución Educativa Adventista Utcubamba (Utcubamba Adventist Academy), in Bagua Grande, Utcubamba, Amazonas;11 Institución Educativa Adventista Tumbes (Tumbes Adventist Academy), Colegio Adventista Las Américas (Las Américas Adventist Academy), in Tumbes;12 and Institución Educativa “Esteban López Serván” (Esteban López Serván Adventist Academy), Colegio Adventista Jaén (Jaén Adventist Academy), in Jaén, Cajamarca.13

In the area of communications, Radio Nuevo Tiempo Perú (Peru New Time Radio), is broadcast in three cities in the MPN territory: Bagua (98.4 FM), Chiclayo (92.7 FM), and Piura (90.1 FM). These three stations contribute to the mission by spreading La Voz de la Esperanza (The Voice of Hope) to all sectors of society.14 Currently, MPN serves its territory through 309 employees, of whom 64 are pastors (48 with ministerial credentials and 16 licensed). There are also five workers with a missionary credential and two workers with a missionary license. An additional 104 people collaborate in other administrative activities.15

Origin of the Adventist Church Work in the Mission Territory

The Adventist message reached Peru in the late 19th century through the work of evangelist canvassers.16 Over time, many other missionaries were sent by the Church to assist in the evangelization of the country through meetings and other initiatives. In the north, the Adventist work was developed by Agustín Alva, who, in 1918, organized the Contumazá Adventist Church in the city of Cajamarca, as well as the Ascope Adventist Church, in La Libertad.17

The canvassers’ work was carried on in the Peruvian lands, such as the small city of Chiclayo, in the Lambayeque region, where Adventism also began through the canvassing work.18 In December 1929, a student canvasser named Alberto Castillo came to that city offering Adventist literature to residents.19 Many of them purchased the publications and the Adventist work advanced in the region. Later the work was expanded to surrounding cities, such as Trujillo, about 215 kilometers from Chiclayo. Over time, the work done in those cities produced favorable results, with many people accepting the message preached by the missionaries.20

During 1945, in the city of Talara, a canvasser learned of a group of workers who were to leave at the first hour of the day for the city’s oil field. With that in mind, the canvasser called the workers at midnight and gave them 40 copies of the book La Gran Controversia (The Great Controversy), by Ellen G. White. As a result of God’s blessings on this initiative, 40 workers from that group agreed to keep the Sabbath and eight of them were baptized. Subsequently, seeking to carry on the evangelistic progress, the Adventists engaged in mission projects along the rivers of that region; and so, the preaching work of the Adventist message continued to achieve success in the northern Peruvian lands.21

Mission’s Organizational History

Around 1950, the river mission projects in Peru received a favorable response from government authorities. This boosted evangelism in the northern region, opening doors to new possibilities and resulting in church growth throughout the decade.22 Taking this growth into consideration, on June 29, 1960, the Unión Incaica (Inca Union Mission), now the Unión Peruana del Sur (South Peru Union Mission), appointed a commission to study the possibility of creating a new administrative unit to manage the progress of the Adventist work in northern Peru. Thus, the creation of Misión Peruana del Norte (North Peru Mission) was considered.23

After the necessary studies, on October 27, 1960, it was voted to approve and recommend to the South American Division (SAD) a plan for the establishment of this new mission. The decision was made because of the need for closer attention to be given to the Adventist work in that region.24 The meeting that gave final approval took place in the city of Montevideo during the SAD Annual Council. At that council, which was held from November 29 to December 5, 1960, the delegates approved the territorial reorganization of Misión Peruana (Peru Mission), presently known as Asociación Peruana Central Este (Central East Peru Conference),25 and the creation of a new administrative unit called Mission Peruana del Norte (North Peru Mission).26

The SAD Board of Directors also authorized that the president and the secretary-treasurer of MPN be appointed at the annual meeting of the Inca Union Mission, which would take place from December 13 to 18, 1960.27 Thus, on December 14, 1960, the Inca Union Mission Board of Directors, meeting in Miraflores, elected Richard A. Hayden as president of the new mission28 and, two days later, Pablo Silva was elected as secretary-treasurer of MPN.29 At the beginning, North Peru Mission was responsible for managing the Adventist work in the departments of Amazonas, Cajamarca, Lambayeque, La Libertad, Piura, and Tumbes. The city of Chiclayo was the location chosen for the administrative headquarters.30

The new mission began operating on January 1, 1961, but the leaders had not yet found an ideal location for the headquarters. For that reason, on February 22 of that year, the administration agreed to rent a building located at 690 San José Avenue, in the city of Chiclayo, where the first offices of the mission were established.31 Administrative activities began there on March 8, 1961. When MPN began operations, it was responsible for 14 organized churches and 3,958 Adventist members.32 At that time, the ratio was one Adventist per 605 inhabitants.33

In 1962, MPN emphasized mission and integrated evangelism, calling that year the Year of Total Evangelism. The leaders planned to work from April to December to indoctrinate, baptize, and confirm people in the Adventist faith. The goal for that year was to reach 2,500 people and the motto was “every church member a missionary.” At the same time, in order to keep the congregations informed about the projects to be carried out in the different departments of MPN, the mission leadership published its first official bulletin, called La Aurora del Norte (The Northern Dawn). That year was also the time when preaching the gospel through the educational system was emphasized, and Piura Adventist Academy was established. Through those means, the preaching of the gospel advanced in northern Peru.34

The growth of the church was accompanied by many difficulties. In the city of San Pablo, in the Cajamarca region, a Catholic gentleman named Chilón García learned about the Adventist message through his cousin, Emilio Ayay. Upon hearing the biblical truths, Chilón García was especially impressed by the Sabbath doctrine and the Bible’s teaching about graven images. After studying, his first impulse was to get rid of the images in his home. As a result, the neighbors denounced him and arrested him. At the trial he was declared innocent due to lack of evidence. Chilón then organized Bible studies at his home and two months later a 38-person Adventist group was meeting in the city.35

From April 17 to 20, 1963, the first biennial council of the North Peru Mission took place in the church at Chiclayo. The meeting was attended by representatives of the South American Division and delegates from 11 churches and more than 43 groups, representing members from all over the mission territory. During the morning service, a sermon was preached on the power of Christian education, and the mission president expressed gratitude to God for the wonderful blessings that had been poured out on that administrative unit since its establishment.36

At the afternoon meeting, lay members gave their testimonies about winning souls for the Lord Jesus Christ. Among these members was Felipe Villar, an inmate at the state prison, who was present at the meeting escorted by two armed guards. Felipe told about his Bible study work in prison with 60 other inmates and also about organizing a Sabbath school there. Thus, the Adventist work continued to achieve success in northern Peru.37

On October 12, 1964, the workers and administrators of MPN inaugurated the offices of the new mission headquarters at 1499 Alfonso Ugarte Street, in the city of Chiclayo. This event was attended by the leaders of Inca Union Mission, the SAD, and the mayor of the city of Chiclayo, as well as other church and civil authorities. The new building had eight offices, accommodation for two families, and a section called Hogar del Libro y de la Biblia (Book and Bible House). As a result of the work carried out by members and leaders of that institution, around 600 people were baptized as Seventh-day Adventists that year. Even though it had only been in existence for a few years, MPN had already reached 3,700 baptized members. In 1969, Jaén Adventist Academy was inaugurated in Cajamarca.38

During 1971, MPN, in collaboration with the Inca Union Mission, offered a Bible course called La Biblia Habla (The Bible Speaks), in which more than 1,500 people enrolled. As a result, in a special ceremony held by MPN, about 700 people received their diplomas for taking the course.39

In 1984, the Las Americas and Bagua Adventist Academies were established in MPN territory. A year later, even with the application of martial law at the time, MPN held a series of evangelistic meetings in a mobile auditorium in the city of Trujillo. At the end of these meetings, 164 people were baptized, including a civil guard sergeant, three teachers, and a radio speaker, as well as the pastor and members of a charismatic religious group.40

During the early 1990s, Adventism in northern Peru grew exponentially. During 1991 and 1992, around

Considering these advances in the mission field, on September 25, 1995, the Inca Union Mission Board of Directors approved the reorganization of MPN territory in two fields. This new configuration would take place in 1997. One of the fields would be called Asociación Peruana del Norte (North Peru Conference), headquartered in Trujillo, and the other would be known as “Misión Peruana Nor-Oriental” (North East Peru Mission), with headquarters in Chiclayo. However, this reconfiguration did not materialize due to economic problems that occurred in late 1997 and early 1998 in northern Peru.‬41‬‬‬‬

With the advent of the new century, the need to better serve the membership and the local pastors became increasingly visible. Time had passed since the Inca Union Mission had approved the division of MPN. By the end of 1999, there were already 110,887 Adventists. At the beginning of 2000, MPN had 304 organized churches and 735 groups under its administration, and 48 pastors were working across the field. In other words,

From November 22 to 25, 2000, the 15th Congress of the Peru Union Mission met and the Survey Commission report was accepted, authorizing the creation of a new administrative unit which would begin its activities in 2001. The reorganization was carried out and the new headquarters received the name of Misión Nor Pacífico (North Pacific Mission), headquartered in the city of Trujillo. MPN continued to be located in Chiclayo. At that time, North Peru Mission was responsible for managing the progress of the Adventist work in the departments of Amazonas, Cajamarca, Lambayeque, La Libertad, Piura, and Tumbes, as well as in the provinces of the department of Cajamarca: Cutervo, Chota, Hualgayoc, Jaén, San Ignacio, and Santa Cruz.42

In 2002, the Radiodifusora Beijing Nuevo Tiempo (Beijing New Time Radio Station) at 92.7 FM was inaugurated in the territory of MPN. The Adventist communication leaders from South America and Peru, as well as other participants, were present on that occasion.43 The establishment of this station in Chiclayo made it possible to reach more people through radio waves. Among the many programs that were broadcast, the program La Esperanza es Jesús (Hope is Jesus) was the first evangelistic program created in the station to fulfill the mission of sharing the eternal gospel.44

This event was complemented by the missionary commitment of the Adventist members from the city of Jaén, in Cajamarca. During three months of 2002, through the evangelistic campaign La Esperanza es Jesús (same name as the radio program), members contributed to the baptism of 859 people from the community.45 Two years later the mission transferred its headquarters to 164 Los Alhelies, Urb. Santa Victoria, in Chiclayo.46 Even with this change, missionary campaigns continued.

On March 11, 2006, MPN celebrated the Jornada Mundial de Oración (World Day of Prayer), during which more than 11,160 people attended the meetings held in 119 mobile tents set up in each of the cities of the territory, with the goal of spending time in prayer.47

There were other changes in the structure of the mission field in 2008, when the North Peru Mission transferred to the North East Peru Mission the responsibility of managing Adventist work in the provinces of the department of Amazon: Chachapoyas, Bongará, Condorcanqui, Luya, and Rodríguez de Mendoza. After that reorganization, MPN was responsible for the work in the departments of Cajamarca, Lambayeque, Piura, and Tumes, in addition to the provinces of Bagua and Utcubamba in Amazonas. Also, in 2008, Institución Educativa Adventista Utcubamba (Utcubamba Adventist Academy) was established in Bagua Grande, Amazonas.48

In 2012, North Peru Mission focused its efforts on encouraging members to be faithful in returning tithes and offerings. Due to that initiative, additional resources became available and were used to establish more pastoral districts and support local churches. Thus, at the end of that year, the mission served 42,791 Adventist members, distributed in 261 churches and 477 groups, which were organized in 42 pastoral districts. About 60 percent of the members of these districts were involved in 2,142 small groups,49 which served as a missionary motivator. At that time, MPN managed seven educational institutions, which served 1,838 students, through 154 teachers.50

In 2013 the mission headquarters moved again. Since then, the offices of that church administrative unit have been located at 235 La Pinta street, La Victoria district, in the city of Chiclayo. Also, in 2014, Institución Educativa Adventista Pimentel (Pimentel Adventist Academy) was established in Pimentel, Lambayeque. On another front, in 2013 the North Peru Union Mission, in partnership with the North Peru Mission, promoted the Rompiendo el Silencio (Breaking the Silence)51 campaign in the city of Paita, Chiclayo province. The project was carried out with the support of the Paita Provincial Administration, and the aim was to combat domestic violence. The program took place from August 17 to 24 and had the participation of some of the local authorities. The Ministerio de la Mujer (Women’s Ministries) department led the program, with the support of the churches in the region.52

In 2015, within the framework of the Holy Week evangelism53 La Pasión de Cristo eres Tú (The Passion of Christ is You), MPN, represented by its president, held a conference on Ethics and Management for the officials of the Lambayeque regional government. This event aimed to consolidate the good relations that the Church maintains with the public powers, in addition to sharing the message of the Word of God, showing that the Bible should provide life’s code of ethics. At the end of the conference, attendees received the missionary book that was distributed during the Proyecto Impacto Esperanza54 (Hope Impact Project) that year: Viva con Esperanza (Live with Hope). They were invited to participate in the Holy Week activities in the various preaching centers throughout the region.55

By 2016 MPN had nine educational institutions in its territory, and that year the mission baptized 5,810 new members.56 In 2017 and 2018, it reached a total of 10,247 additional baptisms.57 On April 7, 2019, the Church inaugurated Colegio Adventista de Sullana (Sullana Adventist Academy) in the city of Sullana. This event was attended by educational authorities, students, and parents, as well as leaders of the Church and MPN. This school now offers early childhood, elementary, and high school education.58

The history of the North Peru Mission has shown that the missionary actions of the Church in this field have been carried out in accordance with the order of Matthew 28:19-20 and the Three Angels’ Messages of Revelation 14:6-12. Committed to this evangelistic mission, MPN continues to faithfully convey the message of divine love to all people in northern Peru. There is the total involvement of its members, disciples of Jesus Christ, who are preparing for the Lord’s return and who seek to fulfill their mission through their personal testimony and service to others. Confidence of the Adventists in MPN remains in the One who has led and blessed them in every missionary effort carried out to this day.

Chronology of Administrative Leaders59

Presidents: R. A. Hayden (1961-1962); Adalberto Alarcón (1963-1967); L. D. Taylor (1968-1969); Raúl Gómez (1970-1971); Haroldo Morán (1972-1976); Eduardo Cayrus (1977); Isaías Chota (1978-1979); Eleodoro Rodríguez (1979-1980); Isaías Rojas (1981); Natalio Cuellar (1982-1985); Eliezer Sánchez (1986-1990); Justo Morales (1991-1992); Rodrigo Gutiérrez (1993-1994); Melchor Ferreyra (1995); Blas Mendoza (1996-1998); Víctor Brañes (1999-2001); Samuel Sandoval (2002-2005); Eliseo Sánchez (2006-2007); Walter Dávila (2008-2009); Edwin Regalado (2010); Wilfredo Gonzales (2011-2012); Lucio Acuña (2013-2014); Gedeón Herrera (2015-2017); Víctor Vázquez (2018-present).

Secretaries: A. M. Rode (1961-1964); H. C. Morton (1965-1967); D. H. Glantz (1969-1972); Pedro López (1973); Federico Chuquimia (1974-1975); Jorge Montalvo (1976); Hugo Ramírez (1977-1978); Moisés Aguilar (1979-1981); José Alomía (1982-1985); Crimo Vallejos (1986); Juan Concepción (1987); Gonzalo Bravo (1988); Humberto Cuentas (1989); Julio Godoy (1990-1993); Crimo Vallejos (1994-1995); Humberto Cuentas (1996); Sergio Mercado (1997-2000); Cesar Palacios (2001); Hugo Lavooy (2002-2003); Santos Corrales (2004-2006); Walter Dávila (2007); Wilfredo Gonzales (2008); Aquilino Coanqui (2009-2012); Percy Panez (2013-2014); Víctor Vásquez (2015); Eduardo Bailón (2016-present).

Treasurers: A. M. Rode (1961-1964); H. C. Morton (1965-1967); D. H. Glantz (1969-1972); Pedro López (1973); Federico Chuquimia (1974-1975); Jorge Montalvo (1976); Hugo Ramírez (1977-1978); Moisés Aguilar (1979-1981); José Alomía (1982-1985); Crimo Vallejos (1986); Juan Concepción (1987); Gonzalo Bravo (1988-1989); Abdon Jalk (1990-1993); Crimo Vallejos (1994-1995); Humberto Cuentas (1996); Sergio Mercado (1997-2000); Cesar Palacios (2001); Hugo Lavooy (2002-2003); Virgilio Miranda (2004-2005); Manuel Egas (2006); Sergio Mercado (2007-2008); Nilton Acuna (2009-2010); Braulio Huanca (2011-2014); Samuel Jove (2015-2019); Mervin Chávez (2019-present).60

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Adventistas Buenos Aires - Zona Norte [Buenos Aires Adventists - North Zone]. Facebook post, October 11, 2018. https://www.facebook.com/.

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Hayden, R. A. “North Peru Mission First Biennial Session.” ARH, July 11, 1963.

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Misión Peruana del Norte [North Peru Mission]. “Informe de la Misión Peruana del Norte 2012” [2012 North Peru Mission Report] (video). MPN informational video, April 26, 2012. Accessed on April 16, 2020, https://bit.ly/2VDdMLI.

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Notes

  1. Seventh-day Adventist Online Yearbook, “North Peru Mission,” accessed on April 13, 2020, https://bit.ly/3hedFAk.

  2. Ibid.

  3. “South American Division,” 2020 Annual Statistical Report Volume 2 (Silver Spring, MD: Seventh-day Adventists Church, 2020), 10.

  4. Misión Peruana del Norte [North Peru Mission], Facebook post, “Sobre” [About us], s/n., June 11, 2020., https://bit.ly/3hhHKiv.

  5. ASEANORTE, “Nuestros Centros de Estudio” [Our Academies], accessed on June 11, 2020, https://bit.ly/3f9ywTq.

  6. Institución Educativa Adventista Bagua [Bagua Adventist Academy], “Nosotros” [About Us], accessed on June 11, 2020, https://bit.ly/2XS78nh.

  7. Institución Educativa Adventista Pimentel [Pimentel Adventist Academy], “Nosotros” [About Us], accessed on June 11, 2020, https://bit.ly/30wQZoV.

  8. Institución Educativa Adventista Chiclayo [Chiclayo Adventist Academy], “Nosotros” [About Us], accessed on June 11, 2020, https://bit.ly/2Aq7dWq.

  9. Institución Educativa Adventista Sullana [Sullana Adventist Academy], “Contacto” [Contact], accessed on June 11, 2020, https://bit.ly/37NsLZq.

  10. Institución Educativa Adventista Piura [Piura Adventist Academy], “Contacto” [Contact], accessed on June 11, 2020, https://bit.ly/3fjAlgV.

  11. Institución Educativa Adventista Utcubamba [Utcubamba Adventist Academy], “Contacto” [Contact], accessed on June 11, 2020, https://bit.ly/2BXCQqM.

  12. Institución Educativa Adventista Tumbes [Tumbes Adventist Academy], “Contacto” [Contact], accessed on July 11, 2020, https://bit.ly/3hsWnQe.

  13. Institución Educativa Adventista Jaén [Jaén Adventist Academy], “Nosotros” [About Us], accessed on June 11, 2020, https://bit.ly/2YpxBaT.

  14. Nuevo Tiempo [New Time Adventist Media Center], “Radio Nuevo Tiempo: Dónde Escuchar” [New Time Radio: Where to listen], accessed on June 8, 2002, https://bit.ly/2w5emcB.

  15. “South American Division,” 2019 Annual Statistical Report: New Series, Volume 1 (Silver Spring, MD: Seventh-day Adventists Church, 2019), 63.

  16. “The canvassers […] are missionaries who are in charge of sowing the Christian seed, through the delivery of thousands of books […]. Many of them make a harvest week at the end of their campaign. […] All big cities are divided into small sectors and marked on the map, and the canvassers are assigned to the areas that must be covered and served.” Portal de la Iglesia Adventista del Séptimo Día [Seventh-day Adventist Church website], “Publicaciones - Grandes Ciudades” [Publications - Big Cities], accessed on July 22, 2020, https://bit.ly/32PLYcx.

  17. Merling K. Alomía, “Comienzos de la obra educativa adventista” [The beginning of Adventist educational work], Theologika 1, no. 1 (1983): 110.

  18. Canvassing “is a way of doing missionary work through the distribution of books and magazines, achieving many benefits. Among them, economic resources to study at a University or as livelihood.” Adventistas Buenos Aires - Zona Norte [Buenos Aires Adventists - North Zone], Facebook post, October 11, 2018 (11:47 a.m.), accessed on July 27, 2020, https://bit.ly/2CITsU1.

  19. J. D. Leslie, “Scholarship in Peru,” South American Bulletin 6, no. 7 (July 1930): 4.

  20. G. F. Ruf, “Notas breves de progreso de la Misión Peruana” [Brief progress notes from Peru Mission], La Revista Adventista [Adventist Review] 41, no. 12 (December 1941): 13.

  21. W. A. Spicer, “Good Fruitage in Peru,” ARH, July 12, 1945, 4.

  22. Floyd Greenleaf, A Land of Hope: the growth of the Seventh-day Adventist Church in South America (Tatuí, SP: Brazil Publishing House, 2011), 405.

  23. Minutes of the Board of Directors of Inca Union Mission, Commission to form a new mission, June 29, 1960, vote no. 60-30.

  24. Minutes of the Board of Directors of Inca Union Mission, Division request to form a new mission, October 27, 1960, vote no. 60-438.

  25. Minutes of the Annual Council of the South American Division, Montevideo-Uruguay, Approval of request for division to form a new mission, November 29 to December 5, 1960, vote no. 60-607; L.H. Olson, “The Annual Meeting of 1961,” South American Bulletin 38, no. 1 (January-March 1962): 2.

  26. Minutes of the Board of Directors of Inca Union Mission, Division request to form a new mission, October 27, 1960, vote no. 60-438.

  27. Minutes of the Board of Directors of Inca Union Mission, Division request to form a new mission, October 27, 1960, vote no. 60-438; Minutes of the Annual Council of the South American Division, Montevideo-Uruguay, Approval of request for division to form a new mission, November 29 to December 5, 1960, vote no. 60-607.

  28. Minutes of the Board of Directors of Inca Union Mission, Hayden, R. A Hayden - North Peru Mission President, December 14, 1960, vote no. 60-478; James J. Aitken, “New Mission Organized in Peru,” Review and Herald 138, no. 14 (April 6, 1961): 21.

  29. Minutes of the Board of Directors of Inca Union Mission, Miraflores, Silva, Pablo - North Peru Mission Treasurer, December 16, 1960, vote no. 60-507; L. H. Olson, “South American Division,” ARH, March 23, 1961, 25.

  30. Minutes of the Board of Directors of Inca Union Mission, Miraflores, Silva, Pablo - North Peru Mission Treasurer, December 16, 1960, vote no. 60-507.

  31. Manuel Jesús Vallejos Calderón, Por la senda de los pioneros [On the path of the pioneers] (Ñaña, Lima: South American Spanish Publishing House Editorial - Peru Branch, 2008), 82.

  32. Minutes of the Annual Council of the South American Division, Montevideo-Uruguay, Approval of request for division to form a new mission- Approve, November 29 to December 5, 1960, vote no. 60-607.

  33. “North Peru Mission,” Seventh-day Adventists Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1962), 170.

  34. Don R. Christman, “A Broken Idol Mends Hearts,” ARH, June 28, 1962, 10-11.

  35. Ibid.

  36. R. A. Hayden, “North Peru Mission First Biennial Session,” ARH, July 11, 1963, 14-15.

  37. Ibid.

  38. Don R. Christman, “North Peru Mission Opens New Office,” ARH, December 24, 1964, 19; R. A. Hayden, “New Mission Office in Chiclayo, Peru,” ARH, February 25, 1965, 17.

  39. H. J. Peverini, “South American Division,” ARH, October 21, 1971, 20.

  40. Assad Bechara, “South American,” ARH, October 10, 1985, 28.

  41. Minutes of the Board of Directors of Inca Union Mission, MPN - Division Project of the MPN territory, September 25, 1995, vote no. 95-225.

  42. Ibid.

  43. “Suplemento Impacto” [Impact Supplement], La Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 3, year 102, March 2002, 3.

  44. “Suplemento Impacto” [Impact Supplement], La Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 1, year 103, January 2003, 3.

  45. Ibid.

  46. “North Peru Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Hagerstown, MD: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 2005), 268.

  47. “Suplemento Impacto” [Impact Supplement], La Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 4, year 106, April 2006, 3.

  48. “North Peru Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Hagerstown, MD: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 2009), 278.

  49. “The grupos pequeños [small groups] (GP) are made up of several people who meet once a week to study the Bible. The SDA church takes this model from the experience of the early Christians. The meetings are conducted by a leader, who directs the Bible study, also supported by a range of materials edited by the SDA.” Portal de la Iglesia Adventista del Séptimo Día [Seventh-day Adventist Church website], “Ministerio Personal – Grupos Pequeños” [Personal Ministries – Small Groups], accessed on July 17, 2020, https://bit.ly/3jf0n7C.

  50. Misión Peruana del Norte [North Peru Mission], “Informe de la Misión Peruana del Norte 2012” [2012 North Peru Mission Report] (MPN informational video, April 26, 2012), accessed on April 16, 2020, https://bit.ly/2VDdMLI.

  51. Rompiendo el Silencio [Breaking the Silence] is an educational and prevention project against abuse and domestic violence, promoted annually by the Seventh-day Adventist church in eight South American countries (Argentina, Brazil, Bolivia, Ecuador, Paraguay, Peru and Uruguay), since 2002. The campaign is carried out throughout the year, however, one of the main activities takes place on the fourth Sabbath of August. This is a ‘Day of emphasis against abuse and violence,’ in which there are walks, forums, parents' school, education events against violence and also peaceful demonstrations in South America. Each year a topic is chosen to be addressed with the purpose of raising awareness in the community, denouncing abusers, and helping the victims. Portal de la Iglesia Adventista del Séptimo Día [Seventh-day Adventist Church website], “Ministerio de la mujer – Basta de Silencio” [Women's Ministry – No more Silence], accessed on July 17, 2020, https://bit.ly/2ZCx7Qw.

  52. Tito Goicochea, “Rompiendo el silencio impacta en Paita–Piura” [Breaking the silence impacts Paita-Piura], Noticias – Adventistas [Adventist News], September 3, 2013, accessed on June 16, 2020, https://bit.ly/3dbhu62.

  53. “The Holy week harvest evangelism is a very special time when the Adventists make their faith in Jesus known to other people through public sharing of the Word of God. The goal of this evangelism is to remember the sacrifice, death and resurrection of our Lord Jesus Christ for humanity. Portal de la Iglesia Adventista del Séptimo Día [Seventh-day Adventist Church website], “Videos Adventistas – Semana Santa 2020 – ¡Amor escrito con sangre!” [Adventist Videos – Holy Week 2020 – Love written in blood!], accessed on July 17, 2020, https://bit.ly/2Cl43Ej.

  54. Through the Impacto Esperanza [Hope Impact] project, Adventists in South America encourage reading and distribution of missionary books. In ten years, the Asociación Casa Editora Sudamericana [South American Spanish Publishing House] and Casa Publicadora Brasileña [Brazil Publishing House] have produced more than 170 million missionary books. Portal de la Iglesia Adventista del Séptimo Día [Seventh-day Adventist Church website], “Impacto Esperanza – 10 Años” [Hope Impact – 10 Years], accessed on July 16, 2020, https://bit.ly/2Bbs3JC.

  55. Jaime Vilcapoma, “Conferencia Magistral en Gobierno Regional de Lambayeque por Semana Santa” [Magisterial Conference in the Regional Government of Lambayeque by Holy Week], Noticias – Adventistas [Adventist News], March 31, 2015, accessed on June 16, 2020, https://bit.ly/3d9NNSO.

  56. “South American Division,” 2016 Annual Statistical Report (Silver Spring, MD: Seventh-day Adventists Church, 2016), 21.

  57. “South American Division,” 2017 Annual Statistical Report (Silver Spring, MD: Seventh-day Adventists Church, 2017), 21; “South American Division,” 2018 Annual Statistical Report (Silver Spring, MD: Seventh-day Adventists Church, 2018), 21.

  58. “Adventista de Sullana inauguran moderno colegio” [Adventists inaugurate modern school in Sullana], Digital Panorama, April 8, 2019, accessed on June 16, 2020, https://bit.ly/30O2isZ.

  59. Seventh-day Adventist Online Yearbook, “North Peru Mission,” accessed on April 15, 2020, https://bit.ly/3hedFAk; “North Peru Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1962), 170; “North Peru Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Nampa, ID: Pacific Press Publishing Association, 2019), 249. For a more detailed list of all North Peru Mission leaders, see the Yearbooks from 1962 to 2020.

  60. More information about the MPN can be found on the website: https://mpn.adventistas.org/, or on social networks – Facebook: @AdventistasMPN; Instagram: @adventistasmpn, Twitter: @adventistasmpn and YouTube: Misión Peruana del Norte.

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Paiva, Dálcio da Silva, Eduardo Bailón Azurín. "North Peru Mission." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. April 28, 2021. Accessed September 23, 2021. https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=HGLI.

Paiva, Dálcio da Silva, Eduardo Bailón Azurín. "North Peru Mission." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. April 28, 2021. Date of access September 23, 2021, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=HGLI.

Paiva, Dálcio da Silva, Eduardo Bailón Azurín (2021, April 28). North Peru Mission. Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. Retrieved September 23, 2021, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=HGLI.