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Showing 1 – 13 of 13

As the founding teacher of the denomination’s first official sponsored school, Goodloe Harper Bell is considered by some historians as the “founder” of the educational work of the Seventh-day Adventist Church.

​Sidney Brownsberger was an Adventist educator and administrator. He played a significant role during the early development of Battle Creek College (Andrews University) and Healdsburg College (Pacific Union College). He was considered a “pioneer” in the development of Adventist education.

​Addison S. Carmichael was a pioneer Adventist medical missionary to Africa.

Stenographer, private secretary, editor, bibliophile, researcher, author, and trusted literary assistant to Ellen G. White, Clarence Crisler was also a missionary, missiologist, and administrator.

​Mary F. Maxson Fish, an early Adventist believer from Adams Center, New York, was closely associated with church leaders such as James and Ellen White and J. N. Andrews during the 1860s and wrote regularly for church periodicals.

Harbor Springs Convention (July 15 – August 17, 1891) is noted by Adventist historians as a decisive “turning point” in the development of Adventist education because during that meeting the Church embarked on creating a distinctive philosophy of Adventist education. This “educational convention” held in Harbor Springs, Michigan was the first meeting of its kind held by the Church.

​Abram La Rue was a mariner, gold prospector, and tireless colporteur and ship missionary who traveled the world and pioneered the Adventist work into Asia.

​Arthur Reinke was a pioneer of colporteur ministry in Mexico.

​Otto E. Reinke gave leadership to Adventist mission work in the United States, Switzerland, Germany, and Russia. During World War I and the Russian Revolution of 1917, he persisted in leading the church forward in the face of severe hardship, violent upheaval, and repression, until exhaustion and illness led to his death at age 46.

​Margaret Rowen claimed to have the prophetic gift soon after the death of Ellen G. White (1827-1915) and led a breakaway group that took the name “Reformed Seventh-day Adventists.” She was discredited by failed predictions, exposure of fraudulent claims, and imprisonment for an attempted murder of a former follower, and her movement virtually disappeared after about a decade.

​Kenneth H. Wood, Jr., served as editor of the denomination’s flagship periodical, Adventist Review (1966-1982), and chair of the Ellen G. White Board of Trustees (1980-2008). His influence in these positions of high responsibility served as a conservative counterweight to forces that he regarded as detrimental to the church’s historic beliefs and mission.