Chekiang Mission and Related Missions (1917–1951)

By Milton Hook

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Milton Hook, Ed.D. (Andrews University, Berrien Springs, Michigan, the United States). Hook retired in 1997 as a minister in the Greater Sydney Conference, Australia. An Australian by birth Hook has served the Church as a teacher at the elementary, academy and college levels, a missionary in Papua New Guinea, and as a local church pastor. In retirement he is a conjoint senior lecturer at Avondale College of Higher Education. He has authored Flames Over Battle Creek, Avondale: Experiment on the Dora, Desmond Ford: Reformist Theologian, Gospel Revivalist, the Seventh-day Adventist Heritage Series, and many magazine articles. He is married to Noeleen and has two sons and three grandchildren.

First Published: April 20, 2023

Chekiang Mission 浙江区会 was not the official name of the mission units that were assigned to the province of Zhejiang (Chekiang). It is used here to represent the set of mission organizational entities that were formed throughout the history of the Seventh-day Adventist mission in the two provinces Jiangsu and Zhejiang. For the most part, northern Zhejiang was combined with southern Jiangsu as the Su-Che Mission, with headquarters in Hangzhou. For a short period it was called North Chekiang Mission. South Chekiang Mission always existed as a separate unit, with headquarters at Wenzhou.

Introduction

The provinces of Jiangsu 江苏 (formerly Kiangsu) and Zhejiang 浙江 (formerly Chekiang) had a complex history of organization. Prior to 1917 they were included with two other provinces under the title East China Mission.1

In 1917 the southern portion of Jiangsu and the entire province of Zhejiang were united under the title Su-Che Mission, an abbreviation of Kiangsu and Chekiang. This title appeared in the SDA Yearbook2 but in the periodical literature it was titled the Kiang-Che Mission, a variant abbreviation.3

In 1919 the southern portion of Zhejiang Province was constituted as the South Chekiang Mission.4 The northern portion of Zhejiang Province and the southern portion of Jiangsu Province were united under the title Kiangsu Mission. At the same time the abbreviations Su-Che and Kiang-Che were dropped.5

In 1930 the northern portion of Zhejiang Province was constituted as a separate entity under the title North Chekiang Mission,6 making three separate missions in the territory: Kiangsu Mission, North Chekiang Mission, and South Chekiang Mission.

In 1937 Kiangsu Mission and North Chekiang Mission were united again under the title Kiangsu Mission,7 and South Chekiang Mission continued as it was since 1919. This situation with both entities extended to 1951. They had always remained in the East China Union Mission fold.

Su-Che Mission and Kiangsu Mission

Prior to 1917 the southern portion of Jiangsu and the province of Zhejiang were pioneered by Seventh-day Adventist missionaries located in Shanghai at the headquarters of the East China Mission, men such as Kenneth Wood and Orrin Hall. The territory was constituted as the Su-Che Mission in 1917. Wood was the pastor of the Shanghai church8 and secretary/treasurer of the East China Mission. National missionaries were located at several out-stations, and Wood regularly visited the circuit to encourage the workers. Among those places were Kiang Yin (Jiangyin) in Jiangsu Province and Dzang Zoh (Hangzhou) in Zhejiang Province,9 both featuring later as centers where churches were established.

The earliest known outreach from Shanghai had been in 1914 when Deng Fu Ling, a canvasser, went to Nanxiang on the outskirts of the city. He found many people who were interested in his message, so a tent crusade was held there in 1915. Later, a church was opened there.10

In 1915 two national canvassers traveled inland from Shanghai to Jiangyin and sold Shi Djao Yeuh Bao (Signs of the Times). They reported much interest in the mission cause, and a national missionary, Liao Yuin Deh, was appointed in 1916 to develop the interest. A two-storey house was hired for the missionary, and the downstairs section was used as an evangelistic hall. Special meetings were held for the Chinese women. An elementary school was opened, and a Sabbath School with several branches was commenced. As a result, a church was established there in the spring of 1918.11

The 1919 report of the Su-Che Mission detailed a team of nine national evangelists, eight workers among the Chinese women, seven school teachers, and two canvassers. Stations that showed promising interest were at Hangzhou, Zhuji and Jiaxing, all in the northern portion of Zhejiang Province. The baptized membership of the mission at January 1, 1918, totaled 188. It increased to 415 by June 30, 1919. There were seven organized churches in the territory, nine out-stations and fourteen Sabbath Schools with a total membership of 573.12 At the close of 1923, numbers had risen to twelve organized churches, eleven companies, and 504 baptized members.13 Further statistical reports revealed continued strong growth throughout the 1920s: Eighteen churches and 845 members in 1925,14 twenty churches and 929 members in 1926,15 and twenty-seven churches and 1,113 members in 1928.16

Advances made by the mission were threatened by war. Wood, then superintendent of the east China Union Mission, wrote in March 1929, “In the Kiangsu Mission the evangelists have endeavored to carry on their work in the chapels, even during long months of anti-Christian and anti-foreign propaganda.17 Circumstances deteriorated. The Japanese occupation of Shanghai and surrounding towns in February 1932 destroyed lives and property.18 Many fled to safer quarters. The statistical report of December 1931 reflected the dangerous conditions, the number of churches reduced to thirteen and the membership down to 886.19 Some of this could be attributed to the division of territory with the formation of the North Chekiang Mission. However, a further reduction was reported in 1933 when the statistics revealed the existence of only eleven churches with 750 members.”20

Statistics from the mid-1930s demonstrated a revival was underway. The report for 1935 spoke of a paid working force of forty, membership figures recovering to nearly nine hundred, twenty-nine Sabbath Schools operating with twelve branches, and four elementary schools.21 The 1938 statistics were even better with the membership climbing to 1,172 in forty churches.22 In the last half of the decade, mission radio broadcasts from Shanghai were attracting a large audience.23 Nevertheless, the political situation was tenuous. The director of the mission, Raymond Hartwell, apparently had a premonition in 1937 that conditions may worsen, and he may have to leave the area. “His plan,” it was reported, “is to remain in the field until all stations have been visited.”24 Hartwell was on furlough in America when the major evacuation took place in 1941.25 The Kiangsu Mission was without a director for the duration of the hostilities.26 Membership had climbed to 1,711 in 1940 but dropped back to 1,664 in 1941.27

In the restoration period after the war, 1945 through 1951, the Kiangsu Mission was led by three different national men. The number of churches dropped from forty to thirty-five but the baptized membership rose to an all-time high of 2, 808.28 The mission, along with all other entities in the China Division, ceased reporting in 1951 because of the Communist takeover.29

North Chekiang Mission

For easier administration the northern portion of Zhejiang Province, formerly included in the Kiangsu Mission, was separated in 1930 to constitute the North Chekiang Mission. German missionary, Carl Schroeter, was elected as director, making his headquarters at Hangzhou by the Qiantang River, where a Seventh-day Adventist church was already established.30

His first report, covering the period to December 1930, spoke of twelve organized churches with a total membership of 435 individuals. The Sabbath School work was particularly strong, having twenty-two groups with a combined attendance of 4,526. He planned to further expand this aspect of the mission, in addition to conducting tent crusades, because he believed it to be a tried and tested method for success.31

Famine conditions prevailed in the region during 1934, prompting the China Division to allocate funds to assist any church members adversely affected. Schroeter was critical of his team and church members when he wrote in his 1934 report, “What has been accomplished is not a hundredth part of what might have been done had every evangelist, Bible-worker, colporteur, and lay member surrendered all selfish ambition and consecrated himself unreservedly to the winning of souls for Christ. There will be a much larger harvest when we are filled with the Holy Spirit….”32 Implying his fellow believers were selfish, unconsecrated, and bereft of the Holy Spirit was a cutting rebuke that broke all the rules for winning friends and inspiring cooperation. Eighteen months later Schroeter took a furlough back in Germany,33 and by the time he returned, the mission was dissolved. A national evangelist had replaced him for the duration of the furlough. The final statistics published before the territory was again joined to the Kiangsu Mission, 1937, revealed twenty-four churches were functioning, and there were 809 baptized members within the fellowship.34

South Chekiang Mission

Colporteurs entered Chekiang Province in 1916. In 1917 Orrin Hall, Kenneth Wood, and John Fulton formed a group to visit Wenzhou, a main center in the territory. To their surprise, they found three small congregations that had organized themselves and were meeting regularly on Saturdays.35 Elder T. S. Wu was transferred from his teaching position at the China Mission Training School and placed at Wenzhou to nurture their faith.36 During the years 1917 through 1919, further resources were directed into the region. For example, Arthur Allum conducted evangelistic meetings in Wenzhou in 1918.37 In the same year Bothilde Miller and two national Bible workers offered a Bible Institute for Chinese women at Wenzhou. She lamented that the custom of feet-binding was prevalent in the region. Furthermore, she observed that male converts exhibited little concern for their wives and families to become Christians. Ten women were baptized as a result of her extended crusade.38 She held a second series of meetings when George Wilkinson arrived at Wenzhou in the fall of 1918 to direct mission efforts after he had studied the local language.39

The South Chekiang Mission was formed in mid-1919 as a separate entity to the Kiangsu Mission chiefly on the basis of the prevalent local language, the Wenzhou dialect of the Wu language common to the coastal cities of Wenzhou and Ruian and the surrounding hinterland. Ninety-nine names were transferred from the Kiang-Che Mission roll to be the seed membership for the South Chekiang Mission. These people were located among four churches and twenty out-stations under the leadership of Wilkinson.40 His headquarters were situated at Wenzhou.41

An elementary church school with twenty-five students was established at Wenzhou in 1919.42 Wilkinson’s first annual report, November 1920, noted that his full mission staff was composed of three school teachers, two canvassers, four lady Bible workers, and nine national evangelists.43 Benjamin Gregory was enlisted as the educational secretary to develop the Wenzhou school and establish more schools at some of the out-stations. At Wenzhou school he initiated the manufacture of cloth, lace, socks, and other machine-knitted goods so that students could earn their tuition fees.44

A decade after mission work began in the territory, Wilkinson reported a total baptized membership of 425 among 14 organized churches and forty out-stations. One-third of the members were farmers. Others were barbers, tailors, shoemakers, carpenters, blacksmiths, teachers, and weavers of bamboo baskets.45 At the Wenzhou school, named the South Chekiang Middle School, nine grades were taught by six teachers. All instruction for the sixty-six students was in the vernacular.46 In February 1930 both the school and the main church moved from rented quarters into their own dedicated building.47 Later the school was renamed the South Chekiang Training Institute. In 1936 there were 100 students enrolled, half their numbers being in the intermediate level.48

Civil unrest during the late 1920s throughout other sections of China did not affect the South Chekiang Mission. Their buildings were not looted, their chapels were not occupied by soldiers, and all evangelistic and educational work proceeded without interruption.49 The role of the Sabbath School was vital to the progress of the mission cause. By 1931 there were over two thousand Sabbath School members scattered among 83 communities,50 some in isolated mountain nests51 and others in crowded villages where they would blossom into organized churches.52 Laity often volunteered to assist the evangelists to conduct the Sabbath Schools.53

Steady growth was a feature of the South Chekiang Mission during the 1930s. A report in 1938 recorded a baptized membership of 1,334. The senior school at Wenzhou had an enrollment of over one hundred forty, and a number of elementary schools at some out-stations increased the total to 466 students receiving the benefits of an education.54 There were 41 organized churches, and national men were beginning to take leadership roles in various mission departments and serve on the mission executive committee.55

War Brings Disruptions

In the late 1930s when the Japanese forces invaded North China, the consequences for the South Chekiang Mission were minimal. Few adverse incidents were reported, one being the Japanese bombing of a town where an evangelistic crusade was being planned and had to be abandoned.56 The Second World War years ushered in more serious times. It was perilous to transport mission supplies across battle zones. In September 1940 Seventh-day Adventist officials gained permission to run the gauntlet by fishing smack from Shanghai and pierce the blockade of the Chekiang coast at Wenzhou and thence by truck convoy up into the hinterland as far as Chongqing in the Sichuan Province. Their cargo was a large quantity of their own denominational literature, Presbyterian groceries, Roman Catholic medicines, X-ray equipment for a Methodist hospital, and Bibles for the American Bible Society. The epic trip was successful.57 However, it wasn’t long before circumstances deteriorated and expatriate missionaries left mission matters in the capable hands of national leadership, being forced to hastily leave China in 1941. Last report was that there were 25 chapels owned by the Seventh-day Adventist mission in South Chekiang.58

Ralph Dinsbeer, director of the South Chekiang Mission at the time of the evacuation, sailed with his wife and children to the safety of the Philippine Islands. The war zone followed them, and they were imprisoned at Bagiou in the north of the country.59 Fortunately, their living conditions were tolerable. Freedom arrived in February 1945 after American troops reclaimed the territory.60

In 1947 Dinsbeer returned to his former role.61 His report at the December 1947 annual meeting indicated the war years had brought reversals in most respects. Membership had dropped to 1,122, but the number of churches had risen to 34 with an additional 27 companies. The number of Sabbath Schools had fallen to 61, and the average weekly attendance totalled 2,000. Enrollment at the school in Wenzhou had dipped to 100 students. One advance was the introduction of two Missionary Volunteer Societies.62

Political stability was brief. Communist armies gradually took control and, once again, mission administration was passed to national leadership. Dinsbeer and family flew out of Shanghai on December 21, 1948.63 The final annual general meeting of the South Chekiang Mission was a gathering in Wenzhou of 250 delegates, May 12-20, 1950.64 By that time the China Division headquarters had transferred out of China to Hong Kong.65

All provincial missions in China, including Kiangsu Mission and South Chekiang Mission, ceased to have any official status by 1951 because of the Communist takeover.66

Directors

Su-Che/Kiangsu Mission: Kenneth Wood 吳德 1917--1929; Shen Xu Cheng 沈緒成 1930 to1931; Kenneth Wood 1931 to1932; Otto Kuhn 柯得恩 1932-1937; Raymond Hartwell 韓德威 1937-1941; Goh Djao Oh 葛肇諤 1945-1947; Wu Ming Seng 吳民生 1947-1949; Du Shu Ren 杜樹人 1949-1951.

North Ckekiang Mission: Carl Schroeter 施愛德 1930-1936; Shen Xu Chen 沈緒成 1936 to 1937.

South Chekiang Mission: George Wilkinson 韋更生 1919-1932; Benjamin Gregory 耿光廉 1932-1936; Alfred Fossey 方適 1936-1940; Ralph Dinsbeer 狄思白 1940--1942; Chen You Shi 陳友石 1942-1947; Ralph Dinsbeer 1947 to 1948; Chen You Shi 1949 to1950; Ernest Tsi acting 1950 to 1951.

Sources

“A New Chapel in the Kiangsu Province.” China Division Reporter, September/October 1932.

“At a recent committee meeting…” Asiatic Division Outlook, July 15, 1919.

“Attention has been called anew…” Asiatic Division Outlook, December 15, 1918.

Bradley, William P. “Recent Missionary Departures.” ARH, March 13, 1947.

Branson, William H. “Change in Division Headquarters.” China Division Reporter, January 1950.

“Brother and Sister George L. Wilkinson…” Asiatic Division Outlook, November 15, 1918.

“Carl Schroeter and his wife…” China Division Reporter, July 1936.

Cormack, Alexander W. “Our Missionaries in the Philippines.” ARH, April 16, 1942.

Cormack, Alexander W. “Report on Our Missionaries in the Philippines.” ARH, March 29, 1945.

Crisler, Minnie H. “Baptism at Shanghai.” Asiatic Division Outlook, August 15, 1917.

Dinsbeer, Ralph. “Let Us Build.” China Division Reporter, September 1941.

“Educational Institutions of the Far East-1928.” Asiatic Division Outlook, April 1929.

“Evacuation News.” China Division Reporter, January 1949.

“Evangelism in the South Chekiang Mission,” China Division Reporter, November 15, 1939.

Fossey, Alfred. “Lay Help in the South Chekiang Mission.” China Division Reporter, November 1936.

Fossey, Alfred. “South Chekiang Mission.” China Division Reporter, April 1938.

Fossey, Alfred. “South Chekiang Training Institute.” China Division Reporter, December 1936.

Fulton, John E. “Tidings of a New Interest.” Asiatic Division Outlook, July 15, 1917.

Gregory, Benjamin F. “Report of the Educational Department of the Chekiang Mission.” Asiatic Division Outlook, April 15, 1923.

Gregory, Benjamin F. “Sabbath Schools Pioneering the Way in South Chekiang.” China Division Reporter, December 1933.

Gregory, Benjamin F. “The South Chekiang Mission-Annual Meeting.” China Division Reporter, May 1934.

Hall, Orrin A. “Report of the Kiang-Che Mission.” Asiatic Division Outlook, September 15, 1919.

Hartwell, Raymond H. “Kiangsu Mission News Report.” China Division Reporter, October 1, 1939.

Kuhn, Otto B. “The Kiangsu Mission Annual Report-1933.” China Division Reporter, March 1934.

Kuhn, Otto B. “The Kiangsu Mission Annual Report for 1935.” China Division Reporter, March 1936.

Liao Yuin Deh. “The Kiangyin Church, Kiang-Che.” Asiatic Division Outlook, November 15, 1918.

Liu Shiao Tien. “Sabbath-School Report-South Chekiang Mission.” China Division Reporter, July-August 1932.

Longway, Ezra L. “Westward Ho in Troubled China.” ARH, May 1, 1941.

Maloney, Vance J. “Treasurer’s Report for the East China Union, Ending June 1941.” China Division Reporter, September 1941.

Miller, Bothilde. “Among the Women of Chekiang Province.” Asiatic Division Outlook, May 1, 1918.

“News Notes.” China Division Reporter, Third Quarter 1950.

“Pastor F.A. Allum returned…” Asiatic Division Outlook, April 1, 1918.

Quimby, Paul E. “Wenchow Annual Meeting and Institute.” China Division Reporter, February 1948.

Schroeter, Carl. “North Chekiang Mission Director’s Report 1934.” China Division Reporter, April 1935.

Schroeter, Carl. “The North Chekiang Mission.” China Division Reporter, April/May 1931.

Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook. Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1915-1952.

“Statistical Report.” China Division Reporter, June 1932, July 15, 1939.

“Statistical Report.” Far Eastern Division Outlook, January 1926, May 1927, January 1929.

Strickland, Walter E. “Encouraging Report from the East China Union.” China Division Reporter, December 1938.

“The Fighting in Shanghai.” China Division Reporter, February/March 1932.

Wilkinson, George L. “Annual Report-South Chekiang.” Asiatic Division Outlook, October 1928.

Wilkinson, George L. “Report from the South Chekiang Mission.” Asiatic Division Outlook, January 15, 1921.

Wilkinson, George L. “South Chekiang Mission.” Far Eastern Division Outlook, June 1929.

Wilkinson, George L. “South Chekiang Mission.” China Division Reporter, April/May 1931.

Wilkinson, George L. “The South Chekiang Mission.” Asiatic Division Outlook, October 1, 1919.

Wood, Kenneth H. “East China Union: 1927-28.” Far Eastern Division Outlook, June 1929.

Wood, Kenneth H. “Kiangsu Province, China.” Asiatic Division Outlook, August 1, 1917.

Wood, Kenneth H. “Ten Years of Progress in the Kiang-Che Mission.” Asiatic Division Outlook, July 1, 1923.

Wood, Kenneth H. “Wenchow, Chekiang Province, China.” Asiatic Division Outlook, June 1, 1918.

Wood, Kenneth H. “Work and Workers of the Kiangsu Mission.” Far Eastern Division Outlook, July 1, 1924.

Notes

  1. “East China Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1916), 147.

  2. “Su-Che Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1920), 161.

  3. “Attention has been called anew…” Asiatic Division Outlook, December 15, 1918, 15.

  4. “At a recent committee meeting…” Asiatic Division Outlook, July 15, 1919, 8.

  5. “Kiangsu Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1921), 108.

  6. “North Chekiang Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1931), 168-169.

  7. “Kiangsu Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1938), 106.

  8. Minnie H. Crisler, “Baptism at Shanghai,” Asiatic Division Outlook, August 15, 1917, 8.

  9. Kenneth H. Wood, “Kiangsu Province, China,” Asiatic Division Outlook, August 1, 1917, 2-3.

  10. “A New Chapel in the Kiangsu Province,” China Division Reporter, September/October 1932, 8.

  11. Liao Yuin Deh, “The Kiangyin Church, Kiang-Che,” Asiatic Division Outlook, November 15, 1918, 4-5.

  12. Orrin A. Hall, “Report of the Kiang-Che Mission,” Asiatic Division Outlook, September 15, 1919, 4-5.

  13. Kenneth H. Wood, “Work and Workers of the Kiangsu Mission,” Far Eastern Division Outlook, July 1, 1924, 9.

  14. “Statistical Report,” Far Eastern Division Outlook, January 1926, 7.

  15. “Statistical Report,” Far Eastern Division Outlook, May 1927, 8.

  16. “Statistical Report,” Far Eastern Division Outlook, January 1929, 9.

  17. Kenneth H. Wood, “East China Union:1927-28,” Far Eastern Division Outlook, June 1929, 6.

  18. “The Fighting in Shanghai," China Division Reporter, February/March 1932, 12.

  19. “Statistical Report,” China Division Reporter, June 1932, 7.

  20. Otto B. Kuhn, “The Kiangsu Mission Annual Report-1933,” China Division Reporter, March 1934, 11-12.

  21. Otto B. Kuhn, “The Kiangsu Mission Annual Report for 1935,” China Division Reporter, March 1936, 4.

  22. “Statistical Report,” China Division Reporter, July 15, 1939, 10.

  23. Raymond H. Hartwell, “Kiangsu Mission News Report,” China Division Reporter, October 1, 1939, 8.

  24. Walter E. Strickland, “Encouraging Report from the East China Union,” China Division Reporter, December 1938, 4.

  25. “Kiangsu Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1941), 108.

  26. E.g., “Kiangsu Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1943), 89.

  27. Vance J. Maloney, “Treasurer’s Report for the East China Union, Ending June 1941,” China Division Reporter, September 1941, 6.

  28. “Kiangsu Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1951), 104.

  29. “China Division,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1952), 104.

  30. “North Chekiang Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1931), 168.

  31. Carl Schroeter, “The North Chekiang Mission,” China Division Reporter, April/May 1931, 2.

  32. Carl Schroeter, “North Chekiang Mission Director’s Report 1934,” China Division Reporter, April 1935, 6-7.

  33. “Carl Schroeter and his wife…” China Division Reporter, July 1936, 2.

  34. North Chekiang Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1937), 105-106.

  35. John E. Fulton, “Tidings of a New Interest,” Asiatic Division Outlook, July 15, 1917, 2.

  36. Kenneth H. Wood, “Wenchow, Chekiang Province, China,” Asiatic Division Outlook, June 1, 1918, 7.

  37. “Pastor F.A. Allum returned…” Asiatic Division Outlook, April 1, 19018, 6.

  38. Bothilde Miller, “Among the Women of Chekiang Province,” Asiatic Division Outlook, May 1, 1918, 5-6.

  39. “Brother and Sister George L. Wilkinson…” Asiatic Division Outlook, November 15, 1918, 11.

  40. Kenneth H. Wood, “Ten Years of Progress in the Kiang-Che Mission,” Asiatic Division Outlook, July 1, 1923, 2.

  41. “South Chekiang Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1921), 108.

  42. George L. Wilkinson, “The South Chekiang Mission,” Asiatic Division Outlook, October 1, 1919, 4.

  43. George L. Wilkinson, “Report from the South Chekiang Mission,” Asiatic Division Outlook, January 15, 1921, 4.

  44. Benjamin F. Gregory, “Report of the Educational Department of the South Chekiang Mission,” Asiatic Division Outlook, April 15, 1923, 5-6.

  45. George L. Wilkinson, “Annual Report-South Chekiang,” Asiatic Division Outlook, October 1928, 10.

  46. “Educational Institutions of the Far East-1928,” Asiatic Division Outlook, April 1929, 17.

  47. George L. Wilkinson, “South Chekiang Mission,” China Division Reporter, April-May 1931, 3.

  48. Alfred Fossey, “South Chekiang Training Institute,” China Division Reporter, December 1936, 5.

  49. George L. Wilkinson, “South Chekiang Mission,” Far Eastern Division Outlook, June 1929, 7.

  50. Shiao Tien Liu, “Sabbath School Report-South Chekiang Mission,” China Division Reporter, July-August 1932, 9.

  51. Benjamin F. Gregory, “Sabbath Schools Pioneering in South Chekiang,” China Division Reporter, December 1933, 3.

  52. Benjamin F. Gregory, “The South Chekiang Mission-Annual Meeting,” China Division Reporter, May 1934, 12-14.

  53. Alfred Fossey, “Lay Help in the South Chekiang Mission,” China Division Reporter, November 1936, 4.

  54. Alfred Fossey, “South Chekiang Mission,” China Division Reporter, April 1938, 8.

  55. “South Chekiang Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1939), 108-109.

  56. “Evangelism in the South Chekiang Mission,” China Division Reporter, November 15, 1939, 4.

  57. Ezra L. Longway, “Westward Ho in Troubled China,” ARH, May 1, 1941, 11-13.

  58. Ralph Dinsbeer, “Let Us Build,” China Division Reporter, September 1941, 3.

  59. Alexander W. Cormack, “Our Missionaries in the Philippines,” ARH, April 16, 1942.

  60. Alexander W. Cormack, “Report on Our Missionaries in the Philippines,” ARH, March 29, 1945, 14-15.

  61. William P. Bradley, “Recent Missionary Departures,” ARH, March 13, 1947, 24.

  62. Paul E. Quimby, “Wenchow Annual Meeting and Institute,” China Division Reporter, February 1948, 5.

  63. “Evacuation News,” China Division Reporter, January 1949, 8.

  64. “News Notes,” China Division Reporter, Third Quarter 1950, 8.

  65. William H. Branson, “Change in Division Headquarters,” China Division Reporter, January 1950, 1.

  66. “China Division,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1952), 104.

×

Hook, Milton. "Chekiang Mission and Related Missions (1917–1951)." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. April 20, 2023. Accessed April 23, 2024. https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=IHPH.

Hook, Milton. "Chekiang Mission and Related Missions (1917–1951)." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. April 20, 2023. Date of access April 23, 2024, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=IHPH.

Hook, Milton (2023, April 20). Chekiang Mission and Related Missions (1917–1951). Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. Retrieved April 23, 2024, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=IHPH.