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The first immigrants reached by the young Advent movement in North America were French, German, and Norwegian-speaking persons in the mid-west and Canada in 1857. More recently, in June 2009 the North American Division of Seventh-day Adventists created Adventist Refugee and Immigrant Ministries (ARIM) that specifically focuses on coordinating and directing the work of more than eighteen language-specific refugee and immigrant groups in North America. Beyond the organized institutions of the Seventh-day Adventist church, two independent ministries have taken active roles in refugee ministry: Adventist Frontier Missions and ASAP Ministries (Advocates for Southeast Asians and the Persecuted).

The importance and urgency of ministering to refugees are set before Seventh-day Adventists in the Bible and in the writings of EGW. No matter the country or place on the refugee highway, wherever a refugee or foreigner is located, there is a responsibility to minister to the needs of the individual and to share the gospel. Ministry to persons along the refugee highway is one place Seventh-day Adventists have in the past and today can continue to make a difference.