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​Russia is a country in Eastern Europe and Northern Asia, which for most of the twentieth century was part of the communist Soviet Union. Today, aside from other Christians, the Seventh-day Adventist Church has a small representation in the country.

The First World War was a serious trial both for all Russian people and for the Seventh-day Adventist Church in Russia. The war greatly complicated interchurch relationships because at that time most of the leaders and members of the church were German, and the Russian people identified them with Germany. Due to the collapse of the transportation system, supervision of the congregations scattered all over the vast territory of the Russian Empire became difficult. Still, World War I with its trials and troubles increased the people’s religious feelings, pushing many of them to seek protection and refuge in God. Statistics show that, during the war, church membership numbers did not diminish.

​The article uses extant sources to examine the almost undocumented travails of the SDA Church in the Soviet Union during the World War II (1939-1945).

Vladimir Stepanovich Zaitsev was a veteran pastor of the Seventh-day Adventist Church in the Soviet Era from 1953 to the 1980s.

​Zaoksky Adventist University is a religious educational institution of higher learning, established by the Euro-Asia Division of the Seventh-day Adventist Church in 1988.