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In the early 1900s, because educational opportunities were rare, correspondence education was increasing in popularity within the United States. Adventist educators at Walla Walla College and Keene Academy had attempted to develop correspondence schools. Goodloe Harper Bell, the first teacher of the first Adventist school, who is also considered to be the founder of Adventist education, hoped to develop such an organization. Eventually, Bell collaborated with educator Frederick Griggs, secretary of education for the General Conference, who envisioned educating people around the world. As a result, The Fireside Correspondence School was established in 1909. The goal was to provide the benefits of an education to those unable to attend traditional schools.