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Showing 81 – 100 of 472

​The Chone District Mission卓尼区会was a short-term sub-entity of the Northwest China Union Mission. Its territory spanned the southeast portion of Qinghai province and the southwest portion of Gansu province.

​Han Chongzhen (韓崇真), also known as Han Tsung Dien, became a Christian in his thirties and served as a gospel evangelist with the China Inland Mission and the Seventh-day Adventist Mission for a total of thirty-six years.

Christchurch Adventist School is located at 15 Grants Road, Papanui, Christchurch, New Zealand. It offers classes at elementary and secondary levels. It is administered by the South New Zealand Conference, a conference of the New Zealand Pacific Union Conference.

Christchurch Sanitarium was a medical facility for hydrotherapy treatments in Christchurch, New Zealand, from 1900 to 1921.

Jerald Christensen served approximately forty years as a missionary in China, a tenure marked by seemingly endless war conditions for the first decade but then emerging safely to minister for years in the relative peace of Taiwan.

Modeled somewhat on the Loma Linda Center for Christian Bioethics, the Christian Centre for Bioethics established on the campus of Sydney Adventist Hospital, Australia, has provided a forum for research, discussion, and practical resolution of ethical issues in the practice of medicine since 1986.

​John W. Christian, pastor and administrator, was president of the South Dakota, Nebraska, and Chicago conferences and of the Southwestern Union and Pacific Union conferences.

Eva May Clements was an Australian missionary to India.

Dr. Day and Edyth Coffin (高清瑞) served as missionaries in southern China for twenty-two years, including many years in war conditions. Day served as a medical doctor, and Edyth served as treasurer bookkeeper, and matron. They developed a medical institution at Nanning, Guangxi Province, leaving it functioning as a well-respected sixty-bed hospital, and then transferred to care for the Canton Sanitarium and Hospital in Guangdong Province.

​Willard Allan Colcord was an editor and religious liberty advocate.

​John Martin Cole was an early missionary to the South Pacific, a conference president in Australia, New Zealand, and the West Indies, and a minister in the United States, mainly in the Northwest.

Trevor Collett was a self-supporting missionary working a timber plantation on the islands of Mussau and Emirau in New Guinea before World War II. His wife Olga and their daughter Anthea escaped to Australia but he lost his life in the Japanese invasion.

​Milton Conger served as a missionary teacher in China and a pastor, conference president, and college lecturer within the Columbia Union Conference.

​Brenton and Lillian Connerly were pioneer missionaries in Puerto Rico, the American Canal Zone and Colombia.

Rudolf Constandt was an Australian educator and church administrator.

The Cook Islands, formerly known as the Hervey Group, are located in the South Pacific Ocean to the northeast and southeast of American Samoa. Seventh-day Adventist missionaries first arrived in the Cook Islands in 1891 aboard the Pitcairn, calling at Mangaia, Rarotonga, and Aitutaki.

​John Orr Corliss was a pioneering evangelist in the United States and in Australia.

​Alexander William Cormack was born on October 12, 1887, in Willoughby, suburban Sydney, New South Wales. His parents were Alexander and Frances (McMahon) Cormack who had four children: Mary Augusta (b.1877), Alexander William (b.1887), Frances Elizabeth (b.1890) and Benjamin (b.1892).

​Elmer and Leatha Coulston were medical missionaries in northern China in the early 1930s. Their united pioneering efforts were cut short when Elmer died of diphtheria in 1934.

A pastor and New Testament professor, James J. C. Cox served Adventist academic institutions in Australia and the United States both as a scholar and an administrator.