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Showing 2321 – 2340 of 2383

Clyde Wimer served as an administrator of the colporteur work in Canada, a missionary with his wife, Victoria, in China, and a church administrator in the homeland territories of Washington State, Oklahoma, and Oregon.

​Abbie Winegar-Simpson, Battle Creek Sanitarium physician and American Medical Missionary College professor, did much to bring the “Battle Creek idea” of health reform to California through her work at St. Helena, Glendale, and Long Beach sanitariums.

​For two decades Herbert Winslow cared for financial assets of the Seventh-day Adventist Church, first as an accountant at Pacific Press Publishing Association and later as a secretary/treasurer in the China Mission.

Charles Winter was an outstanding science teacher and microbiologist who served two mission terms in China under hazardous war conditions. He taught science at Southern Junior College and Washington Missionary College. The last thirty years of his career were at Loma Linda University, teaching and researching in the Department of Microbiology.

Joseph Wintzen, administrator, evangelist, and author, was one of the most important early leaders in the Dutch Seventh-day Adventist Church.

Charles and Violet Wittschiebe were educators, missionaries to China, and World War II Japanese internment camp survivors. Charles served as a religion professor at Southern Missionary College and the Seventh-day Adventist Theological Seminary, first in Washington D.C. and later Berrien Springs, MI. ​Charles authored three books, his best-known of which is God Invented Sex.

​Ludwig Ludwigowich Wojtkiewicz served the Seventh-day Adventist Church as a pastor and administrator in Russia, Ukraine, and Moldova.

Aleka Mitiku Woldegiorgise was a pioneer teacher and evangelist in Ethiopia.

João Wolff was a pastor and administrator in South America. He was the South American Division president for 15 years.

Manuel Wong López was an Adventist philologist, professor, and researcher from Panama.

​Anna and George Wood, from Australia, committed their lives in service to the people of Java and Sumatra. After Anna Wood’s death, George Wood died in a Japanese prisoner-of-war camp in 1944.

Kenneth and Florence Wood were missionaries in China from 1912 to 1941. On return to the homeland Kenneth served as a minister in California.

​Kenneth H. Wood, Jr., served as editor of the denomination’s flagship periodical, Adventist Review (1966-1982), and chair of the Ellen G. White Board of Trustees (1980-2008). His influence in these positions of high responsibility served as a conservative counterweight to forces that he regarded as detrimental to the church’s historic beliefs and mission.

​Ira J. Woodman was a minister in Michigan and Illinois before serving as a conference president, associate secretary in the General Conference Medical Department, and finally as general manager of Pacific Press Publishing Association.

Cecil Woods was a valued teacher of science and mathematics at Hinsdale Sanitarium Academy, Washington Missionary College, the China Training Institute, Emmanuel Missionary College, and Pacific Union College.

​John Henry Woods was born at Firth of Clyde, Scotland, on September 8, 1863. He emigrated to Australia with his parents and was raised in the gold-mining town of Maryborough, VIC. He learned the printing trade and entered a business partnership with Walter Miller in Melbourne.

Robert William Woods, an Adventist educator and physicist, served as president of Union College and acting president of Antillean Union College, among other academic positions.

Charles Woodward served in the Seventh-day Adventist Church as a secretary and treasurer in Texas, China, and the Philippine Islands. His wife, Nannie, worked alongside him as a Sabbath School department leader and fellow missionary.

​Horce Guy Woodward was a pioneer missionary, evangelist, and union president in the Southern Asia Division.

William Oscar Worth was an inventor and engineer who specialized in bicycles and automobiles. One of his business partners was Henry Webster Kellogg. Worth invented the first documented automobile that Ellen White rode in.