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​One of the most effective methods of conveying Seventh-day Adventist teachings in the early decades of the Seventh-day Adventist Church’s growth in the Caribbean was the pioneering of early Adventist songs and hymns. Music has always been an effective vehicle to transmit ideas and ideologies. Early colporteurs and ministers both taught their first contacts and interested people the early Adventist music that they had learned from their mentors. The early Adventists who viewed themselves as “a singing people” had memorized numerous songs about their beliefs, which they shared with new converts.

​One of the industries established during the early years of Caribbean Training College (now University of the Southern Caribbean) was the printing industry. Professor R. S. J. Hamilton started the operation in 1930 in what was called the Print Shop (the Press), which was located in a section of the women’s dormitory.

Roderick Sydney James Hamilton was the third president and longest serving president of the East Caribbean Training School (now University of the Southern Caribbean) located in the British Caribbean colony of Trinidad and Tobago.