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Showing 2281 – 2300 of 2398

Melvin West was a noted Seventh-day Adventist organist, church musician, composer, and music educator.

Walter John Westerman was an Australian Seventh-day Adventist pastor who spent thirty years in administration at the local conference and union conference levels, twenty-six of those years as a vice-president of the Australasian Union Conference.

​Lennox Samuel Westney was a medical doctor and teacher from Jamaica.

​Arthur Leroy Westphal was a pastor, denominational administrator, and missionary in Argentina, the Inca Union Mission, Paraguay, Brazil, and the United States.

​Carlos (Carl) Edgar Westphal, born in the United States and a medical graduate in Chile, served as a missionary doctor and pastor in Argentina. He was director of the River Plate Sanitarium.

​Enrique José Westphal served as a pastor, evangelist, and church administrator in the United States, Peru, Argentina, Paraguay, Uruguay, and Mexico.

Joseph W. Westphal was a pastor, editor, and church administrator (including secretary of the South American Division from 1920 to 1929).

​Wilma Westphal was a school teacher, departmental secretary, and free-lance journalist who published articles and books under the name Wilma Ross Westphal. She and her husband, Chester, served in Colombia, Panama, Costa Rica, and Honduras, in addition to the home conferences of Potomac and Northern California.

John Westrup ministered to Scandinavian communities in America prior to mission service in Henan Province, China, 1905 through 1914.

​William A. Westworth was a pastor, conference president, mission leader, and director of one of Adventism’s earliest radio broadcasting ministries.

Jonathan C. Whatley and his wife, Sophia, were missionaries to Pitcairn Island.

Ben David Wheeler was a missionary to Central Kenya, Uganda, Congo and Zimbabwe.

​Frederick Wheeler was the first ordained minister in the Second Advent movement of the 1840s known to have also proclaimed observance of the seventh day Sabbath as Christian duty.

George B. Wheeler, a Baptist minister who accepted the Seventh-day Adventist message in 1893, focused on advocacy for religious liberty in his work as an Adventist minister in the Northeast and in Washington, D.C.

Albert Henry White was an evangelist and conference president in the Australasian (now, South Pacific) Division of the General Conference of the Seventh-day Adventist church for over forty years.

Nurses Dallas Robert and Vera (born Mosebar) White pioneered in the late 1920’s in Southwest China where they worked with Claude B. and Victoria (Martin) Miller to establish the first Seventh-day Adventist mission in Yunnan. Vera was tragically murdered in 1931 in the fifth year of their mission service in China. Dallas married Florence Grace Numbers in 1932 and served as a nurse, administrator, and ordained minister until evacuation in 1940, completing a total of 14 years of mission service in China. After returning to the U.S., he served an additional 14 years in the medical field in southern California hospitals.

Edward Eric White gave almost fifty years of service to the Seventh-day Adventist church in three world divisions. He served as a science teacher, high school headmaster, and college principal in England; as senior educational administrator and college principal in the Australasian Division; and as an education director in the Euro-Africa Division. He also authored a notable volume on Adventist hymnology.

​Harold and Mabel White served together in New Zealand, Australia, and Fiji. Harold White worked as a pastor, evangelist, and church administrator. Mabel White was a teacher, college matron, and a founding faculty member of the Pukekura Training School in New Zealand.