Browse Articles

Show

sorted by: Title or Division

in

Only show articles:

Where category is

Where title begins with

Where location is in

Where title text includes

Where translation is available in

View list of unfinished articles

Show advanced options +


Showing 21 – 23 of 23

Not very much has been recorded about the earliest beginnings of the Adventist work in Syria. It is reported that in 1893 four people became Seventh-day Adventists in Aleppo during a visit there by Zadour G. Baharian, the pioneer Adventist worker in Turkey. However, it was decades later when regular work was established in the present boundaries of Syria.

Seventh-day Adventist work began in Turkey when a Greek shoemaker, Theodore Anthony, returned from America in February 1889 as a self-supporting missionary. Having immigrated only two years earlier at the age of 49, he accepted the Adventist message during evangelistic meetings near his home. Selling his business and all his belongings, Anthony’s only ambition was to share his newfound faith among friends and family in his native country.

In early Adventist literature, Adventist pioneers made reference to Joseph Wolff’s visit to Yemen as evidence of the worldwide nature of second advent expectations in the early 19th century. Wolff, the “missionary to the world,” traveled to Yemen around 1836 on his way to Bokhara: