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As the founding teacher of the denomination’s first official sponsored school, Goodloe Harper Bell is considered by some historians as the “founder” of the educational work of the Seventh-day Adventist Church.

​Sidney Brownsberger was an Adventist educator and administrator. He played a significant role during the early development of Battle Creek College (Andrews University) and Healdsburg College (Pacific Union College). He was considered a “pioneer” in the development of Adventist education.

​Mary F. Maxson Fish, an early Adventist believer from Adams Center, New York, was closely associated with church leaders such as James and Ellen White and J. N. Andrews during the 1860s and wrote regularly for church periodicals.

Harbor Springs Convention (July 15 – August 17, 1891) is noted by Adventist historians as a decisive “turning point” in the development of Adventist education because during that meeting the Church embarked on creating a distinctive philosophy of Adventist education. This “educational convention” held in Harbor Springs, Michigan was the first meeting of its kind held by the Church.