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Showing 1981 – 2000 of 2398

​Read Smith was born in 1875 in Woolwich, London. Available records name only his thirty-five-year-old father, W. J. Smith, who eventually settled in America. Smith’s father was a devout Christian who did not believe in physical punishment for a child. Instead, when Smith did wrong he was taught by his father to pray to God for forgiveness. In his early teenage years, Smith aspired to be a medical missionary and obtained work with a doctor to familiarize himself with the profession. Later, he spent some time in Canada before returning to England and sailing for Australia. He was engaged in a commercial business in Western Australia when he and his Australian wife, Lucy, became Seventh-day Adventists.

​Samuel Parker Smith, known as Parker or S. Parker, was a missionary to the Island of San Luis, Colombia and Panama.

​Thelma Smith was an american missionary in The United States, China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan from 1927 until 1984. Smith’s husband Herbert was murdered by bandits in China weeks after arriving at their first mission posting as young newlyweds and young parents. Mrs. Smith remained in Asia as a missionary for most of the next forty-seven years.

​William James Smith was born in Hanworth, Middlesex, England, on May 4, 1867, and christened there on June 9. He migrated to New Zealand and married Eliza Wall in 1888. She also was from England, born in Lewes, Sussex, on July 2, 1857. They became Seventh-day Adventists under the ministry of Eugene Farnsworth in 1896. William, at the time, was a schoolteacher with the New Zealand Education Department. As new church members they attended a small Sabbath School company with Sidney Amyes on the Irwell farmlands, near Christchurch, and became close friends. When the central Christchurch meetinghouse was organized in Barbados Street, both men were among its leading officers.

William R. Smith and his wife, Addie, were the first Korean Adventist missionary couple to be sent to Korea from the General Assembly, and were faithful leaders of the Korean Church with Williams serving as a pastor, educator, and administrator while serving as missionaries for 20 years.

​Joseph Grady Smoot was president of Andrews University and also served on the faculty of Columbia Union College (now Washington Adventist University) and Pittsburg (Kansas) State University.

​Benjamin Franklin Snook was a Seventh-day Adventist minister and administrator from 1860 to 1865, and afterward joined an offshoot group.

​Charles M. Snow was an author and editor of leading denominational periodicals in the United States and Australasia during the early decades of the twentieth century.

​Samuel S. Snow was a Millerite minister whose exposition of biblical prophecy, known as the “seventh-month message,” gave rise in the summer of 1844 to widespread expectation that Christ would return to earth on October 22, 1844.

​Elwin Snyder was a missionary in Argentina, Brazil, Uruguay, Paraguay, and Cuba with his wife, Jane Ketring, and was one of the first canvassers sent from the United States to South America.

Heung-Cho Sohn was the first Korean Adventist to be baptized in Japan along with Eung-Hyun Lee, who laid the foundation for the Korean Adventist Church.

​Gabriel Ajadi Oladimeji Solademi was a pastor, evangelist, mentor, and church administrator from Nigeria.

​Haroldo Moreira Soldani was a pastor, canvasser and missionary from Brazil.

​Francis Soper was a noted editor, especially of the temperance periodical "Listen."

Simon Mondol Soren was a pastor and administrator from Bangladesh.

Ervin Leslie Sorensen served the Seventh-day Adventist Church as an evangelist, teacher, and union president in the Southern Asia Division; as a pastor, principal, and professor in the North American Division; and as a teacher and administrator in the Far Eastern Division.

​Pedro Javier Sosa y Sosa was a pioneer of the Adventist work in the part of Guatemala that first received the Adventist message.

​João Carlos Olímpio de Souza was a pioneer canvasser in the Northeast region of Brazil for 30 years.

​Jonas Monteiro de Souza was a teacher, composer and conductor from Brazil.