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Showing 1 – 20 of 27

Carl D. Anderson was a distinguished scholar and advocate of Seventh-day Adventist education who served as the head of the History Department at Oakwood College from 1969 to 1975.

Warren St. Clair Banfield was a prominent black Seventh-day Adventist minister, church administrator, and civil rights activist.

For approximately 37 years John Joseph Beale served the Seventh-day Adventist Church as an educator, scholar, missionary, and pastor.

A staunch advocate of Seventh-day Adventist education, James Irving Beardsley, the first president of Oakwood Junior College, served the denomination for more than thirty years as a teacher, principal, college president, and conference administrator.

Bernard Wilfred Benn dedicated more than fifty years of his life to Christian education as a teacher, principal, professor, department chair, and college president.

For more than fifty years Natelkka Izetta Edith Burrell served in the Seventh-day Adventist educational system as a teacher, principal, department chair, professor, and residential dean.

For more than forty years Robert Harris Carter served the Seventh-day Adventist Church as a colporteur, pastor, evangelist, missionary, and administrator.

Eugenia Isabella Cartwright Cunningham was a strong supporter of Seventh-day Adventist education who served Oakwood for 51 years as a beloved staff person and administrator.

Minneola Lanora Dabney-Dixon served Oakwood University for approximately 40 years in various capacities, including secretary/administrative assistant, director of student employment, director of alumni affairs, and director of the museum and archives.

Poet, author, and Oakwood College graduate, James Elmore Dykes served the Seventh-day Adventist Church for approximately forty years as a pastor, evangelist, editor-in-chief, general manager, and educator.

Lillie Henrietta Emanuel was an Oakwood College alumna and distinguished language arts professor, who worked in the Seventh-day Adventist educational system for 49 years.

For more than fifty years Roy Enford Malcolm worked in the educational ministry of the Seventh-day Adventist Church as a schoolteacher, principal, professor, registrar, admissions director, public relations officer, director of research development, assistant vice president, and college vice president.

James Lewis Moran was a pioneer of black Seventh-day Adventist education who served as the founding principal of Harlem and Pine Forge academies, as well as the first African American president of Oakwood Junior College.

Richard Steven Norman, Jr., was a supporter of Seventh-day Adventist education who served Oakwood College (now a university) for approximately 27 years as an accountant/comptroller and a faculty member of the Business Department.

In the fall of 1895 the General Conference of Seventh-day Adventists commissioned a three-man site location committee to travel south to purchase property for a school to educate African American youth.

Lula Edna Padgett-Roache established an accredited nursing program at Oakwood College (now a university) that continues to produce certified health-care professionals.

For more than thirty years Addison V. Pinkney served the Seventh-day Adventist Church as an educator, pastor, radio program director, and administrator. He was the sixth president of Oakwood College (now a university).